CFB51 College Football Fan Community

The Power Five => Big Ten => Topic started by: 847badgerfan on February 03, 2017, 09:58:27 PM

Title: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 03, 2017, 09:58:27 PM
We are going to archive our old stuff for certain. But we now can start new, as I'm sure we've all evolved in our skill sets and tastes since 2007. For outdoors, I cook on a Weber Genesis gas grill and a Weber Performer charcoal grill, when I'm at the house anyway.

Cast Iron is always my preferred vessel - inside and outside.

Our old stuff is archived on here, and I managed to save the index from the old site before they tore it down on us:

Here is the index as provided by our list guy, Medina. Thanks a ton. Most organized poster ever.


#PageCategoryFoodPosterPost DateComments
34
5
BreakfastGreek Breakfast847badgerfan
09/09/09
.
51
6
BreakfastMigas (Mexican Scrambled Eggs)MextheDog
11/06/09
.
91
11
Breakfastcroissants with sausage, home fries, etcLetsGoPeay
09/18/11
.
49
6
dessertCinnamon ApplesBurntEyes
10/21/09
.
67
8
dessertGuinness Chocolate CupcakesUTerin03
10/26/10
.
99
13
dessertBuckeyes (chocolate and PB)medinabuckeye1
11/07/11
.
16
3
DipDip-CheeseHawkeyes1982
07/15/08
.
30
5
DipDip-Cheesebamabuckeye144
08/31/09
.
32
5
DipDip-Ruebengobrutus1
09/04/09
.
38
5
dipdip-quesoBurntEyes
09/22/09
.
46
6
Dipdip-jalapenoUTerin03
10/08/09
.
37
5
drinksBloody MaryBurntEyes
09/22/09
.
97
12
drinksHot Cidermedinabuckeye1
11/06/11
.
1
1
MeatRibs-dry rubPolyol
09/20/07
.
2
1
MeatBeef Brisketutee94
09/20/07
.
3
1
MeatItalian Sausage and peppersBuckeyeCMO
09/21/07
.
6
1
MeatSunday Gravy-(Pork&Sausage in Sauce)BuckeyeCMO
09/21/07
Not sure what to call this?
7
2
MeatBrats in beer with onion and garlic847badgerfan
09/24/07
.
8
2
MeatChili (with beans)captpointspread
09/24/07
.
9
2
MeatChili (no beans)847badgerfan
09/24/07
.
11
2
MeatChicken Breast Sandwich - Tailgate847badgerfan
01/17/08
.
13
2
Meatmeatloaf847badgerfan
04/23/08
.
14
2
MeatChicken Breast with Goat Cheese and Salsadudekd
05/22/08
.
17
3
MeatSausage BallsRockChalk7598
08/08/08
.
19
3
MeatBurgers-Bacon CheeseLion4Life76
09/05/08
.
22
3
MeatSpaghettiGatorama2
12/11/08
.
23
3
MeatChicken-dry rubGambierDawg
01/07/09
.
24
3
MeatSausage, Red Beans, RiceGambierDawg
01/07/09
.
26
4
MeatRibs-dry rubutee94
03/17/09
.
27
4
MeatMussels847badgerfan
04/21/09
.
29
4
MeatRibs-dry rub847badgerfan
06/19/09
.
31
5
MeatRibs-dry rub or liquid847badgerfan
09/01/09
.
33
5
MeatSteak, Pepper WrapEastLansingAdam
09/05/09
.
35
5
MeatChicken TendersEastLansingAdam
09/10/09
.
36
5
MeatFish-blackened with Cilantro847badgerfan
09/18/09
.
39
5
MeatkielbasaEastLansingAdam
09/23/09
.
40
6
MeatkielbasaBurntEyes
09/23/09
amendments to ELA's
43
6
Meat"BBT" filet mignon sandwich847badgerfan
10/01/09
.
44
6
Meatburger847badgerfan
10/07/09
.
48
6
MeatChicken Breasts with ApplesEastLansingAdam
10/16/09
.
52
7
Meatburgers-with bbq and breadcrumbsGambierDawg
11/24/09
.
54
7
Meatburger-umami847badgerfan
01/30/10
.
55
7
MeatChicken, BourbonMisterBlack
01/31/10
.
56
7
MeatPork Tenderloin847badgerfan
04/23/10
.
58
8
MeatSalmon, smoked847badgerfan
06/22/10
.
59
8
MeatSalmon, smokedMisterBlack
06/22/10
.
60
8
MeatSteak-spiced847badgerfan
07/20/10
.
61
8
MeatBurgers-Western OmletteGambierDawg
09/01/10
.
62
8
MeatBurgers-BBQ Bacon Bleu CheeseGambierDawg
09/01/10
.
63
8
MeatTurkey SandwichGambierDawg
09/01/10
.
68
8
MeatSteak-Stir FryBurntEyes
10/28/10
.
71
9
MeatJamaican Jerk Chicken PastaEastLansingAdam
12/18/10
.
72
9
MeatGyros - Lamb847badgerfan
12/29/10
.
76
9
MeatAhi Tuna Salad847badgerfan
03/12/11
.
77
9
MeatAmberjack (partial recipe)Gatorama2
03/21/11
.
79
10
MeatChicken, Teriyaki BurgerEastLansingAdam
04/22/11
replaces earlier post?
80
10
MeatChicken Breasts-grilled with sauce847badgerfan
04/22/11
.
81
10
MeatShrimp-grilled847badgerfan
05/14/11
.
82
10
MeatTurkey Burgers847badgerfan
05/20/11
.
84
10
MeatTuna-grilledEastLansingAdam
07/20/11
.
85
10
MeatTuna-grilled847badgerfan
07/21/11
.
87
10
MeatBurgers-with blue cheese and a beet847badgerfan
07/28/11
.
89
11
MeatSloppy JoeEastLansingAdam
08/19/11
.
90
11
Meatwings847badgerfan
08/28/11
.
92
12
MeatChili (with beans)MaximumSam
10/03/11
Per utee, this is bean soup
95
12
Meatburgers beef/pork with spices and whiskeyroaddawg2
10/17/11
.
96
12
MeatTacosMaximumSam
10/29/11
.
102
14
MeatLeg of Deer847badgerfan
12/02/11
.
103
14
MeatChicken Breast847badgerfan
01/20/12
.
104
14
MeatChicken and DumplingsEastLansingAdam
01/22/12
.
105
14
MeatFlank Steak847badgerfan
02/11/12
.
111
16
MeatMeatballs847badgerfan
03/04/12
.
114
16
MeatVeal Picatta847badgerfan
03/05/12
.
115
16
MeatTuna-Steak847badgerfan
03/08/12
.
116
16
MeatTuna-Steakroaddawg2
03/09/12
.
119
17
MeatFried ChickenPennState4Life
05/26/12
.
120
17
MeatPork LoinbohonkNU
06/07/12
.
121
17
MeatChicken BreastbohonkNU
06/07/12
.
122
17
MeatMustard and Herb Pork ChopsEastLansingAdam
08/22/12
.
123
17
MeatCaribbean PorkEastLansingAdam
08/22/12
.
125
17
MeatPork SandwichesEastLansingAdam
08/22/12
.
126
17
MeatAsian ChickenEastLansingAdam
08/22/12
.
127
17
MeatBalsamic Garlic ChickenEastLansingAdam
08/22/12
.
129
18
MeatTequila Lime ChickenEastLansingAdam
08/22/12
.
5
1
SauceSauce-basting (garlic)847badgerfan
09/21/07
.
10
2
SauceSauce-Finishing - steak/chicken847badgerfan
09/25/07
.
12
2
SauceSauce-basting847badgerfan
04/04/08
.
18
3
SauceSauce-marinade5honda
09/03/08
.
28
4
SauceMarinade-Teriyaki chickenRaginAsian
06/19/09
.
45
6
Sauceburger sauce (Mayo & horseradish or garlic)847badgerfan
10/07/09
.
53
7
saucedry rub for beef, poultry, pork, fish, etc847badgerfan
01/11/10
.
57
7
Sauceblue cheese steak finishing sauce847badgerfan
06/11/10
.
69
8
SauceBBQ Sauce, Carolina Style847badgerfan
10/30/10
.
70
9
SauceCesar Salad Dressing847badgerfan
11/07/10
.
73
9
SauceTzatziki sauce847badgerfan
01/21/11
.
78
9
Saucemarinade-chicken breastEastLansingAdam
04/22/11
says it is teriyaki chick burger
88
11
Sauceblue cheese sauce847badgerfan
07/28/11
used in other 847 recipes
94
12
SauceBBQ sauce, from SEC board847badgerfan
10/15/11
.
107
15
SauceRoasted Red Pepper and Shallot Sauce847badgerfan
02/12/12
.
108
15
SauceBig Mac Sauce847badgerfan
02/16/12
.
109
15
SauceBlackened (Chicken/fish/prok) rub847badgerfan
02/16/12
.
110
15
SauceBlackened (Chicken/fish/prok) Sandwich sauce847badgerfan
02/16/12
.
112
16
SaucePork Tenderloin Marinade847badgerfan
03/05/12
.
113
16
SaucePork Tenderloin BrineMrNubbz
03/05/12
.
117
17
sauceLow-Fat Creamy Garlic Dressing847badgerfan
04/30/12
.
118
17
sauceFlank/Skirt Steak or Chicken Marinade847badgerfan
05/21/12
.
124
17
sauceCaribbean Pork SauceEastLansingAdam
08/22/12
.
4
1
SideGarlic Bread-Grill/Tailgate847badgerfan
09/21/07
.
15
2
sideAsparagus with BaconGambierDawg
06/11/08
.
20
3
SideMushrooms847badgerfan
11/13/08
.
21
3
SideMushroomsBurntEyes
11/23/08
.
25
4
SideMushrooms847badgerfan
03/16/09
.
41
6
SideMushrooms847badgerfan
09/25/09
repeat of his 11/13/08?
42
6
SideMushroomsBurntEyes
09/25/09
variation of 847's recipe
47
6
SideTomato Salad847badgerfan
10/13/09
.
50
6
SideAsian Marinated Veggies847badgerfan
11/06/09
.
64
8
SideMushroom Soup847badgerfan
09/14/10
.
65
8
SideMushroomsBurntEyes
09/22/10
repeat of his earlier
66
8
sideFrench Onion SoupEastLansingAdam
10/23/10
.
74
9
SidePho (Vietnamese chicken noodle soup)847badgerfan
01/21/11
.
75
9
SideButternut Squash Soup847badgerfan
01/27/11
.
83
10
SidePotato SaladBuckeyeRob
05/29/11
.
86
10
sideEnchiladautee94
07/24/11
not sure this is a side . . .
93
12
SideCorn on the cob847badgerfan
10/14/11
.
98
13
SideJalapeno Cornbreadmedinabuckeye1
11/07/11
.
100
13
SideLobster/Corn Bisque847badgerfan
11/25/11
.
101
13
SidePozoleMaximumSam
11/26/11
.
106
15
SidePotato and Parsnip Puree847badgerfan
02/12/12
.
128
17
side"Homemade" Potato Chips847badgerfan
08/22/12
.
Title: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 09:36:45 PM
 :88:



Is this one of those BBQ threads I have been hearing about?I really enjoy a dry rub on my baby back rids...here is the recipe.1/3 cup Brown Sugar2 tbsp paprika 2-3 tbsp's salt2 tbsp's chili powder1 tbsp onion powder1 tbsp brown mustard2tsp's lemon pepper2tsp's cumin1/2tsp chyanne1 tbsp basile1 tbsp tyme1 tbsp oraganoAll the herbs I like fresh and chopped fine.  Just combine all components and rub it on ohh say 2-3 good size racks.  I also like to remove the membrane that is found on the underside of the ribs...it allows the spices to soak in better.  Put it on the BBQ SUPER HOT...for 3 min on each side...then I like to place them on the hotdog grill up top and turn the heat completley down...sometimes I only run 2 of the 3 burners on low.  Cook for 1hour at the low temp...let me tell you BEST damn ribs EVAR!!!





Thanks for the recipe, Poly. That sounds really good, I'll have to try that sometime soon.





I like to cook mine even slower than that.  But the marinade looks good, and much more sophisticated than mine.





EastLansingAdam wrote: I like to cook mine even slower than that.  But the marinade looks good, and much more sophisticated than mine.Yeah, its kinda complex; however, it is one of the best I have ever had.  You could certanly simplify it...main components being brown sugar, cumin, paprika, and salt...you could throw in some garlic as well...but it really doesnt need it.  Oh and its not technically a marinade...really a dry rub.  And I have gone and hour and a half and it turns out fine...really the longer and slower the better.





If it's got mustard, rather than ground mustard seed, then it's not really a dry rub either. I'd cook 'em even lower than that.  Ribs can stay on a 200-degree pit for 3 or 4  hours depending on their size.Some folks like the membrane off, some like it on.  Like polyol, I prefer it off, because it gets kind of bitter and rubbery as it cooks.  But some people like how it makes the rack easier to handle.  To each his own I suppose. I'll post my Texas BBQ brisket recipe in a bit.





I am looking for a new chili recipe.  Anyone have one that uses chicken as a base?





Hey myillini, you should check out the chili/BBQ thread over on the B12 board.  There are lots of recipes over there.





This is for Texas-style BBQ, which is primarily beef, and specifically, brisket.Just for reference, my cooker set-up has an offset fire-box and a large horizontal smoking chamber, but I included some directions if you have a normal grill.  Also, I'd stick with a 9-lb to 11-lb brisket or so.  You can get them up to 14-17 lbs (and I've even seen some 20-lb monsters), but the bigger ones are typically from older stock, and so they tend to be tougher, and they also take a lot longer to cook.Texas BBQ beef brisketDry Rub:2 parts salt1 part black pepper1 part paprika(1/2 part chipotle powder and/or cayenne pepper if you like spice) Sprinkle liberally over all sides of the meat, including the large fat cap on top.  Note-- don't buy a completely trimmed brisket. You'll trim it after it cooks.  Buy one that is called "packer trim" which is the whole brisket with both halves of the muscle.  Ones that are called "market trim" are usually only one part of the muscls-- the "flat"-- and they have most of the fat trimmed away, which is bad for long-time, indirect cooking methods.You can let it sit in the fridge for a few hours or overnight with the dry rub on it if you like, it'll enhance the flavor a little bitBefore cooking, let the meat sit out for 45 minutes to an hour to come up closer to room temperature.Cooking:Start the fire ahead of time. You can start your logs with charcoal.  Build a fire with about 3 or 4 small logs in the firebox, and then add wood as you go along to maintain the temperature at around 180-225 degrees F.  Use your favorite kind of wood because it will definitely influence the flavor-- many people like hickory and mesquite, and apple and pecan will make delicious BBQ too. But a lot of the time, I end up using oak because I have plenty of it, and it turns out great too.Place the meat fat side UP in the smoker portion. If you don't have an offset firebox, then move the brisket as far from the heat as possible. You can even set up a little tinfoil barrier next to the fire so that the heat and smoke can travel over it, but not the flames.The amount of time will vary depending on your heat source and the size of your brisket, but 8-12 hours is typically the right amount of time for a 9-12lb brisket at low heat. Some folks will say you need to go 1.5 hrs per pound at 180F, but personally I don't think there's any hard and fast rule that always works. You'll know it's done when you can stick your finger into the big fat cap on top of the meat and it slides in easily. If the fat is still hard, then it's not ready no matter how long you've been cooking it.Some people will tell you to pull the brisket off after X number of hours and wrap it in foil. Or, wrap it in plastic wrap and then in foil. Or, I've even heard to wrap it in a paper bag and then in the foil. I don't believe any of that is necessary. Keep the heat low, let the fat render into the meat, and it'll be fine.When it's done, you can pull it off and let it rest in a cooler for  45 minutes or an hour or so. Slicing:You should be able to cut off the large slab of fat on top very easily-- just take a sharp knife and pass it through the meat. Since the muscle is harder than the fat, you can just push the knife down until it "bumps" the firm meat and move the knife sideways through. The fat will slide right off the top.Slice from the thin end (this bottom muscle is called the "flat") and always cut across the grain, unless you like really stringy, chewy, tough meat. Then when you get to the "back end" where the top muscle (the "point") starts overlapping the bottom part, you separate the two parts because the grain direction is different on the heavily marbled "point" section and you slice that separately.. There will be some fat in between the two sections that you can trim and scrape out as well.I've made a special note of how to cut it because I've seen way too many well-cooked, but poorly cut briskets-- even by professionals at some of the "top" restaurants.  And poor cutting will absolutely ruin even the best-tasting brisket.  The marbled "point" section will always have some fairly thick veins of fat in it, honestly because there's no way to get rid of it. And, some people really like this section of the brisket. But the "lean" sections should not have any extra veins of fat at all.  And don't worry about the flavor or tenderness-- they've still got plenty of flavor and juice from all the fat that rendered down through the meat during the hours and hours of cooking.Sauce:Now, we come to the touchy subject of sauce. Many Texans will tell you that good BBQ doesn't need sauce. Personally, I think they're (mostly) correct and I absolutely LOVE eating good BBQ sraight with no sauce at all.However, sometimes a little sauce can add to your BBQ experience. Now I personally don't like the thick, sweet sauces that you find in the KC-style BBQ. I'm okay with the vinegar-based sauces you find in Carolina-style BBQ but I feel that they're much better suited for pork. My favorites are tomato-based sauces that are thinner than the KC-style, and have quite a bit of heat and spice in them which comes from chile peppers, chile powder, and cracked black pepper.Sides:And finally, authentic Texas BBQ brisket should always be served with the following sides: white bread, raw onions, cole slaw, tater salad, pinto beans, jalapenos, and nanner puddin' with 'nilla wafers in it. Other sides and desserts might or might not be acceptable, but these staples should always be available.  Enjoy!





Doesn't anyone use garlic?





I am a big fan of dunkin donuts coffee. And donut holes.





utee94 wrote: If it's got mustard, rather than ground mustard seed, then it's not really a dry rub either. I'd cook 'em even lower than that.  Ribs can stay on a 200-degree pit for 3 or 4  hours depending on their size.Some folks like the membrane off, some like it on.  Like polyol, I prefer it off, because it gets kind of bitter and rubbery as it cooks.  But some people like how it makes the rack easier to handle.  To each his own I suppose. I'll post my Texas BBQ brisket recipe in a bit.See 200 degrees for 3 to 4 hours in more along my lines.  I think I usually go more in the 2 1/2-3 hour range, but agreed, the longer the better.I was just starting to get into chili mode, but now this thread is making me think I need to squeeze the last little bit out of summer.





EastLansingAdam wrote: utee94 wrote: If it's got mustard, rather than ground mustard seed, then it's not really a dry rub either. I'd cook 'em even lower than that.  Ribs can stay on a 200-degree pit for 3 or 4  hours depending on their size.Some folks like the membrane off, some like it on.  Like polyol, I prefer it off, because it gets kind of bitter and rubbery as it cooks.  But some people like how it makes the rack easier to handle.  To each his own I suppose. I'll post my Texas BBQ brisket recipe in a bit.See 200 degrees for 3 to 4 hours in more along my lines.  I think I usually go more in the 2 1/2-3 hour range, but agreed, the longer the better.I was just starting to get into chili mode, but now this thread is making me think I need to squeeze the last little bit out of summer.I like to go long and slow...but usually dont have the time.  Thats why I like a dry rub in the first place...you just rub and go....  No need for long marinading time.  I am a huge fan of garlic but, ive gone with it and without it in this recipe...and it does not seem to make a huge difference.  Oh and id love a good brisket recipe.





myIllini wrote: I am looking for a new chili recipe.  Anyone have one that uses chicken as a base?Beans or no beans....it makes a BIG difference around here!





I'm looking for a great chili recipe with lots of beans... I figured this would be the best place to come.





polyol wrote: EastLansingAdam wrote: utee94 wrote: If it's got mustard, rather than ground mustard seed, then it's not really a dry rub either. I'd cook 'em even lower than that.  Ribs can stay on a 200-degree pit for 3 or 4  hours depending on their size.Some folks like the membrane off, some like it on.  Like polyol, I prefer it off, because it gets kind of bitter and rubbery as it cooks.  But some people like how it makes the rack easier to handle.  To each his own I suppose. I'll post my Texas BBQ brisket recipe in a bit.See 200 degrees for 3 to 4 hours in more along my lines.  I think I usually go more in the 2 1/2-3 hour range, but agreed, the longer the better.I was just starting to get into chili mode, but now this thread is making me think I need to squeeze the last little bit out of summer.I like to go long and slow...but usually dont have the time.  Thats why I like a dry rub in the first place...you just rub and go....  No need for long marinading time.  I am a huge fan of garlic but, ive gone with it and without it in this recipe...and it does not seem to make a huge difference.  Oh and id love a good brisket recipe.Please see above. 





dudekd wrote: I'm looking for a great chili recipe with lots of beans... I figured this would be the best place to come. Evil, evil man.





leitzguy wrote: Doesn't anyone use garlic?I love garlic and use it all the time, but not on BBQ.  Garlic tends to be too subtle under the influences of 10-12 hours of smoke.





BUCKEYECMO's ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND PEPPERS2lbs hot Italian sausage2 large red peppers2 large yellow peppers1 large onion4 cloves garlic2 tablespoons tomato paste28oz can of chopped tomatoes1/2cup of marsala cooking wine1tsp. of oreganofresh basil1/2tsp. of red pepper flakessalt and pepper2 tablespoons of olive oilI cut up all of the vegetables the night before, so as to eliminate as much prep work as possible. This recipe really only is convenient if you have a large grill.I cook the sausage on the grill just like anything else, and then set it aside and cut it into bite size pieces. Take the peppers, onions and garlic which should already be cut from the night before and wrap it all in aluminum foil with the olive oil, salt and pepper. Cook the veggies on the grill until all are almost done.Add the sausage, the peppers/onions mixture and all of the remaining ingredients to a larger pot and let simmer on the grill until the sauce thickens and the flavors mix together. Serve either on hoagie buns or as a side......





That looks great, BuckeyeCMO.And the Italians I know all refer to their red sauce as "gravy" just as the Mexicans around here refer to their chile-based enchilada sauces as "gravy" too.   Gravy = good. 





utee94 wrote: leitzguy wrote: Doesn't anyone use garlic?I love garlic and use it all the time, but not on BBQ.  Garlic tends to be too subtle under the influences of 10-12 hours of smoke. Here's a little something for garlic lovers:Wrap an entire clove bunch in foil. Make sure the tops are cut off of the cloves though - very important. Place the foiled garlic on the grill, bottom down, and let it roast for about 45 minutes while you're cooking your other stuff.When done, unwrap from foil and squeeze a clove onto rye (or your favorite) bread and spread it. If should spread like butter at this time, or it's not done, FYI.Enjoy.





Yup, that is indeed awesome, badger.  I often do the same thing, and sometimes drizzle a little olive oil over the top of the head of garlic, which helps it brown up a little bit.Sometimes I'll also melt some Brie or Camenbert on the side, and take a piece of bread, spread the garlic onto it (like butter), and then dip it into the melted cheese.  It's heavenly.





You are right about the olive oil. You can also use it to speed up the cooking process because of its heat capacity. Olive oil helps move anything along, and helps with browning too!





Here's another garlic thing for our garlic lovers:I use filet mignon for this, but any nice, lean cut of meat will work. This is good for other meats too, like boneless/skinless chicken, pork loin and sea bass (my favorite).Use some olive oil to coat the meat (except on fish - no oil - use spray) and put it on the grill. Sear the meat to seal in the juices and place on indirect heat. Constantly baste and coat the meat with the following mixture, until you acheive your desired doneness.Mixture:Melted butter, minced garlic (powder will work in a pinch) and oregano.Any Italian would approve of this delicious way to cook a nice piece of meat.Coming Soon:Al Forno recipes!





Note for sea bass: If it is skinless you will need to use a basket on the grill or you will lose the fish. If it has skin on one side, there is no need to turn it over. The butter and garlic will promote light browning on the top side.





Finishing sauces are fast becoming one of my favorite methods. I'll have some more on this later. I have to go to some meetings now.





utee94 wrote: That looks great, BuckeyeCMO.And the Italians I know all refer to their red sauce as "gravy" just as the Mexicans around here refer to their chile-based enchilada sauces as "gravy" too.   Gravy = good.  Exactly! In Youngstown, OH, a huge blue collar Italian hot bed,  we call it Sunday gravy as that is the more traditional name people out east say as well. I am glad you brought this up, because that was going to be my next recipe to share...Sunday gravy is great for tailgates, but 100% of the preparation and cooking has to be done 1 or 2 days before. Preferably I like to cook it two days before, so as to let it sit in the refrigerator for a day. It gets better with age. Then I take it to the stadium, heat it up on the grill and serve it over cavatellis. It's great for tailgating.So here goes....BUCKEYECMO's SUNDAY GRAVY............1 lb. pork shoulder (commonly referred to as pork butt)  uncut2 1 lb SWEET Italian sausage3. 4 cloves FRESH garlic4. 1/2 cup fresh basil cut5. 1tsp. oregano6. Half of large onion cut very fine7. 3 large 28oz cans crushed tomatoes. I grow my own in my garden and use those, but store bought are good also.8. 1 cup water9. 2 tablespoons of tomato paste10. 1 beef and 1 chicken bullion cube11. 1 cup chianti wine or another dry red wine12. 1 cup FRESH parmasean cheese13. 1 cup FRESH romano cheese14. Salt, pepper15. 1/4 cup sugar16. 1/4 cup olive oilAdd the olive oil to a pot and brown the pok shoulder and the sausages. They do not have to be cooked through, just brown on all sides. Remove meat from oil and add onion and garlic to simmer.Add the tomatoes, tomato paste, water, bullion cubes, salt, pepper, sugar basil and oregano and stir thoroughly for about 5 minutes. Return meat back to pot and add the wine and all of the cheese.Cook on low heat for about 3-4 hours and let sit.Remove meat and cut the pork as it should be very tender. Serve pork and sausage along with gravy. Serve gravy over cavatelli or spaghetti noodles as well.





BuckeyeCMO wrote: utee94 wrote: That looks great, BuckeyeCMO.And the Italians I know all refer to their red sauce as "gravy" just as the Mexicans around here refer to their chile-based enchilada sauces as "gravy" too.   Gravy = good.  Exactly! In Youngstown, OH, a huge blue collar Italian hot bed,  we call it Sunday gravy as that is the more traditional name people out east say as well. I am glad you brought this up, because that was going to be my next recipe to share...Sunday gravy is great for tailgates, but 100% of the preparation and cooking has to be done 1 or 2 days before. Preferably I like to cook it two days before, so as to let it sit in the refrigerator for a day. It gets better with age. Then I take it to the stadium, heat it up on the grill and serve it over cavatellis. It's great for tailgating.So here goes....BUCKEYECMO's SUNDAY GRAVY............1 lb. pork shoulder (commonly referred to as pork butt)  uncut2 1 lb SWEET Italian sausage3. 4 cloves FRESH garlic4. 1/2 cup fresh basil cut5. 1tsp. oregano6. Half of large onion cut very fine7. 3 large 28oz cans crushed tomatoes. I grow my own in my garden and use those, but store bought are good also.8. 1 cup water9. 2 tablespoons of tomato paste10. 1 beef and 1 chicken bullion cube11. 1 cup chianti wine or another dry red wine12. 1 cup FRESH parmasean cheese13. 1 cup FRESH romano cheese14. Salt, pepper15. 1/4 cup sugar16. 1/4 cup olive oilAdd the olive oil to a pot and brown the pok shoulder and the sausages. They do not have to be cooked through, just brown on all sides. Remove meat from oil and add onion and garlic to simmer.Add the tomatoes, tomato paste, water, bullion cubes, salt, pepper, sugar basil and oregano and stir thoroughly for about 5 minutes. Return meat back to pot and add the wine and all of the cheese.Cook on low heat for about 3-4 hours and let sit.Remove meat and cut the pork as it should be very tender. Serve pork and sausage along with gravy. Serve gravy over cavatelli or spaghetti noodles as well.Man, that sounds soooo darn good. Printing this one.





CMO, we are going to have to tailgate sometime amigo.





You know what? I completely agree, because my speciatly/heritage is Italian and hispanic, so I have a lot of family recipes that go back years. Also, cooking is a hobby of mine. With that being said.......I have never been a very good cook of the Wisconsin traditional tailgaite, i.e brats, saurkrout, etc...To me, that is among my favorite food of all time. Aside from cooking brats on the grill and serving it with store-bought saurkrout, everytime I try to marinate the brats  in beer and/or use apple cider it does not taste like I think it should. I would LOVE to hear some feedback from yourself and other diehard traditonal, native Badgers who could help me out with this. One thing I do love and am familiar with are pierogies(sp) and cabbage and noodles. My wife is Polish, so I have been able to earn/inherit a lot of those recipes. Noodles and cabbage is one of my favorites though.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 09:45:49 PM
I hear you're supposed to SIMMER the brats in beer, but not boil them, and then put them on the grill.But that's just what I heard, I'm a Texican and don't know nothin' 'bout no brats...





CMO sent me a PM looking for the brat recipe, and sourkraut too. In Wisconsin (especially as you get further South) there really is not a mix for saurkraut and brats and I've honestly never eaten them that way. I've had the NY style dogs and Polska Kielbasa and those work well with Kraut, but on a brat I just don't know.As far as brats go, I cut up opnions and used minced garlic (a lot of both) along with a nice dark beer for my marinade. Ultimately you should give 24 hours for the marinade to penetrate thoroughly.I then simmer the marinade and brats for about 20 minutes. This actually cooks the brats in full, allowing for either feezing (if the brats were fresh) or for immediate grilling. DO NOT boil the brats. All the flavor will be gone - even at the sign of the first bubble in the water. When done, remove the brats from the marinade, strain the marinade and reserve the onions and garlic for possible toppings later. Also reserve the marinade, place in a foil pan and put it on the grill.For grilling, charcoal is always best but gas will work. Simply brown the brats on low heat until they are the color and texture you prefer. It is really hard to overcook a brat, but it can be  done and it ain't good. When ready, and to keep warm, you can keep them in the marinade while they wait to be served. Otherwise, serve immediately on a hard roll with onions and brown mustard (and the reserved toppings if desired - note I do not reserve the toppings as a matter of preference when it comes to ME, but others like it just fine).No flimsy hot dog buns allowed. Ketchup is a mortal sin (as it is on a hot dog).





dudekd wrote: I'm looking for a great chili recipe with lots of beans... I figured this would be the best place to come. Here's an easy one I invented.  You can make it up in a crock pot in your hotel room right before heading off to tailgate.  I suppose you can vary the amount of beans in it, and I use ground beef/pork, I suppose you can substitute whatever you want since someone said something about chicken.  1.5-2lbs ground beef and pork, browned1 28 oz can crushed tomatoes1 14 oz can diced tomatoes, drained1 packet hot chili seasoning (I use McCormicks, you can add or not depending on how you want to season it) I also add 1 extra teaspoon (or so, I don't measure) of chili powder1 14 oz can pinto beans, drained (that's all I use, not a big fan of beans)1 chopped onion1 chopped red pepper1 chopped jalapeno pepper1 chopped habenero pepper (leave out if you don't want it too hot)1/2 cup (again I don't measure) BBQ sauce, any brand, I think this can add some smokey flavor.  I've also tried some liquid smoke.  Have fun and experiment.Since chili can be messy in a parking lot, bring fritos for some chili pie, or throw in some dogs to cook with the chili for chili dogs.You have to brown the mean before traveling, then just keep it in your iced-down cooler with your beer on the road.





Here's my chili:1 pound round steak, cubed1 pound sirloin steak, cubed1 pound burger meat - lean1 link chorizo sausage1 habinero3 jalipeno3 sorrento1 banana pepper2.5 oz chili pounder1.25 oz cayenne pepper1.25 oz ground cumin0.5 oz onion powder0.5 oz garlic powder0.5 oz oregano32 oz diced tomatoes16 oz tomato paste! diced onionTo prepare, rub the meats with the cayenne pepper, cumin and chili powder. Lightly brown them in I frying pan coated in a little olive oil. This allows the peppers to cook into the meat. I do each meat seperately, by the way, with proportioned seasonings except for the ground beef. With that I used just a little as the meat is porous to begin with.Slice up the hot peppers VERY thin. You want them to disintigrate. Create two thin slices in the banana pepper so that the juices mingle in the crock pot.Throw it all in together and stir very well until the mixture is as homogeneous as possible.Let it go on low (medium) heat for at least 12 hours, stirring once in a while to prevent top-burning. 





That looks like a mighty fine recipe, badgerfan. The chorizo adds unbelievable richness to the chili.  I usually brown the chorizo first, remove the meat, and then use the chorizo grease, rather than olive oil, to sear the cubed meats.  After I'm done with all of the browning, I throw the chorizo back into the mix and let it simmer with the spices  and everything else for the duration of the cooking time.In another couple of months, it will almost be cool enough around here to consider making some...





I hope it looks good UTee - most of it came from a Texican (who shall not be named - he swore me to secrecy).I forgot about browning the chorizo though. To me it doesn't matter one way or the other, but I LIKE the idea of using the drainings for browning the cubes! Brilliant, you are!





Ha!  I wish I could take credit for it, but it's nothing more than what I learned from my pappy. If nothing else, it saves you a fraction of a cent or two on the olive oil.    Still, sometimes I need a tad more fat to sear the cubed meats, and end up supplementing with olive oil anyway.





Here is a nice, easy finishing sauce recipe that can be used for steak or chicken. I also use it as a dipping sauce for seared Ahi tuna.1 cup clear rice vinegar1 cup soy sauce1 small jar dried yellow mustard Blend very well and let sit for about an hour before using it - especially if this will be for dipping only.As a finishing sauce for steak or chicken, I like to sear the meat and then place in a foil pan with some sauteed mushrooms and onions. Then I add the finishing sauce and simply let it go until the meat is done to my liking. Chicken, of course, has to be well cooked. Steak can be anythng you want.





Oh man...I'm drooling...And thanks for that chili recipe, bro! I had wondered about that!And to anyone wondering or dubious...trust badge on his brats...his are the best ever. No doubt.





847badgerfan wrote: CMO sent me a PM looking for the brat recipe, and sourkraut too. In Wisconsin (especially as you get further South) there really is not a mix for saurkraut and brats and I've honestly never eaten them that way. I've had the NY style dogs and Polska Kielbasa and those work well with Kraut, but on a brat I just don't know.As far as brats go, I cut up opnions and used minced garlic (a lot of both) along with a nice dark beer for my marinade. Ultimately you should give 24 hours for the marinade to penetrate thoroughly.I then simmer the marinade and brats for about 20 minutes. This actually cooks the brats in full, allowing for either feezing (if the brats were fresh) or for immediate grilling. DO NOT boil the brats. All the flavor will be gone - even at the sign of the first bubble in the water. When done, remove the brats from the marinade, strain the marinade and reserve the onions and garlic for possible toppings later. Also reserve the marinade, place in a foil pan and put it on the grill.For grilling, charcoal is always best but gas will work. Simply brown the brats on low heat until they are the color and texture you prefer. It is really hard to overcook a brat, but it can be  done and it ain't good. When ready, and to keep warm, you can keep them in the marinade while they wait to be served. Otherwise, serve immediately on a hard roll with onions and brown mustard (and the reserved toppings if desired - note I do not reserve the toppings as a matter of preference when it comes to ME, but others like it just fine).No flimsy hot dog buns allowed. Ketchup is a mortal sin (as it is on a hot dog).Love the Brat and the best tasting came from a meat market in/near Kohler, can't remebr the name of it but they were good....as were the brat patties and the steaks we picked up!!!!!!





Badger, I do it just the same.  It cannot be understated, DO NOT BOIL THE BRATS.  To me, they are not worth it unless you have quality brat buns.    This was a big problem while at school in Lincoln.  I go to the store here in Milwaukee and unless it is Saturday afternoon on Labor Day/Memorial Day weekend, there is plenty of brat buns available.In Lincoln, I had to improvise and handle half the hoagie rolls and other assorted bakery goods to get something close to a brat bun.  It did improve, but by that time I was back in Wisconsin.I'm very loyal to Klement's brats and italians, but Usinger hot dogs, either natural casings or the big franfurters.  The Usinger's deli on Old World 3rd St. is a must visit if visiting Milwaukee.





 Edited to remove non-related content.





Hmmm, that's not a tailgate recipe...





I made chili yesterday.  Ate some of it last night and it was great, but I'll eat the rest of it over the next couple of days, and it will be even better after the flavors meld.





I recently received packages of venison from a friend who hunts.  There's 3 packages, two that look like steak-cuts (very thick), and one that is ground up like sausage. Anyone have any good recipe's that I can try for this deer/venison meat?  I was just going to use my normal marinade or spice for steaks, but perhaps you will have a suggest for something better....  I'm all ears, er eyes, for suggestions! 





If they are steak type cuts marinate them in italian dressing at least 6 hrs/overnight in fridge.If your friend took care of it properly,field to freezer - you'll love it.Google venison recipes.I have some at home but my computer went south.There was a stroganoff recipe that was pretty good





yes, he knows what he is doing.  He said the meat can only be frozen once, so he had not frozen it when it was given to me.  He was actually staying in a hotel room on his way through town from the hunting trip - that mini-fridge had bloody spots all on the bottom from a few bag leaks. Probably not the most disgusting thing in the hotel room, though, LOL.I have never cooked venison, so that is why I figured some of you would have experience.  I do have Italian dressing - will try that out.  After it is cooked, if there happens to be leftovers, is there any "expiration date" on when you should eat it by?  Like, if it sits in the fridge for more than 2-3 days, after it is cooked, can you still eat it?  I'm sure it's not as touchy as seafood, where you gotta eat it within 24 hours or it's no good.... 





Truth be told I don't know,I 've had it two days after originally cooked and that was in december in a Northern  Ohio deer camp.Vacuum seal if you have one of those or double wrap 2 steaks apiece in saran type wrap and freeze(unless it was prevoiusly frozen)





I've been experimenting alot lately. Here's a good sammitch for tailgating: Boneless/skinless chicken breast, pounded flat to about 1/2" thick.Cooked bacon (pre-cook at home or on a stove at the tailgate)Provelone cheeseTomato slicesYour favorite BBQ sauceHoagie bunsButter or margarine Grill one side of the chicken until browned and then turn over. Add sauce, followed by bacon, followed by tomato, followed by cheese. Let the chicken finsh cooking through - cover to mest cheese if needed. While that's going on, butter the buns and toast on the grill.Serve and enjoy. This is a really good sammitch and it's a piece of cake to make.





Your favorite BBQ sauceGood BBQ needs no sauce. Just kidding amigo, sounds tasty.  Kind of a grilled chicken club?





utee94 wrote: Your favorite BBQ sauceGood BBQ needs no sauce. Just kidding amigo, sounds tasty.  Kind of a grilled chicken club?Yeah, kinda. I suppose you could throw some mayo in there, and some pickle.I never did understand why "they" call it BBQ sauce.





Badgerfan it's the off season and I'm officially trying to eat healthy,your forays into this topic are not helping





Now that we are transitioning (finally) from chili season to grilling season I thought I'd revive this thing. Here is a fantastic marinade for flank, skirt or sirloin steaks. One cup of Brown SugarTwo cups of soy sauce (I use reduced sodium)Two teaspoons of minced garlicTwo teaspoons of Italian oregano Combine all ingredients, making sure to get the brown sugar into solution as best as possible. Make enough to fully cover the meat you are marinating. Fire up the coals, give them time to flame high and let them die just a bit before putting these bad boys on the grill. Be careful to not burn the brown sugar. In this instance, it is OK to flip more than once, as it helps in not burning the sugar.In the mean time, the high coals can be used to rapid-cook asparagus or any kind of potato "meal" mixture in foil. I like young potatoes with onion, carrots and mushrooms all cut up with some butter (I honestly use Smart Balance most of the time nowadays...).ENJOY.





Speaking of grilling, anyone got any good marinates for pork chops?Weather has been nice out here the last couple of days, and I just picked up a pack of chops on sale at Safeway.





I would honestly suggest a dry rub for the pork chops. If you cook them right they will be juicy enough on their own. You can always add sauce to them later, after cooking, if desired.





847badgerfan wrote: Now that we are transitioning (finally) from chili season to grilling season I thought I'd revive this thing. Here is a fantastic marinade for flank, skirt or sirloin steaks. One cup of Brown SugarTwo cups of soy sauce (I use reduced sodium)Two teaspoons of minced garlicTwo teaspoons of Italian oregano Combine all ingredients, making sure to get the brown sugar into solution as best as possible. Make enough to fully cover the meat you are marinating. Fire up the coals, give them time to flame high and let them die just a bit before putting these bad boys on the grill. Be careful to not burn the brown sugar. In this instance, it is OK to flip more than once, as it helps in not burning the sugar.In the mean time, the high coals can be used to rapid-cook asparagus or any kind of potato "meal" mixture in foil. I like young potatoes with onion, carrots and mushrooms all cut up with some butter (I honestly use Smart Balance most of the time nowadays...).ENJOY.I make a similar one.  No brown sugar though, I'll have to try yours.





Grilled Grecian Meatloaf: 2 lbs ground meat*2 large eggs1 1/2 cups plan bread crumbs1/4 cup Greek seasoning http://www.greekseasoning.com/2 tbls garlic powder2 tbls finely chopped onion (or dried minced onion)1 tbls dried oregano1/2 cup diced tomato1/2 cup feta cheese1/2 cup chopped spinachCombine all ingredients and mix completely to form a homogeneous mixture (to the extent possible).Place the mixture in a oiled/sprayed foil pan, allowing for the meat to be about 1.5" thick.Place the uncovered foil pan on the grill, over hot coals, for about a half hour or until mostly done through. At this point, turn the pan over so the meat is directly on the grill for about five minutes to brown it.Enjoy.* I actually used ground turkey for this, because it was out and thawed (not by me). Next time I'm going to try a mix of beef and lamb - or just plain lamb. 





Anyone got a good recipe for possum. Sure a whole lot of dead ones around these parts!





I'm not much of a recipe guy, but maybe you guys will like this one...Herbed Chicken Breasts with Goat Cheese and Salsa Verde1-2 cups Salsa Verde (added on top of chicken and cheese to taste. 3oz. bread crumbs  (1-ounce) slices white bread       4  (6-ounce) skinless, boneless chicken breast halves       1/2  teaspoon salt       1/2  teaspoon ground cumin       1/4  teaspoon ground red pepper       1  large egg, lightly beaten       1  tablespoon olive oil       1/2  cup (2 ounces) crumbled goat cheese (or queso fresco , as per your tastes)         Cilantro sprigs (optional)        Lime wedges (optional)             PreparationFire up the grill.To prepare chicken...First bake up breadcrumbs over a cookie sheet on the grill.Then, place each chicken breast half between 2 sheets of heavy-duty plastic wrap; pound to 1/2-inch thickness using a meat mallet or rolling pin. Combine 1/2 teaspoon salt, cumin, and red pepper; sprinkle evenly over chicken.Place breadcrumbs in a shallow dish. Place egg in another shallow dish. Dip chicken in egg; dredge in breadcrumbs.Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over grill at medium-high heat. Add chicken; cook 4 minutes on each side or until done. Top chicken with salsa, and sprinkle with goat cheese cheese. Garnish with cilantro sprigs and lime wedges, if desired.Eat. Smile. Rejoice. Sleep.I hope you enjoy this one... and--trust me--it's wonderful.





dudekd wrote: I'm not much of a recipe guy, but maybe you guys will like this one...Me neither....it drives my parents, girlfriend, and her parents crazy.....when I'm making a dry rub or a recipe, I just sort of eyeball and taste my way to what I want- they have given up asking for my recipes, because I can't write them down, it'll break my concentration.As for Tailgate foods, here's a real simple one- take raw asparagus, cut it into about inch and a quarter lengths, wrap those each in bacon, skewer them, and put them on the grill....if done right, the bacon will cook and the asparagus will still be crisp, leading to that pleasant snap when you bite into them.  Plus, you can tell your significant other that it's kinda healthy(and there's BACON!)





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 09:57:08 PM
I hear you're supposed to SIMMER the brats in beer, but not boil them, and then put them on the grill.But that's just what I heard, I'm a Texican and don't know nothin' 'bout no brats...





CMO sent me a PM looking for the brat recipe, and sourkraut too. In Wisconsin (especially as you get further South) there really is not a mix for saurkraut and brats and I've honestly never eaten them that way. I've had the NY style dogs and Polska Kielbasa and those work well with Kraut, but on a brat I just don't know.As far as brats go, I cut up opnions and used minced garlic (a lot of both) along with a nice dark beer for my marinade. Ultimately you should give 24 hours for the marinade to penetrate thoroughly.I then simmer the marinade and brats for about 20 minutes. This actually cooks the brats in full, allowing for either feezing (if the brats were fresh) or for immediate grilling. DO NOT boil the brats. All the flavor will be gone - even at the sign of the first bubble in the water. When done, remove the brats from the marinade, strain the marinade and reserve the onions and garlic for possible toppings later. Also reserve the marinade, place in a foil pan and put it on the grill.For grilling, charcoal is always best but gas will work. Simply brown the brats on low heat until they are the color and texture you prefer. It is really hard to overcook a brat, but it can be  done and it ain't good. When ready, and to keep warm, you can keep them in the marinade while they wait to be served. Otherwise, serve immediately on a hard roll with onions and brown mustard (and the reserved toppings if desired - note I do not reserve the toppings as a matter of preference when it comes to ME, but others like it just fine).No flimsy hot dog buns allowed. Ketchup is a mortal sin (as it is on a hot dog).





dudekd wrote: I'm looking for a great chili recipe with lots of beans... I figured this would be the best place to come. Here's an easy one I invented.  You can make it up in a crock pot in your hotel room right before heading off to tailgate.  I suppose you can vary the amount of beans in it, and I use ground beef/pork, I suppose you can substitute whatever you want since someone said something about chicken.  1.5-2lbs ground beef and pork, browned1 28 oz can crushed tomatoes1 14 oz can diced tomatoes, drained1 packet hot chili seasoning (I use McCormicks, you can add or not depending on how you want to season it) I also add 1 extra teaspoon (or so, I don't measure) of chili powder1 14 oz can pinto beans, drained (that's all I use, not a big fan of beans)1 chopped onion1 chopped red pepper1 chopped jalapeno pepper1 chopped habenero pepper (leave out if you don't want it too hot)1/2 cup (again I don't measure) BBQ sauce, any brand, I think this can add some smokey flavor.  I've also tried some liquid smoke.  Have fun and experiment.Since chili can be messy in a parking lot, bring fritos for some chili pie, or throw in some dogs to cook with the chili for chili dogs.You have to brown the mean before traveling, then just keep it in your iced-down cooler with your beer on the road.





Here's my chili:1 pound round steak, cubed1 pound sirloin steak, cubed1 pound burger meat - lean1 link chorizo sausage1 habinero3 jalipeno3 sorrento1 banana pepper2.5 oz chili pounder1.25 oz cayenne pepper1.25 oz ground cumin0.5 oz onion powder0.5 oz garlic powder0.5 oz oregano32 oz diced tomatoes16 oz tomato paste! diced onionTo prepare, rub the meats with the cayenne pepper, cumin and chili powder. Lightly brown them in I frying pan coated in a little olive oil. This allows the peppers to cook into the meat. I do each meat seperately, by the way, with proportioned seasonings except for the ground beef. With that I used just a little as the meat is porous to begin with.Slice up the hot peppers VERY thin. You want them to disintigrate. Create two thin slices in the banana pepper so that the juices mingle in the crock pot.Throw it all in together and stir very well until the mixture is as homogeneous as possible.Let it go on low (medium) heat for at least 12 hours, stirring once in a while to prevent top-burning. 





That looks like a mighty fine recipe, badgerfan. The chorizo adds unbelievable richness to the chili.  I usually brown the chorizo first, remove the meat, and then use the chorizo grease, rather than olive oil, to sear the cubed meats.  After I'm done with all of the browning, I throw the chorizo back into the mix and let it simmer with the spices  and everything else for the duration of the cooking time.In another couple of months, it will almost be cool enough around here to consider making some...





I hope it looks good UTee - most of it came from a Texican (who shall not be named - he swore me to secrecy).I forgot about browning the chorizo though. To me it doesn't matter one way or the other, but I LIKE the idea of using the drainings for browning the cubes! Brilliant, you are!





Ha!  I wish I could take credit for it, but it's nothing more than what I learned from my pappy. If nothing else, it saves you a fraction of a cent or two on the olive oil.    Still, sometimes I need a tad more fat to sear the cubed meats, and end up supplementing with olive oil anyway.





Here is a nice, easy finishing sauce recipe that can be used for steak or chicken. I also use it as a dipping sauce for seared Ahi tuna.1 cup clear rice vinegar1 cup soy sauce1 small jar dried yellow mustard Blend very well and let sit for about an hour before using it - especially if this will be for dipping only.As a finishing sauce for steak or chicken, I like to sear the meat and then place in a foil pan with some sauteed mushrooms and onions. Then I add the finishing sauce and simply let it go until the meat is done to my liking. Chicken, of course, has to be well cooked. Steak can be anythng you want.





Oh man...I'm drooling...And thanks for that chili recipe, bro! I had wondered about that!And to anyone wondering or dubious...trust badge on his brats...his are the best ever. No doubt.





847badgerfan wrote: CMO sent me a PM looking for the brat recipe, and sourkraut too. In Wisconsin (especially as you get further South) there really is not a mix for saurkraut and brats and I've honestly never eaten them that way. I've had the NY style dogs and Polska Kielbasa and those work well with Kraut, but on a brat I just don't know.As far as brats go, I cut up opnions and used minced garlic (a lot of both) along with a nice dark beer for my marinade. Ultimately you should give 24 hours for the marinade to penetrate thoroughly.I then simmer the marinade and brats for about 20 minutes. This actually cooks the brats in full, allowing for either feezing (if the brats were fresh) or for immediate grilling. DO NOT boil the brats. All the flavor will be gone - even at the sign of the first bubble in the water. When done, remove the brats from the marinade, strain the marinade and reserve the onions and garlic for possible toppings later. Also reserve the marinade, place in a foil pan and put it on the grill.For grilling, charcoal is always best but gas will work. Simply brown the brats on low heat until they are the color and texture you prefer. It is really hard to overcook a brat, but it can be  done and it ain't good. When ready, and to keep warm, you can keep them in the marinade while they wait to be served. Otherwise, serve immediately on a hard roll with onions and brown mustard (and the reserved toppings if desired - note I do not reserve the toppings as a matter of preference when it comes to ME, but others like it just fine).No flimsy hot dog buns allowed. Ketchup is a mortal sin (as it is on a hot dog).Love the Brat and the best tasting came from a meat market in/near Kohler, can't remebr the name of it but they were good....as were the brat patties and the steaks we picked up!!!!!!





Badger, I do it just the same.  It cannot be understated, DO NOT BOIL THE BRATS.  To me, they are not worth it unless you have quality brat buns.    This was a big problem while at school in Lincoln.  I go to the store here in Milwaukee and unless it is Saturday afternoon on Labor Day/Memorial Day weekend, there is plenty of brat buns available.In Lincoln, I had to improvise and handle half the hoagie rolls and other assorted bakery goods to get something close to a brat bun.  It did improve, but by that time I was back in Wisconsin.I'm very loyal to Klement's brats and italians, but Usinger hot dogs, either natural casings or the big franfurters.  The Usinger's deli on Old World 3rd St. is a must visit if visiting Milwaukee.





 Edited to remove non-related content.





Hmmm, that's not a tailgate recipe...





I made chili yesterday.  Ate some of it last night and it was great, but I'll eat the rest of it over the next couple of days, and it will be even better after the flavors meld.





I recently received packages of venison from a friend who hunts.  There's 3 packages, two that look like steak-cuts (very thick), and one that is ground up like sausage. Anyone have any good recipe's that I can try for this deer/venison meat?  I was just going to use my normal marinade or spice for steaks, but perhaps you will have a suggest for something better....  I'm all ears, er eyes, for suggestions! 





If they are steak type cuts marinate them in italian dressing at least 6 hrs/overnight in fridge.If your friend took care of it properly,field to freezer - you'll love it.Google venison recipes.I have some at home but my computer went south.There was a stroganoff recipe that was pretty good





yes, he knows what he is doing.  He said the meat can only be frozen once, so he had not frozen it when it was given to me.  He was actually staying in a hotel room on his way through town from the hunting trip - that mini-fridge had bloody spots all on the bottom from a few bag leaks. Probably not the most disgusting thing in the hotel room, though, LOL.I have never cooked venison, so that is why I figured some of you would have experience.  I do have Italian dressing - will try that out.  After it is cooked, if there happens to be leftovers, is there any "expiration date" on when you should eat it by?  Like, if it sits in the fridge for more than 2-3 days, after it is cooked, can you still eat it?  I'm sure it's not as touchy as seafood, where you gotta eat it within 24 hours or it's no good.... 





Truth be told I don't know,I 've had it two days after originally cooked and that was in december in a Northern  Ohio deer camp.Vacuum seal if you have one of those or double wrap 2 steaks apiece in saran type wrap and freeze(unless it was prevoiusly frozen)





I've been experimenting alot lately. Here's a good sammitch for tailgating: Boneless/skinless chicken breast, pounded flat to about 1/2" thick.Cooked bacon (pre-cook at home or on a stove at the tailgate)Provelone cheeseTomato slicesYour favorite BBQ sauceHoagie bunsButter or margarine Grill one side of the chicken until browned and then turn over. Add sauce, followed by bacon, followed by tomato, followed by cheese. Let the chicken finsh cooking through - cover to mest cheese if needed. While that's going on, butter the buns and toast on the grill.Serve and enjoy. This is a really good sammitch and it's a piece of cake to make.





Your favorite BBQ sauceGood BBQ needs no sauce. Just kidding amigo, sounds tasty.  Kind of a grilled chicken club?





utee94 wrote: Your favorite BBQ sauceGood BBQ needs no sauce. Just kidding amigo, sounds tasty.  Kind of a grilled chicken club?Yeah, kinda. I suppose you could throw some mayo in there, and some pickle.I never did understand why "they" call it BBQ sauce.





Badgerfan it's the off season and I'm officially trying to eat healthy,your forays into this topic are not helping





Now that we are transitioning (finally) from chili season to grilling season I thought I'd revive this thing. Here is a fantastic marinade for flank, skirt or sirloin steaks. One cup of Brown SugarTwo cups of soy sauce (I use reduced sodium)Two teaspoons of minced garlicTwo teaspoons of Italian oregano Combine all ingredients, making sure to get the brown sugar into solution as best as possible. Make enough to fully cover the meat you are marinating. Fire up the coals, give them time to flame high and let them die just a bit before putting these bad boys on the grill. Be careful to not burn the brown sugar. In this instance, it is OK to flip more than once, as it helps in not burning the sugar.In the mean time, the high coals can be used to rapid-cook asparagus or any kind of potato "meal" mixture in foil. I like young potatoes with onion, carrots and mushrooms all cut up with some butter (I honestly use Smart Balance most of the time nowadays...).ENJOY.





Speaking of grilling, anyone got any good marinates for pork chops?Weather has been nice out here the last couple of days, and I just picked up a pack of chops on sale at Safeway.





I would honestly suggest a dry rub for the pork chops. If you cook them right they will be juicy enough on their own. You can always add sauce to them later, after cooking, if desired.





847badgerfan wrote: Now that we are transitioning (finally) from chili season to grilling season I thought I'd revive this thing. Here is a fantastic marinade for flank, skirt or sirloin steaks. One cup of Brown SugarTwo cups of soy sauce (I use reduced sodium)Two teaspoons of minced garlicTwo teaspoons of Italian oregano Combine all ingredients, making sure to get the brown sugar into solution as best as possible. Make enough to fully cover the meat you are marinating. Fire up the coals, give them time to flame high and let them die just a bit before putting these bad boys on the grill. Be careful to not burn the brown sugar. In this instance, it is OK to flip more than once, as it helps in not burning the sugar.In the mean time, the high coals can be used to rapid-cook asparagus or any kind of potato "meal" mixture in foil. I like young potatoes with onion, carrots and mushrooms all cut up with some butter (I honestly use Smart Balance most of the time nowadays...).ENJOY.I make a similar one.  No brown sugar though, I'll have to try yours.





Grilled Grecian Meatloaf: 2 lbs ground meat*2 large eggs1 1/2 cups plan bread crumbs1/4 cup Greek seasoning http://www.greekseasoning.com/2 tbls garlic powder2 tbls finely chopped onion (or dried minced onion)1 tbls dried oregano1/2 cup diced tomato1/2 cup feta cheese1/2 cup chopped spinachCombine all ingredients and mix completely to form a homogeneous mixture (to the extent possible).Place the mixture in a oiled/sprayed foil pan, allowing for the meat to be about 1.5" thick.Place the uncovered foil pan on the grill, over hot coals, for about a half hour or until mostly done through. At this point, turn the pan over so the meat is directly on the grill for about five minutes to brown it.Enjoy.* I actually used ground turkey for this, because it was out and thawed (not by me). Next time I'm going to try a mix of beef and lamb - or just plain lamb. 





Anyone got a good recipe for possum. Sure a whole lot of dead ones around these parts!





I'm not much of a recipe guy, but maybe you guys will like this one...Herbed Chicken Breasts with Goat Cheese and Salsa Verde1-2 cups Salsa Verde (added on top of chicken and cheese to taste. 3oz. bread crumbs  (1-ounce) slices white bread       4  (6-ounce) skinless, boneless chicken breast halves       1/2  teaspoon salt       1/2  teaspoon ground cumin       1/4  teaspoon ground red pepper       1  large egg, lightly beaten       1  tablespoon olive oil       1/2  cup (2 ounces) crumbled goat cheese (or queso fresco , as per your tastes)         Cilantro sprigs (optional)        Lime wedges (optional)             PreparationFire up the grill.To prepare chicken...First bake up breadcrumbs over a cookie sheet on the grill.Then, place each chicken breast half between 2 sheets of heavy-duty plastic wrap; pound to 1/2-inch thickness using a meat mallet or rolling pin. Combine 1/2 teaspoon salt, cumin, and red pepper; sprinkle evenly over chicken.Place breadcrumbs in a shallow dish. Place egg in another shallow dish. Dip chicken in egg; dredge in breadcrumbs.Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over grill at medium-high heat. Add chicken; cook 4 minutes on each side or until done. Top chicken with salsa, and sprinkle with goat cheese cheese. Garnish with cilantro sprigs and lime wedges, if desired.Eat. Smile. Rejoice. Sleep.I hope you enjoy this one... and--trust me--it's wonderful.





dudekd wrote: I'm not much of a recipe guy, but maybe you guys will like this one...Me neither....it drives my parents, girlfriend, and her parents crazy.....when I'm making a dry rub or a recipe, I just sort of eyeball and taste my way to what I want- they have given up asking for my recipes, because I can't write them down, it'll break my concentration.As for Tailgate foods, here's a real simple one- take raw asparagus, cut it into about inch and a quarter lengths, wrap those each in bacon, skewer them, and put them on the grill....if done right, the bacon will cook and the asparagus will still be crisp, leading to that pleasant snap when you bite into them.  Plus, you can tell your significant other that it's kinda healthy(and there's BACON!)





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 09:58:35 PM
Anybody tried this bad boy yet? www.bbqaddicts.com/bacon-explosion.html





Holy heart attack Lion! I love ANYTHING with bacon (it's BACON!!!) but that's a little much. I saw last season someone did bacon-wrapped brats, battered and then deep fried. I couldn't bring myself to eat that but ut sure looked good! I've been doing alot of experimenting with Asian methods lately. I should have a good number of things to post for the upcoming tailgate season.





847badgerfan wrote: Holy heart attack Lion! I love ANYTHING with bacon (it's BACON!!!) but that's a little much. I saw last season someone did bacon-wrapped brats, battered and then deep fried. I couldn't bring myself to eat that but ut sure looked good! I've been doing alot of experimenting with Asian methods lately. I should have a good number of things to post for the upcoming tailgate season.Come on bf, you've never had pig-stuffed pig-wrapped pig????I have.





I can't believe you're still around to talk about it UTee!! I've got one. ALL of the cheese are essential to the final flavor of this.Portabella Mushrooms (full size), caps only - stems removedShredded Swiss cheeseShredded Asiago chesseGrated Parmesan cheeseShredded Mozzarella cheeseCrumbled bacon, cookedChopped garlicFresh cracked pepperTop the mushrooms (cap down) with the bacon crumbles and garlic. Then top with an equal portion of the cheeses. Finally, finish with the pepper. Grill on medium coals for about ten minutes or so, and move to indirect to finish the melting process if necessary.





I'm no cook, I was just curious, when marinating a steak how long do you usually let it soak up.. I usually give only a day, not sure if that is long enough for full flavor





Slugsrbad wrote: I'm no cook, I was just curious, when marinating a steak how long do you usually let it soak up.. I usually give only a day, not sure if that is long enough for full flavorIt really depends on a) what kind of meat, b) what kind of marinade and c) what your desired outcome is.I've used many a marinade and many a method. You can over-marinate, to the point that you cannot taste the meat. If that is an objective, and for some people it is, then leave it as long as you want. I suspect you like to taste the meat, however. I'll give you a couple of tips and also summon UTee and Smokey for their input on marinating and also rubs.You'll have to give me some idea of your flavors of choice also.For filets and ribeyes, you really don't need all that long as they will soak up marinade quicker than most other meats. With flanks and skirts, you can go as long as you want as they are tougher cuts and actually get more tender with time in the marinade. Strips are somewhere in between. Round steak should be used for chili only.





Yup, agree with what bf said.  Filets and ribeyes are tender on their own, so the marinade should only be for flavor.  And IMO, the best flavoring for a steak is... well... steak.  So I rarely (never?) marinate a filet or ribeye.  Kosher salt, cracked black pepper, and a mesquite wood fire are ideal for these cuts IMO.Flanks and skirts, on the other hand, are tough cuts.  Really tough.  They need the marinade for tenderization, and they don't soak up flavor as quickly, so you can marinate them for a long time and they will retain much of their own flavor.  I often do these overnight. To me, the classic case of marinating a skirt is that of "fajitas."  These days, anything that is grilled and tossed in a tortilla with some cheese and peppers and onions seems to be called a "fajita."  Shrimp fajitas.  Chicken fajitas.  Portabella fajitas.  Even "steak fajitas" that are made from strip or filets.  But none of those are technically, classically, a fajita, because the word fajita refers to the specific cut of meat that is skirt steak.  And until fajitas rose exponentially in popularity through the 80s and 90s (I blame the chain restaurant Chili's for this), this cut of meat was REALLY cheap, because it was so tough.  Like, $.49 - $.69 per lb cheap.  It was tough so it was cheap, it was cheap so it became standard Mexican street food, and the only way to make it edible and tasty was to marinate the heck out of it.  It was served in a tortilla so it was actually a fajita taco, but the word taco got dropped, and now "fajitas" has become a generic term that means pretty much any meat (or vegetable like the portabella) that is served on (or along with) a tortilla, with shredded cheese, grilled onions and peppers, and maybe sour cream and/or guacamole too.Anyway, that'y my fajita rant.Like bf says, strips are somewhere in-between.  I generally don't prep them with a marinade, but if I did, I'd think a couple of hours would suffice.Now, who wants to talk about BBQ?  I'm thinking about smoking a brisket this weekend!





I'm smoking some ribs this weekend bro. I have the essentials, like sea salt, several fresh ground peppers and of course Cayenne pepper. Do you think a little paprika, onion powder and garlic would be appropriate? I marinate my ribs in Dr. Pepper, believe it or not. Introduces some nice flavor and also helps break down the tougher tissues. Any thoughts on that?





847badgerfan wrote: I'm smoking some ribs this weekend bro. I have the essentials, like sea salt, several fresh ground peppers and of course Cayenne pepper. Do you think a little paprika, onion powder and garlic would be appropriate? I marinate my ribs in Dr. Pepper, believe it or not. Introduces some nice flavor and also helps break down the tougher tissues. Any thoughts on that?As long as you don't BOIL the ribs it's okay by me! I use paprika in most of my dry rubs, and onion powder and garlic always result in tasty goodness as far as I'm concerned, so I think you're set.Have I ever told you my newer method of smoking ribs?  I've used a variation of this for years, but I read a BBQ rib thread on Hornfans about 1.5 years ago, and tried the suggestion, and I'll be darned if they weren't among the tastiest I've ever made.Let me search for that post and re-post it over here.  This weekend, you should try doing a rack this way while you have the smoker going, and let me know what you think.  Be back in a minute. 





Boiling ribs is like putting beans in an otherwise perfectly good pot of chili.





Well, now I'm thinking I posted it at some point over on the B12 Chili/BBQ thread, but I don't know when, and can't find it...





How about a recollection? Or do you have it at home?





No, I'll post it here for you.  I think I must have linked it on the other thread.This method is for pork sprare ribs, and it's called the 3-2-1 method because it spends about 3 hours on the indirect smoke, 2 hours in the oven, and another 1 hour back on the smoke (I usually only do another 35-45 minutes though).If you really like extremely tender fall-off-the-bone ribs, then you can skip the last part on the smoke and just bring 'em straight out of the oven, because that last hour is used to help "firm them up" after it's done.  But as always, let them rest 10-15 minutes before cutting.Okay, found the original post, so I'll copy and translate some of it:Step 1: Trim and rub your meat. I usually get my ribs from Costco - the quality is consistently good and they give you a good sized rack (if you get them from the grocery store it is hit or miss, the racks could be huge or tiny). There is a flap on the back that you need to trim off, as well trimming off the large steak-like portion of meet from the end of the ribs. It's kind of hard to explain, but this site has some really good pictures that make it easy to know what to cut and what to keep. And when I say keep, I mean keep together, I smoke all the meat I trim off as well so don't throw anything you cut off away. It's just that you want it off before you smoke it rather than after. I also remove the membrane from the back, some others do not.  After the ribs are trimmed, I put down a really thin "base coat" of deli style mustard, and then rub with a combination (half and half) of Bolner's Fiesta Pork Rub and McCormick's Montreal Steak Seasoning. And I do mean rub, it all sort of mixes together with the mustard when you rub it on the rack of ribs and your hands get dirty, but it washes off easily. Step 2: Start your fire and get the temperature in the smoking chamber to around 225.  I use charcoal in a chimney starter, then once that is burning I put it in the firebox and stack a few small oak logs on top of it.  Once the oak logs catch, and the coals burn down a bit, the temperture steadies, and I use my air intake in the firebox to regulate the temperature to a steady 225.Step 3: Tell your wife you are "tending the pit" but really just drink beer and DON'T OPEN THE LID TO PEEK.  The ribs are still there, I promise.  After 3 hours at 225, the meat will pull back from the bone, and there you'll see the ends of the bones sticking out.Step 4: During the last 15-20 minutes of step 3 you should have been preheating your oven to 225. Take the ribs off the pit, wrap each rack up individually in foil, and put them in the oven for 90 minutes to 2 hours. The foil will make the ribs moist and tender, with the meat practically falling off the bones (in fact, be careful when moving the ribs between steps 4 and 5 because sometimes the bones will literally slip right out) and another great benefit is that for 2 hours or so they will make your kitchen smell wonderful!Step 5: Put the ribs back on the pit (I usually have something smoking on there at this time, like chicken or sausage), and let them "firm up" in the smoke for 30 minutes to an hour. You could just eat them after the oven step and the meat would fall right off the bone. However, that's not what some folks like, some people prefer to firm the meat up a little bit and be able to cut them up and have the meat not be so tender you need a fork. I tend to agree, that ribs aree meant to be eaten with your hands!  But some people just Ooooh and Aaaah over fall-off-the-bone ribs, so you can skip the final pit step if you like it that way.Step 6: Let the ribs rest, and then carve them with your knife of choice, slicing between the bones. I usually prepare several racks at once and do what I call a "double-slice" on them, which means leaving meat on both sides of one bone, and cutting the next bone completely out.  Be sure to save the best for the chef, because if you put them out they will go fast.So there you have it, the 3-2-1 method and the secret of the rub.  The thin layer of mustard is important, it adds a depth of flavor, but doesn't taste like mustard in the finished product so even for people who normally hate mustard, don't skip it!  Also, if you can't get Bolner's Fiesta pork rub in your area, I'm not sure how to duplicate it.  It's a tangy and slightly sweet blend of spices.  I'm sure there are other "pork-specific" rubs that are similar, but I don't know what they are...There you have it, good luck!





Thanks amigo. I will try it out.





After I went to all that trouble to copy it down for you, ya better!And then someday, I will give you my enchilada gravy recipe...





thanks for the steak tips.. also, I was curious, has anyone ever ordered from Omaha Steaks?  I love me some good steak, wondering if it was worth the price?





I find that a good butcher will have good meat. Omaha is very expensive and in my mind, not worth it.





utee94 wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: I marinate my ribs in Dr. Pepper, believe it or not. Introduces some nice flavor and also helps break down the tougher tissues. Any thoughts on that?As long as you don't BOIL the ribs it's okay by me! I use paprika in most of my dry rubs, and onion powder and garlic always result in tasty goodness as far as I'm concerned, so I think you're set.How do you feel about simmering the ribs in a dark beer before throwing them on the grill Utee?Dr Pepper huh Badge, thats unique.  Might have to try that sometime.  I imagine the sugar would make a nice caramelized coat on the ribs.





MisterBlack wrote: utee94 wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: I marinate my ribs in Dr. Pepper, believe it or not. Introduces some nice flavor and also helps break down the tougher tissues. Any thoughts on that?As long as you don't BOIL the ribs it's okay by me! I use paprika in most of my dry rubs, and onion powder and garlic always result in tasty goodness as far as I'm concerned, so I think you're set.How do you feel about simmering the ribs in a dark beer before throwing them on the grill Utee?Dr Pepper huh Badge, thats unique.  Might have to try that sometime.  I imagine the sugar would make a nice caramelized coat on the ribs.I don't know, I'd have to sample some evidence before rendering a verdict...





utee94 wrote: I don't know, I'd have to sample some evidence before rendering a verdict... It just might be worth a try if you feel like somethin different sometime.I use Mississippi Mud for the beer (Any other Black-n-Tan, or dark variety would work nice).  Put the ribs in a pot, add the beer and some water to cover the meat (the mixture should be at least 50/50, I like to use 3/4 part beer to 1/4 part water).  Bring to a slow simmer and then throw in a couple of bay leaves.  Let it all simmer for at least an hour until the ribs are about to fall off the bone.  Have your grill ready.  Remove the ribs and grill em.  Add your favorite dry rub/wet rub/sauce accordingly.  The ribs will only need to cook about 5 minutes per side, just to sear, as the meat will already be cooked.Now, I don't know how these will compare to your above smoking method, which sounds awesome, but the meat will be tender and flavorfull due to the beer, and it's an easy gameday recipe.





I ordered six five pound briskets and ten pounds of sausage yesterday, which I will properly prepare for my guests tomorrow evening. In addition, we are serving Chili, corn bread, potato salad, cole slaw, pickles, onions, white bread, baked beans and Ruby's BBQ sauce. Mrs. 847 made the potato salad last night and will make the cole slaw tongiht. I think we're going to buy the bread, but I'm going to make the baked beans. The only thing missing is a desert.





Things turned out pretty well with everything we made for the above party. I heard no complaints, anyway. Did this over the last weekend, and I highly recommend trying it. It's very simple. MusselsCarmelized Sweet onion, dicedCrumbled baconCrumbled blue cheeseDry white wine Add a little bit of the wine to a foil pan and bring to a boil. Steam the mussels in the foil pan until they JUST open. Remove them from the grill and peel one of the shells off. Leave the meat in the other shell. Pour about 1 inch of white wine in the pan and bring to a boil. Return the mussels, meat side up, to the pan and top with onion chips, the crumbled bacon and the blue cheese. Don't overwhelm the mussels with too much of any of these ingrediants though.This should take about five minutes to melt the cheese and tenderize the meat.. Use real wood charcoal to get the smokey flavor. If you must use gas, use a smoker box with wood chips.





Slugsrbad wrote: thanks for the steak tips.. also, I was curious, has anyone ever ordered from Omaha Steaks? I love me some good steak, wondering if it was worth the price?Omaha Steaks is a rip off. Small portions, overpriced, and not as good as the quality found in most cities special meat markets. I agree with Badgerfan, stick to locals.





Gatorama2 wrote: Slugsrbad wrote: thanks for the steak tips.. also, I was curious, has anyone ever ordered from Omaha Steaks? I love me some good steak, wondering if it was worth the price?Omaha Steaks is a rip off. Small portions, overpriced, and not as good as the quality found in most cities special meat markets. I agree with Badgerfan, stick to locals.Especially in the Midwest or the Southwest, where cattle are still raised, ordering Omaha Steaks just isn't worth it.Down here in the Southeast, ordering beef is not quite as verboten, because they raise the pork.  That said, you should still check out the local butcher.





test 





Well im Asian but i can BBQ some chicken if you like.Teriyaki or Bust BBQ Chicken.Marinade-(quantity of ingrediants differ for serving size)1.Lemon Juice2.Red Chili pepper powder3.Teriyaki Merrinade base4.Pad Thai noodle SauceMarinade instructions-mix the lemon juice chili powder amd teriyaki marinade sauce till well stirred together pour the noodle sauce into seperate plate b4 placing chicken on the grill roll it in the sauce.Cooking-Grill till sauce crisps or until chicken is done. have teriyaki sauce in a dipping object to dip the chicken in and Enjoy! (:





Courtesy of the Chicago Trib... www.chicagotribune.com/news/columnists/chi-kass-19 -jun19,0,4716398.column  chicagotribune.com  Ribs on regular grill? It's no smoke, mirrors  John Kass  June 19, 2009  There must be a gazillion Weber kettle grills sitting ribless, in backyards and on patios across   America  .Sadly, for most dads on Father's Day, the standard backyard charcoal-fired kettle is used to grill burgers and brats, steaks, chicken, the occasional fish.But with a cheap aluminum foil bread pan, you can turn that kettle into an honest-to-goodness smoker, make some authentic slow-smoked barbecue ribs and have yourself a mini-vacation in your yard.To show you how, we've made a video with barbecue guru Gary Wiviott.On a sunny day, we hauled a standard Weber Kettle (and my trusty Weber Smokey Mountain Cooker) up to the gorgeous 22nd-floor rooftop of the   Tribune   Tower  .You can view the video at www.chicagotribune.com/ribs.What's more, you can play the video for your wife and kids for some nice pre-Father's Day gift guilt, and if they do the right thing, you'll soon be a father who is loved and honored by his family.Wiviott is co-author of "Low & Slow: Master the Art of Barbecue in 5 Easy Lessons."He graciously put together his special rub containing various toasted Mexican peppers, and his famous Tangy Seven-Pepper Sauce. You can find the recipes in the book, and we'll feature them in upcoming videos. Co-author Colleen Rush fixed a deliciously easy vinegar slaw. Serve the ribs on a piece of white bread (don't ask me, it's tradition), drizzle some sauce on the side, and enjoy.In the future, you'll also see how to do Kass' Beer Can Chicken, and some tasty roasted jalapenos stuffed with chorizo and dates and cheese and wrapped in bacon. We now call them "  Gary  's Pepper Treats" since editors, my wife and mom have prohibited me from using the earthy name such peppers are called by pit-masters.But that's later. Let's start with getting you used to smoking on a kettle. Once you try your own ribs this way, you won't want that horrid meat Jell-O sold at most commercial rib joints.And seeing it done will convince you how easy smoking in a standard Weber kettle can be.OK, I admit, smoking ribs on a kettle isn't as easy as using the bullet-shaped Weber Smokey Mountain Cooker. It is designed for slow smoking, and once you build the proper fire you don't have to mess with the cooker for hours."The kettle takes a little more futzing," said Wiviott, "but not that much. And once they actually see how to do it, people reading this will realize that you can get some real decent barbecue out of a kettle."And with all that charcoal goodness around, they'll also realize what a gas grill is for: to use as a table to put all your equipment on while you're cooking over coals.After you gather the equipment, which includes a standard kettle, some wood charcoal (never briquettes), a chimney starter and a couple cheap foil pans, you're almost ready.Don't forget the ribs. I visited Casey's Market in Western Springs and bought the meatiest ribs in the history of barbecue.Wash your ribs with cold water and vinegar, remove the membrane from the back of the ribs (or have the butcher do it).Then slather them with plain yellow mustard to hold your dry rub, cover each rib with lots of rub, top, bottom and sides.Then set up the kettle.On the lower grate where the live coals go, place a cheap aluminum drip pan to one side. Fill a charcoal chimney starter about three quarters full of wood charcoal, and light it using four sheets of the Tribune coiled into paper doughnuts. (My column photo burns too hot, so be careful.)When the coals are glowing, pour them onto the lower grate, on one side next to the drip pan.Add one or two chunks of dry hickory or pecan, bark removed. Then put on the top grate and lay a meaty slab of ribs -- thickest side toward the fire -- above the drip pan.Fill an aluminum foil bread pan with water, and slide it over the top grate, just above the coals. The water isn't for moisture, but to control temperature and redirect the heat.Cover the grill. Leave the top vent open. Never close the top vent. Open the bottom vents, but after about half an hour, adjust the bottom vents to be open only about a third of the way.You'll have to check the fire every 40 minutes or so to add more coals through a hinged grate. It should take about 3 ½ to 4 hours, or maybe more. They're worth the wait. There are other hints, including using the squirt bottle and judging the "flex" of the ribs to know when they're done, but you'll have to watch the video.We used one full slab of ribs for the kettle, and seven on the Smokey Mountain Cooker. Co-workers chomped them down in about half an hour.So treat yourself to some.Take a vacation in your backyard. Slow things down. Smell smoke and meat and have a cold beer or three.Think about how lucky you are, with your family nearby.Happy Father's Day.jskass@tribune.com  Copyright © 2009, Chicago Tribune   





Absolutely perfect, I can't argue with a single thing he did.  The ribs looked fantastic, too.





This is only a slight variation from what I do sometimes, but he wrote it out for me and added the video. I couldn't not share.In the colder months, I actually start them out indirect on the grill with some wood chips over charcoal to get the smokey flavor going, and then I'll finish them off in the oven at 180F for five or six hours. It's tough to do anything outside, let alone smoke, when it's 10F and blowing. Actually, UTee, I think it was you helped me along with this method way back when. It has been used time and time again, so thanks amigo.Or was that Hooky too?





UGH!  I'm pretty certain I've NEVER seen Slick post ANYTHING about how to cook BBQ goldernit!And yup, I recall making that suggestion.  If truth were told, I sometimes do my brisket this way.  It takes on all the smoke it's going to get in the first 5-6 hours, after that the pit is just a heat source, and as good as my pit is, the oven is still a better regulated and more efficient one.Of course, when I leave the brisket in the pit all day, I always have the excuse, "Honey, I can't mow the lawn right now, I'm cooking over here."  And of course, the cooking always involves numerous beers, because it's so darn hot.My wife loves my BBQ enough, she not only lets me get away with this, but she voluntarily keeps the beers in my hand fresh and cold.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 09:59:41 PM
I think I'm starting to fall for your Aggie wife UTee.





Heh.  You gotta look out for those Aggies-- they're wily!





all this forum thread does is make me hungry..its not fair ._.





Don't know if I'd try it for a tailgate but thought I'd pass it along anyways :)www.geekologie.com/2009/03/bac...uffed_pizza.phpWould be great for poker night though!





OK, I'm looking for suggestions for this year.  Anyone who has stuff to share, let's hear it.  I'll see what I can dig up.





What kind of effort are you willing to put forth?





This is a staple during our tailgating/game days (probably a repeat, apologies):Rotel dip.1 lb of Velveeta  1 cn of Rotel tomatoes  ½ teaspoon of Cumin     Cut the velveeta into blocks and melt it with the drained 'maters in a crockpot with the cumin. Makes a cheap, simple, yet spicy cheese dip that those tostitos scoops love. This plus beer brats = heaven for me (and why I gain so much weight during football season).





847badgerfan wrote: What kind of effort are you willing to put forth?I'm willing to put in a lot of effort.  The only problem is that I'm sort of limited in things involving a grill, as the aprtment I live in has a size restrictions on them.  Ribs are generally out of the question.





EastLansingAdam wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: What kind of effort are you willing to put forth?I'm willing to put in a lot of effort.  The only problem is that I'm sort of limited in things involving a grill, as the aprtment I live in has a size restrictions on them.  Ribs are generally out of the question.In all honesty, you don't need a grill to make great ribs. Great ribs are all about the preparation and cooking (low and slow). With a great rub and a little liquid in a covered pan, 5 hours in the oven at 200 will blow your mind. Then you simply sauce them up and set them under the broiler for ten minutes per side. You'd be shocked to know how many restaurants use this method.





847badgerfan wrote: EastLansingAdam wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: What kind of effort are you willing to put forth?I'm willing to put in a lot of effort.  The only problem is that I'm sort of limited in things involving a grill, as the aprtment I live in has a size restrictions on them.  Ribs are generally out of the question.In all honesty, you don't need a grill to make great ribs. Great ribs are all about the preparation and cooking (low and slow). With a great rub and a little liquid in a covered pan, 5 hours in the oven at 200 will blow your mind. Then you simply sauce them up and set them under the broiler for ten minutes per side. You'd be shocked to know how many restaurants use this method.Interesting.  That just VASTLY expanded what I'm willing to try.





For my rub, I've been using garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, black pepper, salt and a little cayenne pepper. For the liquid, I use 6 oz diet Dr. Pepper, 2 oz Teryaki sauce and about three drops of liquid smoke.Set a rack of ribs in a foil pan over the liquid and tightly cover with foil. Bake for 5 hours at 200F. Put the sauce on and then under the broiler for ten minutes on each side (or on the grill for ten minutes on each side, if you have a grill. Always start the browning with the bottom side of the ribs on the fire.You can use your favorite sauce or make one up. I have a few methods but I've never written a recipe for them. If I get some time later on I'll think about it and try to come up with them to post here. Sauce takes alot of time, FYI.





847badgerfan wrote: I have a few methods but I've never written a recipe for them. If I get some time later on I'll think about it and try to come up with them to post here. Sauce takes alot of time, FYI.Hmmm sounds like an enchilada gravy recipe I've heard of...





Rueben Dip: (currently eating and is going over very good in the office)2 lbs Sauerkraut1 lbs Shredded corned beef4 cups shredded swiss cheese16 oz cream cheese Place all into a crock pot, let the cheeses melt and mix. Add around 1/2 bottle of thousand island dressing, more or less depending on the consistency you want.Serve with cocktail rye, or wheat crackers for dipping.





I made some good steak and pepper wraps last night.  I'll post the recipe later.





Here are the wraps I made a couple nights back...Chinese Pepper Steak Wraps2 tbs dry red wine (I used Cabernet)2 tbs soy sauce2 tbs cornstarch8 tsp peanut oil (can substitute any cooking oil, if you don't like the teaste of peanut oil, and some don't)2 tsp sugar1/2 tsp crushed red pepper1-1 1/2 lbs beef round steak4 bell peppers (2 red, 2 green), seeded and diced2 onions dicedflour tortillasMaking the marinade, by combining: (in a ziplock bag)winesoy saucecornstarch4 tsp of the oilsugarcrushed red pepperAdd the beef and make sure it is coated, and let marinate in the fridge for 1 1/2 hours.  Then drain the beef, but reserve the leftover marinade.Put the other 4 tsp of peanut oil in a skillet over medium heat and saute the meat until it is just barely pink.  Then remove the meat and put it on a plate.Saute the peppers and onion in the same pan you just used for the meat, for 4 minutes.  Then add the remaining marinade saved from the meat and saute for another 3-4 minutes (or until the marinade has fully cooked off).  Put the beef back in the pan with the peppers and onion and cook until the meat is fully cooked through.Then serve on the tortillas in a wrap.This recipe makes about 8 wraps.





Here is a nice breakfast dish for tailgating (or any time). I’m going to call it a Greek breakfast because I don’t know what else to call it. I made it one time this summer at the harbor and everyone loved it. This recipe serves about 8 people. So here goes, and please offer feedback if you try it.       Chips:       You can buy pita chips at most stores, or you can bake your own. Cut pita bread to desired size and brush (or spray) with olive oil. Lightly salt and pepper them to taste and bake in the oven at 325 for about 10 minutes or until just browning. Reserve for serving.       Sauce:       You can buy this sauce (tzatkiki) at most stores or you can make your own. This is the way I like it.1 10 oz container of plain yogurt  1 medium cucumber, grated  Lime juice to taste  Fresh cilantro to taste  Fresh dill to taste       Combine all ingredients at least two hours in advance and refrigerate. More time, up to 24 hours, is better. Reserve for serving.       Egg dish:       2 dozen eggs  1 package frozen spinach, heated and drained  1 lb gyros meat, diced (available at the deli counter or near hot dogs)0.5 lb feta, crumbled  1 medium red onion, diced  Fresh garlic to taste (jarred garlic is fine)  1 medium tomato, diced and drained  Canola oil for cooking       Heat a large skillet and add the onion and garlic. Sautee until just browned. Add the spinach, meat and tomato and stir. Add the eggs and scramble to desired doneness. (Sometimes it is better to do this in two phases because of the sheer number of eggs, depending on your pan size.)       Stir in the feta cheese and serve with the chips and sauce on the side. 





847badgerfan wrote: Here is a nice breakfast dish for tailgating (or any time). I’m going to call it a Greek breakfast because I don’t know what else to call it. I made it one time this summer at the harbor and everyone loved it. This recipe serves about 8 people. So here goes, and please offer feedback if you try it.   Chips:   You can buy pita chips at most stores, or you can bake your own. Cut pita bread to desired size and brush (or spray) with olive oil. Lightly salt and pepper them to taste and bake in the oven at 325 for about 10 minutes or until just browning. Reserve for serving.   Sauce:   You can buy this sauce (tzatkiki) at most stores or you can make your own. This is the way I like it.1 10 oz container of plain yogurt 1 medium cucumber, grated Lime juice to taste Fresh cilantro to taste Fresh dill to taste   Combine all ingredients at least two hours in advance and refrigerate. More time, up to 24 hours, is better. Reserve for serving.   Egg dish:   2 dozen eggs 1 package frozen spinach, heated and drained 1 lb gyros meat, diced (available at the deli counter or near hot dogs)0.5 lb feta, crumbled 1 medium red onion, diced Fresh garlic to taste (jarred garlic is fine) 1 medium tomato, diced and drained Canola oil for cooking   Heat a large skillet and add the onion and garlic. Sautee until just browned. Add the spinach, meat and tomato and stir. Add the eggs and scramble to desired doneness. (Sometimes it is better to do this in two phases because of the sheer number of eggs, depending on your pan size.)   Stir in the feta cheese and serve with the chips and sauce on the side. Might try this variant.. Go with Egg WHites, Califlower, Garlic and Feta. Lightly brown the Califlower in a skillet in some Olive Oil with the Garlic. Add Egg Whites until partially cooked, salt and pepper to taste and add Feta once the whites have started to harden. You can ealisy include the spinach in this dish as well, just make sure to add the Spinch for a short time before adding the egg whites otherwise they get too over cooked.





I made these last weekend for the night games, and enjoyed them, but they've got a little kick...Pre-Game Night Soak:1/4 bottle Liquid Smoke1 TBS. Garlic Juice1/4 cup Apple Cider VinegarThis was enough for about 12 chicken tenders with plenty to spare.Dry Spices:5 tsp Garlic Salt1 tsp Cayenne1/2 tsp Cumin1/2 tsp Chili Powder1/2 tsp Paprica1/2 tsp Black Pepper1/2 tsp Curry Powder  Place ingredients into a Ziplock bag and shake until well mixed. I made it at home, so I used the over broiler, but it can obviously be amended for the grill.  I sprinkled the dry spices on the exposed side and broiled for 9 minutes and then flipped, covered the other side with the dry spices and broiled for another 9 minutes.  I just dipped them in ranch and was ready to go.





EastLansingAdam wrote: I made these last weekend for the night games, and enjoyed them, but they've got a little kick...Pre-Game Night Soak:1/4 bottle Liquid Smoke1 TBS. Garlic Juice1/4 cup Apple Cider VinegarThis was enough for about 12 chicken tenders with plenty to spare.Dry Spices:5 tsp Garlic Salt1 tsp Cayenne1/2 tsp Cumin1/2 tsp Chili Powder1/2 tsp Paprica1/2 tsp Black Pepper1/2 tsp Curry Powder Place ingredients into a Ziplock bag and shake until well mixed. I made it at home, so I used the over broiler, but it can obviously be amended for the grill.  I sprinkled the dry spices on the exposed side and broiled for 9 minutes and then flipped, covered the other side with the dry spices and broiled for another 9 minutes.  I just dipped them in ranch and was ready to go.This look good Adam, but I'd like to see you try using some fresh peppers (sliced serrano and jalepeno and a pierced habinero if you dare) and a little canola oil in your marinade and cut down on the dry rub a little bit. The apple vinegar is a nice touch. Kudos on discovering the beauty of vinegar!I'm going to adapt this but I'm going to do it with wings and on a cast iron skillet instead of the broiler. If you don't have a cast iron... Get one ASAP. You can also get a cast iron grill that goes over two burners. You'll be shocked at how great those work.





Cauliflower and egg whites? That looks a little healthy Smokey. But I'll try it.Can I add bacon?





Liquid Smoke... WTF?!?!?





847badgerfan wrote: For my rub, I've been using garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, black pepper, salt and a little cayenne pepper. For the liquid, I use 6 oz diet Dr. Pepper, 2 oz Teryaki sauce and about three drops of liquid smoke.Set a rack of ribs in a foil pan over the liquid and tightly cover with foil. Bake for 5 hours at 200F. Put the sauce on and then under the broiler for ten minutes on each side (or on the grill for ten minutes on each side, if you have a grill. Always start the browning with the bottom side of the ribs on the fire.You can use your favorite sauce or make one up. I have a few methods but I've never written a recipe for them. If I get some time later on I'll think about it and try to come up with them to post here. Sauce takes alot of time, FYI.Trying these today BTW, hoping they can salvage a miserable day.  Went in around 1:45, so they should be done in about an hour and a half.





EastLansingAdam wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: For my rub, I've been using garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, black pepper, salt and a little cayenne pepper. For the liquid, I use 6 oz diet Dr. Pepper, 2 oz Teryaki sauce and about three drops of liquid smoke.Set a rack of ribs in a foil pan over the liquid and tightly cover with foil. Bake for 5 hours at 200F. Put the sauce on and then under the broiler for ten minutes on each side (or on the grill for ten minutes on each side, if you have a grill. Always start the browning with the bottom side of the ribs on the fire.You can use your favorite sauce or make one up. I have a few methods but I've never written a recipe for them. If I get some time later on I'll think about it and try to come up with them to post here. Sauce takes alot of time, FYI.Trying these today BTW, hoping they can salvage a miserable day.  Went in around 1:45, so they should be done in about an hour and a half.How'd it go Adam?Smokey, when you don't have a smoker a little liquid smoke goes a long way. As you know by now, it's pretty hard to smoke in the winter (or if you are very busy and can't tend to the smoker all day). Just a little tip I learned from my boy Marcus!





Turned out perfect!Perhaps my broiler is a little strong, but I think 8 minutes per side was plenty.  Other than that, no complaints at all.





847badgerfan wrote: EastLansingAdam wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: For my rub, I've been using garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, black pepper, salt and a little cayenne pepper. For the liquid, I use 6 oz diet Dr. Pepper, 2 oz Teryaki sauce and about three drops of liquid smoke.Set a rack of ribs in a foil pan over the liquid and tightly cover with foil. Bake for 5 hours at 200F. Put the sauce on and then under the broiler for ten minutes on each side (or on the grill for ten minutes on each side, if you have a grill. Always start the browning with the bottom side of the ribs on the fire.You can use your favorite sauce or make one up. I have a few methods but I've never written a recipe for them. If I get some time later on I'll think about it and try to come up with them to post here. Sauce takes alot of time, FYI.Trying these today BTW, hoping they can salvage a miserable day.  Went in around 1:45, so they should be done in about an hour and a half.How'd it go Adam?Smokey, when you don't have a smoker a little liquid smoke goes a long way. As you know by now, it's pretty hard to smoke in the winter (or if you are very busy and can't tend to the smoker all day). Just a little tip I learned from my boy Marcus!I was just being a smart ass about this liquid smoke. Should I cut and paste my recipeces from the Big XII thread over here, or force these yankees to voyage outside of their home thread?





Throw a link on amigo. That'll get them over there.Glad to hear it Adam. There is nothing like tearing into a set of ribs you've had cooking all day.





Blackened Fish with Cilantro Mayo Sammitch Any white fish will do for this one, but filets perform better than steaks do for a sammitch. Grouper is particularly good for this recipe, but talapia, orange roughy, white fish or Ocean perch (for example) will work too.First, liberally brush or spray the fish with olive oil on both sides. You may have to remove one side of the skin if that's how your store sells it. Then rub each side with salt, pepper, garlic powder, paprika and (if desired) cayenne pepper. Light the gril and preheat to high.While that's getting going, make the mayo and butter the rolls. For the mayo, combine any kind of mayo (I use Smart Balance) with fresh cilantro and lemon juice to taste. Stir and let it set up in the fridge or cooler for about ten minutes before using. The longer the better, up to overnight if possible.I like to use a hoagie-type or sub roll for this, and it comes out really good. Butter (or margarine, etc) up the bread and sprinkle a little garlic powder on. Put on the grill until just browning and remove for serving.Oil up the grill just to make sure it's non-stick and put the fish on. Fish does not take long so be careful, keeping in mind that the grill is not burning the fish but rather the spices. This is part of the blackening process and it's cool. Most fish filets can be cooked in about five minutes per side. Pay attention and use care when flipping. You don't want to leave half the fish - and you won't if you let it cook properly on each side. It will crust from the spices and come right off.Put the fish on the roll, spread out some mayo and top with lettuce and tomato.Enjoy your sammitch. It's one of my favorites.





Hmm, blackened is the only wayI like fish, but I've never liked the texture of fish for sandwiches.





http://mbd.scout.com/mb.aspx?s...202515&p=48Feel free to check out the Big XII thread.Here is a Bloody MaryZing Zang mix (Yes I am cheating a bit)IceFresh Ground PepperSpash o'  WorstorchireSmidge o' crushed fresh Garlic (Stole from below)Greek mix Green olivesGreek Mix pickled CauliflowerQuarter Claussen Pickle sliceLight squeeze of LimeCopious amounts of VodkaQUesoFull Block of Velveeta CheeseBrowned ChorizoFull Glass of Pace Verde Salsa (Not preferred Verde)Can of RotelLarge Crock pot





This was an easy one I made this past weekend...1 1/2 lbs kielbasa (I used turkey kielbasa, a lot healthier)1 can pineapple chunks1/4 cup brown sugarThe night before (or morning of if not eating til that night), mix all in a pot (including the juice from the pineapple) and simmer over medium heat until boiling.  Then remove from heat and store in Tupperware.Strain the mixture so you don't have too much juice, and serve on hoagie buns with your choice of toppings, either reheated or cold, your choice.I reheated it and topped with sauteed onions and pork gravy on Saturday night, and then had some leftover cold topped with sliced onions on Monday for lunch.  I think I might have liked it cold better.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:00:44 PM
EastLansingAdam wrote: This was an easy one I made this past weekend...1 1/2 lbs kielbasa (I used turkey kielbasa, a lot healthier)1 can pineapple chunks1/4 cup brown sugarThe night before (or morning of if not eating til that night), mix all in a pot (including the juice from the pineapple) and simmer over medium heat until boiling.  Then remove from heat and store in Tupperware.Strain the mixture so you don't have too much juice, and serve on hoagie buns with your choice of toppings, either reheated or cold, your choice.I reheated it and topped with sauteed onions and pork gravy on Saturday night, and then had some leftover cold topped with sliced onions on Monday for lunch.  I think I might have liked it cold better.Sounds pretty good but I think I'd have to temper some of that sweetness with some kick.But that's me and my taste buds. I must be part Texican.





847badgerfan wrote: EastLansingAdam wrote: This was an easy one I made this past weekend...1 1/2 lbs kielbasa (I used turkey kielbasa, a lot healthier)1 can pineapple chunks1/4 cup brown sugarThe night before (or morning of if not eating til that night), mix all in a pot (including the juice from the pineapple) and simmer over medium heat until boiling.  Then remove from heat and store in Tupperware.Strain the mixture so you don't have too much juice, and serve on hoagie buns with your choice of toppings, either reheated or cold, your choice.I reheated it and topped with sauteed onions and pork gravy on Saturday night, and then had some leftover cold topped with sliced onions on Monday for lunch.  I think I might have liked it cold better.Sounds pretty good but I think I'd have to temper some of that sweetness with some kick.But that's me and my taste buds. I must be part Texican.I'm with you all the way, but when also cooking for a fiance who would probably wipe the salt off Saltines for having too much kick if she could I have learned to compromise.  She wouldn't go near the chicken wings I posted a couple weeks back.She liked your ribs though!





EastLansingAdam wrote: This was an easy one I made this past weekend...1 1/2 lbs kielbasa (I used turkey kielbasa, a lot healthier)1 can pineapple chunks1/4 cup brown sugarThe night before (or morning of if not eating til that night), mix all in a pot (including the juice from the pineapple) and simmer over medium heat until boiling.  Then remove from heat and store in Tupperware.Strain the mixture so you don't have too much juice, and serve on hoagie buns with your choice of toppings, either reheated or cold, your choice.I reheated it and topped with sauteed onions and pork gravy on Saturday night, and then had some leftover cold topped with sliced onions on Monday for lunch.  I think I might have liked it cold better.Possible additions/changesAdd some chile powder and Paprika (Use hot not sweet paprika)I would also add some fresh minced garlic personallyI would cut back on the sugar a bit. Might think of serving it with Some grilled green pepper and onion Then use the "sauce" sort of like an Italian beef.





Glad she liked the ribs. She can't be all that bad.Smokey,Italian Beef is kinda Chicago. Most of these people here would call it Au Jus or something like that.





847badgerfan wrote: Glad she liked the ribs. She can't be all that bad.Smokey,Italian Beef is kinda Chicago. Most of these people here would call it Au Jus or something like that.Yeah, I thought about calling Au Jus, but with all those additions it would be quite a bit thicker than an Au Jus.I consider Italian Beef totally Chicago. Don't recall seeing it anywhere outside of Chicago.





There are some restaurants outside of Chicago that try it.  It's never right.





BurntEyes wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: Glad she liked the ribs. She can't be all that bad.Smokey,Italian Beef is kinda Chicago. Most of these people here would call it Au Jus or something like that.Yeah, I thought about calling Au Jus, but with all those additions it would be quite a bit thicker than an Au Jus.I consider Italian Beef totally Chicago. Don't recall seeing it anywhere outside of Chicago.I've had decent Italian Beef a couple places in Pittsburgh.  Not Chicago, but decent.  Maybe it's a midwest thing?





Ahh yes, I do now recall seeing them in Pittsburgh. 





I've seen them outside of Chicago too. Just never thought to try one. It's like trying to go to a "Texas BBQ" joint in Chicago. It ain't right.





Though it would rank little higher than Bill Millers in Austin, Smoque is actually a decent hold over during those long non-football season winter months when I am not travelling back to the mother land. http://www.smoquebbq.com/





Smokey,I'll meet you there one of these coming NFL Sundays after CFB is over. Nothing more than a quick train ride for each of us. I think the Metra is right there.





----847badgerfan wrote: ---------------Smokey,I'll meet you there one of these coming NFL Sundays after CFB is over. Nothing more than a quick train ride for each of us. I think the Metra is right there.---------------------------------------------Sounds like a game plan!





Everyone likes portobella mushrooms, right? I hope this isn't a repeat, because I'm sure I've written this down before somewhere. Too lazy to go back and check. Large, fresh portobellas - de-stemmedShredded asiago cheeseShredded parmasan cheeseShredded mozerella cheeseCrumbled blue cheeseShredded swiss cheeseMinced shallot, sauteedMinced garlic, sauteedCrumbled cooked baconI like to use equal portions of each ingredient to stuff the mushrooms with. I add the garlic, shallot and bacon first, and then the blue cheese. Then add the other cheese blend on top to cover the mushroom. Put on the grill on high heat, cover, and let it go for about 15-20 minutes.





I do something sorta of similar Badger.I take the portobellasDestemmedTurn up upside down Olive OilFresh crushed garlicLiberal amounts of fresh shredded parmPut on grill or in Oven on Foil Grill or bake for about 20 min at around 375 - if all the cheese is melted and the lids start to turn its done.Add spread on fresh green olive tapenad (you can make or buy)I have a receipt but I am about to jump on a flight. Perhaps I will post later





There is a restaurant in Kenosha, WI called Chops on the Lake. This is a little thingy I've adapted from their menu. It is called the BBT.Ingredients:Sliced Italian BreadButterGarlic powderPre-grilled filet mignon (or other fine cut) thinly sliced, or diced (B)Crumbled Blue Cheese (B)Diced Tomato (T)Finely diced chives (green onion)Start the coals (or gas...) and get the grill to medium or so. Butter both sides of the bread and dust with garlic powder. Place the bread on the grill and brown one side. This will not take too long, FYI. Remove the bread from the grill and place on foil, browned side up. Put the beef, tomatos, blue cheese and chives on the bread and place on the grill, non-browned side down, with the foil. Cook for about ten minutes, until the bread is browning and the cheese is starting to melt.This is one great sammitch. Enjoy your BBT.





OK, how about some simple burgers?I like to use 80/20 meat for my burgers. That means 20 percent fat, which can usually be called ground chuck. You need the fat content for grilling burgers because you're going to lose almost all of it. But I have a little trick. Add just a few bread crumbs to the burger. Not like doing a meatloaf or meatballs - just a little bit. This helps retain some of the fat without adding any flavor.Anyway, here goes.1 lb of 80/20 meat1 TBL bread crumbsSalt and pepper to tasteHeat the grill to high. Patty the burgers about one inch thick, leaving them a little thinner in the middle so they don't blow up (you know what I mean) and oil the grate. Take some nice rolls and add a little butter for toasting. Place the burgers on the grill for about five minutes per side or until desired doneness. Only flip the once. When you are about two minutes away put the rolls on, butter side down.Remove the buns and throw on the burgers.I like to top with sauces or cheese after grilling, or you can melt the cheese.





Two sauces for topping burgers...1 part horseradish3 parts mayosalt and pepper to tasteAnother one...1 part minced garlic1 part dijon mustard3 parts mayoAs with any sauce, mix them well and let them sit in the fridge for a while.





I don't think this has been posted, but it's one of my favorite things to make for game-watching parties and tailgates because you can make it well in advance and it is really easy to make.  It's a chunky dip that can be served with tortilla chips, fritos, or crackers.  Texas Caviar - just mix all the ingredients below in a large bowl and put in the fridge for at least 2 hours (overnight is fine):1/2 onion, diced1 green bell pepper, chopped1 bunch green onions, chopped2 jalapeno pepers, chopped or diced1 tablespoon minced garlic1 pint cherry tomatoes, quartered1 (8 oz) bottle of Zesty Italian dressing1 (15 oz) can black beans, drained1 (15 oz) can black-eyed peas, drained1/2 teaspoon coriander1 bunch chopped cilantro





Tomato SaladLike my grandma used to make and like my ma still does. OK, not quite, as I've adapted a few things. But you get the point.6 medium tomato, about 3 inch diameter12 green onions, about 3/8 in diameter1/4 cup nice Olive oilWater1 TBL dried Oregano1 TSP dried Basil1 TBL Garlic powderSalt to tastePepper to tasteCut the tomatoes in half and squeeze the juice into the bowl. Take out the stem part and cut up the rest into bite-size peices. Put them all into the bowl. Cut up the onions into 3/8" long peices - whites and greens all. Put them all into the bowl. Add the Olive oil. Look at the bowl and see where the fluid level is. If it's below the food, add water to compensate the lack of juice (water) in the tomatoes. Add the spices and stir until blended. Do NOT skip the salt and pepper. They are needed and essential. I normally put about two teaspoons of salt and pepper each.Cover and leave stand at room temperature for at least two hours. This can be refrigerated and saved almost a week, but needs to be served at room temp.I serve this in bowls, with a nice hunk of crusty Italian bread for dipping.Bon Appetit.





BuckeyeCMO wrote: BUCKEYECMO's ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND PEPPERS2lbs hot Italian sausage2 large red peppers2 large yellow peppers1 large onion4 cloves garlic2 tablespoons tomato paste28oz can of chopped tomatoes1/2cup of marsala cooking wine1tsp. of oreganofresh basil1/2tsp. of red pepper flakessalt and pepper2 tablespoons of olive oilI cut up all of the vegetables the night before, so as to eliminate as much prep work as possible. This recipe really only is convenient if you have a large grill.I cook the sausage on the grill just like anything else, and then set it aside and cut it into bite size pieces. Take the peppers, onions and garlic which should already be cut from the night before and wrap it all in aluminum foil with the olive oil, salt and pepper. Cook the veggies on the grill until all are almost done.Add the sausage, the peppers/onions mixture and all of the remaining ingredients to a larger pot and let simmer on the grill until the sauce thickens and the flavors mix together. Serve either on hoagie buns or as a side......These are on the docket for Saturday.  I am pretty excited.





EastLansingAdam wrote: BuckeyeCMO wrote: BUCKEYECMO's ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND PEPPERS2lbs hot Italian sausage2 large red peppers2 large yellow peppers1 large onion4 cloves garlic2 tablespoons tomato paste28oz can of chopped tomatoes1/2cup of marsala cooking wine1tsp. of oreganofresh basil1/2tsp. of red pepper flakessalt and pepper2 tablespoons of olive oilI cut up all of the vegetables the night before, so as to eliminate as much prep work as possible. This recipe really only is convenient if you have a large grill.I cook the sausage on the grill just like anything else, and then set it aside and cut it into bite size pieces. Take the peppers, onions and garlic which should already be cut from the night before and wrap it all in aluminum foil with the olive oil, salt and pepper. Cook the veggies on the grill until all are almost done.Add the sausage, the peppers/onions mixture and all of the remaining ingredients to a larger pot and let simmer on the grill until the sauce thickens and the flavors mix together. Serve either on hoagie buns or as a side......These are on the docket for Saturday.  I am pretty excited.You would be amazed at how good this dish goes as a solo (no bread) served along side mashed potatos. Mmmmm....





Here is a good one now that you can get good apples and cidar... 2 tbs vegetable oil1 granny smith apple, sliced1 tbs. dark brown sugar4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts1/4 tsp. cinnamon1/4 tsp. salt1/4 tsp. pepper1 onion sliced into rings1/2 cup apple cidar1/4 cup apple cidar vinegar2 cups hot cooked egg noodles 1.) Heat half the oil in a skillet2.) Saute the apple for about 5 minutes, til lightly browned3.) Sprinkle with the brown sugar, saute for another 3-5 minutes and then transfer to a plate4.) Sprinkle the chicken breasts with the cinnamon, salt and pepper5.) Heat the other half of the oiler in the skillet6.) Saute the chicken until browned, 4-5 minutes per side, and then transfer to another plate7.) Boil the noodles according to the directions8.) In the skillet cook the onion until tender, about 6-8 minutes9.) Stir in the cidar and vinegar and cook for another 2 minutes10.) Return chicken to the skillet and cook until cooked through, about 4 minutes, while spooning the sauce over it11.) Return the apples to the skillet, and cook until tender, about 2 minutes12.) Put the noodles on a plate, put the chicken, onions and apples on top, pour remaining sauce over top. Great meal for the fall





Easy dessert... Easy to pre prep Take an apple for every one you want Core out the apple and wash it well. Take aluminum foil and wrap around the bottom In the top of the apple poor in sugar/cinnamon mixed like cinnamon toast (2/3 sugar 1/2 cinnamon) into the open core of the appel. Drop in a small piece of butter (Totally optional) Wrap foil tight As you are finishing your meat off drop in the premade apples After your meal and a few brews, (the apples should be soft to the touch through the foil) open and serve.





 BurntEyes wrote:Easy dessert... Easy to pre prep Take an apple for every one you want Core out the apple and wash it well. Take aluminum foil and wrap around the bottom In the top of the apple poor in sugar/cinnamon mixed like cinnamon toast (2/3 sugar 1/2 cinnamon) into the open core of the appel. Drop in a small piece of butter (Totally optional) Wrap foil tight As you are finishing your meat off drop in the premade apples After your meal and a few brews, (the apples should be soft to the touch through the foil) open and serve.I've done this many times at home but for a tailgate. Try adding a little cardamon to the cinnamon mixture and/or using brown sugar.  Also, I like to serve with a little vanilla ice cream or even heavy cream.





OK, a long time ago I promised some Asian, so here is some Asian. This will be the first of a few posts on this topic, so bear with me as I concoct the recipes for you knuckleheads...





Here is a recipe for Asian marinated veggies: I like to marinate the veggies for at least four hours in the fridge, using a baggie. I make these on the grill, using a grill wok (mine is a Weber stainless model), but you can do this on a stove in a cast iron skillet (preferred over non-stick or stainless because of heat distribution and temperature maintenance). Veggies: 1.5 cups Broccoli crowns, cut into bite size pieces1 cup white mushrooms, whole, bite size1 cup Shredded Carrots1.5 cups dliced yellow onion1 cup shredded red cabbage Marinade: ½ Cup of canola oil1 tbl sesame oil½ Cup of low sodium soy sauce½ Cup of low sodium teriyaki sauce2 tbl rice vinegar1 tsp Saracha sauce1 tsp ground mustard1 tsp ground ginger1 tbl granulated garlic3 tbl diced green onions Put all the veggies in a baggie (or two) and pour in the marinade. Let them sit for as long as possible, up to overnight, but four hours minimum if possible. Empty the marinade in a bowl and save for basting and other uses (dipping, marinade for chicken, beef, shrimp, etc). Dump the veggies onto the heated wok (or cast iron skillet if you don’t have a wok, or grill for that matter) and stir-grill (or stir-fry) for about ten minutes. You don’t want these to soften – you want them really crisp. Baste along the way, if necessary and with about three minutes left add in some option sesame seeds if you like. Note that this is also good with chicken strips mixed in the baggies, but they have to be bite size so they cook quickly with the veggies. You can serve this over rice for a complete meal too. Enjoy.





Badger asked me to post a receipe for Migas.  Here you go buddy. Migas Migas is basically a Mexican version of scrambled eggs.  You don’t really need a measured recipe and I have never used one but just so you get the idea I’ll give you my best estimate on the amounts of ingredients.  This would make enough for about four people. 10 eggs1-1/2 Cups broken corn chips (Tostitos or equivalent, NOT Fritos)1 Cup grated cheese (I like Monterey Jack)½ Cup Milk¼ Cup chopped green chilies1 Large jalapeno chopped (fresh if possible, pickled will work)1 Tablespoon butter Break the eggs into a bowl and whisk with a fork until yolks and whites are mixed up.Add everything except the butter and chips and mix again.Melt the butter in a fry pan on medium heat.When the better is melted, add the chips to the egg mixture stir a little and throw it in the fry pan.Cook about 2-3 minutes stirring regularly. I like to have warm flour tortillas, chorizo, borracho beans and salsa but any normal breakfast fare will work.. At restaurants this dish is hardly ever made the same way twice.  Many times it will have tomatoes, onion or even avocado added or bacon, ham or sausage thrown in.  It’s not an omelet.  IMO if you add a lot of crap you are making an omelet.  Keep it simple.





Thanks pal. More Asian coming up later. And maybe some Tex Mex too.





Mex - Just to modify a bit, and makes it somewhat easier at a tailgate. Brown some Chorizo first in a skillet, add the mixture you mentioned above. This allows for basically one pot cooking and I personally love Chorizo in my Migas. A slight modification for one pan cooking. Toss Chorizo in the pan, brown, add in small cut potatoes and cook golden brown, then throw in the egg mix mentioned above, sans the Chips. This is not Migas, more like Breakfast Tacos. I like to serve them over Flower tortillas with fresh Cheddar.





I am missing a home game today. I figured since I had gone to Dallas, Columbia, and Stillwater, and my fiance was forgetting what I looked like that I should stay home today. I am making Migas for her.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:02:34 PM
  EastLansingAdam wrote:  BuckeyeCMO wrote: BUCKEYECMO's ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND PEPPERS2lbs hot Italian sausage2 large red peppers2 large yellow peppers1 large onion4 cloves garlic2 tablespoons tomato paste28oz can of chopped tomatoes1/2cup of marsala cooking wine1tsp. of oreganofresh basil1/2tsp. of red pepper flakessalt and pepper2 tablespoons of olive oilI cut up all of the vegetables the night before, so as to eliminate as much prep work as possible. This recipe really only is convenient if you have a large grill.I cook the sausage on the grill just like anything else, and then set it aside and cut it into bite size pieces. Take the peppers, onions and garlic which should already be cut from the night before and wrap it all in aluminum foil with the olive oil, salt and pepper. Cook the veggies on the grill until all are almost done.Add the sausage, the peppers/onions mixture and all of the remaining ingredients to a larger pot and let simmer on the grill until the sauce thickens and the flavors mix together. Serve either on hoagie buns or as a side...... These are on the docket for Saturday.  I am pretty excited. I think I'm going to break this out for Sunday dinner, though I might do the simmering on the stove, because my grill is a bit smaller than it should be.   I'm definitely looking forward to it





As for dinner tonight, we've got no work tomorrow, so I'm making barbeque bacon bleu cheeseburgers and sweet potato fries.   They're pretty easy- take the same 80/20 chuck that was talked about a couple posts up, add a tablespoon of bread crumbs for every pound to pound and a half of meat, add between 2 and 4 oz. of your favorite barbeque sauce per pound of meat, put it all in a big bowl and mix thoroughly by hand...then separate out into burger sized patties.   Grill the burgers, adding about a minute per side to what you normally like- this allows the sauce to mix with the meat, and also it takes a little longer because the sauce doesn't heat quite as quickly.   I like a nice applewood smoked bacon to go with this, again, cooked like you would do bacon.   Finally, get some crumbly bleu cheese, and crumble it some more, until it's more like a very coarsely grated cheese.  This will give you better coverage on the burger.   I go burger, cheese, bacon, but my brother goes burger, bacon, cheese and he likes it that way.   A note of caution- you probably won't need any ketchup/mustard/relish for this burger.  Some grilled onions are OK...I especially like some Vidalia onions if the sauce I'm using has lots of kick.





  BurntEyes wrote: I am missing a home game today. I figured since I had gone to Dallas, Columbia, and Stillwater, and my fiance was forgetting what I looked like that I should stay home today. I am making Migas for her.   Mmmm migas.  Had them for dinner last night at Trudy's.    





 utee94 wrote: BurntEyes wrote:I am missing a home game today. I figured since I had gone to Dallas, Columbia, and Stillwater, and my fiance was forgetting what I looked like that I should stay home today. I am making Migas for her. Mmmm migas.  Had them for dinner last night at Trudy's.  Would you mind mailing me a Mexican Martini next time ya hit Trudy's utee? Make it 2 please. Thanks.





For Bowl season, what's the popular vote?  Bring what represents your style tailgating or the "when in rome" mentality?  I've always been in more of a vacation mindset and been a fan of leaving the ol' reliables at home for the bowl and testing the waters of new goodness.  On that note, who knows where we'll end up this year, but it'll be fun conjuring up something good.





I've never really tailgated much for bowl games in traditional fashion. Too hard to lug all that stuff on a plane. What I've done is buy cheap grills and then left them with hotel staff who appreciate them. Tables can be borrowed from the hotel room sometimes. I've done this. At the Hawaii game a few years back we had alot of hotel furnature in the parking lot. I've always kept the food simple. Burgers, dogs. Stuff like that. Like I said, it's hard to do on the road without your normal vehicle and stuff.





Let's do a nice rub, which you can use for alot of things - including beef, poultry, pork, fish, etc.2 parts paprika2 parts sea salt1 part black pepper1 part dried thyme1 part dried oregano1 part cayenne pepper1 part onion powder1 part garlic powderThis will make you about a 1/2 cup of rub for grilling, broiling and even pan work. Keep in in a air tight container and use as you need it.





I used the above rub on grouper yesterday and it was fantastic.I took about a tablespoon of the rub and combined it with a tablespoon each of melted butter and olive oil.Start by preheating your grill to high heat. Brush one side of the grouper and put it down on the grill. Brush the other side of the grouper and let it sit until about half done and the flesh doesn't stick to the grates. Brush again, and flip the fish. Brush again and let it sit until almost cooked. Brush one more time, top with some fresh tarragon and cook one minute more.Remove from the grill and serve.





Anybody on here own a smoker?   I'm building my own this weekend- terra cotta pots lined with aluminum foil, a hot plate, and an old school pie pan to hold the woodchips- and was wondering if there were any suggestions as to what I should go with first....I'm thinking a good pork shoulder, turn it into pulled pork, definitely NC-style barbeque, though....I miss those delicious vinegar based sauces





I'd suggest starting with a brisket, or if you really crave pork, maybe ribs.Quality shoulder is a bit tough to acheive, especially on a smoker you've never used. If you go too long, you're toast. Brisket can be a bit more forgiving, and it's impossible to screw up ribs.Let me know how it works out. I give you alot of credit for creativity.





Saw this on TV. Made it. Love it.The Umami Burger8 oz really nice ground beef - steak if possibleParmesan cheese, gratedCarmelized onionsSauteed ******* mushroomsTomato sliceKetchup (homemade, or prepared)Nice burger bunPut the parmesan cheese and salted tomato on a sheet pan covered with parchmen paper. Arrange the parmesan so that when it melts, it forms a circle, as best as possible, or use a ring. Put in the oven at 400 and watch for melting and browning. The tomato(s) will be fine.Carmelize the onions in a sautee pan, adding the ******* mushrooms at about the last teb minutes or so. Dont forget the salt and pepper.Brush the burger bun outsides with just a little oil and put in the oven for the last minute or so of cooking the cheese and tomato.Cook the burger on cast iron or on the grill as you would normally do - season before with only salt and pepper.Put the ketchup on the bottom bun, and then the parmesan cheese round. Add the burger and the tomato, and top with the onion and ******* blend. Cover with the top bun and EAT.You might want to make two...





Bourbon ChickenJust as good as you get in the mall...if not better!2 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breats or thighs, cut into bite size pieces.  (I prefer the thighs).2 TBS. olive oil2 cloves garlic, crushed1/4 tsp. ginger3/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes1/4 cup apple juice1/3 cup light brown sugar1 TBS. cider vinegar1/2 cup water1/3 cup soy sauce2 TBS bourbon (or you can use whiskey or scotch, depending on what you like).Heat the oil in a skillet.Add the chicken pieces and cook until lightly browned.  Remove chicken.Add the remaining ingredients, heat over medium heat until well mixed and dissolved.Add the chicken back to the skillet and bring to a hard boil, then reduce heat and simmer about 20 minutes, until the sauce is thickened.Serve over hot rice.





 847badgerfan wrote: I'd suggest starting with a brisket, or if you really crave pork, maybe ribs.Quality shoulder is a bit tough to acheive, especially on a smoker you've never used. If you go too long, you're toast. Brisket can be a bit more forgiving, and it's impossible to screw up ribs.Let me know how it works out. I give you alot of credit for creativity. Brisket's a good idea....I've used a smoker fairly regularly in the past, but it will be the first run for this one.I've finally gotten all the pieces to build, so next week looks like the start time.  I'll keep you updated.





Making grilled salmon tonight. I'll report back on what I do and how it comes out.





Oops. Forgot to report on the salmon. Forgot what I made two months ago but I remember what I made on Sunday.I adapted a recipe from Bobby Flay. THIS is AWESOME.MEATTwo pounds of trimmed pork tenderloin (no fat)One can of roasted chipotles in adobo sauce2 TB canola or vegetable oil1 TB apple cider vinegarIn a blender or food processor, puree the chipotles and add the vegetable oil and vinagar while spinning. This will be your marinade.Fork the meat and put into a baggie, adding the marinade. Make sure the meat is covered and let this marinade for at least four hours but preferably overnight.DIPPING/DREDGING SAUCE (this is almost exactly as perscribed in the book)One (or Two if you like them) jalepenos, diced into 1/8 inch piecesOne medium onion, diced into 1/4 inch pieces1 TB canola or vegetable oilSalt and Pepper4 TB brown sugar2 cups chicken stock1 can frozen concentrated apple juiceSweat the jalepenos and onions in the olive oil on medium heat with some salt and pepper to taste. Do not brown these. Add the chicken stock, brown sugar and apple juice and bring to a boil. Let this slowly boil for about 45 minutes, reducing it to about 1.5 cups of liquid.Grill the pork on white coals (or hot gas), about six minutes per side for a total of about 12-14 minutes. It should be about medium - which is FINE in this day and age. Serve as slices on the plate, with sauce poured over the top.You will enjoy this. I guarantee it.





I have been invited by 847badgerfan to come and check out the boards here, just give me some time to catch up and make up some random delicious recipe for consuming during those tailgating and BBQ days.





I was invited too, so before y'all jump me for being a trolling newbie, I just want to say that I'm with badgerfan and hellbent.I like to grill meat and vegetables on my grill out back.  As much as I enjoy dining on the results of my grilling, I think I really just like to relaxation of hanging out in the backyard on a beautiful evening, drinking a beer and excluding myself from the the busy mayem that the rest of the family always has going on.





riding my coat tails............





It's like skiing.





I wasn't invited, but I'm close to being a member of the Big Ten Westand besides, Hooky has shunned me on the Big 12 board





FearlessF wrote: I wasn't invited, but I'm close to being a member of the Big Ten Westand besides, Hooky has shunned me on the Big 12 boardFearless, you are always welcome on the Big Ten Board whether or not Nebraska joins the Big Ten. This would allow you to throw some more of your terrific tailgates and for folks in the Great Heartland of America, too!!!





I appreciate that Gator.Hooky seems bitter about the Big 12 crumbling and wants to blame Nebraska fansI think he's just worried he's gonna miss me





FearlessF wrote: I appreciate that Gator.Hooky seems bitter about the Big 12 crumbling and wants to blame Nebraska fansI think he's just worried he's gonna miss meIt seems a lot of folks over on the Big XII Board are miffed that someone would dare want to leave the Conference. I don't know the full story of Nebraska's history with the Texas schools, but I glean that they would welcome the chance to mix and mingle with other schools in the Heartland. I just wish they would get this thing over with, the suspense is driving me crazy, and I don't really have to be driven quite that far either.





There are gonna be some hurt and bitter feelings for sure, but hurt and bitter is how the conference was formed.Things won't always be rosy in the Big Ten West division either, I'm sure





FearlessF wrote: There are gonna be some hurt and bitter feelings for sure, but hurt and bitter is how the conference was formed.Things won't always be rosy in the Big Ten West division either, I'm sureI just find it interesting that some (not all mind you) Husker fans who are sick of being bullied by Texas, don't seem to understand how little "say" they would have as fledgling members of a conference that already has TWO Texas-like superpowers in it.  If they can't handle the arrogance of Texas, then they're going to be miserable dealing with Michigan.





Badger assures me there are no bullies in the Big Ten





Ha!ole~





utee94 wrote:  If they can't handle the arrogance of Texas, then they're going to be miserable dealing with Michigan. Not if UM continues in their  present trend.But alas they're recruiting Ohio heavily again





Here is a really good blue cheese sauce I made the other day. I served this over finely sliced flank steak, by the way.2 TB Olive Oil1 Large Shallot, finely diced4 Cloves of Garlic, Pressed1/2 cup earthy mushrooms, finely chopped (I use reconstituted morels, but porcini, ******* or even portabellas would work OK)1/2 cup dry white wine (drink the rest!)1 cup light cream (try not to use heavy or half and half - too much fat)1 cup crumbled blue cheese Put the olive oil in a saucepan and heat to almost smoking. Add the shallots for about three minutes, then add the garlic and mushrooms and cook for another three minutes, being careful to not burn the garlic. Add the white wine to deglaze the saucepot and reduce the heat to medium-low. Add the juice from the reconstituted mushrooms (if you reconsituted - if not add about a half cup of beef or veg stock) and cook down for about 10 minutes. Add the light cream and the blue cheese and simmer until the cheese is fully melted. That's probably pretty close to what I did. You can add more or less of anything, but make sure it's all in there in some form. I like my sauce thick.





Very nice Badge, I love a good blue cheese sauce.  I'll try that recipe sometime soon.On a different note...does anyone have a good recipe for some smoked salmon?  I got a few ideas, but was wondering if anyone has done anything that came out really good.  I will be using Alder to smoke with, and have all day to do the cookin.  Any suggestions?





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:03:36 PM
Smoked salmon is really tough.I'd do a brine of sea salt, brown sugar and maybe some black pepper cloves.The proportions depend on how much fish you want to do, and the type of salmon it is.For smoking I'd go with applewood and hickory mixed about 50/50.





I smoked the salmon on Sunday, and it came out pretty good.I did a brine with kosher salt, but only had about 2 hours to let it soak.  It still did a nice job though. I made a wet rub using lime zest, lime juice, lemon juice, olive oil, crushed garlic, sea salt, black peppercorn, and thyme.  After the brining, I rinsed the salmon with cold water and patted it dry.  Then I coated with the rub and let it sit for a half hour while I got the smoker ready.I smoked the salmon skin side down, on foil, for 3 hours, keeping the temperature between 160 - 190 degrees.  I used Alder to smoke with.  About every hour I added another coat of the rub.  I had a pretty good size filet, big enough for 4 generous portions about 1 1/2 to 2 inches thick.  The flovor was very nice, and it was tender, not dried out at all.  I served it with homemade ceasar salad.  Overall pretty good dish





Interesting rub there. What were the proportions you used on the rub and brine?I try to brine for about 8 hours normally, and I remove all of the skin. The salmon I do are from The Lake (the ones I catch normally) so the flavor is a little different. I find that removing the skin gets rid of the "lakey" taste you might otherwise get from lake salmon.





The brine was 2 TBS kosher salt to 1 cup water.The rub was something like this (not exact , as I eyeballed it):zest and juice from 2-3 limes1-2 TBS fresh thyme1 tsp black pepper1 tsp sea salt1-2 TBS olive oilI juiced 1/2  of a lemon and added 1 clove crushed garlic becuase I had it left over from the ceasar salad and I figured it would add some flavor.I got the salmon from a store close to where I live.  I live in Florida, and to my knowledge there is no natural or man made places to fish salmon here, so I'm not sure where it came from, but I know it was fresh.  The skin didn't seem to have an affect on the flavor.





I made a nice steak on Sunday, of the Italian variety. For this, I used a 2 lb flank.Rub/Paste (approximate measurements - the truth is I don't measure):Extra virgin olive oil, about 4 TBEqual parts, about 1 TB, of oregano, basil and garlic powderEqual parts, about 1 tsp, of thyme and rosemaryA couple of dashes of crushed red pepper flakesLiberal amounts of course sea salt and fresh crushed black pepperFirst use a fork to poke alot of holes in the flank. Then evenly coat the flank with the paste, wrap in plastic (or baggie) and refridgerate overnight for best penetration.Preheat the grill to the highest possible setting. You want the thing to be super hot for this.Put the flank on for about 6 minutes and then flip. Let it go for another 6 minutes and remove from the grill and let it rest for about 10 minutes or so on a cutting board. Then slice it thinly on the bias and place the slices evenly arranged in a foil pan. When done, drizzle some marinara sauce over the slices and return to the grill for about two minutes in the pan to heat evenly.This turned out excellent, and I served it with italian-style fried potatoes and grilled asparagus.I make a marina sauce, but there are some good ones out there you can simply buy.





Felt like it was time to bring back posting in this thread.....  so, I've got a couple recipes I've tried since last season that I'm putting here.Western Omelette Burger - mix diced red&green peppers and onions into the patties, grill, put sharp cheddar, a fried egg, and salsa on topBarbecue Bacon Bleu-cheese Burger - mix the sauce in with the meat, until moist and darker, but not  dripping, grill, put some bleu cheese and bacon on the top, and use BBQ  sauce as a condiment. Note: the cheese makes a sweeter sauce the way to  go."Mr. Delicious" Turkey Sandwich - Fresh sliced turkey, bacon, havarti, and honey between two thick  slices of buttered sourdough, cooked on the griddle until the bread is  browned on top and bottom and the cheese has just melted a little bit.





OK, here's a pretty good one for a fall day at the tailgate (or Saturday evening at home with the windows open and football on the tube).Mushroom soup 16 oz regular button mushrooms, quartered8 oz baby bella mushrooms, quartered8 oz ******* mushrooms, chopped to bite size8 oz oyster mushrooms, chopped to bit size5 morel mushrooms5 porcini mushrooms8 cloves of garlic, crushed into a pasteSea salt and fresh pepper1 cup red wine (a nice Cab will work)8 cups beef stock2 cups heavy whipping creamCorn starch and melted butter for thickeningFresh Parsley (You can use reconstituted morels and porcini for this. A jar of dried mixed mushrooms is pretty cheap at Costco or Sam's. The more variety, the better.) Add 4 TB olive oil and ½ stick of butter to a stock pot. Add the mushrooms and a little bit of water if it looks to dry. Season with salt and pepper and stir to brown stage. Add the garlic and cook about four minutes being careful to not brown the garlic. (It will turn bitter if browned) Add the red wine and reduce by half. Add the beef stock and reduce by ¼. Add the cream and simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the thickener to reach desired thickness. Top with fresh parsley and serve immediately.





By the way, if anyone tries these things out, please report back on your thoughts. I'm always trying to hone and improve so input - good or bad - is welcome.





 UTerin03 wrote: I don't think this has been posted, but it's one of my favorite things to make for game-watching parties and tailgates because you can make it well in advance and it is really easy to make.  It's a chunky dip that can be served with tortilla chips, fritos, or crackers.  Texas Caviar - just mix all the ingredients below in a large bowl and put in the fridge for at least 2 hours (overnight is fine):1/2 onion, diced1 green bell pepper, chopped1 bunch green onions, chopped2 jalapeno pepers, chopped or diced1 tablespoon minced garlic1 pint cherry tomatoes, quartered1 (8 oz) bottle of Zesty Italian dressing1 (15 oz) can black beans, drained1 (15 oz) can black-eyed peas, drained1/2 teaspoon coriander1 bunch chopped cilantro I made this last year and loved it.  Making it for a tailgate this weekend, although with some unfortunate modifications due to the low heat tolerance of my family who are cautious of anything I make for them at this point.





No worries ELA let the mayo & shrimp sit out all afternoon





EastLansingAdam wrote: UTerin03 wrote: I don't think this has been posted, but it's one of my favorite things to make for game-watching parties and tailgates because you can make it well in advance and it is really easy to make.  It's a chunky dip that can be served with tortilla chips, fritos, or crackers.  Texas Caviar - just mix all the ingredients below in a large bowl and put in the fridge for at least 2 hours (overnight is fine):1/2 onion, diced1 green bell pepper, chopped1 bunch green onions, chopped2 jalapeno pepers, chopped or diced1 tablespoon minced garlic1 pint cherry tomatoes, quartered1 (8 oz) bottle of Zesty Italian dressing1 (15 oz) can black beans, drained1 (15 oz) can black-eyed peas, drained1/2 teaspoon coriander1 bunch chopped cilantroI made this last year and loved it.  Making it for a tailgate this weekend, although with some unfortunate modifications due to the low heat tolerance of my family who are cautious of anything I make for them at this point.Awesome!  At the tailgate in Madison this past weekend, one of the tables had a "Build Your Mashed Potatoes" set up, with a crock pot full of mash pots, and stuff on the side to toss on top  (Bacon bits, sour cream, butter, cheese, etc).  I thought that was a great idea, and really yummy!!





I am not sure I posted my portabellas here yet. If this is a repeat I apologize. You can pre-prep these and put them in some aluminum foil for transit.Portabella De-StemmedPut about a tea spoon of Olive oil1-2 cloves of crushed garlic per PortabellaFresh Grated ParmesanGreen Olive Topenade (Trade Joes offers a pretty good premade one, or make your own if you feel ambitous)Simply poor the olive oil into the upturned Portabella, spread on the Topenade and Crushed garlic cloves, and top off with the Parm. Let them cook for around 20-25 minutes on a hot grill. The best way to tell they are done is the Parm will be completely melted. Each portabella will feed 1-2 folk. This can work as a nice "Meat" Substitute if you should happen to have an idigit Vegetarian at your tailgate.





French Onion Soup2 1/2 lbs yellow onion3 tbs butter1 tbs canola oillittle bit of sugar, salt and pepper2 cups light red wine8 cups beef stockbay leaf6 slices of course bread3 cups gruyere cheeseMelt the butter in a pot and add sliced onions, sugar, salt and pepper over mid-low heat til carmelized.Add the wine and incread heat to mid-high til half the wine is cooked offAdd the bay leaf and beef stock, lower heat and simmer for 35-45 minutesToast the bread in the over for 8-10 minutes and 400 degrees, turning halfway throughAdd the soup to bowls, removing the bay leaf.Put one piece of the bread in each bowl and cover with about a half cup of the cheeseBake for about 12 minutes, but keep an eye on it, you want the cheese fully melted but not burned and the toast becomes lightly browned, again not burned.





Great recipes!





Looks good Adam. Let me know how it turns out with the red wine. I always use Cognac. I also put garlic in with the onions in step one.My guests loved it last night. What a coincidence you went to a farmer's market like me yesterday, 1000 miles apart!





A friend of mine just won a Bake Off Contest with Guinness Chocolate Cupcakes.  I had one, it was delicious.  I think it would be a great idea for tailgates, if anybody likes to do some baking.  Here is the recipe she used:Guinness Chocolate Cupcakes 1 1/2 cups Guinness12 oz melted butter1 cup + 2 tablespoons cocoa, sifted3 cups flour3 cups sugar3/4 tablespoon baking soda1 1/8 tsp salt3 eggs1 cup sour cream3/4 teaspoon cinnamon1. Preheat the oven to 360 degrees.2. Gently heat the Guinness and butter together in a pot over medium heat until the butter is melted. Don't let it boil. Cool for 20 minutes.3. Combine dry ingredients.4. Combine all wet ingredients in a separate bowl.5. Combine the wet and dry ingredients. Gently stir until just combined. Do not overmix.6. Scoop into cupcake pans lined with paper liners. (Fill the cups 2/3 full, no more.)7. Bake until cupcakes spring back when lightly pressed, about 20 minutes. Cinnamon Frosting 1package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened1/4cup butter or margarine, softened2to 3 teaspoons milk1teaspoon vanilla1/2teaspoon ground cinnamon4cups powdered sugarIn medium bowl, beat cream cheese, butter, milk, vanilla and cinnamon with electric mixer on low speed until smooth. Gradually beat in powdered sugar, 1 cup at a time, until smooth and spreadable.





UTerin03 wrote:A friend of mine just won a Bake Off Contest with Guinness Chocolate Cupcakes.  I had one, it was delicious.  I think it would be a great idea for tailgates, if anybody likes to do some baking.  Here is the recipe she used:Guinness Chocolate Cupcakes 1 1/2 cups Guinness12 oz melted butter1 cup + 2 tablespoons cocoa, sifted3 cups flour3 cups sugar3/4 tablespoon baking soda1 1/8 tsp salt3 eggs1 cup sour cream3/4 teaspoon cinnamon1. Preheat the oven to 360 degrees.2. Gently heat the Guinness and butter together in a pot over medium heat until the butter is melted. Don't let it boil. Cool for 20 minutes.3. Combine dry ingredients.4. Combine all wet ingredients in a separate bowl.5. Combine the wet and dry ingredients. Gently stir until just combined. Do not overmix.6. Scoop into cupcake pans lined with paper liners. (Fill the cups 2/3 full, no more.)7. Bake until cupcakes spring back when lightly pressed, about 20 minutes. Cinnamon Frosting 1package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened1/4cup butter or margarine, softened2to 3 teaspoons milk1teaspoon vanilla1/2teaspoon ground cinnamon4cups powdered sugarIn medium bowl, beat cream cheese, butter, milk, vanilla and cinnamon with electric mixer on low speed until smooth. Gradually beat in powdered sugar, 1 cup at a time, until smooth and spreadable.Sounds tasty and I am not even a big sweets person.847 - Pass this on to the tower, see if we can get some of these prepped up for our road trip.





She's not allowed in my kitchen. I keep her near the sewing machines.





847badgerfan wrote: She's not allowed in my kitchen. I keep her near the sewing machines.I am going to cut and paste this and email her right now.





Go for it. Been married >10 years = doesn't matter





847badgerfan wrote: Go for it. Been married >10 years = doesn't matter





Now quit dicking around and post that stir-fry recipe dammit.Please?





847badgerfan wrote: Now quit dicking around and post that stir-fry recipe dammit.Please?If you had the eggs to make your own plans, I would make it for you. Tips from Skirt (or you can just slice up some skirt) - feel free to marinade in some TeriyakiI cheated because I was lazy and used frozen Oriental mix (I believe it was jewel) If you want to buy freshBroccoliRed PepperSnow PeasBamboo ShootCarrotsWater ChestnutI browned the on a low medium heat with Cumin, Senise, Ground Red Chili Paste, Teriyaki, Soy, Crushed Garlic (a lot)  and some red chili powder. Turn the heat high and throw in the veggiesToss veggies with some Sesame Oil, more Ground Red Chili Paste,Siranche (sp?!?) and Grade A real maple syrup (don't use corn syrup crap) and cook for about 5 min or until the Veggies just start to turn.If you want amounts, you know I don't measure a thing.





Some eggs would be good in there.And I originally comitted to going to this stupid freaking costume party so now I freakin' have to. It was a moment of weakness. I was comprimised and in a good mood, both of which are rare.So I'm going to this freakin' costume party.AS A CHEF.





847badgerfan wrote: Some eggs would be good in there.And I originally comitted to going to this stupid freaking costume party so now I freakin' have to. It was a moment of weakness. I was comprimised and in a good mood, both of which are rare.So I'm going to this freakin' costume party.AS A CHEF.You know, you don't have to put eggs in everything asian.





But it sure helpsI'm intregued by the maple syrup.





Same general effect as brown sugar, with a refined flavor. they accomplish the same thing texturally, but the flavor of the syrup is much more intense.





BurntEyes wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: Some eggs would be good in there.And I originally comitted to going to this stupid freaking costume party so now I freakin' have to. It was a moment of weakness. I was comprimised and in a good mood, both of which are rare.So I'm going to this freakin' costume party.AS A CHEF.You know, you don't have to put eggs in everything asian.I know that you silly Texican. You've seen me make Asian.I only brought up eggs because you did.





This is a Carolina BBQ sauce - directly from Bobby Flay's site on the Food Network.Carolina Style BBQ Sauce:1/4 cup canola oil 2 medium Spanish onions, coarsely chopped 6 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped 2 cups ketchup 2/3 cup water 1/4 cup ancho chili powder 2 tablespoons paprika 2/3 cup Dijon mustard 2/3 cup cider vinegar 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 2 canned chipotle chiles in adobo, chopped 1/4 cup dark brown sugar 2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoons molasses Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper DirectionsHeat the oil over medium-high heat in a heavy-bottomed medium saucepan. Add the onions and cook until soft, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Stir in the ketchup and water, bring to a boil and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the remaining ingredients and simmer until thickened, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes. Cool for about 5 minutes.Carefully transfer the mixture to a food processor and puree until smooth. Season with salt and pepper, to taste, then pour into a bowl and allow to cool at room temperature. Sauce will keep for 1 week in the refrigerator, stored in a tightly sealed container.NOTE FROM ME: If you don't want to puree, the sauce is good chunky as well. If you want to and don't have a food processor, use a blender. That works well too.





I made Kung pao chicken and curry the other night.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:04:59 PM
And?Tell us how please.





Caesar Salad DressingThis is a really good one guys. I had help with this one, from a friend of mine who frequented a now-closed steakhouse in Wheaton, Illinois. And who makes a better Caesar salad than a good, old-fashioned steakhouse? I wouldn't know. Try this one out, and serve it over crispy romainne lettuce topped with nice rustic croutons and shredded parmesan cheese. You can also add a little sliced hard boiled egg and sliced anchovies if you dare.THE DRESSING1- 3 oz jar of anchovies3 garlic cloves, peeled, and more if you like up to 5 total1/2 cup of nice extra virgin olive oil1 tsp Grey Poupon (or other fine mustard)1 dash of red wine vinagarfresh cracked pepper1 TB  worchershire sauce1 raw eggAdd the anchovies and garlic to a food processor and pulse to a paste. Add the remaining ingredients to combine and buzz until liquid.That's IT! And it will keep for about a week in the fridge too. Good eats.





Jamaican Jerk Chicken Pasta Toss-1 Red onion chopped-1 Green pepper chopped-tbsp cayenne pepper-2 tbsp ginger-2 tbsp jerk seasoning-1/2 tbsp cinnamon-1/2 tbsp all spice-1/2 tbsp nutmeg-1 1/2 cups olive oil-1/2 cup white vinegar-1/2 cup soy sauce1.) Combine all the ingrediants into a marinade a 1 gallon bag2.) Take 2 pounds of chicken, cut into 1 inch bites3.) Put the chicken in the marinade and put in the fridge overnight4.) The next day take out the chicken and grill in a skillet til cooked through, reserving the marinade5.) Put the marinade in a pot and bring to a boil, then reduce to simmer for 10-15 minues.  With a couple minutes left, add a tbsp of flour to thicken6.) Either prepare veggies of your choice, or as I do use a steam fresh bag of Birds Eye Baby Potato Blend7.) Cook as much thin spaghetti as you desire.8.) Put the chicken, pasta and veggies in a large serving bowl.9.) Using a slotted serving spoon, spoon the marinade over the mixture, letting some of the fluid drain back into the pot10.) Toss, and serve





Is that ground ginger? Also, what spices are in a jerk spice mix?





847badgerfan wrote: Is that ground ginger? Also, what spices are in a jerk spice mix?Dry gingerThyme, crushed red pepper and all spice are the main 3 spices





Gyros:One medium onion6 cloves of garlic2 tb olive oil1 tb ground marjorim2 tsp dried rosemary1 tsp sea salt1 tsp fresh ground black pepper2 lb ground lambThe ground lamb is key. If your grocer doesn't have it, find lamp shank and have it ground. Beef is NOT a substitute for this at all. It doesn't work right.Puree the onion in a food processor and dry it on paper towels. You don't want the moisture so you can even squeeze it out to make it more dry. Mash the garlic with some of the sea salt to make a paste.Add the ground lamb and the rest of the ingredients to the food processor and pulse until you have a paste-like mixture. You want the lamp really finely ground for texture purposes. Do it in batches if your processor is too small, and adjust the mixture as you go if it balls up while you are processing.I used a foil meatloaf pan for this and submerged it in a water bath in a larger foil pan, because I don't have a rotisserie. It worked pretty well. I put it in the oven at 400 for about 45 minutes.After taking it out I let it rest for a bit and then sliced it reallt thin. I then put it on a baking sheet and returned it to the oven to brown it a bit.Serve this with pita, sliced red onion, sliced tomato and some tzatziki sauce. Make sure to put a little oil on the pita and warm it before serving. I serve it in little finger sammitches. Feta cheese is optional too, along with kalamata olives on the side.I have a recipe for the tzatziki sauce if anyone is interested. It's pretty simple too.





Mmm sounds like something I need to try.  Also I'd love the tzatziki recipe.





As crazy as this might sound, I had the best gyro I've ever had at an Italian place in the middle of nowhere in Pennsylvania.Before you question that, know that I spent a week in Greece, and probably ate about 10-15 of them all over the country.





I completely forgot about the Tzatziki sauce guys. sorry about that.I use 1.5 cup of Greek yogurt. You need to put it in a strainer and let it drip in a bowl for a few hours in the fridge. It's too watery otherwise.Grate one small cucumber and strain that as well. You don't want it wet.Make three cloves of garlic into a paste using your knife and some course sea salt.Mince fresh dill, enough for about a tablespoon.Mince fresh mint, enough for about a teaspoon.Combine all ingredients and let set up in the fridge for about two hours or overnight to let the flavors meld.Serve with the Gyros on a warm pita. Garnish Gyros with red onion, tomato, feta cheese and kalamata olives.





OK, so I've got a request for Pho.Pho is a Vietnamese noodle soup by definition. This one is a chicken broth variety, that I learned in California. It takes time, but it's worth it.2 medium onions2 pieces of fresh ginger, about the size of your pointer finger2 TB coriender seeds8 anise stars4 cloves of garlicThe bones, gizzards and other parts of 2 chickens, as available.One whole roasting chicken, cut up into piecesCut the onions into quarters, cut the ginger into small pieces the size of a quarter and rough chop the garlic. You don't have to peel any of this. Put it all on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for about a half hour at 400 degrees.Toast the anise stars and coriender seeds in a pan until you can start to smell them. They are now ready.Put the chicken bones into a stock put and then the chicken. Add the roasted veggies and the toasted spices. For the spices, put them in cheese cloth or a spice ball so it makes straining easier later. Add enough water to cover the chicken by about two inches.Bring to a boil and then simmer for about 4 hours, skimming the fat from the top occasionally. Do not boil - you want a clear broth and simmering will accomplish that.After 4 hours, remove the chicken and reserve. Discard the bones, spices and veggies.Return the strained broth to the stockpot and reduce by 1/3.The broth is now ready.Cook rice noodles to done and transfer the servings to bowls. Add enough broth to the bowls to cover the noodles.Add very thinly sliced raw flank steak to the bowls - make sure to slice on the bias and against the grain or you will not be able to chew it. The broth will cook the steak.Add soy sauce and Asian hot sauce(s) to taste. I like asian hot pepper paste and sriracha with mine.Garnish with fresh cilantro, sprouts, lime slices and jalepeno slices. Add as much to the soup as you like.Like I said, it's a lot of work. It's well worth it if executed properly.





I should note for this that if you wish, you can use the cooked chicken in place of beef for the pho. I like the beef but the chicken is good too.





yer the MAN





Sweet, thanks for posting this bf!





Here's a recipe for butternut squash soup.4 seeded ends of butternut squash (save the non-seeded parts for another use)4 shallots12 cloves of garlic4 TB Balsamic vinegar4 TB Canola or Veg oil3 medium carrots1 medium onion3 stalks of celery2 cups of chicken broth2 cups of whole milkHeavy CreamCanola oil for cookingSalt and fresh black pepperCut the squash at the start of the seed pouch and use a spoon to remove all the seeds and fibers from the pouch, being careful to not penetrate through the bottom of the squash. You should now have a squash bowl. Quarter the shallots. Add one of the quartered shallots, 3 garlic cloves and 1 TB of the balsamic to each "bowl" of squash, on a baking sheet covered with parchmen paper. Add 1 TB olive oil to each bowl, a little on the outside and a little on the inside to coat lightly. Season with salt and pepper and place the baking sheet in a 425 degree oven for about 1 hour until fork tender. Remove and reserve the shallots, garlic and liquids if necessary after cooling and then remove the skin from the squash. Save all of the components.In the meantime, dice the carrots, onion and celery and sautee them in a dutch oven or stockpot with some oil until almost calmelized. Be sure to season along the way with salt and pepper. Once they are almost carmelized, add the chicken stock to deglaze. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Add the milk and return to an almost boil to scald the milk.Transfer the mixture and the cooked squash and shallots, etc. to a blender, in batches if necessary to avoid an accident, and puree until smooth. Return the puree to the dutch oven and heat until warm enough to serve.Put the finished soup into serving bowls and add a dolup of heavy cream to the top and garnish with fresh parsley or basil. Serve with a garlic toast or croutons.Note - you may adjust for consistency and thickness at the end by either adding more stock to thin the puree or adding a roux to thicken it.





Fish related question.  Is there a rule for what technically qualifies as blackened?





EastLansingAdam wrote: Fish related question.  Is there a rule for what technically qualifies as blackened?Blackening, to me, involves the spices. That's what gets blackened - not the fish itself.I like to use paprika, cayenne, chili powders and peppers for the blackening agents. The mode of heat can vary, but I find cast iron skillets to be your best friend when you are blackening a fish.There is nothing like a good blackened, spicy fish served with a cooling tartar sauce in my opinion.Funny you posted this. I'm going to test a new tuna recipe I came up with tonight. If it turns out good, I'll post it here tomorrow or after dinner tonight.





OK, that's what I thought, but I wasn't sure if blackeneing involved a specific mixture of spices, I see not.





Not to me. I do it to taste.I also like to add dried thyme and oregano to my blackening. I do it all to taste, but I keep track of how much, in case I find something I really like. When I do, I make a big batch and store it in jars for the next time.





OK, so the tuna came out fantastic. I will post the recipe tomorrow. I'm under the Scotch thing now.





This is a recipe for Ahi tuna salad. Serves 2.Fresh field greens or micro-greensToasted sesame seeds to garnishFor the tuna:2 6 oz Ahi tuna steaksToasted sesame oil to lightly coat the tunaWhite pepper, cayenne pepper, sea salt and fresh black pepper to taste, rubbed on tunaSet the tuna steaks on a hot grill and cook 1-2 minutes on each side. Remove from the grill and allow to cool to room temperature before slicing.For the veggies:1 lb of fresh sh1take mushrooms1 large carrot, cut into matchsticks1/2 red onion, diced4 baby yukon gold potatoes, pre-backed and quartered3 cloves fresh garlic, mincedFresh chopped cilantro to taste, plus more to garnish laterThe greens of 2 scallions, chopped finely1 tsp toasted sesame oil2 TB canola or grapeseed oil2 TB lime juicePut the oil in a foil pan and heat on the grill. Add the mushrooms, carrots, potatoes and onions and sweat to almost brown. Add the garlic and sweat some more, about 2 minutes. Add the cilantro and scallions and cook for about a minute more. Add the lime juice and remove from the heat and keep warm.For the dressing:1/2 cup orange juice (fresh if possible)1/4 cup soy sauce (low sodium)1 tsp wasabe mustard1 tsp siracha sauce1 tsp rice vinegar1 TB honey1 tsp toasted sesame oilCombine all the ingredients and stir aggressively to combine.For serving:Cover you serving plate with fresh field greens or micro-greens. Add half of the warm veggies to each plate. Slice the tuna very thin and add half of it to each plate. Add half of the dressing, or to taste, to each plate. Garnish with toasted sesame seeds and more of the chopped cilantro and serve immediately.





 847badgerfan wrote: OK, so the tuna came out fantastic. I will post the recipe tomorrow. I'm under the Scotch thing now. I need some scotch





I busted out the new meat grinder today, and made use of scraps I've been saving to make ground burger meat.Pure awesomeness. I can't wait to eat the burgers tonight.





Someday, off line, I will tell you my grandmothers gravy recipe. It starts with grinding some veal.





Milanese?Do tell.I LOVE Milanese preparation and technique. I think there's a lot of French influence there. Would you concur?





I just returned from a weekend of fishing down in the Gulf. Went down friday morning via Air Tran and returned late last night. We caught lots of red snapper, grouper and at long last 4 amberjack. One of the guys wives fixed the amberjack in an array of spices to include, oregano, allspice, pepper, garlic, italian seasoning, lime juice, cream of tartar, chili pepper, and lord knows what else. She had already begun the preparation when I looked on. She cooked the fish in an open barbeque pit along with corn on the cob, hushpuppies, home made potato salad and San Francisco sourdough bread bought from a nearby bakery. I managed to find some Russian (Georgian actually) lavash flat bread and we buttered it all up. The four of us caught a total of 328 pounds of fish. We were using shad as bait along with shrimp and cut up octopus. The largest fish caught was a grouper weighing in at 51 pounds. The amberjack averaged about 11 pounds each. One of the guys I fish with knew someone over at the University of South Florida who tested one of the fish for oil residue. None was found so we consumed it feeling safe. 





Gator is still living the dream!





FearlessF wrote: Gator is still living the dream!Quite true, but I wish I was able to travel more to football games than fishing with old codgers like myself.  My next trip is later this year where I will be going on a cruise through the Panama Canal visiting Panama and the neighborhood around it.





Bring back some recipes!





Anyone make a Teriyaki Chicken burger they like?  I've had several eatign out that I enjoy, but I tried this one, and for some reason it tasted sort of bland.  I have one I like made with chicken breast, but wondering about one with ground chicken.1.25 lbs ground chicken1.75 cups water1 cup soy sauce1 cup brown sugardash of onion and garlic powderGarnish as desired, but pineapple slices are a must IMO.





What's all the water for?





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:06:42 PM
847badgerfan wrote: What's all the water for?Sorry, I wrote down my ingredients from my chicken breast recipe.  I use all that for the marinade.My one for ground chicken is...1 lb ground chicken1/2 cup bread crumbs1 egg1 onion2 tbs teriyaki sauce2 tsp garlicsage, thyme and pepperI've thought about putting peppers in it to kick it up, but i don't know about how well it will hold together with that.





I see.OK, but you reallt don't need that much, even for a marinade.Try this one out. It's more of a paste than a marinade but you still acheive the same result for chicken.One LB of trimmed chicken breasts, pounded to a 1/4 inch thick.1/2 cup low sodium soy sauce (I use Kikkoman)1 TB Hoisin sauce1 TB Sirarcha sauce1 TB garlic paste1 TB ginger pasteFresh minced cilantroCombine all the ingredients except the chicken and whisk together to make a uniform paste. Rub the paste all over the chicken and put in a baggie overnight (or as long as possible) in the fridge.Scrape off some of the paste and go to the grill, about 3 minutes per side. Move to indirect heat for about another 3 minutes and serve.I like to garnish with shitake mushrooms sauteed in wok oil with minced garlic and finished with a little fresh cilantro and (believe it or not) parmesan cheese.I imagine pineapple would work for this too, but I think you'd be best served to grill it.





Today we're going to make a simple grilled shrimp and a sauce to go over the top.Peel the shrimp and remove the vein, of course. Place the peels in a sauce pot and cover with water. Add salt and pepper. Bring it to a boil and then simmer gently for about an hour and then strain and reserve. This is your shrimp stock. You should have about a cup, from 2 cups of water.Dry the shrimp very well, with paper towels, wrap in paper towel and refridgerate.In the mean time, sautee fresh minced garlic and shallots in a pan with a TB butter and a TB canola oil. When almost brown, add 2 TB corn starch and cook down to make a reux. Add the shrimp stock, stir and turn to low heat, reducing until consistency is rather thick.Spray the shrimp with non-stick spray (I use canola with a pump sprayer) and season with salt and pepper. Place on the grill on high heat and cook for a couple minutes per side.(Cooking the shrimp can be done in a cast iron skillet or stove top grill)Serve the shrimp on a plate and top with the sauce and fresh chopped parsley.





I made some turkey (gasp) burgers the other night and they actually came out pretty good so I'm going to share.1 LB Ground Turkey2 tsp garlic powder2 tsp Cavandar's Greek seasoning (contains salt)1 tsp onion powder2 tsp dried parsley2 tsp sodium-free beef base1 egg1 TB canola oil (I actually used grapeseed oil)Juice of 1/2 lemonFresh black pepperBreadcrumbs (if necessary)Combine the egg and the rest of the wet ingredients in a bowl, and then add the dry spices and beef base. Make a homogeneous mixture out of it and then add the turkey. If the mix feels too moist to form patties, add some breadcrumbs to firm it up.This should make 2 8 oz or 3 5+ oz patties.Spray the patties with non-stick spray and place them on the grill with high heat. Cook for about 3-4 minutes per side and move to indirect heat to cook through.Serve topped with melted goat cheese and more lemon juice.





sorry, not gonna try them tonight





not a recipe, but the “Official Hot Dog of Husker Nation.”





So my girlfriend just got a job managing a garden/organic living boutique.  As a result, I've ended up owning a lot of basil plants.  It being grilling season, what are your fellas' best grilling recipes involving basil.  Disclaimer:  I have a rather diminutive charcoal grill.TIA





Grilled shrimp with a marinade of tomato sauce, olive oil, red wine viegar, basil, garlic and cayenne pepper is good and easy.





Get some skin-on chicken breasts or thighs and rub garlic paste, salt and pepper under the skin. Then put whole leaves under the skin as well.Put them on the grill and it's go time.





Ingredients1/2 cup sour cream 1/2 cup mayonnaise3 tablespoons of mustard6 tablespoons dill pickle relish6 heaping tablespoons of horse radish sauce2 chipotle peppers with some additional adobo sauce1 tablespoon of hot sauce ( I use a hot sauce based on Jolokia Bhut peppers)1/4 teaspoon of Cayenne Pepper powder1/2 large white sweet onion, chopped into pea-size chunks1 small red bell pepper, chopped into pea-size chunks2 stalk celery, chopped into pea-size chunks1/2 teaspoon table salt5 pounds waxy potatoes (Yukon are a great choice)3 eggSalt & pepper to tasteThis makes a LOT of potato salad but its so good after a couple of days that IMO its worth taking up the extra space in the fridge.I find its best to mix all of the ingredients for making the dressing in a food processor.  Mix the Mayo, sour cream, mustard, cayenne pepper powder, chipotle pepper, hot sauce in your food processor and puree the mixture. Combine the potatoes, relish, celery, onion and bell peppers.  Fold in the dressing until well mixed.  Ideally you want to serve this cold.  It is outstanding after a couple of days of marinating.I do tend to eyeball things so you may have to experiment a bit but this should be fairly close.  Even though this may sound really hot, its not.  It has a nice kick and the hot is mostly in the back of your mouth and throat.... but its really, pretty good... hope you guys enjoy.





Happy 4th of July weekend!Already got the 4 day plan laid out...KabobsRibsBurgersYellowfin Tuna





How'd it go ELA?





We forgot we had tickets to a stand up show, so the tuna got pushed back (making it tomorrow).  Kabobs and ribs turned out well, burgers were moved inside due to rain.This will be my first attempt at tuna, I'm making a teriyaki recipe.  Any tips on grilling tuna?





My general rule with tuna is high heat and short duration. I also subscribe to the cast iron skillet for cooking tuna...





If you have a coal chimney, I saw an Episode of Good Eats where he cooked tuna right over the chimney.  I haven't tried it, but it looked neat.





847badgerfan wrote: My general rule with tuna is high heat and short duration. I also subscribe to the cast iron skillet for cooking tuna...I did tin foil on the grill.  High heat, 3 minues per side.Used a marinade of soy sauce, wine vinegar, red wine, garlic, ginger and pepper.Served it with sugar snap peas and brown rice.  Was fantastic.





Sounds pretty good, but a little long on the cooking for my liking. I'm going to experiment with the foil method.My favorite:I coat the fish with black and white sesame seeds and cook it with a mixture of a little canola and a little sesame oil on the skillet. I cook it about 1 minute per side so when I slice it, only the first 1/8" or so is cooked but it's heated through.I serve it with wasabe mustard, soy sauce and pickled ginger slices. To die for is a good way of putting it.





847badgerfan wrote: Sounds pretty good, but a little long on the cooking for my liking. I'm going to experiment with the foil method.My favorite:I coat the fish with black and white sesame seeds and cook it with a mixture of a little canola and a little sesame oil on the skillet. I cook it about 1 minute per side so when I slice it, only the first 1/8" or so is cooked but it's heated through.I serve it with wasabe mustard, soy sauce and pickled ginger slices. To die for is a good way of putting it.That would be fantastic, I've had it that way at Japanese restaurants, delicious!





847badgerfan wrote: My general rule with tuna is high heat and short duration. I also subscribe to the cast iron skillet for cooking tuna...http://www.amazon.com/FIRE-FLA...s/dp/B001E95KMY





Funny you post that. I hate using those things and one I had laying around just found the garbage can.





Okay badgerfan, here we go-- you ready? I just made some enchilada gravy yesterday, in preparation for my family's enchilada-off this afternoon, and here's the recipe I used.  I vary it all the time, but this is what I did yesterday, and it's pretty darn good.Ingredients:6-8 dried cascabel chile peppers4-5 dried ancho chile peppers3-4 dried chile de arbol2 roma tomatoes, rough chopped1/2 small onion, rough chopped2-4 cloves garlic roughly chopped1 tsp Mexican oregano1/2 tsp comino (ground)4 cups water2 cups low-sodium chicken stock2-3 tbsp cooking oil (I used corn 'cause it was first on the shelf)Salt to taste1. Stem and seed the dried chiles (might want to wear rubber gloves for this), rip or cut them open, and place them on a cookie sheet and put in the oven at 400 and toast them for 2-4 minutes, until fragrant.2. In a fairly large pot, bring to boil 4 cups of water + 2 cups of chicken stock.  When boiling, add in the toasted peppers, onion, garlic, and tomatoes.  Add the Mexican oregano and comino, and then lower the heat and simmer for around 15 minutes, the onion should get translucent or very close to it3. Pour all of the above into a blender and blend for 2 minutes.  It might take a couple of batches.  4. Put the cooking oil in the bottom of the pot and heat on medium-low.  Return the blended mixture to the pot, but through a strainer, pushing the mixture through with the back of a spoon.  The strainer will remove the waxy bits of leftover chile skin and make a much smoother, silkier gravy.5. Bring to boiling and then reduce heat and simmer for around another 15 minutes or so to let the flavors come together, add the salt to taste at this point.  This will also reduce the mixture somewhat, to the consistency of a thin gravy.  You don't want it to be too thick or too thin, the way I usually test is to see if it will coat a tortilla chip and stick but not pile up on it.  That's also a tasty way to check the flavor. The flavor of the gravy should still be fairly subtle, the idea is that it will add to the overall flavor of the dish, not overpower it.  If you want it hotter, you can add in more chile de arbol or use a few dried red New Mexican chile peppers to replace some of the above, or in addition to them.If you're going to assemble the enchiladas later, wait for it to cool and store in something airtight in the refrigerator, it will keep for a couple of days.  And like chili, it tends to get tastier if you let it set up overnight. If you plan to assemble the enchiladas immediately, just transfer the gravy into a wide skillet or pan (you could just make the whole thing in a deep skillet if you've got one that's big enough and then you wouldn't need to transfer).To make the enchiladas:Ingredients:16-24 ozs grated cheese.  For Tex-Mex, this tends to be a blend of orange cheddar, and white Mexican cheeses like Monterrey jack, asadero, and whatever else you can get your hands on. 1/4 - 1/2 onion, diced12-20 corn tortillasA couple cups of cooking oil (depends on the size of your frying pan)Filling (I'm making BBQ brisket enchiladas this time but my usual filling is taco meat, or just cheese)TWO different pairs of tongs1) Spray a large casserole dish with non-stick spray.  Then spread a VERY thin layer of the gravy across the bottom.2) Fill a second skillet or wide pan with cooking oil, and heat it hot enough to fry a tortilla.  Create your assembly line from one side to the other starting with tortillas, skillet with hot cooking oil, skillet with gravy, and then cheese, fillings, and the casserole dish.3) Grab a tortilla with one set of tongs, and slide it into the oil.  Let it fry VERY lightly on one side, flip it over, and let it fry very lightly on the other.  You are not trying to fry it hard or crispy, it should be just a little bit firmer and offer a little more "bite" than before.4) With the "grease" tongs, pick the tortilla out of the oil and slide them into the gravy.  DO NOT let any of the gravy get on your grease tongs.5) With your "gravy" tongs, flip the tortilla to coat on both sides with gravy, then move over into the casserole dish.  If you get any of the gravy into the hot cooking oil, it will splatter.  A lot.6) Fill the tortilla with a bit of cheese and a bit of filling, and some of the onion if you like, whatever looks right to you, then roll the tortilla so that it stays closed and move to the edge of the pan.7) Repeat the above steps until your pan is full of rolled up tortillas.8) Spread another layer of gravy over the top of all of the rolled tortillas, then coat the top LIBERALLY with cheese.  Top with the rest of the diced onion if you like, pop into the oven around 300-350 for 10-15 minutes, until cheese is bubbly and delicious.And there you have it.  It's really quite simple.  Sorry it took 10 years to get it for you.





Thanks bro! My life is now complete.





You are welcome my friend, let me know when you try it.  Do you have access to a Mexican grocery up there for the dried chiles?  A general Latin American grocery might have what you need but they won't necessarily use the same names.  If you post up a list of dried chiles you have access to, I can probably advise you on which ones will blend well. You can use almost any blend, but the ancho is a smoked poblano pepper, so has a pretty disctinctive flavor that adds a lot to the profile.  The cascabel is also sometimes called chile bola and is pretty mild and flavorful, which is why it's used as the base.  And the chiles de arbol add some heat, but you can substitute other fairly hot peppers if you can't find the chile de arbol-- dried New Mexican red chiles work nicely for that. The general idea is to use several different varieties to develop the flavor profile.





You bet. I actually have all those peppers in my pantry.





Well then, giddyup!





utee94 wrote: Okay badgerfan, here we go-- you ready? I just made some enchilada gravy yesterday, in preparation for my family's enchilada-off this afternoon, and here's the recipe I used.  I vary it all the time, but this is what I did yesterday, and it's pretty darn good.What?Did the heat wave break today?P.S.  That looks like a great recipe.





Utee has been tantalizing us (and especially badgerfan) with the mythical "Enchilada Gravy" recipe for YEARS now, could it be that I am finally looking at it with my own two eyes?!?!? And I echo CW's comments, it looks downright amazing. I am going to pass that off to my mom, she would love it.





It's tasty and quite simple really-- I'm somewhat embarrassed that it took me this long to post but then again, good things come to those who wait.  It's quite versatile, because it all depends on the blend of chile peppers you choose.  Experimentation is good and if you practice it enough you'll figure out your favorite flavors.  For example, I don't always use the ancho, but I knew that for this batch the smoky flavor would complement the BBQ brisket nicely.I must admit that I won my family enchilada-off today, I was pretty surprised and humbled as well.  The brisket enchiladas turned out quite nicely, but honestly I voted for my sister-in-law's green chile chicken enchiladas, they were out-of-this world.  Lucky for me she sent me home with a half-dozen, as well as a pint of the green chile gravy that I'll freeze and use at a later date for my own evil purposes.





I've been inspired to make cheeseburgers this weekend. I have an idea that might soound strange, but I'm gonna try it.I'm going to use 80/20, simply pattied up in 1/2 pound portions and seasoned heavily with salt and pepper.Toppings will be a blue cheese sauce and a slice of grilled beet, served on a nice roll.





just the blue cheese sauce for cheese or will you also throw on an 1/4" slab of Wisconsin's finest blue cheese or cheddar?





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:07:38 PM
I'll probably do my standard blue cheese sauce, which is shallots and garlic sauteed in a little butter, followed by a little white wine and whole milk and a tub of blue cheese crumbles. It's good for a lot of things and as long as you simmer it long enough it becomes a spread.





Bought a pair of T-bones today.  Any suggestions?





847badgerfan wrote: I'll probably do my standard blue cheese sauce, which is shallots and garlic sauteed in a little butter, followed by a little white wine and whole milk and a tub of blue cheese crumbles. It's good for a lot of things and as long as you simmer it long enough it becomes a spread.I tried that, although I had no shallots or wine or milk, so the wine became apple cider vinegar and the milk became cream, and it was pretty delicious.





EastLansingAdam wrote: Bought a pair of T-bones today.  Any suggestions?Sorry I missed this over the weekend.Lots of salt and pepper and a hot grill is all you need if the steaks are good ones.Make a nice sauce to your preference. I like a mustard-based sauce for these steeaks, with shallots included in the sauce. Then put some garlic mashed potatoes on the plate, a pile of sauteed garlic, spinach and mushrooms on the side.I also like fries on the side as opposed to the mashed potatoes, but either way is great.





 EastLansingAdam wrote: Bought a pair of T-bones today.  Any suggestions? There are two things I want to do with steaks that I haven't manned up and done.  One is from Alton Brown, who did a show where he cooked steaks directly on the hot charcoals (using a hair dryer to blow away any ash before placing them on the coals).  I thought that would be pretty neat to try.The other is to try this method - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwdWmVqd5mMBasically slow cook the steak up to the desired temperature and then use a blowtorch to get the nice dark crust.  I have to believe that is the best way to cook a steak.  I'd probably dispense with the sous-vide and just use the oven, as that seems somewhat work intensive.  The blowtorch, however, seems perfect and awesome.





MaximumSam wrote: Basically slow cook the steak up to the desired temperature and then use a blowtorch to get the nice dark crust.  I have to believe that is the best way to cook a steak.  I'd probably dispense with the sous-vide and just use the oven, as that seems somewhat work intensive.  The blowtorch, however, seems perfect and awesome.I had a buddy try that.  He said there wasn't enough difference to try it again.





 EastLansingAdam wrote:  MaximumSam wrote: Basically slow cook the steak up to the desired temperature and then use a blowtorch to get the nice dark crust.  I have to believe that is the best way to cook a steak.  I'd probably dispense with the sous-vide and just use the oven, as that seems somewhat work intensive.  The blowtorch, however, seems perfect and awesome. I had a buddy try that.  He said there wasn't enough difference to try it again. awww disappointment.  Still, using a blowtorch on food is fun in all respects.





Torch works pretty well on fish and shellfish, as well as cheese toppings.





847badgerfan wrote: Torch works pretty well on fish and shellfish, as well as cheese toppings.I'll endorse this, although I haven't done it myself.Made a pretty simple pork tenderloin the other night.  Marinade just had OJ, soy sauce, oil, garlic, rosemary and thyme.Also, I don't think I've shared my sloppy joe recipe on here before.  I don't like to brag about my cooking, I do it for fun, and don't think I hold a candle to some of our more experienced, but my sloppy joes are my one recipe I have had called "the best I've ever had" multiple times...3 lbs ground beef2 chopped onions4 cloves garlicSaute the onions and garlic in oil, add the meat to brown, draining grease.1 can tomato soup8 oz tomato sauce1/4 cup ketchup1/4 cup mustard1 tbsp horseradishsalt and pepper to tasteCombine all of those ingredients in a large pot.Add the browned meat, onion, garlic combination to the pot.Cook over low-medium heat for about 3ish hours, stirring frequently (like every 15 minutes)You can serve immediately, but I think it tastes better, like with most chilis and sauces, if you chill and re-heat later.  I have tried it with a variety of peppers too, for a little bit more kick, but this is the basic recipe my grandma has made for 70 years.





Anyone have a good Hot Wings Recipe? ,I always do Ribs,Steaks,Burgers,Brats or Chili want to do something different alot of the recipes i saw on here looked really good,i just like simple things to Cook for football games though.





I like to grill wings. Much less fat and tons of good flavor.The Buffalo sauce I make is pretty simple - a jar of Franks Red Hot and a stick of butter.Brine the wings for a coule of hours in heavily salted water, in the fridge. Rinse them off with fresh water, and pat them dry. Season with salt and pepper and hit a red-hot grill. Cook about 10 minutes per side, and then transfer them to a foil pan containing the sauce, to indirect heat or to the oven at 350 for about 20 minutes.Serve with Blue Cheese dressing, carrots and celery. It doesn't get any easier and it doesn't get much better.I have a Blue Cheese dressing recipe too, if anyone is interested. Pretty low fat.





EastLansingAdam wrote:I made these last weekend for the night games, and enjoyed them, but they've got a little kick...Pre-Game Night Soak:1/4 bottle Liquid Smoke1 TBS. Garlic Juice1/4 cup Apple Cider VinegarThis was enough for about 12 chicken tenders with plenty to spare.Dry Spices:5 tsp Garlic Salt1 tsp Cayenne1/2 tsp Cumin1/2 tsp Chili Powder1/2 tsp Paprica1/2 tsp Black Pepper1/2 tsp Curry Powder Place ingredients into a Ziplock bag and shake until well mixed. I made it at home, so I used the over broiler, but it can obviously be amended for the grill.  I sprinkled the dry spices on the exposed side and broiled for 9 minutes and then flipped, covered the other side with the dry spices and broiled for another 9 minutes.  I just dipped them in ranch and was ready to go.Bump





847badgerfan wrote: I like to grill wings. Much less fat and tons of good flavor.The Buffalo sauce I make is pretty simple - a jar of Franks Red Hot and a stick of butter.Brine the wings for a coule of hours in heavily salted water, in the fridge. Rinse them off with fresh water, and pat them dry. Season with salt and pepper and hit a red-hot grill. Cook about 10 minutes per side, and then transfer them to a foil pan containing the sauce, to indirect heat or to the oven at 350 for about 20 minutes.Serve with Blue Cheese dressing, carrots and celery. It doesn't get any easier and it doesn't get much better.I have a Blue Cheese dressing recipe too, if anyone is interested. Pretty low fat.Thank You,sounds easy instead of throwing them in oven at the end,Could you put the sauce in a Slow Cooker and finish that way ? P.S. ill be using Ranch Dressing since Blue Cheese  seems to trigger my Gag reflex





847badgerfan wrote:Cook about 10 minutes per side, and then transfer them to a foil pan containing the sauce, to indirect heat or to the oven at 350 for about 20 minutes.Grill for 20 minutes, then bake for 20 minutes?  That seems like they'll be burned by the end of that.





I'm gonna try and make tamales tomorrow.  Anyone have a good source for fresh lard?





EastLansingAdam wrote: 847badgerfan wrote:Cook about 10 minutes per side, and then transfer them to a foil pan containing the sauce, to indirect heat or to the oven at 350 for about 20 minutes.Grill for 20 minutes, then bake for 20 minutes?  That seems like they'll be burned by the end of that.You'd be surprised. I do this all the time and they come out nice and crisp, but not burned.





MaximumSam wrote: I'm gonna try and make tamales tomorrow. Anyone have a good source for fresh lard?I never used it so I don't have a clue. Maybe try the butcher?





polyol wrote:Is this one of those BBQ threads I have been hearing about?I really enjoy a dry rub on my baby back rids...here is the recipe.1/3 cup Brown Sugar2 tbsp paprika 2-3 tbsp's salt2 tbsp's chili powder1 tbsp onion powder1 tbsp brown mustard2tsp's lemon pepper2tsp's cumin1/2tsp chyanne1 tbsp basile1 tbsp tyme1 tbsp oraganoAll the herbs I like fresh and chopped fine.  Just combine all components and rub it on ohh say 2-3 good size racks.  I also like to remove the membrane that is found on the underside of the ribs...it allows the spices to soak in better.  Put it on the BBQ SUPER HOT...for 3 min on each side...then I like to place them on the hotdog grill up top and turn the heat completley down...sometimes I only run 2 of the 3 burners on low.  Cook for 1hour at the low temp...let me tell you BEST damn ribs EVAR!!!Sounds great,just one question Surgar tends to burn easy ,does the Brown surgar Burn if cooked for the entire duration?





847badgerfan wrote: EastLansingAdam wrote: 847badgerfan wrote:Cook about 10 minutes per side, and then transfer them to a foil pan containing the sauce, to indirect heat or to the oven at 350 for about 20 minutes.Grill for 20 minutes, then bake for 20 minutes?  That seems like they'll be burned by the end of that.You'd be surprised. I do this all the time and they come out nice and crisp, but not burned.Alright I'm combining my recipe with your cooking suggestion tonight.





Turned out perfect, I was wrong to question the cook time.





Excellent news ELA. Glad you liked them.





Well, I wouldn't go that far, but the problem was not in the method.





I stumbled upon a pretty good gameday breakfast-type thing. 1 pound ground sausage2 packages cream cheeseAbout half a package of frozen home friesAbout a quarter cup of diced onionQuarter cup of diced green pepperHalf a small can of diced mushroomsShredded colby jack cheeseGarlic powder2-3 cans of pillsbury croissantsmix up the sausage, cream cheese, home fries, onion, green peppers, mushrooms into a filling like consistency. Add garlic powder to taste.  Fill the unbaked croissants and bake until golden brown. Take them out and sprinkle with shredded cheese. Bake again for a couple minutes to melt the cheese and then serve. Thank me later.





Hey Adam,Do you think your sloppy joe recipe would work with ground turkey instead of ground meat?





I would think so, but I've never done a substitution before.  IMO, and maybe it's just mental, ground turkey doesn't absorb flavor as well as ground beef does, so that might be a difference in a slow cook recipe like this, but I'm not sure.





buckeyecraaazy wrote: Hey Adam,Do you think your sloppy joe recipe would work with ground turkey instead of ground meat?It will work, but it won't be very flavorful.Use ground sirloin if you want to be very lean. Better protein than turkey.That breakfast dish looks good, but it's one of those that you eat and then don't  eat the rest of the day, it seems.





I'm making it com and garlic stuffed pork filets tonight. If it comes out good I will post the recipe and methods. I haven't figured it all out yet.





Making my last ribs of the "summer" tomorrow.Making chili tomorrow to eat Sunday.Figured that would be a fitting transition from summer to fall.





With beans of course





MrNubbz wrote: With beans of courseAs a side for the ribs?  I'll consider it.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:08:34 PM
847badgerfan wrote: I'm making it com and garlic stuffed pork filets tonight. If it comes out good I will post the recipe and methods. I haven't figured it all out yet.I was thinking of trying a breaded pork tenderloin sandwich to harken back to my IU days in a few weeks.





I didn't do the chops last night. I found some crab legs in the freezer.I'll do the pork tonight and report back.





Mmmmm chili....with beans.  I love Aldis - they have boneless beef and pork ribs for pretty cheap, which makes for good eats in the chili dept.





It actually turned out to be one of the better batches of chili I had, so I figure I'd put on the recipe.About three pounds boneless beef ribs1 can kidney beans1 can black beans1 28 oz can crushed tomatoes1 can tomato paste2 Tbsp chili powder2 Tbsp ground cuminSalt5-6 Guajillo chiles10-12 De Arbol chileshalf an onion1 Tbsp garlicWaterTake the latter ingredients (cut up the chiles with scissors and dump out the seeds) and blend in a food processor.  Place ribs in cook, then cover with everything else.  Season to taste.  I cooked on high for a couple hours then on low for about 7 or 8 - the main thing is to cook long enough to ensure the meat can be easily shredded.  I find it much easier to take the meat out at the end and shred it vs. cutting up the raw meat earlier but either approach would probably be fine.* I got everything at Aldis except for the chiles, which I got at a Mexican grocery store.  I think Aldis does sell dried chilis, though I'm not sure if they sell the spicy de arbol ones.





Once the weather gets a little colder, I'm going to make a mole.  Anyone done one of those?  They seem...time intensive.





MaximumSam wrote: Once the weather gets a little colder, I'm going to make a mole. Anyone done one of those? They seem...time intensive.Why would you want to eat a mole a lot of work for so little meat but I'm sure they taste good





MrNubbz wrote: MaximumSam wrote: Once the weather gets a little colder, I'm going to make a mole. Anyone done one of those? They seem...time intensive.Why would you want to eat a mole a lot of work for so little meat but I'm sure they taste goodWell the sauce doesn't require any meat but you could make pretty much an unlimited amount of meat to go with it if you like.  Rick Bayless says an entire turkey is traditional.





I was going to advise using Bayless for this actually, and I forgot.His is the best I've ever had.http://www.rickbayless.com/rec...ew?recipeID=225





 847badgerfan wrote: I was going to advise using Bayless for this actually, and I forgot.His is the best I've ever had.http://www.rickbayless.com/rec...ew?recipeID=225 Did you make that recipe or did you go to his restaurant?  Bayless always impressed me as one of those guys who can effortlessly make something phenomenal out of three ingredients, and then following his technique takes tons of practice.  I hate to think how many years it would take to perfectly follow his mole recipe.





I've done both - his and my attempt at his.Lots of patience will get you the result you want. Get in the kitchen, put the games on and go.





Weather permitting I'll be hitting the Farmer's Market Saturday morning by 8 (gotta be home by noon for MSU).I've never really been a fresh spice guy, but I think I'm going to try picking up a few along with the usuals, which in Pittsburgh always includes a couple pies from the Amish.  They are phenominal.





 EastLansingAdam wrote: Weather permitting I'll be hitting the Farmer's Market Saturday morning by 8 (gotta be home by noon for MSU).I've never really been a fresh spice guy, but I think I'm going to try picking up a few along with the usuals, which in Pittsburgh always includes a couple pies from the Amish.  They are phenominal. Get some hardneck garlic.





 847badgerfan wrote: I've done both - his and my attempt at his.Lots of patience will get you the result you want. Get in the kitchen, put the games on and go. That's my plan.  All that grinding, roasting, and everything else, especially when it comes to cooking the meat as well - it would take a while.  A cold day and good football will be my target.





Heading to Illini country this weekend, gonna try a burger recipe-Whiskey Barrel Burgers.  I was planning on pairing that with a Three Cheese Beer soup that I have made before, but the forecast is projected to be sunny and near 70, so scraped that and gonna the ol' corn on the grill and homemade tater salad, sorta the last blast of summer meal I guess.   Let ya know how they taste/turn out and if the recipe is worth posting.





Peel the husk back from the corn, and put some butter, salt, pepper, a little sugar and some paprika on it. Then put the husks back and slowly roast it on the grill.Trust me on that one.





Corn Husker!





FearlessF wrote: Corn Husker!Damn straight. I love the redness.I got some chairs too.





Copied this from the SEC board. Looks like a winner to me.Just1Hog wrote: 3 24 oz bottles of ketchup. 1 litre grapette1 9 oz bottle plain yeller mustard 4 oz of Garlic  Salt 2 oz black pepper 2 oz worcestershire sauce2 oz tabasco2 cups apple cider vinegar2 cups dry red wine1 cup packed dark brown cane sugar12 oz dark honeyThe last ingredient is 4 oz of chili powder. everything I've read or heard leads me to believe this was the secret of the Shack BBQ sauce. I've tried everything I could find and finally settled on Pure ground Ancho pepper for the last 3 batches. The upcoming batch #7 will be the last shot at the secret recipe Dump it all into a BIG pot. rinse out all the bottles with wine or vinegar and pour in the pot. You'll use the bottles once the sauce cools to store it.Bring to a boil for 5 mins on high heat, stirring madly to avoid burning it and to help mix it up.Reduce heat to half or so, just enough for a slow bubbling boil. This is a key part of the process, stirring occasionally, note the level of the sauce in the pot. I let my sauce reduce about an inch, but the other thing to watch is the rind that boils up. as it gets smaller and finally disappears. the sauce be done!Let cool for a hour, pour back into the clean bottles. I've been giving most of what I make away to rave reviews





847badgerfan wrote: Copied this from the SEC board. Looks like a winner to me.Just1Hog wrote: 3 24 oz bottles of ketchup. 1 litre grapette1 9 oz bottle plain yeller mustard 4 oz of Garlic  Salt 2 oz black pepper 2 oz worcestershire sauce2 oz tabasco2 cups apple cider vinegar2 cups dry red wine1 cup packed dark brown cane sugar12 oz dark honeyThe last ingredient is 4 oz of chili powder. everything I've read or heard leads me to believe this was the secret of the Shack BBQ sauce. I've tried everything I could find and finally settled on Pure ground Ancho pepper for the last 3 batches. The upcoming batch #7 will be the last shot at the secret recipe Dump it all into a BIG pot. rinse out all the bottles with wine or vinegar and pour in the pot. You'll use the bottles once the sauce cools to store it.Bring to a boil for 5 mins on high heat, stirring madly to avoid burning it and to help mix it up.Reduce heat to half or so, just enough for a slow bubbling boil. This is a key part of the process, stirring occasionally, note the level of the sauce in the pot. I let my sauce reduce about an inch, but the other thing to watch is the rind that boils up. as it gets smaller and finally disappears. the sauce be done!Let cool for a hour, pour back into the clean bottles. I've been giving most of what I make away to rave reviews Thanks Badge  Just a couple of notes to add.Makes just over a gallon, I bought Walmart store brand for all but the ground Ancho Chili Pepper, that I ordered from Penzey's online. Costs about 15 bucks to make, altho the wine added a bit more.The red wine is a recent addition, the first 5 batchs had 4 cups of vinegar. The red wine smoothed the tang out a bit. I've also tried black Molasses, but it doesn't have the sticky you need when grilling and drips off faster than the honey verison.The first batch had 4 oz of black pepper and it wasalmost too hot for me and literally had the wife running to the sink  But several folks that have tasted all the batches think it was the best one.Enjoy it guys!





 847badgerfan wrote: Peel the husk back from the corn, and put some butter, salt, pepper, a little sugar and some paprika on it. Then put the husks back and slowly roast it on the grill.Trust me on that one. Peel and grill is the only, I do that most of the time.  In addition 847 to those items, smear alittle mayo, sprinle with parm cheese and abit of chilli powder for a good taste.  I have also used herbs(parsley, dill, thyme, or parsley) mixed with melted butter and pepper as a spread, put on before grilling-tastes great as well.





I've done the mayo thing, but lately I've not been using mayo in much of anything. Trying to be a good boy most of the time.





Had this at the Illini/Ohio St game, they were very very good so I would recommend trying them.  You can adjust the mixture to suit your taste, as I often do not follow the exact recipe.2/3 C(cup) finely chopped green onions1/2 C whiskey   (I used Gentelman Jack just because it was the 1st bottle in the cabinet I grabbed)1/4 C dry bread crumbs2 Tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce2 Tablespoons melted butter2 cloves minced garlic1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt OR garlic salt   (I used garlic salt)1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper1 pound ground beef     (I subbed Bison Burger)1 pound ground pork Chedder Whiskey Filling: Take 2 cups of shredded cheddar cheese, 1/3 cup finely chopped green onions, 2 tablespoons                                  Whiskey, 1 1/2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce and 2 cloves of minced garlic and mix in a                                        food processor until smooth or nearly so, it will be about like a paste.   (SAVE ALL THE FILLING)1/2 Cup BBQ sauce  (I used Sweet Baby Ray's)Lettuce, Red Onions and Tomato's sliced for garnish on Jumbo Buns (I toasted mine when I was cooking)DAY BEFORE:Mix the green onions, whiskey, bread crumbs, worcestershire sauce, butter, garlic. seasoned salt, red pepper and black pepper in a bowl.  Add in the BURGER and PORK and mix well.  Patty the mixture out to make an even amount of patties that are about 1/2 inch thick (I have a hamburger patty press, but if you are using your hands the mix should make about 12-14 patties).  Place 1 tablespoon of the whiskey filling one center of half the patties.  Keep the remaining filling in a storage container to be used when you grill the burgers.  Take the other patties and cover each patty that has filling and pinch the two together to form one nice sized burger-don't worry they will shrink some during the cooking, but you should have a hefty patty to start out with, about 3/4 inches thick.Put the burgers in a storage container with wax paper between each row/level to keep them from sticking and refrig overnite.  Transport to the tailgate site in a cooler with ice.  Remove them from the ice/cooler about 15 minutes before grilling (IF doing this in HOT weather, maybe 5-9 minutes before throwing on the grill.).Grill the burgers when ready, give a little extra time than you may used too since they are pretty thick and sometimes the tailgates grills are not as hot as home grills.  After you flip the burgers (I sear my burgers by pressing down on the top with the spatula) place 1 tablespoon of the remaining whiskey filling on top of the cooked side of the burger.  The filling will be oozing out of the burger, but don't worry, the topping will more than make up for whatever leaks out.  IF you have the grill space you can toast the burger buns as well.Swab the bottom of the burger bun with BBQ sauce, place the burger on top and garnish with your lettuce, red onions, and whatever else you what to top it with, cover with the crown of the bun and ENJOY! !! !I was able to get some nice sweet corn to grill; we also had macaroni salad, potato salad, and chips.   I know it sounds like a lot of work, but really it is not.  The pre-prep makes this very easy on game day.  The corn was not hard to cook either.  We used one coleman grill (standard equip for tailgate) and had no troubles.  Just adjust your cooking times for the burger thickness.





Going to be cooking food tomorrow.  Not sure exactly what yet but it seems likely that tacos are on the horizon.  And apple pie.





Tacos were pretty great.  Went with a shredded beef that was roughly similar to the barbacoa at Chipotle.  The pies weren't bad too.  For the meat, I cooked about 2 pounds of boneless chuck ribs from Aldis, with a diced up onion, 4 cloves of garlic, cumin, and chili powder, salt and pepper, and water until tender.  Then I cut up a can of whole tomatoes and cooked them with the meat until nice and thick.  For the tacos, I made some guac, which I always make with a ratio of a hald lime for every avocado as well as salt.  I also rooasted some red bell pepper, cut up some red onion, and had some sour cream adn hot sauce on hand.  Mmm good.





One of these days we're going to have to set up a watch party and just cook our asses off while we watch football.





847badgerfan wrote: One of these days we're going to have to set up a watch party and just cook our asses off while we watch football.That would be a blast.  I'll bring the beans for the chili.





Bring some beer for me to cry in too.Bastage.





I made a reduced fat Chili (with beans) today because my dad has a heart condition.  Would anyone be interested in moderately healthy recipes on this thread?





medinabuckeye1 wrote: I made a reduced fat Chili (with beans) today because my dad has a heart condition.  Would anyone be interested in moderately healthy recipes on this thread?I think any recipes are welcome, as long as they taste good.  That said, it's tough to figure out what is healthy and what is not healthy these days.  If you go to one person, meat is bad.  Another says meat is good.  Carbs are bad.  Or maybe good.  Fat is bad, or maybe good.  Protein is good, unless it is bad.  Saturated fat is the devil, or maybe it's heart healthy.  Vegetable oil is healthy or the root of all health problems.  I say just present the recipe and if you avoid fat or other things just say so and let us know how it worked out.





Hot Cider:1 cup Brown Sugar2 TSP Allspice1/2 TSP salt1/2 TSP nutmeg3" stick cinnamon2 TSP Cloves2 Oranges1 Gal Apple ciderAs a tailgate recipe what I do is this:Put all the dry ingredients except the cloves in a tupperware container together.Put the Cloves in a spice ball and place that in the tupperware container as well.  Cut one of the oranges into 4 or 6 wedges.  Cut the other orange into 3/8" slices.  Put the oranges in a ziploc bag in your cooler.  When you get to your tailgate: Pour cider into your stock pot until it is about half full.  Add the dry ingredients.  Start the burner.  Add the rest of the cider, while stirring with a ladle.  Add the Orange Wedges.  After it gets hot (bubbling slightly) reduce heat to a simmer and add the orange slices.  Serve an ornage slice with each person's cup.  Options: Pour a shot or two of something in each cup.  Edit:  I forgot to mention, but this is great to make a home because it makes the house smell nice!





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:09:29 PM
medinabuckeye1 wrote: I made a reduced fat Chili flavored soup (with beans) today because my dad has a heart condition. Would anyone be interested in moderately healthy recipes on this thread?I fixed your post for you.And yes, all recipes are welcome and like Max said, as long as you have tested them and they were good, bring it on.





Jalapeno Cornbread:This goes great with Chili (with or without beans).  Or, as 847 would say, this goes great with either Chili or Chili flavored Bean Soup. 4 boxes of cornbread muffin mix1 cup milk4 eggs1 can whole kernel corn1 can creamstyle corn1 red pepper (or part of one)1 green pepper (or part of one)1 Jalapeno Pepper (or two, depends how hot you want)Mix the cornbread mix, the milk, the eggs, the whole kernel corn (drained), and the creamstyle corn.  Use this to make some plain cornbread.  I make about 48-72 plain mini-muffins.  While you are waiting for that to bake, cut up the red, green, and jalapeno peppers.  Add in the red and green peppers and make some more.  Add in the Jalapeno and make some of the Jalapeno cornbread.  If you want Jalapeno cornbread only, you will need more jalapenos.  Also, if your audience likes things that spicy you can mix in all or part of a can of diced chilies.  Usually at least some people will want plain cornbread with their chili (or chili flavored bean soup) which is why I usually make it this way.  One tip that works well:  I usually make the plain cornbread in mini-muffins.  Then I make the pepper cornbread in regular sized muffins.  Finally, I make the jalapeno cornbread in the square muffin pan that I have.  That way it is easy to tell which is which.  That is really important if some people don't like hot stuff.  I find this is a great compromise to make if some of your tailgaters don't like really hot chili.  You can dial back your chili a little bit and offer jalapeno cornbread to the people that want it hotter.  Also, the plain cornbread neutralizes the spicier chili as well. 





Buckeyes:I'm really surprised this hasn't been posted yet.  These are a great desert if you are a Buckeye fan.  I suppose you could make them when you are playing the Buckeyes (I cooked Duck when we played Oregon a couple years ago). 3 cups creamy peanut butter1 1/2 sticks of softened butter2 lbs (one bag) of powdered sugar16 oz (1 package) of chocolate barkMix the PB, butter, and sugar then form into small balls.  I have found that you have to press them and it helps A LOT to coat your hands with powdered sugar (it keeps the PB mixture from sticking to your hands).  Melt the chocolate in a double boiler (or two pans placed together to form a double boiler)Use toothpicks to dip the PB balls in the chocolate covering all but a small circleChill overnight. 





Is anyone interested in learning how to cook?  I'm always far less interested in actual recipes than the actual technique used to make a dish.  For example, one of my favorite things is baked chicken thighs.  Put some chicken thighs in a pan (skin side up), splash on some olive oil, salt, and pepper, then put in a 400 degree oven until done (usually about 45 minutes).  You can't get simpler, but the combination of chicken and salty, crispy chicken skin is pretty great.





MaximumSam wrote: Is anyone interested in learning how to cook?One of my favorite chefs - Ohio's own Michael Symon - has a great saying:"You can learn a recipe and make a great dish, but you can learn a technique and make a hundred great dishes."That's how I roll, so yes. I'm with you.





 medinabuckeye1 wrote: Buckeyes:I'm really surprised this hasn't been posted yet.  These are a great desert if you are a Buckeye fan.  I suppose you could make them when you are playing the Buckeyes (I cooked Duck when we played Oregon a couple years ago).  3 cups creamy peanut butter 1 1/2 sticks of softened butter 2 lbs (one bag) of powdered sugar 16 oz (1 package) of chocolate bark  Mix the PB, butter, and sugar then form into small balls.  I have found that you have to press them and it helps A LOT to coat your hands with powdered sugar (it keeps the PB mixture from sticking to your hands).  Melt the chocolate in a double boiler (or two pans placed together to form a double boiler)Use toothpicks to dip the PB balls in the chocolate covering all but a small circleChill overnight.  I tasted these a few weeks back in Lincoln at an outstanding tailgate partyvery tasty!





 847badgerfan wrote: One of these days we're going to have to set up a watch party and just cook our asses off while we watch football. where and when?





Seriously, we should figure out how to do that sometime.





someplace outside with plenty of room and plenty of electric hook upsI'm suggesting early September for non-conference games and good weatherbring my chairs!





Why non-conference?I'll be in Lincoln next year to see Big Red, although they will be wearing all white.





conference games are too important





so...Anyone have anything special planned for cooking this weekend?I've got some veal that I want to do, and I'm thinking about a vesuvio or some variety of that. I love lemon, garlic and capers together and that may be the ticket. Not sure yet.I also want to do some burgers. I'm thinking of getting some utility ribeye meat to grind up along with a half brisket and some skirt steak I have in the freezer.





847badgerfan wrote: so...Anyone have anything special planned for cooking this weekend?I've got some veal that I want to do, and I'm thinking about a vesuvio or some variety of that. I love lemon, garlic and capers together and that may be the ticket. Not sure yet.I also want to do some burgers. I'm thinking of getting some utility ribeye meat to grind up along with a half brisket and some skirt steak I have in the freezer.I'm mulling it over.  Going to cook Saturday with a buddy - looking for suggestions.  For your burgers, try some miso as a seasoning.





 847badgerfan wrote:  MaximumSam wrote: Is anyone interested in learning how to cook? One of my favorite chefs - Ohio's own Michael Symon - has a great saying:"You can learn a recipe and make a great dish, but you can learn a technique and make a hundred great dishes."That's how I roll, so yes. I'm with you. I plead ignorance here, what do you mean by learn a technique?





jhetfield99 wrote: I plead ignorance here, what do you mean by learn a technique?One example would be learning how to sautee properly. By that I mean the type of cookware that's appropriate, the type of fat (butter, oil, nothing) to use, basting, etc.





MaximumSam wrote: For your burgers, try some miso as a seasoning.Talk to me about miso. There are lots of different kinds, right?





Speaking of learning to cook... this is a must to have. Not a recipe book - this tells you what goes with what. For example, garlic and ginger are a perfect marriage. You gotta have this if you are learning to cook. I love it and use it constantly.http://www.amazon.com/Flavor-B...e/dp/0316118400#_Good gift...





847badgerfan wrote: MaximumSam wrote: For your burgers, try some miso as a seasoning.Talk to me about miso. There are lots of different kinds, right?There are.  I have a buddy who cooks on a fancier level than I do, but he made some burgers that were the best I've ever tasted.  He used a mix of a ground beef, short ribs in the food processor, pork fat, and miso.  He won't tell me exactly how he made them, as he wanted to open his own restaurant, but he used red miso.  It''s very salty so you have to be careful on the amount use and how much salt you use.  But dag they were good.





847badgerfan wrote:Speaking of learning to cook... this is a must to have. Not a recipe book - this tells you what goes with what. For example, garlic and ginger are a perfect marriage. You gotta have this if you are learning to cook. I love it and use it constantly.http://www.amazon.com/Flavor-B...e/dp/0316118400#_Good gift...That does sound good.  I have a zillion books but the ones I use most are America's Test Kitchen, a couplke books by Rick Bayless, and On Food and Cooking by Harold McGee.





Do you have the Julia Child Bible?Mastering the Art of French Cooking?That's technique. For aspiring cooks, it's a must.





I love French cooking and I love that book.





I use it constantly. It's amazing that it's about 50 years old.Other books I consider a must are from Michael Symon, Michael Chiarello, Le Cordon Bleu, Jonathan Waxman and Wolfgang Puck.And that Flavor Bible, of course.I've probably got 100 books.





847badgerfan wrote: Do you have the Julia Child Bible?Mastering the Art of French Cooking?That's technique. For aspiring cooks, it's a must.Don't have it but it's on the list of books to get.  I'm a big fan of the Test Kitchen series, because I like reading about recipes way more than actually using recipes.  When I understand why a particular ingredient is useful, I'm much more likely to go out of my way to get it and use it.





I've got another tip, for those of you who use ovens alot.I've got a higher-end GE (if there is such a thing) and whenever I preheat it, it's never right when it says it is.I bought a magnetic thermometer and stuck it inside, and I was shocked to find out that when the oven said it was a 450, it was at 350!It's also off temperature, up or down, depending on the setting. 180 means 205 in my oven, while 500 means 460.Until I can buy a Viking, this is what I deal with.Moral of the story is to go spend $10-15 at Williams Sonoma or Sur Le Table and get a thermometer so you can quit wrecking your food.





that's why the disclaimer on the box.............ovens may vary





Trying to make pozole.  First challenge was finding lime for the field corn.  Three Mexican grocery stores later, I found it, and now my house smells pretty freaking great.  Haven't put in the pig's feet yet, though.





Sounds good Max.I roasted some corn on the grill for one of my dishes yesterday. Here is the recipe:18 ears of corn2-1.5 lb lobster tails4 TB butter1 cup half and half2 TB smoked paprika1 tsp sugar1/2 tsp celery salt1 TB garlic powder1 tsp onion powderfreshly ground sea salt and pepperRoast the corn on the grill until done, and not burning inside. In the meantime, steam the lobster tails in a pan suitable for the grill, or in a foil pan, for about 10 minutes.Remove the husks from the corn, and reserve 12 ears.Add 2 TB butter to a sauce pan and melt it. Add the corn from 6 ears. Add salt and pepper, 1 TB paprika, the sugar, the celery salt, the onion powder and the garlic. Stir until combined and when hot, add the half and half. Bring to a boil then simmer to reduce by about a third.Pour the mixture into a blender and puree until smooth. Set aside.Cut the lobster into about 1/2 inch cubes. Add 2 TB butter to a skillet and melt it. Add the rest of the corn, lobster and paprika, season to taste, and stir to combine until warm. Add the reserved puree and stir to combine.Serve RIGHT NOW!Damn, it was good. The only side dish I made without a recipe and it went over the best.





The pozole was erm interesting.  I'm not sure if I got the right consistency for the hominy.  I boiled it in lime solution and rinsed off the coat, but despite simmering for hours, it never got that creamy texture that beans get.  Of course, I don't know what consistency hominy gets too, so maybe that's the best it gets.  It sure smelled wonderful.  Anyways, after treating the corn and simmering until tender, I put in a pound of pig's feet and a pound of pork shoulder and some garlic, and let that simmer until tender.  Once there, I hydrated 4 puya peppers and 4 guajillo peppers and then blended them up and strained them into the soup.  I let that come together, then it was ready to serve.  I served it with some pickled onions I made on Thanksgiving, as well as some crema, which is sort of a tangy sour cream.  The toppings really came together well with the pozole, but I didn't think the pozole itself was quite good enough.  I think I had too much corn v. meat.





Try it again because it sounds amazing if done right.





847badgerfan wrote: Sounds good Max.I roasted some corn on the grill for one of my dishes yesterday. Here is the recipe:18 ears of corn2-1.5 lb lobster tails4 TB butter1 cup half and half2 TB smoked paprika1 tsp sugar1/2 tsp celery salt1 TB garlic powder1 tsp onion powderfreshly ground sea salt and pepperRoast the corn on the grill until done, and not burning inside. In the meantime, steam the lobster tails in a pan suitable for the grill, or in a foil pan, for about 10 minutes.Remove the husks from the corn, and reserve 12 ears.Add 2 TB butter to a sauce pan and melt it. Add the corn from 6 ears. Add salt and pepper, 1 TB paprika, the sugar, the celery salt, the onion powder and the garlic. Stir until combined and when hot, add the half and half. Bring to a boil then simmer to reduce by about a third.Pour the mixture into a blender and puree until smooth. Set aside.Cut the lobster into about 1/2 inch cubes. Add 2 TB butter to a skillet and melt it. Add the rest of the corn, lobster and paprika, season to taste, and stir to combine until warm. Add the reserved puree and stir to combine.Serve RIGHT NOW!Damn, it was good. The only side dish I made without a recipe and it went over the best.Badge, this sounds amazing, but I'm trying to imagine what kind of dish it is.  With the half and half and puree, was it a bisque?





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:10:23 PM
No, not a bisque at all.There was still a lot of corn kernels (2-1 solid vs. puree) and not all that much half and half based on the overall quantity of the other ingredients.It was still a dish with a ton of texture, but it had that silkiness from the puree. Hope that helps.





I went to a local eating joint yesterday and the cook there gave me a leg of deer meat. He couldn't keep it in the store cooler because of laws regarding non FDA rated meat. Now, all I have to do is figure out how to cook the thing.





Brazing would the way to go with that meat Gator.Rub it with olive oil, then season it generously with salt and pepper. Sear it first on high heat, in a dutch oven if you have one. Add a diced carrot, a diced celery stalk and a diced onion and cook until just turning soft (5 minutes). This would also be the time to add herbs or minced garlic, if you desire.Deglaze with 2 cups of red wine. Reduce the wine to wait until the alcohol burns off (10 minutes or so) and add beef broth or stock to cover the meat. NOTE: If you don't have the dutch oven, use a cast iron skillet (or any skillet, really) and simply transfer it into a foil pan or other deep vessel after the wine is reduced.Cover and let it cook at 325 for 3-4 hours or until fork tender.





a deer leg????I'd bone it out and grind it with some beef tallow.  Guessing deer near Atlanta don't eat much corn...





They nibble on rock and red clay





They eat peaches and listen to the Allman Brothers.





If it's too bulky for a pot, you could try to wrap it really tightly in foil and put in some beer n garlic n onion and then bake until tender.  That's my standard braising trinity, though I haven't tried it on Georgia deer leg.





You wouldn't sear it first?





I would if it fit in a pot.





847badgerfan wrote: Brazing would the way to go with that meat Gator.Rub it with olive oil, then season it generously with salt and pepper. Sear it first on high heat, in a dutch oven if you have one. Add a diced carrot, a diced celery stalk and a diced onion and cook until just turning soft (5 minutes). This would also be the time to add herbs or minced garlic, if you desire.Deglaze with 2 cups of red wine. Reduce the wine to wait until the alcohol burns off (10 minutes or so) and add beef broth or stock to cover the meat. NOTE: If you don't have the dutch oven, use a cast iron skillet (or any skillet, really) and simply transfer it into a foil pan or other deep vessel after the wine is reduced.Cover and let it cook at 325 for 3-4 hours or until fork tender.Thanks for the advice. I'll do just what you suggest and let you know the outcome.





Gatorama2 wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: Brazing would the way to go with that meat Gator.Rub it with olive oil, then season it generously with salt and pepper. Sear it first on high heat, in a dutch oven if you have one. Add a diced carrot, a diced celery stalk and a diced onion and cook until just turning soft (5 minutes). This would also be the time to add herbs or minced garlic, if you desire.Deglaze with 2 cups of red wine. Reduce the wine to wait until the alcohol burns off (10 minutes or so) and add beef broth or stock to cover the meat. NOTE: If you don't have the dutch oven, use a cast iron skillet (or any skillet, really) and simply transfer it into a foil pan or other deep vessel after the wine is reduced.Cover and let it cook at 325 for 3-4 hours or until fork tender.Thanks for the advice. I'll do just what you suggest and let you know the outcome.Well...?





hope he didn't expect too much





I don't really like deer meat, as I don't like any gamey meat, but I'm curious as to how it worked out.





I did just what Badgerfan suggested and it turned out to be delicious. Much more tender that I suspected and not too gamey either.





Here's a chicken dish I concocted last night. It was fantastic so I'm sharing.Boneless/skinless chicken breasts, pounded to about 1/4 inch thickFlour1 beaten eggMilk2 TB CapersFresh lemon juiceFresh garlic, 4 clovesOlive oil1 TB unsalted butter2 cups chicken stock/brothPound the chicken, and if very thick slice them to make things a little easier. Combine the egg with about a 1/4 cup of milk and add salt and pepper. Add salt and pepper to the flour. Coat the chicken with flour, and shake the eccess off. Dip into the egg mixture and then back into the flour mixture. Heat a skillet with the oil and butter to almost smoking and add the chicken. Cook about 3 minutes per side to brown and remove. Mince the capers and garlic and add to the pan. Cook until almost brown and add the stock. Reduce by half. Add the chicken back to the pan and cook through, basting the entire time with the sauce. At the last minute, add the fresh lemon juice over the chicken and serve.I like to serve this with roasted potato wedges, cooked in the oven with a little bit of olive oil and salt and pepper. I also like to add a little sauce to the potatoes. A little steamed and buttered broccoli on the side and you're rocking with a great meal.





BuckeyeCMO wrote: BUCKEYECMO's ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND PEPPERS2lbs hot Italian sausage2 large red peppers2 large yellow peppers1 large onion4 cloves garlic2 tablespoons tomato paste28oz can of chopped tomatoes1/2cup of marsala cooking wine1tsp. of oreganofresh basil1/2tsp. of red pepper flakessalt and pepper2 tablespoons of olive oilI cut up all of the vegetables the night before, so as to eliminate as much prep work as possible. This recipe really only is convenient if you have a large grill.I cook the sausage on the grill just like anything else, and then set it aside and cut it into bite size pieces. Take the peppers, onions and garlic which should already be cut from the night before and wrap it all in aluminum foil with the olive oil, salt and pepper. Cook the veggies on the grill until all are almost done.Add the sausage, the peppers/onions mixture and all of the remaining ingredients to a larger pot and let simmer on the grill until the sauce thickens and the flavors mix together. Serve either on hoagie buns or as a side......Bump





Thanks dood. Try my chicken dish above. Let me know.Also...You need to add to this thread. Slacker.





Made this last nightChicken and DumplingsChicken, cut up into bite size piecesVeggies of your choice, uncooked, or 2 bags of frozen veggie medley2 can Cream of Chicken soupenough water to coverPut in a crock pot on high for 5 1/2 hours.Take a can of refridgerated rolls and divide each roll into thirds.  Add to crock pot and cook for an additional 30 minutes.Couldn't have been easier.





speaking of crock pots.........I browned a hormone free beef rump roast and put it in the crock pot this morning.  Along with carrots, taters, onions, and garlic cloves.smells wonderful!





 roaddawg2 wrote: Had this at the Illini/Ohio St game, they were very very good so I would recommend trying them.  You can adjust the mixture to suit your taste, as I often do not follow the exact recipe.2/3 C(cup) finely chopped green onions1/2 C whiskey   (I used Gentelman Jack just because it was the 1st bottle in the cabinet I grabbed)1/4 C dry bread crumbs2 Tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce2 Tablespoons melted butter2 cloves minced garlic1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt OR garlic salt   (I used garlic salt)1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper1 pound ground beef     (I subbed Bison Burger)1 pound ground pork Chedder Whiskey Filling: Take 2 cups of shredded cheddar cheese, 1/3 cup finely chopped green onions, 2 tablespoons                                  Whiskey, 1 1/2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce and 2 cloves of minced garlic and mix in a                                        food processor until smooth or nearly so, it will be about like a paste.   (SAVE ALL THE FILLING)1/2 Cup BBQ sauce  (I used Sweet Baby Ray's)Lettuce, Red Onions and Tomato's sliced for garnish on Jumbo Buns (I toasted mine when I was cooking)DAY BEFORE:Mix the green onions, whiskey, bread crumbs, worcestershire sauce, butter, garlic. seasoned salt, red pepper and black pepper in a bowl.  Add in the BURGER and PORK and mix well.  Patty the mixture out to make an even amount of patties that are about 1/2 inch thick (I have a hamburger patty press, but if you are using your hands the mix should make about 12-14 patties).  Place 1 tablespoon of the whiskey filling one center of half the patties.  Keep the remaining filling in a storage container to be used when you grill the burgers.  Take the other patties and cover each patty that has filling and pinch the two together to form one nice sized burger-don't worry they will shrink some during the cooking, but you should have a hefty patty to start out with, about 3/4 inches thick.Put the burgers in a storage container with wax paper between each row/level to keep them from sticking and refrig overnite.  Transport to the tailgate site in a cooler with ice.  Remove them from the ice/cooler about 15 minutes before grilling (IF doing this in HOT weather, maybe 5-9 minutes before throwing on the grill.).Grill the burgers when ready, give a little extra time than you may used too since they are pretty thick and sometimes the tailgates grills are not as hot as home grills.  After you flip the burgers (I sear my burgers by pressing down on the top with the spatula) place 1 tablespoon of the remaining whiskey filling on top of the cooked side of the burger.  The filling will be oozing out of the burger, but don't worry, the topping will more than make up for whatever leaks out.  IF you have the grill space you can toast the burger buns as well.Swab the bottom of the burger bun with BBQ sauce, place the burger on top and garnish with your lettuce, red onions, and whatever else you what to top it with, cover with the crown of the bun and ENJOY! !! !I was able to get some nice sweet corn to grill; we also had macaroni salad, potato salad, and chips.   I know it sounds like a lot of work, but really it is not.  The pre-prep makes this very easy on game day.  The corn was not hard to cook either.  We used one coleman grill (standard equip for tailgate) and had no troubles.  Just adjust your cooking times for the burger thickness. I know it the "off season" and here in Indiana the weather is uh, ummmmm, oddd, so the mind starts to think, and mine said the other day "self, I wonder how that Whiskey Burger recipe would taste as a meatloaf?".   Come to find out it tastes pretty damn good!    I called my younger brother, who is Michigan Fan, and sister-in-law, who is a Notre Dame fan, up and invited them over for the experiment along with my wife who is Wisconsin grad.  I mixed it up, baked it for about an hour and served with the traditional "meatloaf" sides-biscuts, mashed potatoes, and corn.  We paired it with a red wine and glasses of ice water.   Everyone enjoyed it very much.The only change I made was:  I diced the red onions and tomato up and added it to the center of the loaf with about 2/3 of the whiskey cheese filling.  I added a little more bread crumbs to make sure it stayed together and spread the remaining 1/3 of the cheese mixture on top of the loaf for the last 15 minutes of baking(which I did at 350 for about an hour).   P.S.As a precaution, in the event it did not turn out well, and to assure that Buckeye Nation continues to grow strong, I served my four year old son hot dog and the sides!





nothing wrong with a good hot dog!





I fried beef hot dogs in beef fat yesterday and it was AWESOME!!!





This is a flank steak I made, so I'm sharing.1 flank steak1 sweet onion, sliced thinn1 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped1 red bell pepper, sliced thin4 cloves of garlic, finely chopped1 cup of mushrooms, sliced thin1 TB chipotle puree (or chipotle salsa would work)1/2 up of blue cheese crumbles3 TB sugarolive oilsalt and pepperRub the steak with a little oil, and liberally salt and pepper. Set aside and let it come to room temperature. Heat the grill to high heat.In a sautee pan, add a little oil and the onions and red pepper. Season with salt and pepper. Bring to a high heat, then reduce and add the sugar to carmelize. When half way, add the jalepeno and garlic. Continue to sautee and add the mushrooms and puree with about 5 minutes left. You may need to add a little more oil or even water at this time. Reduce the heat, add the blue cheese and let cook until the mushrooms are done.Put the steak on the grill and cook to medium-rare - about 6 minutes per side. Remove the steak and let it rest for a few minutes on the cutting board covered with foil.Thinly slice the steak on the bias and add to the sautee pan. Stir to combine and heat through. Add a little more blue cheese at this time, if desired.Serve with potatoes or rice and a nice veggie like asparagus.





I was just thinking that the above recipe could be served in a flour tortilla as well. That might be really excellent.





flour tortilla and a frosted mug of Budweiser!





there are already carbs in the tortilla ya don't need rice to boot





 MaximumSam wrote: I fried beef hot dogs in beef fat yesterday and it was AWESOME!!! yum





MrNubbz wrote: there are already carbs in the tortilla ya don't need rice to bootIt's an either/or thing Mr. N.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:11:19 PM
Potato and parsnip puree2 parsnips, peeled and diced into 1/2" cubes3 large yukon gold potatoes, peeled and diced into 2" cubes6 cloves of garlic, finely diced or pressed1/2 stick of butter1/2 cup of olive oil1/2 cup warm milksalt and pepperBring a pot of salted water to a heavy boil. Add the parsnips and boil for 10 minutes. Add the potatoes and boil for 20 minutes longer, until parsnips and potatoes are fork tender. Add the olive oil and butter to a saucepan and add the garlic. Season with salt and pepper. Cook the garlic on low/medium heat to just browning. Add the milk, stir, and remove from the heat.Drain the parsnips and potatoes and return to the pot. Pour the milk mixture over the potatoes. Season with salt and pepper. Beat the mixture to a puree and serve.Can be garnished with fresh parsley and can also be served with grated parmeson or romano cheese, but I like them plain.





Roasted red pepper and shallot sauce1 whole roasted red pepper, seeds and skin removed1 shallot, finely dicedpinch of saffron strands1/2 cup dry white wine1/4 cup white wine (champaign) vinegar1/2 stick of butter, cold and cubedsalt and pepperAdd the wine, vinegar, shallot and saffron to a small saucepan and season to taste. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to medium/low. Reduce the mixture to about a 1/4 cup. Puree the red pepper in a food processor or blender and add it to the reduced mixture. Whisk in the butter one cube at a time. The sauce will emulsify and it's ready to serve on fish or chicken.I served this over sauteed sea bass last night.ToDieFor





847badgerfan wrote: I was just thinking that the above recipe could be served in a flour tortilla as well. That might be really excellent.I'll throw just about anything into a flour tortilla and eat it.  Corn tortillas are good too, and are actually a slightly "healthier" option (until you deep-fry them, that is).





Tortillas are verstile little buggers. Like rice and potatoes.I like to grill hotdogs (big, beefy ones) and put them in tortillas along with chili, cheese, yellow mustard and onions. I've also added fritos or other chips for crunch.





847badgerfan wrote:I like to grill hotdogs (big, beefy ones) and put them in tortillas along with chili, cheese, yellow mustard and onions. I've also added fritos or other chips for crunch.Down here in Texico that's called a sausage wrap.  Most common filling is BBQ sausage, but any grilled sausage or hot dogs can be used.  And any toppings you like too, for me it's usually yellow mustard, jalapenos, and grilled onions, or sometimes BBQ sauce.(It's okay to eat BBQ sauce on a sausage wrap, just not on real BBQ  )





Anyone who has ever had a Big Mac and liked it will appreciate this sauce recipe...1 c. Miracle Whip  1/3 c. bottle creamy French dressing  1/4 c. sweet pickle relish  1 tbsp. sugar  1/4 tsp. pepper  1 tsp. dry minced onion     Combine. Mix with fork. Refrigerate in covered container for 24 hours and serve. Makes 2 cups.





I had a request for a blackened chicken recipe, and here is the basic rub I use for most things blackened. It's a modification from a recipe I got from Emeril.3 tablespoons paprika2 tablespoons cayenne pepper2 tablespoons salt2 tablespoons garlic powder1 tablespoon black pepper1 tablespoon onion powder1 tablespoon dried oregano1 tablespoon dried thymePut all ingredients into a spice grinder and combine. Use to rub on chicken, fish or pork, to taste.Remember to put some oil or spray the meat before rubbing so it sticks.





To make a chicken or fish sandwich, use the rub from above. Use a nice, fresh roll of your choice along with some lettuce, red onion slices and tomato slices.Toast and coat each slice of roll with some of this:1 Cup Mayo3 TB chopped fresh taragon leaves or cilantro leaves (depending on taste)Juice of one lemon (for taragon) OR juice of one lime (for cilantro)salt and fresh black pepperCombine and place in the refridgerator for 24 hours in a covered container.





 847badgerfan wrote: I had a request for a blackened chicken recipe, and here is the basic rub I use for most things blackened. It's a modification from a recipe I got from Emeril. Put all ingredients into a spice grinder and combine. Use to rub on chicken, fish or pork, to taste.  do you have a different version for beef?





Beef can withstand alot more than the other proteins so I tend to mix it up a little more - a little more heat, a little more herb. It depends on the dish.





So I've been reading up and have decided to move away from more processed oils like vegetable and canola and towards more natural fats like olive oil, butter, lard, and beef tallow.  Mmm beef tallow.  Anyone else done that?  I'd like to make my own butter - any tips?





Compound butter? Or butter from scratch?What is tallow?What have you read about the oils?How about peanut, sesame and grapeseed? Anything on those oils?





speaking of beef tallow, I was wondering if the "Good Eats" burger was ground together with beef tallow to give it some flavor and enough fat to cause it to stick together in a patty.Here in Iowa, the land of corn-fed whitetail.  We always ground our venison with beef tallow.





847badgerfan wrote: Compound butter? Or butter from scratch?What is tallow?What have you read about the oils?How about peanut, sesame and grapeseed? Anything on those oils?Butter from scratch - it sounds pretty simple - run cream in a blender or Kitchenaid until it butter forms, then you have to wash it, which doesn't sound too complicated.  I would really like to try it though.Tallow is just beef fat typically rendered from the suet.  I've done that a couple times, and I absolutely love it.  It is perfect for frying, especially steaks.  McDonald's used to fry their fries in beef fat, but switched to all sorts of other garbage to avoid saturated fat.My concern about the oils is the idea that one of the bigger problems for health is the ratio of essential fatty acids, specifically Omega-6 to Omega-3.  Both are necessary for continued living, but Omega-3s are typically found in seafood and a few other places, while Omega 6s are found in high quantities in other foods.  The problem voiced about "healthy" oils like vegetable oil is that they have very quantities of Omega 6 and low of Omega 3.  Now, I am hardly an expert on this type of stuff, but I've read some lately and it seems believable.  The same camp of people tend to think fats with high quantities of saturated fat are perfectly fine.  They make good arguments and I tend to find myself convinced.  The most accessible of these people is probably from www.marksdailyapple.com, although really the whole "primal" and "paleo" diet movements are based on a lot of the same principles.  There is a post about those oils and a bunch of other ones at Mark's Daily Apple.  Fascinating stuff, really, but I am always curious as to other's people experiences and opinions.  I don't want to eat a bunch of butter and die from a heart attack.  I also don't want to skimp out on all that great stuff and then die of a heart attack anyway because I avoided the wrong things.





Oh, OK. I know what that is.I think, like anything, you can eat whatever you want in moderation.I have a funny story. I've been prone to gout flares my entire life and I just had the worst one I've ever had. I don't drink beer. I've cut WAY back on all alcohol consumption. I've cut back on red meat.This last flare was caused by eating too much seafood, and, get this...TOO MANY WHOLE GRAINS.Whole grains are high in purine, which causes uric acid production, which causes gout.I ate too many. Holy crap, right?!?!?





847badgerfan wrote: Oh, OK. I know what that is.I think, like anything, you can eat whatever you want in moderation.I have a funny story. I've been prone to gout flares my entire life and I just had the worst one I've ever had. I don't drink beer. I've cut WAY back on all alcohol consumption. I've cut back on red meat.This last flare was caused by eating too much seafood, and, get this...TOO MANY WHOLE GRAINS.Whole grains are high in purine, which causes uric acid production, which causes gout.I ate too many. Holy crap, right?!?!?I don't know anything about gout.  So I investigated.  And I'm curious - purines are apparently the evildoer here, but purines in plants are apparently ok, and purines in animals are apparently not ok.  And beer isn't ok.  And now whole wheat isn't ok.  And I'm thinking - maybe purines aren't really what the problem is.  I found one website - GoutPal, which seemed to agree, but his page was pretty hard to read and didn't provide much reasoning.  After more perusal I found an alternate theory that fructose may be the bad guy, meaning sugar/corn syrup, soda, etc.  Then I found this link to a missing chapter of a book called "Good Calories, Bad Calories," by Gary Taubes, which focused on gout. Thoughts?





Who knows?I get bad flares when I have to much spinach or too many mushrooms.One of my favorite dishes I make is based on spinach and mushrooms.It sucks.I've also had bad flares from too much chicken.I'm blood type O.





So to update a previous post - I saw Snowville Creamery Cream at Krogers of all places - (usually you can only get it at Whole Foods - it's not ultra-pasteurized, very fresh, and mostly grassfed).  So I bought a half gallon and went to making some butter.  It was surprisingly easy and took just minutes.  The first step was putting in the Kitchen Aid with the Whisk and running it until the fat separated from the liquid.  Then you put it in collender and rinse it while you squeeze it until you get all the liquid out.  And that's it.  Fresh butter on the table.





Was it good? Better than a stick from the store?





847badgerfan wrote: Was it good? Better than a stick from the store?Definitely very clean and sweet tasting.  If you like making compound butter, it would be an excellent time to make it, since it's already pretty malleable.  Also, since you like having guests, there is something pretty cool about making butter while dinner is cooking.





Sounds pretty simple and worth the effort. Thanks.Is there anything you can do with the leftover liquid?





 847badgerfan wrote: Sounds pretty simple and worth the effort. Thanks.Is there anything you can do with the leftover liquid? Probably - it's traditional buttermilk (which is not the same as the buttermilk at the store).  Store bought buttermilk is regular milk that has been cultured with bacteria, so it is much thicker.





Interesting. I'd like to try that to treat chicken and calamari. I almost always use buttermilk to tenderize either of those meats.Also... I noted that you mentioned putting citrus in regular milk instead of using buttermilk. I don't think that would work.I'm going to try the milk thing with lemon on some calamri this weekend to test it. I'll let you know.





847badgerfan wrote: Oh, OK. I know what that is.I think, like anything, you can eat whatever you want in moderation.I have a funny story. I've been prone to gout flares my entire life and I just had the worst one I've ever had. I don't drink beer. I've cut WAY back on all alcohol consumption. I've cut back on red meat.This last flare was caused by eating too much seafood, and, get this...TOO MANY WHOLE GRAINS.Whole grains are high in purine, which causes uric acid production, which causes gout.I ate too many. Holy crap, right?!?!?Um I'm a big violater,better go back to coffee,bacon & eggs sorta screwed either way





Today is gonna be Italian day.I've got some veal cutlets, ground pork, ground beef, potatoes, pasta, fresh veggies and a stocked pantry.I'll let you know how things turn out and if they do, the recipes will be posted.





up and at 'em early to start preparing the Saturday feastmotivated by food!





Marinara is on. Meatballs are baked and now braising.Gonna pound the veal and flour it next, for ease of prep later.





well???  results??





Much success.Carbonara was awesome. Veal was the best I ever ate. Meatballs were fantastic.I'll get the recipes up when I figure them out, except the carbonara. I used a recipe from Giada for that and it worked.http://www.foodnetwork.com/rec...cipe/index.htmlI used half and half in place of cream, and I drained the bacon fat in favor of olive oil.





I suspected success





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:12:12 PM
Meatballs1 LB ground beef (85%)1 LB ground pork (80%)1 cup bread crumbs1 cup grated parmesan cheese1 egg1 TB oregano1 TB basil1 TB onion powder1 TB garlic powber1 TB parsley flakes1/2 cup milksalt and pepperPreheat the oven to 450F.Beat the egg and milk, then add the spices and the cheese and bread crumbs and combine so it is consistent. Add the meat and hand mix to fully combine.Form the mixture into 1.5" balls and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Leave a little room in between the balls so that air can flow. Bake for 15 minutes and turn. Bake for 15 minutes more and remove from the oven to rest.Braise the meatballs in 1/2 marinara and 1/2 beef broth for 3 hours in a sauce pan on low heat.Marinara recipe to follow...





I made a crabmeat croissant for dinner today, with vinegar potatoes. I'll get those recipes up tomorrow, along with the veal from last night.AMAZING.





wish I lived 8 hours closer





Hey any of you guys have marinade suggestions that you've tried for Pork Loin.Got a good price on a couple of 'em and like to try this week





I like to use sage with pork. It's a great pairing.How are you going to cook it?





grilling,previously Ive had the loins vacuum sealed in a marinade and they turned out great.I have marinade recipes just thought I'd ask for one already sampled.The loin is a little over 21/2lbs





Is it the loin, or the tenderloin?





Been off with elbow surgery if I went into work I'd have less to do,Anyhoo TENDERLOIN.Thanx





Try the one I posted a while back, marinating in the chipotle and adobo puree along with some apple cider vinegar and canola oil.Go with a can of the chipotles and puree them. Add 1/2 cup each of the vinegar and the oil, as well as salt and pepper. Let it go overnight if possible.If you want, finish it with the apple juice reduction I posted, or just some apple sauce mixed with some roasted diced jalepeno and shallot to warm.Pair with roasted or grilled sweet potato planks.





Will do,ever try this a friend sent me this said he got it off the web.Said it was lip smackin'Brine the tenderloins In a medium bowl, mix 1/4 C Kosher salt and 1/4C sugar with 1 pint cool water until dissolved(for every tenderloin). Trim the tenderloins of excess fat and silverskin and submerge them in the brine; let stand about 45 minutes. Remove the pork from the brine, rinse thoroughly, and pat dry.





I've done brining quite a bit, but I let that go overnight as well.I also like to add toasted spices, like allspice berries, juniper berries, cloves, etc. They add a nice dimension to the brine. Brown sugar instead of regular and some cidar vinegar (a TB or 2) also works nicely.Cut back the salt a bit and you can easily go overnight on brining - especially with whole roasts and such.





Badge you said marinade overnite if possible.I'll makeit in the morning and let sit til around 5 PM-should do it.Is that chipolte puree recipe in this thread?





Veal Picatta1 LB veal cutlets, pounded to about 1/8" thickFloursalt and pepper2 eggs, beaten with a little milkOlive oil2 TB unsalted butter1.5 TB capersJuice of 2 lemons1 cup dry white wineSeason the floour and dredge the veal in the flour, covering uniformly and shaking off the excess. Preheat a sautee pan to medium heat and lightly coat the bottom with olive oil, adding more oil throughout the process as needed to cook all the veal. Pass the veal through the egg wash and then straight into the pan. Sautee for roughly 2 minutes per side, so the veal browns and cooks through. place on a plate with paper towel to drain and keep warm. Deglaze the pan with the wine and reduce by half. Add the butter, the lemon juice and the caper and whisk to thicken. Return the veal to the pan and coat with the sauce. Serve over mashed potatoes and add a little more sauce and fresh parsley to the place, alongside some roasted carrots and/or asparagus.





Well Badge pureed' the chipolte's.Used Apple cider & white vinegar with the oil and sprinkled some sage in there.Prolly pull it out of the marinade & grill around 6 PM





Good. don't forget the sauce though. Very important.





 847badgerfan wrote: Veal Picatta1 LB veal cutlets, pounded to about 1/8" thickFloursalt and pepper2 eggs, beaten with a little milkOlive oil2 TB unsalted butter1.5 TB capersJuice of 2 lemons1 cup dry white wineSeason the floour and dredge the veal in the flour, covering uniformly and shaking off the excess. Preheat a sautee pan to medium heat and lightly coat the bottom with olive oil, adding more oil throughout the process as needed to cook all the veal. Pass the veal through the egg wash and then straight into the pan. Sautee for roughly 2 minutes per side, so the veal browns and cooks through. place on a plate with paper towel to drain and keep warm. Deglaze the pan with the wine and reduce by half. Add the butter, the lemon juice and the caper and whisk to thicken. Return the veal to the pan and coat with the sauce. Serve over mashed potatoes and add a little more sauce and fresh parsley to the place, alongside some roasted carrots and/or asparagus. I make this as well, I enjoy it very much, my wife, not so much.  He has this phobia about Veal.





Any good Tuna Steak recipes from the CFN Kitchenmates?





Ahi?If it's fresh enough you need not do much. Slice it thinly and serve it with some traditional Japanese condiments in its raw state.If it was frozen, make sure it's thawed and lightly spray it with cooking spray. Then sprinkle it with black and white sesame seeds to cover it. Sear it on high heat in a cast iron skillet or other heavy pan, about a minute per side maximum. You want it to be warm, but raw inside still.Slice it thin, arrange it on a plate nicely, and place some pickled ginger, wasabe and soy sauce on the side.





 847badgerfan wrote: Ahi?If it's fresh enough you need not do much. Slice it thinly and serve it with some traditional Japanese condiments in its raw state.If it was frozen, make sure it's thawed and lightly spray it with cooking spray. Then sprinkle it with black and white sesame seeds to cover it. Sear it on high heat in a cast iron skillet or other heavy pan, about a minute per side maximum. You want it to be warm, but raw inside still.Slice it thin, arrange it on a plate nicely, and place some pickled ginger, wasabe and soy sauce on the side. I lightly coated it with olive oil, salt, and pepper, and broiled it about 6 min on one side and about 3 on the other.  May have been a tad over done for some, but I do not like it rare, more medium rare.  I made a cucumber sauce with finely diced cucs, lemon juice, dill weed, pepper/salt and sour cream.  Not too bad, rather plain, but enjoyable.





Broke down and bought a little smoker - I had been smoking things using a combo of starting on the grill and finishing in the oven, but that requires a lot of work and I just want to watch basketball and drink beer.  Any tips, smoker people?





I just bought some ahi that was caught 3 hours ago.Hanalei is a good place to be for that. I'm gonna lightly grill it and serve with the ginger, wasabe and soy trilogy.Mmmm.Smokey or UTee would be your best bets on the smoking Max. I'm going to defer.





My main question now is whether there is a good way to convert a wet smoker, which is what I have, to a dry smoker, and back again.





847badgerfan wrote: I just bought some ahi that was caught 3 hours ago.How did they get it to Chi-town in 3rs?F-18 Hornet?





I was lucky enough to pick up some just-caught mahi mahi last night at the beach, so that is what I will be making today.I'm going to mix a little butter, teriyaki and salt and pepper and glaze as I cook it gently on the grill.Then it's home tomorrow.Bummer, but it sounds like the weather at home has been just as nice as it is here.





Golfing Weather





Hmm....learn something new every dayKobe beef (the real deal) can't and isn't sold in the US. People who claim they are selling you Kobe beef anything are taking you for a ride.





won't bother meI wouldn't spend have of that on the real thingthe steaks and beef I get locally are some of the best in the world and plenty good enough for medon't need no stinking Japanese beef and don't need no stinking Russian fish eggs





FearlessF wrote: won't bother meI wouldn't spend have of that on the real thingthe steaks and beef I get locally are some of the best in the world and plenty good enough for medon't need no stinking Japanese beef and don't need no stinking Russian fish eggsRussian Vodka is alright and you drink Rice Beer like the Japanese





Stolichnaya vodka is my favoriteOtherwise I go with Ketel One





Luksusowa - Polish Potato Vodka,rated a Best Buy - Beverage Tasting Institute or Tito's are my Favs.Prolly toss Sky in there too





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:13:07 PM
I am obviously a huge fan of Tito'sworthy of a best buy awardWish I could get the big bottles of Tito's here





FearlessF wrote: I am obviously a huge fan of Tito'sworthy of a best buy awardWish I could get the big bottles of Tito's hereLet me know how many you want.10 cases? 20? That should get you by for a month or so.





Anyone have some good ideas for about 3-4 pounds of country style pork ribs?I tried something last weekend, and didn't like it.  Slow cooked them in the oven for about 4 hours at 200 covered in garlic and lemon, then covered in sauce and cooked for another hour at 225, bleh.Should I just use my regular rib recipe on them, even though they aren't actually ribs?





EastLansingAdam wrote: Anyone have some good ideas for about 3-4 pounds of country style pork ribs?I tried something last weekend, and didn't like it.  Slow cooked them in the oven for about 4 hours at 200 covered in garlic and lemon, then covered in sauce and cooked for another hour at 225, bleh.Should I just use my regular rib recipe on them, even though they aren't actually ribs?That's what I typically do.  Country ribs are a little tricky because they aren't exactly a universal piece of meat - they tend to cut up all sorts of things and call them country ribs.  But generally, take a look at the fat content in the rib - the higher it is, the longer you can cook them on indirect heat and the better they will taste.  I am usually too lazy and just cook them all the same time, which always leads to a couple being dry.





I agree with Max.You can also braise them in seasoned pork or beef stock after grilling them.





Didn't even bother throwing them on the grill, partially because it was about 40 and raining.  Slow cooked them with apple cidar, cidar vinegar, brown sugar, onions and BBQ sauce.  Worked well.





847badgerfan wrote: FearlessF wrote: I am obviously a huge fan of Tito'sworthy of a best buy awardWish I could get the big bottles of Tito's hereLet me know how many you want.10 cases? 20? That should get you by for a month or so.That reminds me, I have a case of Tito's handles leftover from football season just waiting in my cabinet.  Big baseball weekend series against the departing Aggies, I should drag that sucker out and kill it.





don't waste it on the Aggies!





FearlessF wrote: Stolichnaya vodka is my favoriteOtherwise I go with Ketel OneI like Stolichnaya too. On my trips to Russia I drank the real stuff over there. Cost was 60 cents for a full liter and the proof over there is 125.





847badgerfan wrote: FearlessF wrote: I am obviously a huge fan of Tito'sworthy of a best buy awardWish I could get the big bottles of Tito's hereLet me know how many you want.10 cases? 20? That should get you by for a month or so.I think you are right on with that estimate.





Ya well it is the off season you know





20 cases during SHARKWATER season





Change O' plans today, unfortunately. 39 degrees, rain and 8 foot waves put a damper on fishing. Oh well.So...I'm making short ribs, mashed potatoes and parsnips, grilled sweet corn, tomato salad and grilled broccoli.Just poured a 2009 Edmeades Zinfindel, an axiously awaiting a pour of JW Gold that the wife got me for our 15th.It could be worse. Life is pretty good.





This is something I love, and I started getting creative over the weekend to come up with this recipe. There are several variations around, but this one is mine and I think it's the best. Finally - a creamy garlic dressing that doesn't have Big Mac calories....Low fat creamy garlic dressing 1 cup fat-free mayo½ cup half and half½ cup skim milk5 cloves of garlic, minced2 TB soy sauce2 TB lemon juiceSalt and cracked black pepper to taste Combine all ingredients in a blender or food processor, and process until smooth. Let it sit for a day in the fridge to thicken.





847badgerfan wrote: This is something I love, and I started getting creative over the weekend to come up with this recipe. There are several variations around, but this one is mine and I think it's the best. Finally - a creamy garlic dressing that doesn't have Big Mac calories....Low fat creamy garlic dressing 1 cup fat-free mayo½ cup half and half½ cup skim milk5 cloves of garlic, minced2 TB soy sauce2 TB lemon juiceSalt and cracked black pepper to taste Combine all ingredients in a blender or food processor, and process until smooth. Let it sit for a day in the fridge to thicken.WTF is in fat free mayo?





I probably don't want to know - and next time I will use the real stuff or just the reduced fat variety, and skip the 1/2 and 1/2 in favor of all skim milk or maybe lowfat buttermilk.My guess is there are no egg yolks in fat free mayo, for starters.





I love mayo, but make your own.  The essential ingredients are an egg yolk and oil.  I would only use olive oil due to its low polyunsaturated fat content. Lemon juice, salt, vinegar, mustard, and sugar are all good ingredients, and there are many more.  Mmmm mayo.Also a good slaw recipe would be a half a shredded cabbage, a quarter of a chopped onion, a few spoonfuls of mayo, a splash of rice vinegar, and salt and pepper.





I do love homemade mayo, but that day I just used stuff that was in the fridge. I didn't even know we had it, to be honest. The dressing still came out good - and I will use the real stuff next time. Thanks.





It's been a while, but I've been a little busy lately.This is a recipe for a marinade that works well with tougher cuts of beef (flank, skirt) and chicken. Let the beef go for 24 hours, and chicken about 8 or so.4 sprigs of fresh rosemary, stems removed4 cloves of garlic2 tbl capers1 tbl sea salt1 tbl fresh cracked pepper1 tbl brown mustardJuice of 1 lemon1/2 cup canola oil or grapeseed oilCombine all these ingredients in a food processor or blender and work until somewhat smooth.Hint:If you use this marinade for beef, you can re-use it for chicken afterward. Keep in mind though - you cannot do this backward. You will die. Beef is always first.





Tomorrow I'm making fried chicken using some of the suggestions from you all.1. Soak chicken for 4 hours in milk2. Egg wash3. Dip in bowl of flour4. Dip in bowl of bread crumbs and seasonings: salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, Old Bay, and Oregano5. Fry in vegetable oil.





PennState4Life wrote: Tomorrow I'm making fried chicken using some of the suggestions from you all.1. Soak chicken for 4 hours in milk2. Egg wash3. Dip in bowl of flour4. Dip in bowl of bread crumbs and seasonings: salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, Old Bay, and Oregano5. Fry in vegetable oil.Milk, or buttermilk? I prefer the latter as it has enzymes that regular milk doesn't.Also, you're going to want to go in the flour before you do the egg wash. The flour will coat the chicken, and the egg wash will hold to the flour and then the bread crumbs.Let us know how you make out.





I'm using whole milk because I couldn't find buttermilk at the store.  As for reversing the flour/egg wash order, I tried that last time and the flour washed off when I dipped the part in the egg wash bowl.  But now that I'm thinking about it, scooping up the egg by hand and placing it on the floured part would not wash the flour off.  Thanks for mentioning that.





Everything turned out pretty good: crispy on the outside and juicy on the inside.  Unfortunately, I poured a larger amount of bread crumbs into the bowl than needed and the seasonings got buried in them, preventing their flavors from shining through.  Lesson learned.





What is the purpose of soaking the chicken in Buttermilk?I am sure this sounds like a weird question, but if the purpose is to bring out some sort of flavor or provide additional moisture, would this be advisable before smoking a whole chicken?Here are a couple of my favorite Summer time go-tos: Brine a Pork Loin overnightPat Dry. Cover in your favorite rib rub. paint with a mixture of half Heinz 57 steak sauce and plain yellow mustard. Completely wrap the whole thing in the best bacon you can find. Throw in your smoker until 10 degrees from your desired temp (I like to use apple to smoke it)... take off and wrap in foil and towels and put in cooler to rest for 20 minutes. Good eating. Marinade Chicken Breast cubed into 1.5 inch cubes and large sliced fresh mushrooms in a mixture of 1/4 apple cider vinegar,  1/4 honey, 1/2 lite soy sauce. Add  a few tablespoons of veggie oil and a whole crap load of chopped green onion and garlic that has been run through a press. Do not marniate for over 3-4 hours, as the vinegar and soy sauce it so salty/acid, it will nearly cook the chicken. Wrap the chicken in bacon and skewer along with the mushrooms, pinneapple and onion. Cook over a medium hot grill, turning frequently to avoid flareups. The only take about 10-15 minutes to cook, and are nearly impossible to mess up. You will not be disappointed.





MUSTARD & HERB PORK CHOPSStir salt into water to create a brine (I do about 1 cup salt per 10 cups water - for 2 chops)Place the pork chops in the brine for about an hourCombine (per pork chop)...0.5 tbs marjoram0.5 tbs rosemary0.5 tbs thyme2 tbs dijon mustardAs you grill the chops apply the sauce generously.  Remember to adjust the sauce for however many pork chops you are making.  There should be none left when you are done grilling.I served with a grilled veggie medley and roasted redskin potatoes.





CARIBBEAN PORKI used a pound of boneless pork chops for this, but I imagine you could use a variety of pork...Combine1 cup brown sugar2 cups apple cidar1/4 cup salt1 tbs rosemary2 tbs pepper2 cloves garlicBring ingrediants to boil, then let simmer to totally dissolved.  Let pork marinade in marinade, adding enough water to cover.Refridgerate overnight, then grill.I made it with this sauce, but honestly, I think it was flavorful enough without it, that if I made it again, I would skip the sauce.1 tbs olive oil1 pear, peeled and cut into small cubes1 tbs caribbean jerk spice8 oz chicken stock0.5 cups dark rum1 tbs buttersalt and pepper to tasteSimmer until totally dissolved, you may have to whisk a bit to get the pear to totally dissolve.I served with green beans and potato wedges.





PORK SANDWICHESGrill the pork loin chops just with salt and pepper to taste.Take a baguette and divide into 1/4ths and then cut in half to prepare sandwiches.Combine...2 tbs cidar vinegar1 tbs dry mustard1 tbs dijon mustard1 tsp brown sugarWhick together into blended, then spread on top portion of sandwich as you would any topping.Place the grilled pork on the bottom piece of break and top with anythign of your choice (I did lettuce and onions).  Place the top piece of the baguette with the sauce already on it on top.I served with sweet potato fries and corn on the cob.





ASIAN CHICKEN3 lbs chicken breastsCombine1/3 cup soy sauce2 tbs sugar1 tbs white wine1/2 onion (grated)2 cloves garlic1 tsp gingerPlace the breasts in the marinade and refidgerate for 1 hourRemove chicken, but reserve marinadeTake reserve marinade and add...1 tsp dry mustard1/4 tsp pepperGrill the chicken, brushing with the marinade.To create glaze, combine...1/4 cup soy sauce1 tbs sesame oil1 tbs butterCombine over heat until melted.Remove the chicken from the grill, put glaze over top.I served with rice and sugar snap peas.





BALSAMIC GARLIC CHICKENSeason chicken with salt and pepper and grill as desired.Sauce2 tbs olive oil1 tbs butter5 cloves garlic1 onion, chopped1/3 cup balsamic vinegar1 cup chicken broth2 tbs flourHeat the olive oil in a panAdd the garlic and onion and fryAdd the vinegar and broth and bring to boilReduce heat and add the flour, stirring constantly until desired consistancyServe the chicken with the sauce drizzled over.





Shortcut "homemade" potato chipsSure you can make homemade chips, but when time does not permit, try these.First, you want to buy a nice bag of all-natural kettle chips, lightly salted.Heat them in a foil pan on the grill while your meat is resting.When the oils start releasing from the chips, lightly coat them with a blue cheese/rosemary dipping sauce*, toss and serve.*For the sauce, sautee 1 finely diced shallot and 3 finely diced cloves of garlic. Add 1 cup of dry white wine and reduce to 1/4 volume. Add one up of heavy cream and 1 small container of blue cheese or 1 cup of fresh crumbles. Stir until the cheese is melted and add 2 sprigs of very finely diced rosemary. Remove from heat.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:14:09 PM
TEQUILA LIME CHICKEN1 lbs chicken breast2 cloves garlic1/4 cup lime juice1/4 cup gold tequila1/2 tsp saltdash of pepper3/4 tsp chili powder1/2 tbs olive oilCombine all ingredients and marinade the chicken for 30 minutes.Throw it on the grill.Simple





Does anyone use an electric smoker?  I am somewhat perplexed by the one I got.  I got it just for the ease of use, but it seems to take forever, and I can't quite find the range where my meat is perfectly done.  Everything comes out either too tough or too tender.





I am going to try something this weekend and wondered if anyone had experience with it.  I like sweet potatoes with ribs.  At home I make a pecan crusted sweet potato dish in the oven.  It is delicious, but I can't make it or even heat it properly at a tailgate/campsite.  I checked with google and found that sweet potatoes can be baked on a grill (wrapped in tinfoil) but it takes 45 minutes.  That is probably too long for people to wait.  Another site suggested slicing the sweet potatoes into roughly 1/4" slices and grilling them for 5-10 minutes.  Has anyone tried this or does anyone have another idea?  I was thinking that I could mix up some cinnamon or brownsugar (or both) with butter in advance and offer that as a spread for the grilled sweet potato wedges.  Thoughts?  Please note that this needs to be a tailgate recipe.  If I can't do it with a stove, grill, a few pots and pans, and a limited number of ingredients then it will not work for this application.





BurntEyes wrote:Easy dessert... Easy to pre prep Take an apple for every one you want Core out the apple and wash it well. Take aluminum foil and wrap around the bottom In the top of the apple poor in sugar/cinnamon mixed like cinnamon toast (2/3 sugar 1/2 cinnamon) into the open core of the appel. Drop in a small piece of butter (Totally optional) Wrap foil tight As you are finishing your meat off drop in the premade apples After your meal and a few brews, (the apples should be soft to the touch through the foil) open and serve.I'm really curious about this.  Our thread only has three desserts.  The other two are my chocolate/PB Buckeyes which are obviously pre-prep and cold serve and UTErin's cupcakes which require an oven and therefore can't be prepared at most tailgates.  Thus, this is the only hot dessert in this entire thread that I could actually make at my tailgate/campsite.  I plan to try it this weekend.  When you say to "core out the apple", do you mean to just cut out the core and leave the rest completely intact?  I have an apple-corer, but it cuts the rest into wedges and I don't think that would work for this recipe.  Am I reading that correctly, and do you do it with a knife or do you have a tool for it?





Sweet Potato Planks – Serves 8 4 sweet potatoes, sliced lengthwise into ¼ inch think planksCanola oilCourse sea saltFreshly ground black pepper Brush the sweet potato planks with canola oil and liberally season both sides with the salt and pepper. Place on the grill on medium heat and grill until cooked through, about 5-7 minutes per side. Serve immediately. TIP: Move to indirect heat in order to prevent burning.





Thanks badge, that sounds good.  I am not sure that everyone in my group will want them with salt and pepper so I think I'll go half and half.  I'll do half with canola, salt, and pepper and the other half with just a little canola and have cinnamon-sugar (like you use for cinnamon toast and also for Burnt's apples) and butter for the other half. I'm glad to get it confirmed that grilling them as planks works.





cinnamon-sugar on sweet potato planks = dessert





 medinabuckeye1 wrote:  BurntEyes wrote: Easy dessert...   Easy to pre prep   Take an apple for every one you want   Core out the apple and wash it well.   Take aluminum foil and wrap around the bottom   In the top of the apple poor in sugar/cinnamon mixed like cinnamon toast (2/3 sugar 1/2 cinnamon) into the open core of the appel.   Drop in a small piece of butter (Totally optional)   Wrap foil tight   As you are finishing your meat off drop in the premade apples   After your meal and a few brews, (the apples should be soft to the touch through the foil) open and serve.  I'm really curious about this.  Our thread only has three desserts.  The other two are my chocolate/PB Buckeyes which are obviously pre-prep and cold serve and UTErin's cupcakes which require an oven and therefore can't be prepared at most tailgates.  Thus, this is the only hot dessert in this entire thread that I could actually make at my tailgate/campsite.  I plan to try it this weekend.  When you say to "core out the apple", do you mean to just cut out the core and leave the rest completely intact?  I have an apple-corer, but it cuts the rest into wedges and I don't think that would work for this recipe.  Am I reading that correctly, and do you do it with a knife or do you have a tool for it? Keep it intact. Simply using a paring or heck any knife to cut out the core. So basically you have a apple donut, if you will. Then pour the sugar and cinnamon inside the core using the foil as the bottom. When it's soft to the touch, it's ready. Nice thing for camping and tailgating is, when premaid, if you don't use butter, you don't even have to refrigerate them. With butter, be sure to put them in a cooler. I occasional throw one these in the pack when trekking, and you should see the looks of envy from others. (I usually share)





Fearless:You are probably right, I guess I just have a sweet tooth! Burnt:Thanks for the clarification, now I have my menu for this weekend's major meal complete:Ribs - I will cook them in the Crockpot on Friday with Apple Cider vinegar, Bourbon, onions, peppers, garlic, and apple slices then put some sauce on them and grill them on location.  I have a homemade BBQ sauce, but it isn't perfect, I'm still experimenting. Chicken - I am just going to use a simple marinade for this.  I will cut bonelss-skinless chicken breasts in two and place them in Italian Dressing in a container in the cooler then grill them on location. Sweet Potato Planks - Half badge's way with salt and pepper, half with butter and cinnamon-sugar available. Rice - This is the most unimpressive thing, just boil-in-a-bag rice.  I know it isn't the greatest, but really easy to cook at a tailgate. Veggies - just veggiesCrescent Rolls - I'll make those up Friday during the MSU-Boise game so I have them ready to take along. Burnt's cinnamon apples for dessert. Oh, I'll also take my two 2 1/2 Gallon water containers.  One full of water for cooking/cleaning and the other full of lemonade with lemon slices (for when we aren't drinking other things).





One of my favorite football foods and it's very simple.Armadillo EggsGet about a pound of medium size fresh jalapenos - Halve them lengthwise and deseed. If you want to take a bit of the bite out of them it's best to do this a couple days before you plan to eat them (Gameday!) and then let them soak in water. But who really wants to take the bite out of them?Fill the jalapeno halves with cream cheese and then roll slices of bacon around them. Secure the bacon with a toothpick. You should then freeze the whole assembly. This keeps the cream cheese from oozing out when you bake them. To finish it off, bake for a half hour and eat up the awesomeness.I've been toying with an idea to bread and deep fry the assembled "eggs" but haven't been brave enough to try it yet.





LetsGoPeay wrote: One of my favorite football foods and it's very simple.Armadillo EggsGet about a pound of medium size fresh jalapenos - Halve them lengthwise and deseed. If you want to take a bit of the bite out of them it's best to do this a couple days before you plan to eat them (Gameday!) and then let them soak in water. But who really wants to take the bite out of them?Fill the jalapeno halves with cream cheese and then roll slices of bacon around them. Secure the bacon with a toothpick. You should then freeze the whole assembly. This keeps the cream cheese from oozing out when you bake them. To finish it off, bake for a half hour and eat up the awesomeness.I've been toying with an idea to bread and deep fry the assembled "eggs" but haven't been brave enough to try it yet.Breading and frying them is the most common way they're eaten down here in Texico.  Don't have to be deep-fried though, you can pan fry them if you like.Oh, and typically down here they're not halved, just opened up enough to put the filler inside.





Fearless Phil authentic Chili: 1 1/2 cups finely minced white onion 8 garlic cloves, finely minced  2 (15 1/2-ounce) cans chicken broth, with fat removed 4 ounces tomato sauce  3/4 teaspoon garlic powder  3 tablespoons ground cumin  2 1/2 tablespoons Gebhardt chili powder3 tablespoons   Fort Worth   Light chili powder3 tablespoons California chile powder (mild)  2 tablespoons Flagstaff chile powder (medium)  1 tablespoon  New Mexico  chile powder (hot)  2 teaspoons Seasoning salt  3 pounds tri-tip beef, cut into 3/4-inch cubes  1 tablespoon virgin olive oil  1/2 teaspoon meat tenderizer  1/2 teaspoon light brown sugar  1 teaspoon   Tabasco   brand pepper sauce In a large pot simmer onion and minced garlic in 2 cups of chicken broth for 10 minutes. Add tomato sauce and all dry spices, except the tenderizer and sugar. Mix well. Brown the meat in oil using a separate pan and drain well. Sprinkle the meat with the tenderizer. Add the meat to the onion/spice mixture. Add remaining broth and simmer for 2 1/2 hours. Mix in brown sugar and pepper sauce just before serving.





Where are the beans?





medinabuckeye1 wrote: Where are the beans?It's a recipe for chili, not bean soup.





BurntEyes wrote: medinabuckeye1 wrote: BurntEyes wrote:Easy dessert... Easy to pre prep Take an apple for every one you want Core out the apple and wash it well. Take aluminum foil and wrap around the bottom In the top of the apple poor in sugar/cinnamon mixed like cinnamon toast (2/3 sugar 1/2 cinnamon) into the open core of the appel. Drop in a small piece of butter (Totally optional) Wrap foil tight As you are finishing your meat off drop in the premade apples After your meal and a few brews, (the apples should be soft to the touch through the foil) open and serve.I'm really curious about this.  Our thread only has three desserts.  The other two are my chocolate/PB Buckeyes which are obviously pre-prep and cold serve and UTErin's cupcakes which require an oven and therefore can't be prepared at most tailgates.  Thus, this is the only hot dessert in this entire thread that I could actually make at my tailgate/campsite.  I plan to try it this weekend.  When you say to "core out the apple", do you mean to just cut out the core and leave the rest completely intact?  I have an apple-corer, but it cuts the rest into wedges and I don't think that would work for this recipe.  Am I reading that correctly, and do you do it with a knife or do you have a tool for it?Keep it intact. Simply using a paring or heck any knife to cut out the core. So basically you have a apple donut, if you will. Then pour the sugar and cinnamon inside the core using the foil as the bottom. When it's soft to the touch, it's ready. Nice thing for camping and tailgating is, when premaid, if you don't use butter, you don't even have to refrigerate them. With butter, be sure to put them in a cooler. I occasional throw one these in the pack when trekking, and you should see the looks of envy from others. (I usually share)My sister-in-law is trained a as a pastry chef, she makes what she calls "inside-out apple pie" like this, but adds some strudel mix to the filling to form a bit of a crust.  Delicious.





medinabuckeye1 wrote: Where are the beans?Not sure why you'd ask that, but there are probably 17 pages of this thread with the answer to your silly question.





847badgerfan wrote: medinabuckeye1 wrote: Where are the beans?Not sure why you'd ask that, but there are probably 17 pages of this thread with the answer to your silly question.How do you live up there, amongst all those idgit yankees??





Goldernd Bevo-lovin' 3rd party smack hacker.And fearless recipe looks fine you expect us to find and purchase 5 different chili powders.Screw it just throw in a jar of medium/hot salsa.





MrNubbz wrote: .Screw it just throw in a jar of medium/hot salsa.Ugh.





Hey Texican I slice & dice quite a few components into my Chili.Not everything pre-packaged sucks.America's test Kitchen recommended Pace Salsa I tossed some into my last batch in march and got thumbs up.We have quite a few farm stands uphere and had my sister can some produce.So it's alright by me.Might wanna try some black or kidney beans in there.You already know that though





the different chili powders with different heats and flavors affect different areas of the tongue.someday perhaps you'll be lucky enough to try my recipe at a board meetingI mix a complex bloody mary as well





Oh boy,chili....bloody mary's.....sharkwater now I know why Gator sstopped barnstorming





Gator been living in the south long enoughdon't think it hurt him muchwell, maybe the sharkwater





MrNubbz wrote: Hey Texican I slice & dice quite a few components into my Chili.Not everything pre-packaged sucks.America's test Kitchen recommended Pace Salsa I tossed some into my last batch in march and got thumbs up.We have quite a few farm stands uphere and had my sister can some produce.So it's alright by me.Might wanna try some black or kidney beans in there.You already know that thoughI use salsa in my taco meat, but only chile in my chili. 





Here's a fairly simple, but very tasty, breakfast dish that seems to be a hit whenever I make it. This is an omlette.3 eggs, beatenAssorted field greens, spinach, etcGoat cheeseGood Balsamic vinegarFreshly ground salt and pepperOlive OilBeat the eggs in a dish, add the seasoning and combine well. Set aside and let come to room temperature. Place a sautee pan on medium heat, and add a little olive oil. When the pan is hot, add the egg mixture and make sure it spreads throughout the pan. Using a rubber spatula, keep rimming the eggs around the pan and keep an eye on the doneness. Just before the eggs turn golden brown on the underside, add the goat cheese in the middle. Gently fold the eggs from two directions, in thirds, wrapping the goat cheese.Place some of the greens on a plate and top with the egg. Drissle the balsamic over the eggs to taste, and add a little more salt and pepper, to taste.If you want, you can add some fresh rasberries over the top. That's a nice finish. Also a little parsley is nice.





a chili recipe from Pittsburgh........... I advise leaving out the beans GRETCHEN MCKAY Pittsburgh Post-Gazette(0) Comments  It's not necessarily cold enough to turn on the heat, but the nights are definitely getting cooler. That means pulling out the sweaters and warming our bellies with a good bowl of chili. This recipe from the editors of Cooking Light is only moderately spicy but still quite delicious. I substituted pumpkin beer because that's what I drink this time of year, and used only one can of beans so there would be less for my daughters to pick out. For extra crunch, top with thinly sliced radishes. Serve with hot buttered corn bread.POBLANO-JALAPENO CHILICooking spray1 1/2 pounds ground sirloin2 jalapeno peppers1 tablespoon canola oil3 cups chopped onion1 cup chopped seeded poblano chiles8 garlic cloves, minced12-ounce bottle Mexican beer1 tablespoon chili powder1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin3/4 teaspoon kosher salt2 1/2 cups marinara sauce1 cup fat-free lower-sodium chicken broth2 15-ounce cans no-salt added kidney beans, rinsed and drained14.5-ounce can diced fire-roasted tomatoes, undrained3/4 cup (3 ounces) shredded sharp cheddar cheese1/2 cup light sour cream1/4 cup fresh cilantro leavesHeat a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. (I used 1/2 tablespoon olive oil.) Add beef; cook 10 minutes or until browned, stirring to crumble. Remove beef from pan; drain. Wipe pan clean with paper towels.Remove and discard seeds and membranes from one jalapeno; finely chop both jalapenos. Heat pan over medium-high heat. Add oil; swirl to coat. Add jalapenos, onion, poblanos and garlic; saute 10 minutes or until onion is tender. Add beer, scraping pan to loosen browned bits; cook 12 minutes or until about half of the liquid evaporates. Add chili powder, cumin and salt; cook 1 minute, stirring frequently. Stir in beef, marinara, broth, beans and tomatoes; bring to a boil.Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, 30 minutes or until slightly thick. Ladle about 1 1/2 cups chili into each of eight bowls; top each with 1 1/2 tablespoons cheese, 1 tablespoon sour cream and 1 1/2 teaspoons cilantro.Serves 8.





MrNubbz wrote: Oh boy,chili....bloody mary's.....sharkwater now I know why Gator sstopped barnstormingIt wasn't the food or drink, I simply got "OLD."





FearlessF wrote: Gator been living in the south long enoughdon't think it hurt him muchwell, maybe the sharkwaterNah, the sharkwater didn't hurt much. I was long ago warned about the stuff and drank cautiously as must be the case. I do miss having a belt though now and again.





I had a few belts last night during the Michigan game





I'm going on an expedition to be an expert bread baker.  Any tips?  My first loaves have been a little dense.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:15:11 PM
MaximumSam wrote: I'm going on an expedition to be an expert bread baker. Any tips? My first loaves have been a little dense.I gave up on that. If you'd like to buy a seldom-used Kitchenaid stand mixer, let me know.





847badgerfan wrote: MaximumSam wrote: I'm going on an expedition to be an expert bread baker. Any tips? My first loaves have been a little dense.I gave up on that. If you'd like to buy a seldom-used Kitchenaid stand mixer, let me know.Yeah? I have a KitchenAid or else I might take you up on it.  I don't even eat much bread, but I have it in my mind that to be a good cook I should be able to put together a really good loaf of bread.  Something really chewy with a good crust that goes well with olive oil or butter.  I have a book called "Ratio" by Michael Ruhlman that I've had sitting around forever, but just now decided to really get into.  He lists basically all sorts of types of doughs, sauces, and other goodies by ratio - for example the baker's ratio for bread is 5 parts flour to 3 parts water, with salt and yeast.  As you learn the basics, you can easily add and subtract ingredients and make your own recipes.  So it is that I am trying to increase my cooking skills, and bread is the first thing I need to conquer.





I guess that's one way to look at it. I like to cook and I very much dislike baking. There are some very fine bakeries in my neighborhood and that also has an effect on my thinking, I guess.





847badgerfan wrote:I guess that's one way to look at it. I like to cook and I very much dislike baking. There are some very fine bakeries in my neighborhood and that also has an effect on my thinking, I guess.Same here.  I love to cook, but don't enjoy baking.  Access to good bakeries is definitely part of it.





I guess my thought is when they have those cooking shows on tv and someone is asked to make a pie and they all look at each other like, wtf how do you make a pie?  I feel I should be able to make a pie.  Also, the smell of baking bread is a wonderful thing.  My second kid is about to be born and I have this feeling that it would be nice if I could bake fresh things in the morning.





FearlessF wrote: I had a few belts last night during the Michigan gameHey your boys took us to the woodshed. Glad you had a good time, even though at our (Michigan) expense.





MaximumSam wrote: I guess my thought is when they have those cooking shows on tv and someone is asked to make a pie and they all look at each other like, wtf how do you make a pie? I feel I should be able to make a pie. Also, the smell of baking bread is a wonderful thing. My second kid is about to be born and I have this feeling that it would be nice if I could bake fresh things in the morning.Fresh baked (or baking) bread definitely smells delicious, no doubt about it.





I have one Max... mine is a digital Bradley smoker.  I like it because I don't have to pay attention to it that much.  It rotates smoking pucks every 20 minutes and maintains a constant temperature.  I have used it for ribs, pork shoulder, chicken, and fish.  For pork I have found that I get better results when I finish it off in the oven wrapped in foil.  Chicken and fish have both turned out wonderful just using the smoker.





utee94 wrote: 847badgerfan wrote:I guess that's one way to look at it. I like to cook and I very much dislike baking. There are some very fine bakeries in my neighborhood and that also has an effect on my thinking, I guess.Same here.  I love to cook, but don't enjoy baking.  Access to good bakeries is definitely part of it.+1Doesn't hurt that my wife loves to bake and hates to cook.





EastLansingAdam wrote: utee94 wrote: 847badgerfan wrote:I guess that's one way to look at it. I like to cook and I very much dislike baking. There are some very fine bakeries in my neighborhood and that also has an effect on my thinking, I guess.Same here.  I love to cook, but don't enjoy baking.  Access to good bakeries is definitely part of it.+1Doesn't hurt that my wife loves to bake and hates to cook.Ditto. Mine made homemade bread yesterday. Smelled good and she said it was good. I didn't have any.





Maggiano's house dressing (and salad)I serve this on a salad similar to what they make. I include romaine lettuce, gorgonzola cheese, diced tomatoes, red onions and toasted walnuts. I don’t think they use the nuts, and you don’t have to, but I think it’s really good that way. I found several variations on the internet over the years, and this is my attempt after using many of the ones I found as a guide… Here goes: ¾ cup canola oil2 TBL red wine vinegar¼ cup white wine vinegar¼ cup water1 TSP dry yellow mustard*1 TSP flour*1 TBL sugar2 cloves garlic, finely choppedfine sea salt to taste½ teaspoon crushed red pepper½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper¼ teaspoon dried oregano Add all the ingredients but the oil to a blender (or food processor) and blend until smooth. With the blender running, slowly add the oil and blend until emulsified. Refrigerate in a sealed container overnight so it sets up nicely.* A better way, if you can find it, is to use 2 TSP of Colman's mustard instead of what I listed. It's a dry mustard flour, and it really does make it better. Not all stores have it, but it's becoming more available as alot of recipes out there call for it these days.





Fooling around with a picnic roast.  Any suggestions?  Went with the very, very basic method of scoring the skin and roasting with salt and pepper.  Have the day off and am enjoying XCOM and a house that smells like cooked pig.





Probably need a solid 8 to 12 hours to do it, no?





847badgerfan wrote: Probably need a solid 8 to 12 hours to do it, no?Maybe - it's about 7 pounds.  I'm going with a Jamie Oliver recipe I found on the internet which calls for 6 hours, but I'm skeptical about it.  But it sure smells nice.  Here in a sec I'm going to take it out and put in a bunch of carrots, celery, onions, and garlic, and then roast it another hour.  Then it will really smell nice.  That with some mashers?





Can't go wrong with mashers. Throw one sweet potato in with all the white ones. Adds a new element and sweet pots are a natural with pork.





847badgerfan wrote: Maggiano's house dressing (and salad)I serve this on a salad similar to what they make. I include romaine lettuce, gorgonzola cheese, diced tomatoes, red onions and toasted walnuts. I don’t think they use the nuts, and you don’t have to, but I think it’s really good that way. I found several variations on the internet over the years, and this is my attempt after using many of the ones I found as a guide… Here goes: ¾ cup canola oil2 TBL red wine vinegar¼ cup white wine vinegar¼ cup water1 TSP dry yellow mustard*1 TSP flour*1 TBL sugar2 cloves garlic, finely choppedfine sea salt to taste½ teaspoon crushed red pepper½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper¼ teaspoon dried oregano Add all the ingredients but the oil to a blender (or food processor) and blend until smooth. With the blender running, slowly add the oil and blend until emulsified. Refrigerate in a sealed container overnight so it sets up nicely.* A better way, if you can find it, is to use 2 TSP of Colman's mustard instead of what I listed. It's a dry mustard flour, and it really does make it better. Not all stores have it, but it's becoming more available as alot of recipes out there call for it these days.This is money Badge.  I use a hand stick mixer to blend my dressings and it is a little less cleanup.  Also support the Coleman's mustard, in the metal yellow tin.  I use that quite a bit actually.Do you prefer canola, or only use canola for this?  We have too many oils in our pantry, trying to create other ways to use some of the more specialized oils..





I used canola because it does not add flavor. You can also add a little more (double) sugar if needed on this one. I know I do, but some people like to use less of it.This dressing calls for the big blender. It takes a while to emulsify.





Medina/Badgerfan... thanks SO MUCH for the index on the first post of this thread.  I came back in here to look for a specific recipe not knowing when the heck it was originally posted, and the index pointed me to the right place in seconds.   That was brilliant and I appreciate the efforts to keep this organized.





Have I ever posted my wife's recipe for her Great Uncle George's Famous Eggnog?  Seems like a good time to do it.  In fact, Burny made it just last week and brought it to the T-Day tailgate party, it turned out mighty tasty.This makes a "medium" match, not sure how much that is though, my wife always make the nogg.24 eggs2 3/4 cup sugar1.5 pints heavy cream2 quarts light cream1 fifth bourbon (~750ml)1 cup dark rum or to taste1) Using stand mixer, cream egg yolks with sugar. Add whiskey. Pour into large container.2) Whip cream, pour into same container and stir.3) Whip egg whites, pour into same container, blend with other liquids already in there.4) Stir in rum to taste5) Keep chilled while serving, we usually place our punch bowl in a wide glass serving dish with ice in it.When my wife makes this, she generally has to do a couple of batches each in the stand mixer for the cream and the egg whites. She also uses a (well-cleaned and sterilized) medium-sized kitchen trash can for all the ingredients, and then pours into gallon containers and keeps refrigerated for a day before our party. She usually at least doubles the above recipe though, so YMMV on size of batches and size of containers.If you're nervous about raw eggs, you can buy already-heat-pasteurized eggs at most markets, or you can actually do it yourself at home and save some bucks. We've done both and have never noticed any difference in texture or flavor.There you have it. This stuff absolutely destroys storebought nog, you'll never want to go back. But I'll warn you, it's a bit tedious and time-consuming because you have to separate all the eggs first, and then it takes a while to blend and mix all the ingredients.





I have a couple martini recipes that are good for the Holiday season......see if I can find themnever been a big eggnog drinker





FearlessF wrote: I have a couple martini recipes that are good for the Holiday season......see if I can find themnever been a big eggnog drinkerHave you ever had homemade eggnog?  I grew up hating eggnog, because all I'd ever had was commercial storebought stuff.Homemade eggnog tastes pretty much nothing like storebought.  Even without the booze, but of course the booze is what makes it great.





Not a big fan. Not at all, actually, but thanks for sharing. I'm sure plenty of people will enjoy that recipe.





I'll ask the same question-- have you ever had real, homemade eggnog, like in the recipe above?If not, you should try it.  If so and you still didn't like it, fair enough.I loathed eggnog my entire life, until I was almost 30 years old.  That's when my i s c &  aggie wife made the above recipe for me, and I couldn't believe how great it tasted. It's definitely something I can only handle in small doses, it's way too rich to drink multiple cups of it, but that's why it's perfect for parties.  Everybody gets a taste, without having to overload on it.Anyway, not trying to be an eggnog pimp, just sharing my personal experiences.  I always found commercial nog to be disgusting and was highly skeptical when I first tried this recipe, but it made a convert out of me.





yes, I've had homemade eggnogdoesn't mean it was well madeI'll reserve final judgement until I have a splash from your recipe.





Peppermint Martini2 ounces Absolut Peppar Vodka1 ounce White Crème de Menthe1 ½ ounces Godiva White Chocolate Liqueur1 ounce Rumple Minze Peppermint Liqueur2 small peppermint patty candies or can garnish with fresh mint leaves





I've had egg nogs of all kinds. No thank you, unless it could be deep fried somehow.





Anything can be deep fried.  One trip to the Texas State Fair will prove it to you.





deep fried Badger nutz?





I will pay you $1 to try and harvest some Badger testies. I know you're Fearless and all, but yer not stoopid.





I'd rather deep fry girl scout cookies:  These were new this year, and very good.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:16:04 PM
847badgerfan wrote: I will pay you $1 to try and harvest some Badger testies. I know you're Fearless and all, but yer not stoopid.hah, don't bring claws and teeth to a gun fight





FearlessF wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: I will pay you $1 to try and harvest some Badger testies. I know you're Fearless and all, but yer not stoopid.hah, don't bring claws and teeth to a gun fightThat's right, you better look out for Inbred Jed, he's nasty!





Jed is his southern cousindude's name is Herby





Autumn Martini2 ounces Ketal One Vodka1 ounce Stoli Vanilla Vodka1 ounce Bols Pumpkin Smash Liqueur½ ounce Goldschlager½ tsp. Cardamom½ tsp. NutmegCinnamon sticks to garnish





Slower Cooker Taco SoupBrown 1 pound ground beef, drain and transfer to slow cooker.Add:1 chopped onion1 can (15 ounces) kidney beans with liquid1 can (15 ounces) whole kernel corn with liquid1 can (8 ounces) tomato sauce2 cans (14.5 ounces) diced tomatoes1 can (4 ounces) diced green chilies2 cups water2 tablespoons chili powderStir together. Cook on low setting 8 hours. Serve with tortilla chips or corn bread and garnish with a dollop of sour cream. 





Someone is gonna add beans to that and call it chili.Idgits.





It's soup.It's OK.





Anyone interested in some new chicken dishes?Francaise? Morrocan? I made them both this weekend. Very good stuff.I did some flash-fried Chinese green leaves too.Also made butter-poached lobster and a nice beef stew, but that's just basic stuff.





Gonna make some indoor pulled pork for the playoffs.  Any suggestions.  I made a little brine of salt, sugar, and liquid smoke that is sitting out in the garage now.  I haven't quite figured out how to consistently get a really good crust on the meat.  Sometimes it happens and sometimes it doesn't.





MaximumSam wrote: Gonna make some indoor pulled pork for the playoffs. Any suggestions. I made a little brine of salt, sugar, and liquid smoke that is sitting out in the garage now. I haven't quite figured out how to consistently get a really good crust on the meat. Sometimes it happens and sometimes it doesn't.It turned out pretty well - brined it for a few hours, then roasted it covered for three hours, then uncovered it, split it in half, and roasted it for a bit longer to firm up the crust.  It still wasn't exactly what I wanted on the crust, though the meat itself was very good.





I think next time you should try a little broiler heat or even a finish on the (charcoal) grill. It's a dryer heat then the oven, but you have to be careful to not dry out the meat. It's a tough balance.One thing I've done with briskets, turkey and larger meats is to start off at a crazy-high heat in the oven, uncovered.Set the thing as high as possible and wait for it to preheat. Put the meat in and cook for about a 1/2 hour or so. Remove the meat, cover and set to desired temp.Take about an hour off the total cooking time for this method.It works.





Here are the one I make, very simple, use a corck pot, and I don't like Memphis style.  tried it over and over, just don't like the vinegar...3 lbs pork roast2 onions3 cloves garlic1.5 cups water12 oz BBQ sauceSalt & pepperSlice 1 of the onions and put in the bottom of the Crock Pot.  Stud the pork with the garlic and sprinkle the top with salt and pepper.  Add the water.  Cook on low for 10 hours.Slice the other onion.  Pull the pork, add the BBQ sauce and the 2nd sliced onion.  Mix together.  Cook on high for another 2 hours.





Roast Pork Top LoinBrine:2 TBL all spice berries2 TBL juniper berries2 Cups of water2 turns fresh ground pepper2 TBL fine sea salt2 TBL brown sugar2 TBL assorted chile powders1 CUP apple cider vinegarPorkCanola Oil1 3 LB Pork Top Loin Roast1 vidalia onion, sliced6 cloves of garlic1 lemon, quartered1/2 CUP of beef or chicken stock, plus more for the sauce2 TBL pepper jelly (habaniero or jalepeno)Preheat your oven to 375 degrees.Toast the berries in a sauce pan on high heat to release the oils. Do not burn, about 2 inutes. Add the water and bring to a boil. Add the ground pepper, salt, brown sugar and the chile powders. Add the vinegar and return to a boil. Reduce heat and let simmer for 15 minutes. Allow to cool completely and pour over the pork. Refridgerate overnight.Rince the pork and pat dry. Add the oil to a dutch oven or other heavy cooking vessel and place on high heat to almost smoking. Brown the pork on all sides. Remove the pork and cover the bottom of the cooking vessel with the onions. Place the garlic cloves in the voids. Return the pork to the vessel and add the stock. Place the lemon quarters in the corners.Place vessel in the preheated 375 degree oven, covered, and bake for at least 45 minutes, until temperature of pork inside is about 145/150 degrees. Remove the pork and tent for about 10 minutes. Remove the lemons. Add a little more stock, if neccessary and bring to a boil. Stir and add the jelly and mix to combine. Let the jelly melt and turn off the heat to cool slightly. Blend the mixture in a high-speed blender to puree, and pour into a fat seperator.Once seperated, reheat the sauce to temperature. Slice the pork and spoon the sauce over the slices. Serve with baked, fried or mashed sweet potatoes and a green veggie.EDIT: Recipe adjusted after preparation and refining.





Seared and Roasted Whole ChickenYou will need 2 large cast iron skillets for this recipe. The good news is they can be had for under $15 each. Everyone should have a couple of these in their arsenal. You will also need a sharp knive. I have a boning knife that works well, and I use kitchen shears to cut the backbone.1 3-4 LB chicken, wholeSpice Rub *Canola Oil* Any of the various spice rubs will work here, according to your taste, but for this one I have used the rib rub and a variation of a Morrocan rub that I found online.Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.Remove the backbone from the chicken and open it up to lay flat. Remove the breast and rib bones. The bird will now be almost like one slab of meat.Spray or pat the bird with a light coating of canola oil. Rub the spices into the bird on both sides. Lightly coat the bottom of a cast iron skillet with a little more oil and set the bird, fat side down, into the skillet. Set the skillet on high heat. Meanwhile, set another skillet ** on high heat on a seperate burner. When both skillets are blazing hot, place the seperate skillet, bottom side down, on top of the chicken. The total stove time will be 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, remove the seperate skillet and cover the one with the bird in it. Place in a 350 degree oven for about 20-25 minutes or until cooked through. Remove the skillet from the oven and then carefully remove the bird to a cutting board and tent to rest, about 5 minutes.Your sides will depend on your rub. I've gone with French Fries as a basic, and couscous for the Mediterranian/Morroccan varieties. There are lots of choices, as in the end all it really is is a roasted chicken.** As opposed to a second skillet, you can use heated foil-wrapped bricks for this. I don't have bricks, nor do I want any, so the second skillet works great and serves far more uses than do the bricks. The key is to sear both sides without turning and to keep the bird flat.





I like Morrocan food, especially Tangine.





847badgerfan wrote: Anyone interested in some new chicken dishes?Francaise? I'm curious how you did your Francaise. Care to share??I made an awesome(yet unhealthy) chicken dish yesterday..Goes like this:Take 3-4 chix breast, bread in a flour/parmigiano reggiano flour mix. Use 2 parts flour, 1 part parmesan. Get the good stuff too. Finely grated.. I use Ambrosi. Best I've tasted and fairly reasonable price.Heat saute pan with 3-4 tablespoons of butter. Get it hot to the point where the butter is just starting to brown. Add chix breasts. Cook until gold brown and flip and do the same on the second side. Remove chix breast and put in oven at 425 for 8-10 minutes depending on size.Immediately after removing the chix, add another 1-2 tablespoons of butter. Add chopped proscuitto(1/4 lb or so). Brown just a little, then add 1/4 cup chopped garlic. Once garlic is almost browned, add 1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream(I prefer Dean's). Bring cream to a boil and add 1/2 cup parmesan, 3 tablespoons butter. Stir until butter is melted. Once butter is melted, add cubed roma(plum) tomatoes (is add about 1/2 cup) and a little chopped parsley for color.Once chix is cooked, poor sauce over the chix. Sometimes I'll put some linguine under the chix as well.I call it chicken proscuitto.. It's a homerun when cooked right.. Not super healthy though.





How about some Pad Thai?I was struggling a little bit here because I've never used dried shrimp or tamarind, but it turned out pretty tasty. From Cooks Illustrated:You need:2 tbl tamarind paste: This was gross looking stuff. I got mine at an Asian Grocery store. It looks like tar. Anyway, you have to pour about 3/4 cup boiling water over it and soak it until it is soft, then push it through a strainer (there are lots of seeds and pulp and stuff). I soaked mine for ten minutes. Then you mix this with:3 TBL fish sauce1 TBL rice vinegar3 TBL sugar3/4 ts cayenne2 TBL oilThis is the sauce.Put 8 oz rice noodles in hot water and let soak about 20 minutes, then drain and set asideYou need protein - I used shrimp, though tofu and chicken are also popular. I also used:1 can bean sprouts2 TBL dried shrimp, chopped (these were kind of weird, I got them at a mexican grocery store. I took off the shells and heads though I'm not certain that is necessary)2 eggsGreen onionsCilantro6 TBL peanuts (chopped)LimeOver medium heat, using a bit of peanut oil, cook shallot and garlic for a minute or two then add eggs and cook while stirring for about 20 seconds. Then add noodles, and dried shrimp, then add sauce and turn up heat to high and cook while stirring. Add protein, a handful of green onions, most of the peanuts, and sprouts, and cook until the liquid is gone and everything is covered in sauce, then put in serving dish and finish with cilantro and rest of peanuts and green onions. Serve w lime wedges.





Chicken Francais4 boneless/skinless chicken breasts (1.5 to 2 pounds or so)floursalt and freshly ground black pepper4 TBL cup extra-virgin olive oil3 eggs1/2 lemon, juiced1/4 lemon, sliced thin with seeds removed1/3 cup dry white wine1 cup chicken broth2 TBL butter2 TBL Italian parsleyPound the chicken breasts to about 1/4 inch thickness. Combine flour, salt and pepper to make a dredge. Dredge the chicken. Heat the oil in a non-stick pan over medium/high heat. Beat the eggs (add a little milk if too thick) and dip the chicken into the eggs. Shake off the excess and put the chicken into the oil for about 2 minutes per side, until golden brown. Remove the chicken to a platter and keep warm.Add the lemon slices to the pan and lightly brown on both sides. Remove and set aside. Add the lemon juice, wine and broth and reduce by about half. Slowly add the butter and about 1 tsp of the flour and swirl around the pan with a whisk until melted and the flour is cooked through. The sauce should thicken.Reduce the heat to low and add the chicken back to the pan to warm through and then serve. Garnish with the reserved browned lemon slices and the parsley.This is great with a side of pasta (I prefer orzo here) or mashed potatoes. Some roasted asparagus completes the dish nicely.Note that this recipe can also be used with veal cutlets, which I absolutely love.





I just made a filling for an apple pie. Yes, I'm baking.Now to the crust.The filling has apples (duh), jalepeno peppers, tangerine wedges and rind, shallots and brown sugar. I also used some apple juice and thickened it with a roux.I will report back.





hope you have some vanilla ice cream to top that with when it comes out of the oven!





847badgerfan wrote: Chicken Francais4 boneless/skinless chicken breasts (1.5 to 2 pounds or so)floursalt and freshly ground black pepper4 TBL cup extra-virgin olive oil3 eggs1/2 lemon, juiced1/4 lemon, sliced thin with seeds removed1/3 cup dry white wine1 cup chicken broth2 TBL butter2 TBL Italian parsleyPound the chicken breasts to about 1/4 inch thickness. Combine flour, salt and pepper to make a dredge. Dredge the chicken. Heat the oil in a non-stick pan over medium/high heat. Beat the eggs (add a little milk if too thick) and dip the chicken into the eggs. Shake off the excess and put the chicken into the oil for about 2 minutes per side, until golden brown. Remove the chicken to a platter and keep warm.Add the lemon slices to the pan and lightly brown on both sides. Remove and set aside. Add the lemon juice, wine and broth and reduce by about half. Slowly add the butter and about 1 tsp of the flour and swirl around the pan with a whisk until melted and the flour is cooked through. The sauce should thicken.Reduce the heat to low and add the chicken back to the pan to warm through and then serve. Garnish with the reserved browned lemon slices and the parsley.This is great with a side of pasta (I prefer orzo here) or mashed potatoes. Some roasted asparagus completes the dish nicely.Note that this recipe can also be used with veal cutlets, which I absolutely love.Just saw this, sounds great, pretty much like a chicken piccata no?  No capers, but the lemon and pan fried chicken breast are the basis.One question, did you really need to do all 3 eggs?  Usually when I do 4 breasts pounded flat, 1 or a max of 2 eggs would do the trick?





BuckeyeCMO wrote:One thing I do love and am familiar with are pierogies(sp) and cabbage and noodles. My wife is Polish, so I have been able to earn/inherit a lot of those recipes. Noodles and cabbage is one of my favorites though.Just saw this CMO,I have Bohemian/Bavarian ancestry cabbage and noodles have always been a staple(although I rarely do the cooking).One thing you might try is grilling different types of ethnic sausage slicing it up when done then add to the cabbage/noodles.The crunch & smoke add to the dish





utee94 wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: Chicken Francais4 boneless/skinless chicken breasts (1.5 to 2 pounds or so)floursalt and freshly ground black pepper4 TBL cup extra-virgin olive oil3 eggs1/2 lemon, juiced1/4 lemon, sliced thin with seeds removed1/3 cup dry white wine1 cup chicken broth2 TBL butter2 TBL Italian parsleyPound the chicken breasts to about 1/4 inch thickness. Combine flour, salt and pepper to make a dredge. Dredge the chicken. Heat the oil in a non-stick pan over medium/high heat. Beat the eggs (add a little milk if too thick) and dip the chicken into the eggs. Shake off the excess and put the chicken into the oil for about 2 minutes per side, until golden brown. Remove the chicken to a platter and keep warm.Add the lemon slices to the pan and lightly brown on both sides. Remove and set aside. Add the lemon juice, wine and broth and reduce by about half. Slowly add the butter and about 1 tsp of the flour and swirl around the pan with a whisk until melted and the flour is cooked through. The sauce should thicken.Reduce the heat to low and add the chicken back to the pan to warm through and then serve. Garnish with the reserved browned lemon slices and the parsley.This is great with a side of pasta (I prefer orzo here) or mashed potatoes. Some roasted asparagus completes the dish nicely.Note that this recipe can also be used with veal cutlets, which I absolutely love.Just saw this, sounds great, pretty much like a chicken piccata no?  No capers, but the lemon and pan fried chicken breast are the basis.One question, did you really need to do all 3 eggs?  Usually when I do 4 breasts pounded flat, 1 or a max of 2 eggs would do the trick?Much different than piccata. No eggs used in that dish. I like to use alot of egg - they actually form the crust on the chicken and give the overall dish a richness you don't get with piccata.Sorry for the late reply pal.





In honor of Cinco de Mayo...Shredded Pork BurritosStart with roughly a 3-4 lb pork roast.Wisk together...4 tbs chili powder1 tbs brown sugar1 tbs salt2 tsp cumin2 cloves garlic (minced)1 tsp cayenne pepper1 tsp garlic powder1 tsp onion powder1 tsp oregeno1/4 tsp cinnamon4 tbsp oilPut the roast in a crock pot, and cover in the mixture.  Cook for 9-10 hours on low.Remove the roast and pull apart.  Return to the crock pot to cook in the juices for 45-60 minutes.1 cup salsa3 oz. refried beans1 tsp fajita seasoning.Stir together in a bowl, and add the pork.  This is for roughly 1.5-2 cups of the pulled pork, so adjust based on how much you made.Warm tortilla shells in the oven.Place roughly 1/3 cup of the mixture onto the shell, and top with 1-2 oz (depending on taste) of the shredded cheese of your choice.Place in a baking pan and bake at 350 until heated through to desire.  20-30 minutes.Serve with shredded lettuce, sour cream, salsa and a shot of Cuervo, washed down with a light Carta Blanca.





Time to start making this one active again fellers.I've got a few good ones to share so I will get them written and posted here in the coming days.





About damn time.  Can't believe we went all summer without a new one added.





I know. I feel bad about that too.I'll get a recipe up this afternoon - marinara sauce.





SHARKWATER2 parts Tito's or otherwise "good" vodka1 part blue maui1 part red maui1/2 part triple secsplash of Rose's lime juicemeant to be tossed back in small cups over and over and over and over again





One Hour Marinara SauceExtra Virgin Olive Oil2 Vidalia Onions, finely diced1 Tsp red chili flakesSalt and freshly ground black pepper6 cloves of garlic, minced1/2 cup Italian flat leaf parsley leaves, chopped1/2 cup basil leaves, chopped1/4 cup fresh oregano leaves, chopped1 106 oz can of San Marzano tomatoes1 TBL Sugar1 Tsp Baking SodaPlace a large stock pot on medium heat and coat the bottom with a thin layer of the olive oil. Add the onions and chili flakes and sautee until the onions are translucent, maybe 8 minutes. Do not brown the onions. Add salt and pepper, the garlic and all the herbs and cook until fragrant. Add the tomatoes and cook on medium/low heat for about 45 minutes, stirring every ten minutes or so. Keep an eye on the heat so that nothing burns.Using and immersion blender, blend the sauce until completely smooth. If you don't have an immersion blender, use a regular blender and work in batches. (Be careful by placing a towel over the blender lid as the sauce is hot and could escape the lid.)After the sauce is fully pureed, continue cooking for 5 minutes on low heat.Add the sugar and baking soda and stir to incorporate fully. Continue cooking for 5 minutes on low heat.





Best treatment of an onion for purposes of eating an onion.  I had this last week while fishing in Canada, all during shore lunch.  Peel a large onion (yellow/vidalia/sweet)lather with butter (1-2 tbl I'm guessing)1/2 a slice of bacon, or just a slice I guess.wrap it up in aluminum foil like a...onion with a gentle twist at the top (the way a whole garlic clove appears).Park it on a hot grill for about an hour.  indirect is fine. once ready, don't you dare remove the onion from the foil, the jus alone is incredible.  cut off a slice or two for anything, or just eat the onion on its own.  The jus on the fish (grilled lake trout one day) is delightful.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:17:14 PM
Here is an easy and delicious way to grill pork, works on all chops.  Equal parts:1 part Creole seasoning (I use Tony Chachere's)1 part cumin1 part garlic powder1 part olive oilMix those spices together first, then blend in olive oil and stir until you have a nice rub.  You can add more olive oil if you think you need to.  Rub it on your pork chops and grill, simple as that.  It goes good with some thick slices of yellow squash or zucchini, which you can rub with olive oil and sprinkle with the dry spice mix and grill as well.





So, not that I necessarily have much to offer this thread, since my wife is the cook of the house, but I just [finally] got around to setting up my grill to be a smoker.  I did the ghetto method -- put a metal partition between one grate and the other two, set two of the commercial cast iron wood chip boxes on the "hot" side to generate smoke and had no direct heat on the bird on the other side.  The internal temp of the grill (according to the grill thermometer) held ~240-250 degrees easily.  Yesterday I gave it my first run-through, with a *very* basic chicken.  Rubbed with olive oil and a pre-bought BBQ mix, smoked with hickory.  Regularly basted with a mix of my Imperial Milk Stout and a Santa Maria style BBQ seasoning mix, and a little bit of rub with a half-stick of butter at one point and slathered with olive oil later to help it crisp up.Overall, it was a success for the first time out.  It was a flavorful bird from both the smoke and the seasoning, and my wife [the critic] really liked it.  A few things I need to change, though.  First, I need to drill some holes in the metal partition at the top to help the smoke pass.  My big concern coming into this is that the grill would get too hot, but it looks like that's not an issue, so additional permeability for the smoke should help.  Second, I need better thermometers.  I'm sure the thermometer on the lid of the grill is not very accurate, and I only had a simple poultry thermometer for the bird itself.  Neither is up to the level of precision I'd like for moving to more serious meats.But I'm glad to have gotten this out of the way -- I've been thinking of building a smoker for years and never gotten around to it, so now that I have this in place, I think I'm going to jump in headfirst and start going nuts.  It's football season, so it's a perfect time to take up a lot of Saturdays smoking meat while watching the games :-)





There's a lengthy thread on the B12 forum about smoking meats, you should check it out if you're interested in such things.





utee94 wrote: There's a lengthy thread on the B12 forum about smoking meats, you should check it out if you're interested in such things.Thanks, I just headed over...  And updated my wares on the B12 beer thread too 





You can get grilling thermometers almost anywhere on line, but check the Sur Le Tab or Food Network web sites.





847badgerfan wrote: You can get grilling thermometers almost anywhere on line, but check the Sur Le Tab or Food Network web sites.I already have a thermoworks instant-read thermometer (not the Thermapen, but a lower-cost model), but of course I'd forgotten that I owned it when I was cooking on Monday.However, UPS is already on their way with this:http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007UFOUB8/I think that'll get the job done :-)





That should work. I was thinking more along the lines of an internal magnetic one. It would just need to be cleaned often.





utee94 wrote: LetsGoPeay wrote: One of my favorite football foods and it's very simple.Armadillo EggsGet about a pound of medium size fresh jalapenos - Halve them lengthwise and deseed. If you want to take a bit of the bite out of them it's best to do this a couple days before you plan to eat them (Gameday!) and then let them soak in water. But who really wants to take the bite out of them?Fill the jalapeno halves with cream cheese and then roll slices of bacon around them. Secure the bacon with a toothpick. You should then freeze the whole assembly. This keeps the cream cheese from oozing out when you bake them. To finish it off, bake for a half hour and eat up the awesomeness.I've been toying with an idea to bread and deep fry the assembled "eggs" but haven't been brave enough to try it yet.Breading and frying them is the most common way they're eaten down here in Texico.  Don't have to be deep-fried though, you can pan fry them if you like.Oh, and typically down here they're not halved, just opened up enough to put the filler inside.Do either of you have a tailgate version of this?  I can't bake or deep-fry things at my tailgate.  I have a two-burner camp stove and a grill.





UTerin03 wrote: Medina/Badgerfan... thanks SO MUCH for the index on the first post of this thread. I came back in here to look for a specific recipe not knowing when the heck it was originally posted, and the index pointed me to the right place in seconds. That was brilliant and I appreciate the efforts to keep this organized.I think I need to update it again.





That 2-burner Coleman stove will heat up a cast iron skillet and the oil hot enough to deep fry. I've done it.





My stove probably would do it, but I already have the two burners spoken for (rice and veggies).  I should have clarified because I said I had a stove and you gave me a way to do it on a stove, but what I really need is a way to do it on the grill.





How about doing the veggies on the grill, or doing the rice ahead and simply warming it on the grill in foil pans?





I do have a grill basket I could do the veggies in.  I'll have to see if it fits in the tailgate grill.  Good thought, ty badge.





I have made this a couple times and it was a big hit.  I am making this for my tailgate for the tOSU/SDSU game tomorrow:Columbia Gold Barbecue Sauce RecipeYield. About 4 1/2 cups. Click here to calculate how much you need and for tips on saucing strategies.Preparation time. 30 minutes.Ingredients2 cups prepared yellow mustard2/3 cup cider vinegar3 tablespoons tomato paste1/2 teaspoon chipotle Tabasco sauce or you favorite hot sauce3/4 cup sugar2 teaspoons chicken bouillon granules or 1 cube2 teaspoons dried rosemary leaves1 teaspoon celery seed3 teaspoons mustard powder2 teaspoons onion powder2 teaspoons garlic powder1 teaspoon table salt1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepperAbout the mustard. To be authentic, use yellow ballpark style mustard, not Dijon. Besides, it just doesn't taste right with Dijon.About the tomato paste. You can substitute ketchup if you wish.Method1) Mix the wet ingredients together in a bowl.2) If you are using a bouillon cube, crush it with a spoon in a bowl or mortar & pestle and add it to the bowl. Crush the rosemary leaves and celery seed in a mortar & pestle or in a blender or coffee grinder and add it to the bowl. Add the rest of the dry ingredients to the bowl and mix thoroughly. Let it sit for a an hour in the refrigerator for the flavors to meld. No cooking necessary. Leftovers will keep in the fridge for a month or more.





Ribs (for a tailgate):I really can't compete with what you can do at home (with a smoker and whatnot) and what people like UTEE can do at their tailgate with RV's and rolling industrial kitchens.  I live two hours from the stadium and do not own an RV.  This recipe is something that you can transport to a game in the trunk of a car and cook on a portable tailgate type grill.  What I do:I precut the ribs into individual bones.  This is blasphemous to some people, but at a tailgate where you have limited utensils I find it a lot easier to be able to let people grab one rib.  I cut so as to remove every other bone leaving the remaining bones with lots of meat on either side.  I use a good travelling crock-pot (latched lid helps avoid spillage in transit).  Line the bottom of said crock-pot with about half and half apple and onion wedges.  Dip each rib in cooking bourbon then add rub.  I use a mix of about half and half applewood and pork rub.  Place the ribs in the crock-pot.  Once you get a layer of ribs, stop and add a thin layer of apple slices (cored apples sliced into 1/4" or 1/8" slices), cut up onion, and cut up pepper.  Then add another layer of ribs.  Repeat until crock-pot is full.  Cook on low overnight (about 6 hours).  If possible you want to time this such that the six hours ends right when it is time to leave.  Leave the ribs in the crock-pot and head for the stadium.  At the stadium I use a small portable propane camp grill.  I realize that propane is blasphemous, but I just can't fit a smoker or even a decent sized grill in the trunk so this is all I can do.  I do add multiple smoker-boxes full of applewood chips to add something of a smoky flavor.  Pull the ribs out of the crock-pot, slather them with sauce (the mustard BBQ sauce I listed above is great and if you have never tried a mustard-based BBQ sauce you really should at least try it).  Put the ribs on the grill, flip, and enjoy.





Tomorrow's menu at the 'Shoe:Armadilo Eggs -Jalapeno Poppers- (thank you LetsGoPeay, utee94, and badge; see above)Ribs (see above) with mustard-based BBQ sauce (see further above).  Chicken (simple lemon-pepper marinade for my non-bbq lovers).  Sweet Potato Planks (thank you badge, see page 18)Rice (boil in a bag because I can do that on location without too much stuff)veggies (maybe in the grill basket, have to check tonight if it fits in the tailgate grill)Crescent rolls (made up in advance)Garlic Bread (thank you badge, see page 1)Grilled baked apples for dessert (thank you BurntEyes, see page 18)





medinabuckeye1 wrote: I do have a grill basket I could do the veggies in. I'll have to see if it fits in the tailgate grill. Good thought, ty badge.You could do the breading and frying ahead of time, but I'd worry that the crust would get soggy during reheating.





medinabuckeye1 wrote: Tomorrow's menu at the 'Shoe:Armadilo Eggs -Jalapeno Poppers- (thank you LetsGoPeay, utee94, and badge; see above)Ribs (see above) with mustard-based BBQ sauce (see further above).  Chicken (simple lemon-pepper marinade for my non-bbq lovers).  Sweet Potato Planks (thank you badge, see page 18)Rice (boil in a bag because I can do that on location without too much stuff)veggies (maybe in the grill basket, have to check tonight if it fits in the tailgate grill)Crescent rolls (made up in advance)Garlic Bread (thank you badge, see page 1)Grilled baked apples for dessert (thank you BurntEyes, see page 18)Sounds awesome man, have fun!  I sure wish we had a home game tomorrow, alas our team will be out in Provo this weekend.  Utah, not Spain.





medinabuckeye1 wrote: I have made this a couple times and it was a big hit.  I am making this for my tailgate for the tOSU/SDSU game tomorrow:Columbia Gold Barbecue Sauce RecipeYield. About 4 1/2 cups. Click here to calculate how much you need and for tips on saucing strategies.Preparation time. 30 minutes.Ingredients2 cups prepared yellow mustard2/3 cup cider vinegar3 tablespoons tomato paste1/2 teaspoon chipotle Tabasco sauce or you favorite hot sauce3/4 cup sugar2 teaspoons chicken bouillon granules or 1 cube2 teaspoons dried rosemary leaves1 teaspoon celery seed3 teaspoons mustard powder2 teaspoons onion powder2 teaspoons garlic powder1 teaspoon table salt1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepperAbout the mustard. To be authentic, use yellow ballpark style mustard, not Dijon. Besides, it just doesn't taste right with Dijon.About the tomato paste. You can substitute ketchup if you wish.Method1) Mix the wet ingredients together in a bowl.2) If you are using a bouillon cube, crush it with a spoon in a bowl or mortar & pestle and add it to the bowl. Crush the rosemary leaves and celery seed in a mortar & pestle or in a blender or coffee grinder and add it to the bowl. Add the rest of the dry ingredients to the bowl and mix thoroughly. Let it sit for a an hour in the refrigerator for the flavors to meld. No cooking necessary. Leftovers will keep in the fridge for a month or more.LOL...  Most of what I've learned about BBQ in my short research period has come from reading that site, and I'm making this same sauce for my pulled pork tomorrow...Also using his Memphis Dust for the rub, but I'm going to add a tbsp of cayenne in with the rub...





utee94 wrote: medinabuckeye1 wrote: I do have a grill basket I could do the veggies in. I'll have to see if it fits in the tailgate grill. Good thought, ty badge.You could do the breading and frying ahead of time, but I'd worry that the crust would get soggy during reheating.It would, unless you had one of these to reheat them in, like I do:





847badgerfan wrote: utee94 wrote: medinabuckeye1 wrote: I do have a grill basket I could do the veggies in. I'll have to see if it fits in the tailgate grill. Good thought, ty badge.You could do the breading and frying ahead of time, but I'd worry that the crust would get soggy during reheating.It would, unless you had one of these to reheat them in, like I do:That would be great except that I drive one of these:So I have no idea where I would put it.  However, it is in my longterm plan to build myself one of these:to tow behind the car and if I ever get around to building this, it will have a stove built in.





You need to get one of these:





You don't like the teardrop?  Seriously, ignoring the tOSU stuff (I know you don't like that) but those things have galley-kitchens built into the back.  I think they would be awesome for tailgating and the plans looked like something I could do.  I think it would be great!





And better for your overall gas spending too.





bwarbiany wrote: LOL...  Most of what I've learned about BBQ in my short research period has come from reading that site, and I'm making this same sauce for my pulled pork tomorrow...Also using his Memphis Dust for the rub, but I'm going to add a tbsp of cayenne in with the rub...LoL.  Good luck with it.  It is really easy to make, but make it up tonight because you need to let it sit in the refrigerator at least overnight for the flavors to blend properly.  The first time I made it I had decided to try making my own BBQ sauces for the first time.  I made this and two SUBSTANTIALLY more difficult tomato-based sauces.  Everyone preferred this one.





Here is a better view of the back of one.  This one has a cooler built in (at right) but I have also seem them with propane RV ranges built in.  Also note that it is being towed by a very small car.  Here is an OLD ad for one, note that the weight was a mere 665 lbs.  





medinabuckeye1 wrote: bwarbiany wrote: LOL...  Most of what I've learned about BBQ in my short research period has come from reading that site, and I'm making this same sauce for my pulled pork tomorrow...Also using his Memphis Dust for the rub, but I'm going to add a tbsp of cayenne in with the rub...LoL.  Good luck with it.  It is really easy to make, but make it up tonight because you need to let it sit in the refrigerator at least overnight for the flavors to blend properly.  The first time I made it I had decided to try making my own BBQ sauces for the first time.  I made this and two SUBSTANTIALLY more difficult tomato-based sauces.  Everyone preferred this one.Yeah, this just looked like it would taste great with pulled pork.  And I'll be making it tonight before trimming the shoulder and making/applying the rub, which I'm going to let sit a few hours in the fridge before waking up early tomorrow and firing it up.





utee94 wrote: Sounds awesome man, have fun!  I sure wish we had a home game tomorrow, alas our team will be out in Provo this weekend.  Utah, not Spain.Thank you.  This one is extra special for me because it is a family thing.  Yesterday was my dad's 73rd birthday so this is his birthday celebration.  He and my mom and my brother and I along with brother's wife and my g/f are going.  Fearless met my dad and brother.  You guys know that Dad, brother, and I visited all of the B1G stadiums together so we are pretty close.  Should be a fun day!





Enjoy!





medinabuckeye1 wrote: utee94 wrote: Sounds awesome man, have fun!  I sure wish we had a home game tomorrow, alas our team will be out in Provo this weekend.  Utah, not Spain.Thank you.  This one is extra special for me because it is a family thing.  Yesterday was my dad's 73rd birthday so this is his birthday celebration.  He and my mom and my brother and I along with brother's wife and my g/f are going.  Fearless met my dad and brother.  You guys know that Dad, brother, and I visited all of the B1G stadiums together so we are pretty close.  Should be a fun day!Very cool.  And I love the teardrop, you should definitely do it.  I helped a friend build one a couple of years ago.  You might or might not know, I'm in the midst of restoring a vintage Airstream, so I've done a lot of trailer building/rebuilding/fabricating.  It's a lot of fun.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:18:06 PM
medinabuckeye1 wrote: utee94 wrote: LetsGoPeay wrote: One of my favorite football foods and it's very simple.Armadillo EggsGet about a pound of medium size fresh jalapenos - Halve them lengthwise and deseed. If you want to take a bit of the bite out of them it's best to do this a couple days before you plan to eat them (Gameday!) and then let them soak in water. But who really wants to take the bite out of them?Fill the jalapeno halves with cream cheese and then roll slices of bacon around them. Secure the bacon with a toothpick. You should then freeze the whole assembly. This keeps the cream cheese from oozing out when you bake them. To finish it off, bake for a half hour and eat up the awesomeness.I've been toying with an idea to bread and deep fry the assembled "eggs" but haven't been brave enough to try it yet.Breading and frying them is the most common way they're eaten down here in Texico.  Don't have to be deep-fried though, you can pan fry them if you like.Oh, and typically down here they're not halved, just opened up enough to put the filler inside.Do either of you have a tailgate version of this?  I can't bake or deep-fry things at my tailgate.  I have a two-burner camp stove and a grill.Reporting back:I prepared these last night and made them today.  I could neither bake nor fry them so I did them up on the grill and they were great that way.  Freezing definitely helps!





utee94 wrote: Very cool.  And I love the teardrop, you should definitely do it.  I helped a friend build one a couple of years ago.  You might or might not know, I'm in the midst of restoring a vintage Airstream, so I've done a lot of trailer building/rebuilding/fabricating.  It's a lot of fun.I have seen you mention the Airstream before.  Sounds great!  Do you do historic roadtrips?  You might have seen here that I finished Route 66 last weekend.  I really enjoyed that.  I came across the teardrop idea while driving Route 66.  There was a Popular Mechanics (IIRC) publication in the early/mid 50's that gave directions for a homemade teardrop.  I'd love to have one because it is small enough that I could tow it easily behind my convertible and I think it would be awesome for Route 66, camping, and tailgating.  We were talking about it today and trying to figure out how to create interchangeable decorations for the side so that it could be a "Route 66" teardrop in the summer and a "tOSU" teardrop in the fall.





A simple way might be to clad the sides in metal, and use magnets for decoration.





That would work, but I was planning on doing it in fiberglass.  I figured I could build it out of very thin wood and cover that with glass which would be light and strong.  Not sure yet.





Chilli Beer Glazed Steaks1/2-3/4 cups chilli sauce (I used Heinz)2/3 cup Heinz 57 or A-1 Bold and Spicy steak sauce1/2 cup shallots1/2 beer (I used Sam Adams Oktoberfest...poured the rest in my glass as I was cooking)4 Top Loin or NY Stripsalt and pepperMix all the in a sauce pan and bring a boil, then turn heat down and simmer for about 12 -15 minutes.  Salt and pepper the steaks to your liking and throw on the grill.  Bast the meat during cooking often and as wet as your desire yields.  I saved a little of the glaze for a dipping sauce, but did not really need it because I basted the steaks pretty good on the grill.  Smelled great and tasted wonderful.  Paired it with pineapple/green & red pepper shrimp skews, potato salad and grilled sweet corn.





Thanks!Now we need the shrimp recipe, and all the rest.





For the shrimp, I used the pre-cooked large or Jumbo's they had at the seafood counter, not bad but not near as good as the coastal folks get, I basted them with a light coat of butter and skewed length wise, placing a shrimp at the bottom then a pineapple chunk, a red pepper, a shrimp a pineapple chunk, a green pepper chunk and topped it with a pineapple chunk.  The corn was soaked in the husk, all day, then husked and de-silked, grilled directly on the grate while basting with butter served up.





BTW right now I'm rendering beef fat.  Meijers sells beef suet for about a buck a pound.  Chop it up and throw it in a pot on low heat and let it sit for a few hours and you will render a good amount of beef fat.  Beef fat is very nice for sautéing and frying - it has a high smoke point and doesn't degrade or burn easily.





I've never used beef fat. What would you cook in it, and what would you not cook in it?





roaddawg2 wrote: Chilli Beer Glazed Steaks1/2-3/4 cups chilli sauce (I used Heinz)2/3 cup Heinz 57 or A-1 Bold and Spicy steak sauce1/2 cup shallots1/2 beer (I used Sam Adams Oktoberfest...poured the rest in my glass as I was cooking)4 Top Loin or NY Stripsalt and pepperMix all the in a sauce pan and bring a boil, then turn heat down and simmer for about 12 -15 minutes.  Salt and pepper the steaks to your liking and throw on the grill.  Bast the meat during cooking often and as wet as your desire yields.  I saved a little of the glaze for a dipping sauce, but did not really need it because I basted the steaks pretty good on the grill.  Smelled great and tasted wonderful.  Paired it with pineapple/green & red pepper shrimp skews, potato salad and grilled sweet corn.drooling......





847badgerfan wrote: I've never used beef fat. What would you cook in it, and what would you not cook in it?It has a very high smoke point and is very stable, which means you can use and reuse it without it going rancid, and has a meaty flavor that lends well to frying things like French fries and other things.  I like cooking chicken in it too.  Also for the Super Bowl we fry beef hot dogs in beef fat.  It's a heart healthy tradition.





Anyone ever do roasted acorn squash?  My mom used to make it when I was a little, but I'd completely forgotten about it until my i s c & a aggie wife came home with an acorn squash a few days ago, that she purchased because "it looked Thanksgivingy."Anyway...Cut an acorn squash in half, scoop out all of the seeds and stringy bits (you can toast the seeds just like a pumpkin if you want), then set them in a casserole dish or roasting pan open-side up. Put a tablespoon of butter and a tablespoon of brown sugar in each open half, a sprinkle of sea salt, and drizzle a little maple syrup over the top. Bake in the oven at 400 for an hour or a little more, until the flesh is soft and the top is browned. Pull it out when done, and spoon the buttery syrupy goodness all over the tops and sides, then serve, either in their skins, or scooped out onto plates or bowls.You can also put apple slices or chunks into the cavity and bake them together, and you can sprinkle the whole mess with cinnamon or nutmeg if you like the flavors.1/2 squash will serve a couple of people if you have other courses/sides, so one whole squash is enough for 3-5 people, especially if you're roasting some apples in there with it.





I've done butternut squash alot, as a savory dish served as a soup or a puree under short ribs and the like. It's a very similar cooking method, with the cavity and all, which I like to fill with garlic, shallots, olive oil and aged balsamic.





Yup, I've made a  lot of butternut squash soups.  Very hearty.





I have a couple acorn squash on my counter - from my buddy's garden





847badgerfan wrote: Caesar Salad DressingTHE DRESSING1- 3 oz jar of anchovies3 garlic cloves, peeled, and more if you like up to 5 total1/2 cup of nice extra virgin olive oil1 tsp Grey Poupon (or other fine mustard)1 dash of red wine vinagarfresh cracked pepper1 TB  worchershire sauce1 raw eggAdd the anchovies and garlic to a food processor and pulse to a paste. Add the remaining ingredients to combine and buzz until liquid.That's IT! And it will keep for about a week in the fridge too. Good eats.Ok Badge, mine is similar and I can put my down on here, but basically I use anchovie paste, I do use 3 cloves, and I use more red wine vinegar, less EVOO, and a little more dijon than that.  Plus I use white worcestershire, and often skip the raw egg.   I do use a stick electric mixer, and it does last a week.  I'm fairly liberal with the cracked black pepper.The key to an elite caesar salad, besides the dressing, is great croutons (easy to make your own) and most importantly, a cold plate and a cold fork.  9/10 people don't want the anchovies, including me, the paste gives the essence.





Back on page 2 of this long and distinguished thread, badgerfan posted a recipe for some pretty darn authentic-looking Texas chili.  I haven't posted my recipe before now, because honestly I don't have one, I change it up almost every time.  But there are some basic elements that are always present, and this past weekend I made a very nice batch, and actually bothered to record what I did.  So here it is, this time in fewer than 7 years...Note, for this recipe I actually used some dried chili peppers and reconstituted them.  You can use ALL chili powder if you want, but if you do I'd suggest using a couple tbsp. of several different kinds, rather than 3-4-5 tbsp. all of the same kind.  There are many blends on the market, but if you're in a chili-poor area, then just look for two basic kinds-- regular chili powder, and dark chili poweder, and use some combination of the two.  It makes the chili more complex if you use a blend of actual dried chiles and/or chili powders.  Anyway, here goes:1 lb chorizo2-3 lbs cubed beef  (1" cubes -- lots of cuts you can use here.  FF suggests tri-tip, I like using beef shortrib, or beef shoulder chuck.  Some people just use the "stew meat" that the butcher pre-cuts for you, that works  too)SaltPepperFlour3 dried New Mexican red chiles3 dried chile cascabel2-3 dried chile de arbol2-3 tbsp. chile powder1 tbsp. cumin1 tbsp. paprika1 tsp Mexican oregano1/2 tsp cayenne1 packet Goya sazonSalt to taste (usually 1-3 tsp)2 jalapenos, diced2 serranos, halved1 small onion diced (save some raw to go on top of chili)2-3 cloves garlic, minced2 tbsp. cooking oil (if necessary)6 12-oz dark beers (only one is for cooking, the rest go in your belly)2 cups beef stockFresh cilantro for garnishQueso fresco or grated cheddar for garnish1) Toast the dried chiles on a cookie sheet in the oven at 225 for a few minutes, until they become fragrant.  Don't burn them, if you do, start over.  Burned chile in chili tastes nasty.2) Remove the chiles from the oven and remove the stem and seeds.  They'll be dry and crackly, you can do this with your hands.  If your skin is sensitive then wear some nitrile or rubber disposable gloves, and do not wipe our eyes.3) Heat a pot of water to boiling, turn off, and steep the chiles in the water for 10-15 minutes, until they're tender.  Remove the chiles from the pot (reserve the chile-water), and put them in a blender, with enough of the chile water to blend until smooth.  Set aside this chile puree.4) Heat a tiny bit of oil in a large, heavy pot.  I have  7-quart cast iron enameled dutch oven that I use for this, a "Le Creuset" knockoff I've had for ages.  It's awesome for chili, beef bourguignon, and any other stews that require long periods of simmering.  I highly recommend such a pot.5) Place the chorizo in the pot, and brown until a lot of the fat is rendered out.  It'll be bright red.  Don't be alarmed.  Remove the chorizo and reserve on a plate.6) In the meantime, cube your beef if not already cubed. I do ~1" cubes, because I let it simmer for a long time.  If you want to cook faster, then you can do 1/2" cubes.  Sprinkle beef on all sides with a little bit of salt, pepper, and flour.7) Work in batches to brown the cubed beef on all sides, and reserve off to the side. 8) Remove the last batch of meat, add a little cooking oil if necessary, and then sautee the onions until almost tender.  Then put in the garlic and jalapenos and sautee them for a few minutes, until the onions are translucent.9) Pour your 12-oz beer into the pot to de-glaze, be sure to scrape the browned bits off the bottom with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula.  Allow around 1/2 to evaporate.  Then put all of the meat back in, and pour in the beef stock, to cover the meat. Bring to a boil, then reduce to the lowest simmer you can.10) Pour the chile puree into the pot.  Add the powdered chile powder, comino, paprika,cayenne, Goya sazon, salt, and Mexican oregano (I usually pour a tsp into the palm of my hand, crush until really fine, and sprinkle over the top.  Otherwise you might end up with too-large oregano chunks).11) Float the serrano halves on top and remove at the end, or you can dice them really finely and leave them in.  Sometimes they dissolve anyway and disappear, even if you float them, so don't sweat this step.12) Simmer the chili on the lowest setting you have until the meat is tender and falls apart on its own, or is easily shredded by fork.  I typically simmer for 6-8 hours, just check it every so often after the first 4 hours or so.  If the liquid gets too low, you can add some of the reserved chile-water.  Or plain water.  Or stock.  But be careful not to over-beef-stock it, you want the falvor of the chiles to shine through.13) When it's done, serve in bowls with some fresh cilantro on top, and either some shredded queso fresco, or grated cheddar works too.  Also, some raw diced onion on top if you like that sort of thing.There you have it, authentic Texas Red.  Down here in Texico, this will often be served with cornbread on the side, as well as beans.  ON THE SIDE, of course.And the second meal you make out of it can be Frito pie, with grated cheddar and onions on top of course.Happy Thanksgiving!





Oh, and in the above, you can definitely make it hotter by adding more than 1/2 tsp cayenne (up to 2-3 tsp would be fine) and using more jalapenos/serranos or adding in some habanero.I made this batch for my whole family including the toddler kids, so I kept the heat down.





I like that recipe. That would yield very deep, bold flavors.I like to use 1" diced short rib as well, and also 1/2" diced skirt steak for contrast. I've been putting a lb of ground sirloin in to thicken the sauce.





Skirt steak would be good, the long simmer should break down all of that connective tissue and help thicken the sauce.  Some folks use cubed or coarse-ground brisket to get a similar effect.





Badge, I made your chili recipe a few days ago, I used top sirloin, bottom round, ground sirloin and chourico.  Damn good!I washed it down with some Glenlivet 15 year.  I'm saving the 18 year for the holidays.  I want to make Utee's recipe as well, but noticed I will need to hunt down a few of those ingredients.





Eggsellent!Go online to the Spice House, or go to Evanston/Milwaukee/Geneva and get them from their store. They should have all of them. You're near Chicago, right? It's worth the trip if you are.





I'm In Daytona Beach, FL.  I like the weather better.  I was born at Christ Hospital in Oak Lawn on the southwest side of Chicago and lived in that area until we moved to Pittsburgh, where I grew up.  I haven't been back to Chicago in a while, though the wife and I have been trying to plan a trip there.





OK, so here's my take on shrimp cocktail (4 servings +/-):1 pound, 15 count shrimp, peeled and deveined, tail-onCanola OilFresh ground salt and pepper1/2 cup ketchup (Heintz is best)4 tablespoons of good horseradish (or fresh ground if you choose)1 teaspoon of cayenne pepper sauce (I use Frank's)1 tablespoon of lemon juice1 tablespoon of Worchestershire saucePreheat the oven to 450 degrees.Rinse and then pat the srimp dry with paper towel. Lightly coat in the canola oil, and season both side with salt and pepper. Arrange on a baking sheet, and allow to come to room temperature.Combine the remaining ingredients and stir to combine, allowing the mixture to come to room temperature.Place the shrimp in the preheated oven and bake for 8 minute until just done. Remove from the oven and allow to return to handling temperature.Serve with the sauce, for dipping.





Just made some Ahi tuna with a nice fresh topping. Here it is (2 servings):2 - 6 ounce Ahi tuna steaksFresh ground salt and pepper1 cup red seedless grapes, quartered1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil1 shallot, finely minced2 cloves of garlic, finely minced or crushed (preferred)1 tablespoon of capers, drained and finely minced1 tablespoon Italian flat leaf parsley, finely mincedFresh squeezed lemon juiceRinse the tuna steaks and pat dry. Season with salt and pepper and allow to come to room temperature.At least 2 hours ahead, make the topping. Combine all ingredients after the tuna steaks and through the parsley, and season with fresh cracked pepper and a little salt. (You don't need much salt because of the capers)Preheat a sautee pan on very high heat, with a tablespoon of canola oil, until just smoking. Squeeze the lemon juice on the tuna steaks just before adding them to the pan. Cook one minute on each side and remove from the heat. Slice thinly and place on serving plates, over a bed of microgreens (if desired). Top with the grape mixture and serve immediately.NOTE:This topping can also be used on grilled pork tenderloin or chicken, a well as any firm white fish.





Was doing the mess around in the kitchen before getting serious when parents arrive.Turkey Sloppy Joesa little Olive Oil (2 tbl) in a large skillet or sauté pan.1lb ground turkey (some fat 7-10%), more if you're feeding more of course1 diced green pepper2-3 garlic cloves minced (i never use a press btw, hone your knife skills I say)cook through (whatever heat you need, med, med high)A palmful of chili powder (2-3 TBL I'm guessing), work it in for a minute1 beer, ale, lager or pilsner, I used Founder's session ale tonight, all I had.1/2 a bottle of chill sauce (Heinz is fine).a can (4 oz?) diced green chilisShake or two or three of worcestershiresimmer for a good 15 minutes, stir occasionally while tending to your buns until it thickens, then addthinly chopped green onion at the buzzer and stir.salt and pepper to taste if you'd like.I shouldn't have to say it, but please toast your buns before serving.Garnish with a little shredded cheese.  Open face it, or don't.





utee94 wrote: Back on page 2 of this long and distinguished thread, badgerfan posted a recipe for some pretty darn authentic-looking Texas chili.  I haven't posted my recipe before now, because honestly I don't have one, I change it up almost every time.  But there are some basic elements that are always present, and this past weekend I made a very nice batch, and actually bothered to record what I did.  So here it is, this time in fewer than 7 years...Note, for this recipe I actually used some dried chili peppers and reconstituted them.  You can use ALL chili powder if you want, but if you do I'd suggest using a couple tbsp. of several different kinds, rather than 3-4-5 tbsp. all of the same kind.  There are many blends on the market, but if you're in a chili-poor area, then just look for two basic kinds-- regular chili powder, and dark chili poweder, and use some combination of the two.  It makes the chili more complex if you use a blend of actual dried chiles and/or chili powders.  Anyway, here goes:1 lb chorizo2-3 lbs cubed beef  (1" cubes -- lots of cuts you can use here.  FF suggests tri-tip, I like using beef shortrib, or beef shoulder chuck.  Some people just use the "stew meat" that the butcher pre-cuts for you, that works  too)SaltPepperFlour3 dried New Mexican red chiles3 dried chile cascabel2-3 dried chile de arbol2-3 tbsp. chile powder1 tbsp. cumin1 tbsp. paprika1 tsp Mexican oregano1/2 tsp cayenne1 packet Goya sazonSalt to taste (usually 1-3 tsp)2 jalapenos, diced2 serranos, halved1 small onion diced (save some raw to go on top of chili)2-3 cloves garlic, minced2 tbsp. cooking oil (if necessary)6 12-oz dark beers (only one is for cooking, the rest go in your belly)2 cups beef stockFresh cilantro for garnishQueso fresco or grated cheddar for garnish1) Toast the dried chiles on a cookie sheet in the oven at 225 for a few minutes, until they become fragrant.  Don't burn them, if you do, start over.  Burned chile in chili tastes nasty.2) Remove the chiles from the oven and remove the stem and seeds.  They'll be dry and crackly, you can do this with your hands.  If your skin is sensitive then wear some nitrile or rubber disposable gloves, and do not wipe our eyes.3) Heat a pot of water to boiling, turn off, and steep the chiles in the water for 10-15 minutes, until they're tender.  Remove the chiles from the pot (reserve the chile-water), and put them in a blender, with enough of the chile water to blend until smooth.  Set aside this chile puree.4) Heat a tiny bit of oil in a large, heavy pot.  I have  7-quart cast iron enameled dutch oven that I use for this, a "Le Creuset" knockoff I've had for ages.  It's awesome for chili, beef bourguignon, and any other stews that require long periods of simmering.  I highly recommend such a pot.5) Place the chorizo in the pot, and brown until a lot of the fat is rendered out.  It'll be bright red.  Don't be alarmed.  Remove the chorizo and reserve on a plate.6) In the meantime, cube your beef if not already cubed. I do ~1" cubes, because I let it simmer for a long time.  If you want to cook faster, then you can do 1/2" cubes.  Sprinkle beef on all sides with a little bit of salt, pepper, and flour.7) Work in batches to brown the cubed beef on all sides, and reserve off to the side. 8) Remove the last batch of meat, add a little cooking oil if necessary, and then sautee the onions until almost tender.  Then put in the garlic and jalapenos and sautee them for a few minutes, until the onions are translucent.9) Pour your 12-oz beer into the pot to de-glaze, be sure to scrape the browned bits off the bottom with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula.  Allow around 1/2 to evaporate.  Then put all of the meat back in, and pour in the beef stock, to cover the meat. Bring to a boil, then reduce to the lowest simmer you can.10) Pour the chile puree into the pot.  Add the powdered chile powder, comino, paprika,cayenne, Goya sazon, salt, and Mexican oregano (I usually pour a tsp into the palm of my hand, crush until really fine, and sprinkle over the top.  Otherwise you might end up with too-large oregano chunks).11) Float the serrano halves on top and remove at the end, or you can dice them really finely and leave them in.  Sometimes they dissolve anyway and disappear, even if you float them, so don't sweat this step.12) Simmer the chili on the lowest setting you have until the meat is tender and falls apart on its own, or is easily shredded by fork.  I typically simmer for 6-8 hours, just check it every so often after the first 4 hours or so.  If the liquid gets too low, you can add some of the reserved chile-water.  Or plain water.  Or stock.  But be careful not to over-beef-stock it, you want the falvor of the chiles to shine through.13) When it's done, serve in bowls with some fresh cilantro on top, and either some shredded queso fresco, or grated cheddar works too.  Also, some raw diced onion on top if you like that sort of thing.There you have it, authentic Texas Red.  Down here in Texico, this will often be served with cornbread on the side, as well as beans.  ON THE SIDE, of course.And the second meal you make out of it can be Frito pie, with grated cheddar and onions on top of course.Happy Thanksgiving!Just made this again today, a double-batch to use tonight, and then for post-Christmas camping in the Airstream.Added in a couple of chipotle in adobo, totally delicious and makes it spicier.  Also tossed in a cup and a half of red wine left over from last night and cut down the beef stock a bit, made it even richer if possible.It's always good the day of, but man after a couple of days left to meld in the refrigerator, it might end up being the best freaking thing I've ever put in my mouth.





------------------------------------------------ utee94 wrote:utee94 wrote: Back on page 2 of this long and distinguished thread, badgerfan posted a recipe for some pretty darn authentic-looking Texas chili.  I haven't posted my recipe before now, because honestly I don't have one, I change it up almost every time.  But there are some basic elements that are always present, and this past weekend I made a very nice batch, and actually bothered to record what I did.  So here it is, this time in fewer than 7 years...Note, for this recipe I actually used some dried chili peppers and reconstituted them.  You can use ALL chili powder if you want, but if you do I'd suggest using a couple tbsp. of several different kinds, rather than 3-4-5 tbsp. all of the same kind.  There are many blends on the market, but if you're in a chili-poor area, then just look for two basic kinds-- regular chili powder, and dark chili poweder, and use some combination of the two.  It makes the chili more complex if you use a blend of actual dried chiles and/or chili powders.  Anyway, here goes:1 lb chorizo2-3 lbs cubed beef  (1" cubes -- lots of cuts you can use here.  FF suggests tri-tip, I like using beef shortrib, or beef shoulder chuck.  Some people just use the "stew meat" that the butcher pre-cuts for you, that works  too)SaltPepperFlour3 dried New Mexican red chiles3 dried chile cascabel2-3 dried chile de arbol2-3 tbsp. chile powder1 tbsp. cumin1 tbsp. paprika1 tsp Mexican oregano1/2 tsp cayenne1 packet Goya sazonSalt to taste (usually 1-3 tsp)2 jalapenos, diced2 serranos, halved1 small onion diced (save some raw to go on top of chili)2-3 cloves garlic, minced2 tbsp. cooking oil (if necessary)6 12-oz dark beers (only one is for cooking, the rest go in your belly)2 cups beef stockFresh cilantro for garnishQueso fresco or grated cheddar for garnish1) Toast the dried chiles on a cookie sheet in the oven at 225 for a few minutes, until they become fragrant.  Don't burn them, if you do, start over.  Burned chile in chili tastes nasty.2) Remove the chiles from the oven and remove the stem and seeds.  They'll be dry and crackly, you can do this with your hands.  If your skin is sensitive then wear some nitrile or rubber disposable gloves, and do not wipe our eyes.3) Heat a pot of water to boiling, turn off, and steep the chiles in the water for 10-15 minutes, until they're tender.  Remove the chiles from the pot (reserve the chile-water), and put them in a blender, with enough of the chile water to blend until smooth.  Set aside this chile puree.4) Heat a tiny bit of oil in a large, heavy pot.  I have  7-quart cast iron enameled dutch oven that I use for this, a "Le Creuset" knockoff I've had for ages.  It's awesome for chili, beef bourguignon, and any other stews that require long periods of simmering.  I highly recommend such a pot.5) Place the chorizo in the pot, and brown until a lot of the fat is rendered out.  It'll be bright red.  Don't be alarmed.  Remove the chorizo and reserve on a plate.6) In the meantime, cube your beef if not already cubed. I do ~1" cubes, because I let it simmer for a long time.  If you want to cook faster, then you can do 1/2" cubes.  Sprinkle beef on all sides with a little bit of salt, pepper, and flour.7) Work in batches to brown the cubed beef on all sides, and reserve off to the side. 8) Remove the last batch of meat, add a little cooking oil if necessary, and then sautee the onions until almost tender.  Then put in the garlic and jalapenos and sautee them for a few minutes, until the onions are translucent.9) Pour your 12-oz beer into the pot to de-glaze, be sure to scrape the browned bits off the bottom with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula.  Allow around 1/2 to evaporate.  Then put all of the meat back in, and pour in the beef stock, to cover the meat. Bring to a boil, then reduce to the lowest simmer you can.10) Pour the chile puree into the pot.  Add the powdered chile powder, comino, paprika,cayenne, Goya sazon, salt, and Mexican oregano (I usually pour a tsp into the palm of my hand, crush until really fine, and sprinkle over the top.  Otherwise you might end up with too-large oregano chunks).11) Float the serrano halves on top and remove at the end, or you can dice them really finely and leave them in.  Sometimes they dissolve anyway and disappear, even if you float them, so don't sweat this step.12) Simmer the chili on the lowest setting you have until the meat is tender and falls apart on its own, or is easily shredded by fork.  I typically simmer for 6-8 hours, just check it every so often after the first 4 hours or so.  If the liquid gets too low, you can add some of the reserved chile-water.  Or plain water.  Or stock.  But be careful not to over-beef-stock it, you want the falvor of the chiles to shine through.13) When it's done, serve in bowls with some fresh cilantro on top, and either some shredded queso fresco, or grated cheddar works too.  Also, some raw diced onion on top if you like that sort of thing.There you have it, authentic Texas Red.  Down here in Texico, this will often be served with cornbread on the side, as well as beans.  ON THE SIDE, of course.And the second meal you make out of it can be Frito pie, with grated cheddar and onions on top of course.Happy Thanksgiving!Just made this again today, a double-batch to use tonight, and then for post-Christmas camping in the Airstream.Added in a couple of chipotle in adobo, totally delicious and makes it spicier.  Also tossed in a cup and a half of red wine left over from last night and cut down the beef stock a bit, made it even richer if possible.It's always good the day of, but man after a couple of days left to meld in the refrigerator, it might end up being the best freaking thing I've ever put in my mouth.---------------------------------------------If you were a fan of the lentils, and you assumed I wanted to add them to the mix, how would you change the recipe up, if any?





I suppose chili-flavored lentel soup would taste OK.





You know not of what you speak, oh culinary challenged cheese curdle.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:19:00 PM
Anyone have any good salad dressing recipes?  I usually just go with olive oil and balsamic but want to stretch out some.





I've got a couple things I've been saving up for a while now. I'll get something up this weekend when I'm done compiling/writing.





MaximumSam wrote: Anyone have any good salad dressing recipes? I usually just go with olive oil and balsamic but want to stretch out some.a good cheat for homemade dressings is to buy some dressing starters from Penzeys Spices.  They are versatile and keep well.You may live near a location, otherwise shopping online works.  They've got about six or seven that I do use fairly regularly.  My favorite being creamy peppercorn, which is 1 tbl base mix, 2 tbl water, equal parts sour cream and mayo (I make my own mayo), stick mixer to blend, cover, chill and it lasts a good 5 days.Basically, you use a tablespoon or two of the dressing base, and then add some number of additional liquid/cream ingredients, typically a fat or two, and maybe water.





I've been using alot of citrus lately, mostly lemon. Makes a nice dressing and very light too.





Does anyone know how to make clarified butter?





847badgerfan wrote: Does anyone know how to make clarified butter?Pretty simple really.  Use unsalted* butter, and plan on losing 25% of it in milk solids, etc. In other words, 1 cup of butter will get you 3/4 cup clarified butter.  Cut it in cubes in a heavy saucepan on low heat, you're not making brown butter. (All-clad actually has a little saucepan that's perfect for this, and other sauce uses, as it has a small pouring lip).  1. Heat until melted and the foam popping subsides, at this point skim the white foam/solids with a spoon, get as much as you can and discard.  some people save this and put it on popcorn or rice, whatever. Remove butter from heat for a minute or two as you set up #2.2. Mesh strainer over a glass bowl, layer it with cheesecloth (coffee filter does work but takes much longer to strain).  Pour the mostly clarified butter over the cheesecloth lined strainer and it will strain nicely into the bowl, leaving behind the remaining solids in the cloth.3. It actually keeps nicely in the fridge in a air tight container, and can easily be reheated w/o any real loss.  I generally don't keep it around much longer than a couple days.  Usually I make it ahead of time (a day) and then use it for whatever purpose (shell fish usually), although people like to fry with it.*I've asked and wondered 'why unsalted' and the reasons I've been given are these. 1. Less 'solids' in unsalted butter, which means better yield.  2. It is cleaner tasting.  3. Unsalted butter is typically fresher than salted butter.  I rarely buy 'high end' butter (I don't bake), but do if I'm making a bunch of shell fish and thus lots of clarified butter, or if I'm making a compound butter, as you can always add salt to it.





Thanks a lot pal.I want to use it for basting my hamburgers and steaks, so this is perfect.





847badgerfan wrote: I've got another tip, for those of you who use ovens alot.I've got a higher-end GE (if there is such a thing) and whenever I preheat it, it's never right when it says it is.I bought a magnetic thermometer and stuck it inside, and I was shocked to find out that when the oven said it was a 450, it was at 350!It's also off temperature, up or down, depending on the setting. 180 means 205 in my oven, while 500 means 460.Until I can buy a Viking, this is what I deal with.Moral of the story is to go spend $10-15 at Williams Sonoma or Sur Le Table and get a thermometer so you can quit wrecking your food.one thing to consider is your oven's heating element.  Last summer, we were cooking something, and I often use a thermometer with the long rip cord in the oven to keep an eye on my meat temp, as the golden rule for meat is never cook to time, cook to temperature, and I was like what the #$%* is going on.   I got the heating element replaced and all was well.





utee94 wrote: BurntEyes wrote: medinabuckeye1 wrote: BurntEyes wrote:Easy dessert... Easy to pre prep Take an apple for every one you want Core out the apple and wash it well. Take aluminum foil and wrap around the bottom In the top of the apple poor in sugar/cinnamon mixed like cinnamon toast (2/3 sugar 1/2 cinnamon) into the open core of the appel. Drop in a small piece of butter (Totally optional) Wrap foil tight As you are finishing your meat off drop in the premade apples After your meal and a few brews, (the apples should be soft to the touch through the foil) open and serve.I'm really curious about this.  Our thread only has three desserts.  The other two are my chocolate/PB Buckeyes which are obviously pre-prep and cold serve and UTErin's cupcakes which require an oven and therefore can't be prepared at most tailgates.  Thus, this is the only hot dessert in this entire thread that I could actually make at my tailgate/campsite.  I plan to try it this weekend.  When you say to "core out the apple", do you mean to just cut out the core and leave the rest completely intact?  I have an apple-corer, but it cuts the rest into wedges and I don't think that would work for this recipe.  Am I reading that correctly, and do you do it with a knife or do you have a tool for it?Keep it intact. Simply using a paring or heck any knife to cut out the core. So basically you have a apple donut, if you will. Then pour the sugar and cinnamon inside the core using the foil as the bottom. When it's soft to the touch, it's ready. Nice thing for camping and tailgating is, when premaid, if you don't use butter, you don't even have to refrigerate them. With butter, be sure to put them in a cooler. I occasional throw one these in the pack when trekking, and you should see the looks of envy from others. (I usually share)My sister-in-law is trained a as a pastry chef, she makes what she calls "inside-out apple pie" like this, but adds some strudel mix to the filling to form a bit of a crust.  Delicious.Do you have any suggestions for a non-trained-pastry-chef for the crust?  Also, does she wrap it around the apple, or put it in the removed core?





medinabuckeye1 wrote: utee94 wrote: BurntEyes wrote: medinabuckeye1 wrote: BurntEyes wrote:Easy dessert... Easy to pre prep Take an apple for every one you want Core out the apple and wash it well. Take aluminum foil and wrap around the bottom In the top of the apple poor in sugar/cinnamon mixed like cinnamon toast (2/3 sugar 1/2 cinnamon) into the open core of the appel. Drop in a small piece of butter (Totally optional) Wrap foil tight As you are finishing your meat off drop in the premade apples After your meal and a few brews, (the apples should be soft to the touch through the foil) open and serve.I'm really curious about this.  Our thread only has three desserts.  The other two are my chocolate/PB Buckeyes which are obviously pre-prep and cold serve and UTErin's cupcakes which require an oven and therefore can't be prepared at most tailgates.  Thus, this is the only hot dessert in this entire thread that I could actually make at my tailgate/campsite.  I plan to try it this weekend.  When you say to "core out the apple", do you mean to just cut out the core and leave the rest completely intact?  I have an apple-corer, but it cuts the rest into wedges and I don't think that would work for this recipe.  Am I reading that correctly, and do you do it with a knife or do you have a tool for it?Keep it intact. Simply using a paring or heck any knife to cut out the core. So basically you have a apple donut, if you will. Then pour the sugar and cinnamon inside the core using the foil as the bottom. When it's soft to the touch, it's ready. Nice thing for camping and tailgating is, when premaid, if you don't use butter, you don't even have to refrigerate them. With butter, be sure to put them in a cooler. I occasional throw one these in the pack when trekking, and you should see the looks of envy from others. (I usually share)My sister-in-law is trained a as a pastry chef, she makes what she calls "inside-out apple pie" like this, but adds some strudel mix to the filling to form a bit of a crust.  Delicious.Do you have any suggestions for a non-trained-pastry-chef for the crust?  Also, does she wrap it around the apple, or put it in the removed core?She puts it in the removed core, so the crust is on the inside, hence the name "inside-out apple pie."  I'll check with her on how she does it, I just know she mixes the strudel stuff with cinnamon, sugar, and most likely butter, and it gets crusty on the inside as it bakes.





So my daughter, who is turning 8, has requested a pig roast for her birthday.  So by God, I am going to roast a pig.  Anyone done this?  Suggestions?





Are you doing it on a smoker or in a hole? Are you doing the head too?For smoking, if at all possible, I would suggest a long brine or lots of injections to keep it moist. The standard rubs listed on here would all work well.





847badgerfan wrote: Are you doing it on a smoker or in a hole? Are you doing the head too?For smoking, if at all possible, I would suggest a long brine or lots of injections to keep it moist. The standard rubs listed on here would all work well.I think I'm going to build a pit out of cinder blocks, and hell yes I'm doing the head.  What kind of pig roast doesn't have the head ?  Brining may be unrealistic - also, I don't want to make the skin too soggy, but I may do injections.  My main issues right now are figuring out the pit and getting the pig.





I only asked because I've seen it done without it and was disappointed.The cheek meat is the best meat on the pig, after the belly.Injection would be good. It will dry out otherwise. If you could brine, do it (need to do it in the bathtub). The skin will still crisp up.If you do the brine, use equal salt and brown sugar, along with allspice berries, whole peppercorns, roasted ginger, roasted onions and garlic. There are lots of guides on this and the amounts vary depending on how much water you use. 24 hours is normally long enough for pork. Just keep fresh ice on it every 4 hours or so.





847badgerfan wrote: I only asked because I've seen it done without it and was disappointed.The cheek meat is the best meat on the pig, after the belly.Injection would be good. It will dry out otherwise. If you could brine, do it (need to do it in the bathtub). The skin will still crisp up.If you do the brine, use equal salt and brown sugar, along with allspice berries, whole peppercorns, roasted ginger, roasted onions and garlic. There are lots of guides on this and the amounts vary depending on how much water you use. 24 hours is normally long enough for pork. Just keep fresh ice on it every 4 hours or so.I'm on the fence on brining.  Some people swear by it, but a lot of people are against it.  Not sure how I feel about it, though when I'm on the fence and it requires a lot of work I usually go with the no work option.





My vote is pork cheek #1 and probably the best single bite of meat, definitely a finalist.I wouldn't turn away a halibut cheek either.





So I've ordered the pig, and the next step is building the bbq.  I drive a Camry, so I'm regularly getting cinder blocks in small amounts.





Are you going to brine it in the bathtub?What will be your rub? I just put one together this morning, actually.I added celery salt to my standard rub.





847badgerfan wrote: Are you going to brine it in the bathtub?What will be your rub? I just put one together this morning, actually.I added celery salt to my standard rub.I borrowed one from Amazing Ribs the other day when I made some ribs, and I liked it quite a bit and have lots left over, so I'll use that.  Probably not going to brine, debating whether I want to inject or not.  I kind of want to just have the hog flavor.  Going to wet and salt the skin, as I hear that's the best way to get edible skin through the roast.3/4 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar 3/4 cup white sugar 1/2 cup paprika 1/4 cup Morton's kosher salt 1/4 cup garlic powder 2 tablespoons ground black pepper 2 tablespoons ground ginger powder 2 tablespoons onion powder 2 teaspoons rosemary powderThat's his rub recipe, but I substituted 1/4 cup chili powder, cumin, and cayenne for 1/4 cup of paprika





So, how did this ever shake out Max?





847badgerfan wrote: So, how did this ever shake out Max?Well!  I built the pit with my father-in-law, and used cinder block, some old fence and rebar as a cooking grate, and some plywood covered in aluminum foil as a lid.  I left two blocks out in the bottom row and used cookie sheets as vents, and shoveled in lit coals about every hour or so to maintain a 250 degree temp, give or take 25 degrees.  The pig was bigger than I expected, so we had to cut his feet off to get him to fit, but fit he did.  I didn't brine him but I did inject with some chicken stock with salt and sugar solution, and salted the skin as well as put a rub on the cavity.  I had planned to flip him midway through, but he was so big I abandoned that plan and just let him cook on his stomach the whole way.  The meat ended up very tender, but I was disappointed in the skin - I wasn't able to get that cracklin crunch I wanted.  Still, it ended up really good and the carcass was pretty well stripped by the end of the night.





Awesome. Thanks for sharing.





Dare that be 'spatchcock style'?





MarqHusker wrote: Dare that be 'spatchcock style'?LOL well I asked for it butterflied.  But spatchcock sounds better.





I didn't serve a whole hog this 4th of July weekend, but I did brine and grill a whole pork loin for a family party at the lake and it turned out quite nicely (citrus based brine).The real hit though was the Peach Mustard (sauce). and I don't even like peaches on their own.  One thing I noticed over the years, people just don't like mustard as much as I do, which is their loss.  This works because it isn't 'just mustard'Mustards, and soft cheeses (blue, gorgonzola) pair very well with pork (especially loin) IMO.This Peach Mustard is a breeze. hat tip: bon appetit1 overripe peach, peel it like a tomato by scoring with an 'x' on top and bottom, place in boiling water for about 45 seconds, remove from the hot water, cool in ice water bath and peel.roughly chop the Peach (discard the pit)splash Apple Cider Vinegar2 TBL water2 TBL sugarpinch of kosher saltbring to boil and simmer for 5 minutes until it thickens slightly.  Remove from heat and  blend (I use a stick mixer) a little bit, but don't puree.  Pour this into a bowl and cool.Add equal parts whole grain mustard/dijon mustard, (1/4 c each sounds good)S & P to taste.  and chill.optional: add fresh chives (chopped) at time of serving.I will put this on pork, chicken, ham / turkey sandwiches, lamb,





A man’s guide to cooking the perfect steak (17 Photos) http://thechive.com/2013/05/23...teak-17-photos/





Skip the room temperature steak and instead do a reverse sear, where you warm it to a desired temperature through indirect heat and then sear it over high heat.





MaximumSam wrote: Skip the room temperature steak and instead do a reverse sear, where you warm it to a desired temperature through indirect heat and then sear it over high heat.That's a decent cheat, but to me, the 'take the meat out' hour (or less) is the time to prep, and make other items, and also get started on the drinks.  Perhaps the package in the white butcher paper on the counter is a sign to those dining.Either way, anything is better than sous vide, which to me doesn't lend itself to proper crusting (carmelization) no matter the techniques of the chef.





I need some advice.  At the County Fair today I bought a pig, well actually half a pig, I'm splitting with another guy.  I need to talk to the butcher on Monday to give him instructions and I don't have any idea what I want to tell him.  Oh, I'll also need to review pork recipes as I'm going to have LOTS of pork.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:20:01 PM
medinabuckeye1 wrote: I need some advice.  At the County Fair today I bought a pig, well actually half a pig, I'm splitting with another guy.  I need to talk to the butcher on Monday to give him instructions and I don't have any idea what I want to tell him.  Oh, I'll also need to review pork recipes as I'm going to have LOTS of pork.How many pounds is it?You can probably ask the butcher what is common - you'll get ribs, some shoulder roast, belly, chops, and whatever they want to do with the hams.  Can you have the bacon cured?  Don't ignore the feet - great in soup, skin for cracklins, and the leaf and back fat.  You can develop lard from the fat, which can be good for all sorts of things.  The leaf lard is very mild and is prized for baking, while the back fat has a piggier flavor and is better for things like tamales.





I hope you got the cheeks.  Yeah, do not discard the skin.  You just can't readily walk in to a store and get yourself cracklin quality product.I got some pork parts this weekend from a new Amish vendor at our local Saturday farmer's market.   Succulent.  I'm really looking forward to trying his chicken sausage.





Grilled Deviled Avocados1. Cut avocados in half horizontally (held so the stem is at the top). Remove the pit and scoop out the flesh into a bowl. Save the skin.2. Mash up the avocado until is of a smooth consistency. 3. Brown your favorite type of sausage until it is nice and grainy.  Drain excess grease and liquid. 4. Mix avocado, sausage, and sour cream (optional) thoroughly.5. Fill the avocado skins with the mixture, place on the grill 10-15 minutes until thoroughly heated.6. Top with shredded cheese and enjoy.I've also mixed some salsa in with the filling and while still good, it tends to either get lost or overpower the sausage flavor depending on how much you put in there.





I'm going to try that recipe this weekend, LGP. Thanks.





847badgerfan wrote: I'm going to try that recipe this weekend, LGP. Thanks.I forgot to mention that grilling them in a muffin pan works best so they don't fall over and spill the filling. I've only done these three times so I'm sure there are plenty of ways to improve the recipe with spices or other things.





I was contemplating a chorizo (flavor) and turkey sausage (low fat) blend for the stuffing.I have a rack for veggies that will work out well for this, I think. Again, thanks.





Ok, I've got another one for you. I got a new grill a few weeks ago so that explains my sudden grilling proliferation.Grilled Bananas (Dessert)1. Lay banana on it's side and down the length of it through the peel and through most of the actual banana (This allows the glaze to penetrate.)2. Gently open the peel in the slice you just made but don't remove it. 3. I always do this part just by look so I don't have any actual measurements. Put butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, a little honey, and a little vanilla extract in a microwave safe cup and heat it up until you have a nice thick liquid.4. Pour some of the glaze from the previous step into the sliced banana.5. Loosely wrap the banana in foil with the sliced side up. 6. Place on the grill for 10 minutes or so. I usually put them on the upper warming rack of the grill.7. Open up the foil and the banana should be a nice gooey mess inside the now brown and disgusting looking peel. Top with spoonfuls or vanilla ice cream or whipped cream and enjoy. It has a very banana bread-like taste to it.  My kids absolutely destroy these things when I make them. 





I'm guessing you missed the word 'slice' or 'score' ' in #1  after the word 'and'.These are my kinds of bites from a grill.I'm going to do this tonight, after I eat another tasty treat with my fish, which was earlier wrapped in foil, bathed in butter and a slice of bacon, that being a whole onion.another cool thing to grill sometimes is watermelon, seriously.





I didn't get to make the avocado dish over the weekend, but I will be doing it soon.I grill a lot of fruit. Especially stone fruits.





I grilled plantains one time - I just sliced them down the middle with the peel on, brushed butter on them, then finished with salt and pepper.  Tasty tasty





Overnight low at my house was 59.  So of course this morning I woke up and decided to make a big pot of chili.  I can smell it just simmering away, gonna enjoy the heck out of it tonight whilst watching my team play the man's game of football.





I made some stock a few weeks ago, and this weekend it is time to make some soup with it, with the am temps getting into the 40s.





we've had some frost on the greens in the mornings, but it's gotta get a little colder for me to brew a batch of chili





Heh.  If I waited that long, I'd just about never get to eat chili!





y'all could always move north!





Uhhh, thanks anyway...





Thank You for your support





You don't need to run a campaign, people are willingly leaving the rust belt in droves.





 dudekd wrote: I'm looking for a great chili recipe with lots of beans... I figured this would be the best place to come.  OK here is my first foray into the recipe thread. Be gentle. Pumpkin, & Chorizo ChiliIngredients:2 lbs lean ground turkey1/2 lbs. ground chorizo 1 can Chili Beans1 can Pinto Beans1 can Black Beans4 cups Chicken Broth1 16oz can Pumpkin Puree2 6oz cans Tomato Paste1/2 cup Onion Flakes2 tsp Minced Garlic3 tsp Pumpkin Pie Spice1 tsp Brown Sugar1 tsp All Spice1 tsp CuminDirections:Brown MeatMix ingredients in a crock pot and cook over night.Notes: - I'm a cook to taste type guy, so amounts are guessed and can/should vary.- I don't like "skin" in my chili so I used tomato puree and onion flakes instead of crushed/diced tomato and saute onions.- Brown the Turkey and Chorizo together, and let simmer in their juices while you do the rest of the prep to mix the chorizo fat and spice with the turkey.- This is a sweet chili, have hot sauce on the side for those who want to spice it up.- Addins I like include Frito's, guacamole, sour cream and shredded cheddar cheese.





 utee94 wrote: You don't need to run a campaign, people are willingly leaving the rust belt in droves.  And I've been handing them pamphlets from the Austin Welcome Wagon/Chamber of Commerce





Sausage/cabbage/kraut/onions/apples(in the slow cooker)There's brazillion versions of this recipe.I've played with & tweeked it until I found my preference :Need a BIG mixing bowl or I use a white 5 gallon bucket my buddy gave me that  cucumbers came in(he runs a kitchen).- Take 1 head of cabbage run it thru the food processor(FP)with the shreading disk.Rinse 1 bag/can/jar of Kraut.Toss both in the bucket(you'll get the crunch of the cabbage & tartness of Kraut)- 2 apples(I like Granny Smith or MacIntosh)both turn sweet when cooked and 2-3 onions depending on size.Put onions & apples thru FP with slicing disk. Thow into white bucket- I add 1-2 table spoons of Caraway seed to bucket.Roll up your sleeves and mix Cabbage/Kraut/ Apples/Onions w  caraway seed all up by hand real good until evened out good.- Empty contents of bucket into slow cooker.I have a 7 QT Crock Pot and it fits perfect.Add 2/3rds  of a beer(I use Porter) and 1 tablespoon of honey into slow cooker.Turn on low and don't even think of opening it for 4 hrs.-As the 4 hour mark approaches I grill 5-6 Fresh Sausages.Grilling the sausage is tastier than leaving them in the slow cooker the whole time.You can use German/Italian/Polish/Hungarian/Slovenian/Ukranian sausages.Cleveland is a big ethnic mix so procuring these are no problem.Today I'm using Brats- I throw Brats on the hot grill for 2-3 minutes a side after that I drag them over to the cool side shut the lid and let them finish indirect.When done bring Brats inside let them cool down for half hr or so then I slice them diagonally  and add them to the Crock Pot(by this time ingredients will have rendered/settled leaving room for brats)- Leave in Crock Pot a minimum of 2 more hrs more.I usually go 8-9 hrs total- I steam redskin potatoes or cook egg noodles on the side.Then ladle crock Pot concoction over spuds/noodles.I like pumpernickel bread with this.-This is a great fall comfort recipe.It's cold & wet  today but I'll have to wait-





I'm gonna try that one Mr. N. Looks great.





847 Meat MarinadeThis is one that I've been working on refining for a while now, and I'm pretty happy with it. It works really well for tougher cuts like flank or skirt, but can be used for all meats. The time required depends upon the cut. A strip would take about and hour or so - a flank up to overnight.1/2 cup canola oil1 TB Worcestershire sauce1/4 cup water2 TB meat marinade mix*Combine all ingredients and stir together completely. Coat the meat and place in the fridge for as long as desired. When ready to cook, remove the meat from the marinade and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook as normal.*Recipe for meat marinade mix:2 TB beef base powder (bouillon/soup base)1 TB garlic powder1 TB onion powder1 TB meat tenderizer1 TB paprika powderCombine all ingredients into a consistent powder. Keep on hand for quick use whenever you need it.





847badgerfan wrote: I'm gonna try that one Mr. N. Looks great.Thanx Badge coming from a gourmet to a gourmund that means a lot.It really came out good.I use to use all sauerkraut but it bothered Cindy's stomach.The cabbage balances out the kraut.I also tossed in two tablespoons of raisins that seemed to temper the acidity.I forgot the Honey this time but adding the raisins worked.She loved it so I'll use that version now.BTW what is "TB" does this marinade work on Pork Tenderloin?





TB is tablespoon. I don't know it that's the proper way but that's what it means in my recipe.I don't know that I'd use that on pork, because of the beef base and tenderizer. I use the beef base to further enhance the natural beef flavors.For pork, a good brine is always my answer.





Ya I use a Soy sauce based brine.When scribbling down recipes I use T for TB and t for teaspoon.





Whatever works is the best way.Try a brine of all spice berries, whole peppercorns, salt, brown sugar and ginger.BRINE RECIPEAbout 2-3 cups of water would do. Add the berries (about 2T), peppercorns (1T), ginger (pickled, to taste), 1/2 cup of salt and a 1/2 cup of brown sugar.Toast the berries and peppercorns to release the oils - about 2 minutes or so. Add the water and then the rest of the ingredients and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for about a 1/2 hour so. Let it cool completely, and then refrigerate to get cold.Add this to the pork and let it go overnight.This same brine can be used for poultry (I'm doing this right now) but you have to cut the salt and sugar in half.No matter the protein, you have to be careful to rinse the brine off or your food will be too salty.





Today is one of those days. Found time to get to the gym and keep an eye on the bad news bears, among..Roasted a chicken, making pork ribs, have some beef short ribs braising away and finally I'll do some grilled veggies and then some homemade fries.I'll be posting all of these recipes if they work, although I already posted the chicken brine above.





Tried a new salad dressing recipe which I liked-olive oil-white vinegar-lime juice- honey- sriracha - salt and pepper





 MaximumSam wrote: Tried a new salad dressing recipe which I liked-olive oil-white vinegar-lime juice- honey- sriracha - salt and pepper Looks similar to one my wife makes, out of Betty Crocker. She serves it over a salad of half romaine, half iceberg, candied slivered almonds, mandarin oranges, celery and green onions.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:20:55 PM
For my meal for Monday night:Roasted Duck Stuffing:4.5 cups cooked brown rice (I used a rosemary rice/cus cus mix)1 cup chopped onion and four bulbs of finely chopped garlic sauteed in 6 tbsp unsalted butterMix rice with onion/butter mix, 8 sprigs chopped fresh sage, 3/4 cup chopped pecans, Brandied Balsamic Cherry Sauce:Combine 1 can (15oz) pitted cherries, 1 1/2 cups cherry brandy, 1/4 cup honey (I used local buckwheat honey), and 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar.  Heat until mixture is reduced by half.





I know this is a play on the Ducks, but come on, where's the roasted duck part of the recipe.  Some of us love to eat duck.





Tea Smoked Rotisserie DuckA soy sauce brine followed by tea smoking on the rotisserie creates an incredibly flavorful bird worth of a holiday celebration.Prep Time:30 MinutesInactive Time:14 HoursCook Time:1 HourTotal Time:15 Hours 30 MinutesYield:4 servingsIngredientsFor the Brine2 quarts ice-cold water2 cups soy sauce3 tablespoons salt1/4 cup honey6 clove garlic, smashed1 1-inch piece of ginger, thinly sliced1 medium orange, quartered 1 whole duck2 quarts boiling water For the Tea Packet1/4 cup tea leaves1/4 cup brown sugar1/4 cup rice2 whole star anise pods1 3-inch long cinnamon sticks2 teaspoons orange zestProcedureTo make the brine, place water, soy sauce, salt, honey, garlic, and ginger in a large bowl. Squeeze orange quarters into bowl, then drop in peel. Stir to combine. Place duck in brine, breast side down, and weight down with plate to keep fully submerged. Place in refrigerator and brine for at least 2 hours, up to 8 hours.Remove duck from brine; pat dry with paper towels. Transfer duck to wire rack set in a sheet pan. Place in refrigerator for 12 to 24 hours to air dry.Remove duck from refrigerator. Using the point of a skewer or paring knife, prick holes all over duck breasts, being careful not to pierce the meat. Place duck on a wire rack in the sink. Pour 1 quart of boiling water over duck. Flip and pour remaining quart of water over other side. Allow duck to dry while preparing the grill.To make the tea packet, place tea leaves, brown sugar, rice, star anise, cinnamon sticks, and orange zest in a double layer of heavy-duty aluminum foil and fold into a packet. Cut slits at top of foil packet.Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on either side of the charcoal grate and place a foil pan between the two piles of coals. Cover gill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Place tea packet directly on top of the coals. Run spit of the rotisserie through middle of duck and secure ends with rotisserie forks. Place on the grill, cover, and cook at medium-high heat until duck registers 160 degrees when an instant read thermometer is inserted into the thickest part of the breast. Remove from grill, let rest for 15 minutes, then remove spit and serve.





MarqHusker wrote: I know this is a play on the Ducks, but come on, where's the roasted duck part of the recipe.  Some of us love to eat duck.As Fearless, NUWildcat and my other Facebook friends on here can attest, I actually did roast a Duck for the game.  I posted the stuffing and Brandied Cherry Sauce recipes but roasting a duck is pretty simple.  They don't need basted so it is pretty much just time and temperature.FWIW:  The stuffing and particularly the sauce were excellent!





Face what?   That looks fantastic.I did wing it last night (empty the pantry night) making a batch of chili for tonight's dinner.  It tasted great last night.  The only interesting twist is using the homemade beef stock1 lb. ground bison1 white onion diced2 cloves garlic dicedabout 2 cups homemade beef stockBrown meat for a bit, then add onion and garlic.  I also season meat with a little s&pThen, using some beef stock I made on NYE/NYD, I started treating the meat like rice in a rissotto and started adding the broth a little at a time, stirring constantly as it soft boiled, until a decent amount of the stock was absorbed and then did it again.  Bison  is pretty lean and generally isn't that flavorful, I thought this would dominate, and I'm optimistic it will absorb the rich stock nicely and pay off tonightThen I addeddiced tomatoesa can of Rotelcouple diced chipotle peppers w adobo sauceI have a Penzey's chili powder and cumin and I add a little rubbed palmful of each.simmer for as long as you'd like.Edit for Verdict: I certainly will not make turkey chili or buffalo chili again without working in the beef stock as described above.  Very good method and use of beef stock (which I encourage everybody to make their own stock, high yield product).





You guys are gonna think I'm going nuts, but I made a meatless chili flavored soup the other night, and it had black beans in it.I'll post what I did a little later. I'm just waking up still. Need coffee.





I received a Immersion Circulator (Sous Vide cooking) as a gift recently.  I'm looking forward to giving this thing a spin this week.  Anybody play around with one of these before?





I have not. Been thinking about it - let me know what you think.





  The Sous Vide results for the Duck Breast tonight.   I have the Anova immersion circulator, which looks like a bigger version of a hand held stick mixer for dressings, etc.  This thing is really easy to use. Fill your pot (I used a pasta pot) with water, attach the clip to the pot, slide in the Anova, tighten it, set your temp (I set it at 134 degrees) and hit play.  The circulator circulates the water, prep your meat, season it, insert it in a ziplock bag, or vacuum seal it (I don't have one, so I used ziplock and used good old fashioned water displacement to get the air out and then sealed the bag.  Once the thing hits the temp you set, place the bag(s) in the water pot and walk away.  Remember cooking meat is all about the temp. not time, this is easy to understand when you use sous vide methods.  I basically left this in the water bath of 134 for 2 hours and 10 minutes, plenty of time to play with kids, get them ready for bed and book time   I tried this out with duck breast for a few reasons.  Duck is probably my favorite food, it has a great skin, which renders so nicely, the fat is the best and it would be an easy way to test my doubts I had with this thing.   Plus my wife was out and she doesn't eat duck.  I heated an iron skillet to med high heat, After removing the bags from the water, and the ziplock, pat the duck dry, hatch marks on the fat with a knife, it is warm at 134 not hot, slightly oiled pan, drop the duck in skin side down.  (ordinarily this would be an 8 minute sear for  me, then 1 min on the meat side, flip back to fat side and 7 minutes in the 375 degree oven for medium rare.)  This was two minutes on skin side, one minute on the meat side for color, and then its done, rest the meat.  There's no questioning, this device removes all doubt in terms of cooking your meat to the desired doneness.  There was no need to poke, prod, or use probe meat thermometers.  If I do it again w duck, I'd drop my temp to 130 on the water, I like it a teeny bit more pink/red.  The skin, and this was my doubt with using this.  The fat renders a little bit in the water bath, but surprisingly it crisps and renders very quickly post bath in just two minutes.  That skin in the picture looks as good as it tasted.   The meat was just as tender and juicy as done via conventional methods.verdict:  not really necessary if you're cooking for yourself, as it is a time commitment, but it removes any error, and if you're prepping four different dishes for a dinner party or something, than this is a no brainer to use.  Weeknight dinners, I don't get home before 6 so I didn't eat until 9, which is ok, but not going to work for my wife or kids.  I know people use this thing for burgers, I think I'll be using it for chicken and fish (which can be done in less time).





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847badgerfan wrote: You guys are gonna think I'm going nuts, but I made a meatless chili flavored soup the other night, and it had black beans in it.I'll post what I did a little later. I'm just waking up still. Need coffee.you are nutz





The next innovative ballpark food is set to hit Miller Park this season, as Milwaukee Brewers fans will have a chance to take a bite of the Inside The Park Nachos.They feature a stick of beef, loaded with refried beans, rolled in Doritos, and then deep fried and drizzled with sour cream and cheese.The Inside The Park nachos feature a stick of beef, loaded with refried beans, rolled in Doritos, and then deep fried and drizzled with sour cream and cheese."We've sold nachos before, but some people don't want to get messy," said Jamie Hodgson, general manager of Miller Park hospitality for concessionaire Delaware North. "I think this is going to be a big seller because you can eat this in one hand and have a beer in the other."Two other items will get the attention of Brewers fans. One is the Down Wisconsin Avenue Brat. It's an 18-inch brat covered with gravy, French fries, cheese curds, cheese sauce, fried sauerkraut and jalapeños, then topped with sour cream and chives. The behemoth will cost $20."The smart fan knows that you pay for something like this by just splitting it, but we know there are going to be people that save it all for themselves," Hodgson said.The third star of the Miller Park menu this season is the Miller Park Bratchos, a take on the meat-based nachos that were popularized recently by the Green Bay Packers.This version has four sausages -- chorizo, Italian, Polish and bratwurst -- cut up and served on top of kettle chips, sour cream, fried jalapeños and sauerkraut.The Brewers will be competing for the item that gets the most buzz at major league ballparks this year. The leader in the clubhouse is the Arizona Diamondbacks, who are serving a Churro Dog, which is a churro inside a doughnut bun topped by a frozen yogurt sundae.





I doubt I'll get these, but if you do find yourself in Appleton (Rookie A ball) you would be wise to get the bacon cheeseburger with two funnel cakes serving as the bun, that's good eats.Though the Bratchos, or some variation of that item has long been a great food served at tailgate parties.





I finally broke down and bought a Vitamix.  Blending is fun.  I haven't tried to blend an Ipad, but I did just order a new phone and wonder what would happen if I dropped my old phone in there...





I'm liking this Anova device.  I used it for some chicken tonight, and finished them with a sear on the grill and brush of various sauces for my discriminating children.





Badge,  I officially like this immersion circulator a lot.  I've had great results for chicken, beef, duck and fish.   Its best attribute is allowing you to do other things, while you prepare dinner,  loosely ahead of its primary purpose, to prep your meat to the exact temp for final searing, broiling, grilling, whatever.





Sounds good enough for me. I'm getting one.Getting a Vitamix too. I keep hearing great things from everyone. My Kitchenaid sucks.





847badgerfan wrote: Sounds good enough for me. I'm getting one.Getting a Vitamix too. I keep hearing great things from everyone. My Kitchenaid sucks.I'm about to start making some chili sauce - I can never get it to the right consistency before, but I'm quite confident the Vitamix will turn it smooth as silk





Let us know how it goes, and share the recipe too please.





So my wife and I (along with a few others) recently bought a cattle (well, we are buying a claim to the carcass).  We're now all figuring out what to buy, and what to have them do with the cuts.  The slaughter was yesterday.My #1 draft pick is a bone-in 'Standing' Ribeye Roast.  Yeah, prime rib, but nothing makes better beef stock than those rib bones.I've got skirt steak, a brisket (side), short ribs, a flat iron, boneless rump roast for carved or Italian roast beef, chuck for chili/stews and I'm sure my wife will  want some ground.  We've pre divided any filets and ribeyes.  I'm not into beef back ribs, or strips and sirloin.What am I missing? …besides the stent?





You should end up with some burger. You will be very happy with it,  but you are taking a critical component with the flat iron cuts.





That's a good point.  I really like using flat iron (as a cut) but as noted, the tradeoff is what I can't do with the flat iron, unless I grind it myself, which defeats the purpose of having the meat locker do it for me (for a price of course).





I used to get cows all the time, when I had the two boys under the roof. You couldn't have enough food in the house...I got some of the roasts and the steaks (filet, T-bone, flank, skirt, ribeye) and left everything else (including tongue, brain, etc) to grind. That was some of the best burger meat I've ever had. I always figured I could go get a brisket from the local butcher if needed, which is what I always did and still do.Out of the total weight, around half of it went to the grind. I also used to get the liver for my Dad when he was still here.Now that we are free of eating machines in the house, I just use the butcher. For my burgers now, I use 1/3 brisket, 1/3 ribeyes and 1/3 skirt. I grind it myself. Ends up around 20 pounds at 85/15, depending on the size of the brisket I get (I shoot for 7 pounds).I like the ribeye component better than the chuck component. Deeper flavor, I believe.





I'd suggest beef short ribs off the plate, but to get really meaty ones, you'd have to sacrifice some of your ribeye steak, and not many people want to do that.Personally, I like meaty beef ribs more than I like ribeye steak, so that's an easy decision for me. 





I've also used short ribs in my grind, in place of the ribeye. Thanks for the reminder!





You better believe it.  I use cubed beef short rib in chili all the time as well.





Me too. Gives that deep flavor we all love, rather than sirloin or something.Another dish that I love short rib for is Beef Bourguignon. Give that a whirl sometime, with Julia Childs' recipe from Volume One (available on line in many places).





I've done it, works great!    I've also approximated osso bucco with it.  Basically, any dish that requires long braising, is well suited for beef short rib.





Oh, I posted this in the B12 BBQ/chili thread, but will do so here as well.  Anyone interested in knowing more about slow-smoked BBQ, should watch the show "BBQ with Franklin" on PBS, featuring Austin pitmaster Aaron Franklin.  Really interesting stuff.http://www.pbs.org/food/shows/bbq-with-franklin/





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:21:58 PM
It is exciting to buy mass quantities of an animal, I've traditionally have done so with pigs for awhile because I'm in the middle of Indiana, and why wouldn't you buy 1/2 a hog if you live in Indiana or Iowa for that matter, but haven't done so with cattle in a number of years.   It didn't make sense when I was single.





Some good stuff on here now fellas. Now it's time to start adding more.I've got a lot to put here from the past year or so, and need to find time to take my scribbles and put them into Word docs. Maybe next week. Supposedly I'm on vacation. We'll see how that goes.





utee94 wrote: Personally, I like meaty beef ribs more than I like ribeye steak, so that's an easy decision for me. geez, we have something else in common





Made very good, very simple breaded boneless pork chops the other day.Dipped them in spicy brown mustard, rolled them in a mixture of 3 parts bread crumbs, 1 part finely grated parmesean cheese.Didn't need to do a thing to them when they came off.





 EastLansingAdam wrote: Made very good, very simple breaded boneless pork chops the other day.Dipped them in spicy brown mustard, rolled them in a mixture of 3 parts bread crumbs, 1 part finely grated parmesean cheese.Didn't need to do a thing to them when they came off. Off of what?





Sorry.  Slapped them on the grill.  I had doubts, I don't recall grilling breaded meat before, but it worked well.





That's what I was wondering.I've never done that.





Cooked it lower and longer so, I'm not sure how much work the direct flame did.  Kept it in the 350ish range.





 EastLansingAdam wrote: Cooked it lower and longer so, I'm not sure how much work the direct flame did.  Kept it in the 350ish range. Yes, this is a nice change of pace (grilling breaded meats), I saw my sister in law do this with chicken a few years ago and now copy her technique.    Clean grates a must, but I also keep the temps on the lower side





I thought breading was what deep fat fryers were all aboutI suppose anything can be grilled





Never heard of grilling something that's breaded.  Frying, pan--frying, baking, sure.  But grilling?  Interesting...I wonder if you could BBQ something breaded.  Hmmmmm....





ya gotta have a small corner in the back of the smoker that you could try an experiment this weekend





FearlessF wrote: ya gotta have a small corner in the back of the smoker that you could try an experiment this weekendWell sure.  I'm only doing one brisket, 2 racks of beef ribs, and 3 racks of pork ribs.  Plenty of extra room.I'm just not sure what I'd bread and smoke? Gotta be something that stand up to some heat over time without drying out. Maybe something bacon-wrapped and then breaded?





I hope you tried something and it was a huge success





I never got around to breading anything to smoke, sadly.  Perhaps next time.





I can understand that





But the beef ribs were other-worldly.  Not to pat myself on the back too much, but they might have been the most delicious BBQ I've ever tasted.  And they were super-easy to make.





that's the wonderful thing about BBQ, it's easy enough that folks from Kansas City, Memphis, and South Carolina can make superb BBQya don't hafta be a rich, arrogant Texan to BBQ meat 





No, you certainly don't. But I can guarantee you that having access to the right equipment makes it a lot easier, and having access to the right heritage makes it better.  When you're growing up on great BBQ, you're going to make better BBQ.  Them's the facts o' life.





I picked up the beef last week at the Meat Locker near the farm.  It is pretty awesome to be load up the back of a car with hundreds of pounds of beef.  Based on the rough math, we (the four of us who bought an equal 1/4 of our half of the cattle, another group bought the other half of cattle) we each took home about 65 lbs of meat ( I got most of the rib bones).  Total cost is about $5.38 per lb, We had plenty of grind (packed at 1.05lbs) , rib eyes , strips, some filet, a few bottom rumps, stew meat,  6 packs of short ribs (between 2-4lbs each), a little bit of flank, and I got my full brisket which will be smoked by my English friend in the neighborhood, who knows what he's doing with his smoker.  From what I understand, the other group had somebody that wanted some of the tongue, and other parts.





Corngrats on the beef





Oh man, you definitely should have gotten some of the tongue, and cheek meat.  Makes scrumptious tacos!





I am a big fan of the cheek, which is almost always the best bite of food from any fish or animal IMO.I passed on the cheek in order to secure the rib bones.  We basically had a draft for the one off cuts.  In truth, the other lady really wanted to the cheeks





I can't keep track of what I've posted here.  Anyways, made a dish I liked last night.  The Mexican grocery store had short ribs marked down to 3 bucks a pound, so I bought two pounds of those and braised them with onion, garlic, jalapenos, chili powder, cumin, a couple guajillo chiles, fish sauce, vinegar, and water.  I fried plantains, then smashed and fried them again.  I topped the plantains with the beef, some cheese, cilantro, tomatoes, sweet onion, and avocado.  Add some lime juice or hot sauce and that was a really good meal.





I don't think you've made something like that and posted it here.Looks real good. Did you sear the ribs before the braise?





Very similar concept to Puerco Pibil, which I still need to post here.I stopped using shoulder to make that and now use country ribs - the short rib of the pig.





847badgerfan wrote: I don't think you've made something like that and posted it here.Looks real good. Did you sear the ribs before the braise?A few of them.  I would do them all but the perils of cooking while chasing three kids has made corner cutting an acceptable method.





Also, use a ripe plantain.  I've been trying to hit the four flavors - sour, salty, spicy, and sweet, and this dish really highlights that.





I've been trying that too, but for you it also looks like you may have hit the 5th flavor with the fish sauce.





847badgerfan wrote: I've been trying that too, but for you it also looks like you may have hit the 5th flavor with the fish sauce.Yeah, a little bit.  There were some bones in the short ribs so that helped too.  You ever cook with MSG?  I'm thinking of trying it.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:22:54 PM
I have not. I don't think the wife would like that. When we order Chinese food, we always have them make it without.





Just ordered some ground buffalo meat for the first time.  Should I treat it the same as ground beef?  Any suggestions?





EastLansingAdam wrote: Just ordered some ground buffalo meat for the first time.  Should I treat it the same as ground beef?  Any suggestions?I haven't cook much of it, but from what I read it has very little fat so be careful overcooking it.





Agree, don't want to past medium IMO.    Most bison is 90-95%, and bison has no marbling, which ordinarily works to slow the cooking of meat.  Without marbling bison will cook faster than beef.Whatever you're doing with it, burgers, chili, tacos, etc., you should find a way  to some moisture into the meat.  If you take it to far, you're going to have ground turkey, in terms of being fairly dry.  Depending on the flavor of the dish, I'm talking using anything from onion (red, white or green), beef stock, celery minced finely.   I actually use sour cream with ground turkey, though never used it on beef or bison.If you do make burgers, make them thicker than you otherwise would.  I love caramelized onions on a bison burger.





yes, similar to ground venison, very lean and healthyvery good in moist recipes such as chili and sloppy Joe





I'm cooking a brisket on our first college football Saturday.  What's everyone favorite brisket rub?





How are you cooking it?  What type of brisket (whole packer or something else?), what type of cooker (offset smoker, kamado-style, Weber smoky mountain vertical, etc?)? What's your target cooking temp and for how long?Brisket is serious bidness around here. 





I may smoke a pork shoulder for a Husker-BYU party at my placeIf I'm not busy playing golf that morning  any tips?





FearlessF wrote: I may smoke a pork shoulder for a Husker-BYU party at my placeIf I'm not busy playing golf that morning  any tips?225 until it's falling apart.  Really tough to go wrong with pork butt.





I was planning on 225no wonder its what my brother smokes the most 





Wagyu Top Round - Ranch Raised. Grain fed to Prime ++Double grocery bagged 2 parts salt 1 part pepper - put it in the bag and turn a few times - allow to restPut in a few pop ups for Medium in the Top roundGrill -- charcoal all around sides (so you never have to turn the meat)Water pan below in Grill (so the meat never dries out)Light the charcoal with a torch - no need for lighter fluid (ad charcoal as needed)Close the lid maintain lower heat and open a Shiner BockTell Aggie Jokes and bash sooners -- ya know normal conversation. PS: Aggies and sooners (be sure to put the top round on the grill before you open your first beer)





Really no need to even sauce it despite what all the Carolina folk do.  Put a pan down under it to catch the drippings, then pour those over the meat after you pull it and are ready to serve.





utee94 wrote: How are you cooking it?  What type of brisket (whole packer or something else?), what type of cooker (offset smoker, kamado-style, Weber smoky mountain vertical, etc?)? What's your target cooking temp and for how long?Brisket is serious bidness around here. I'm not doing at my house, and my buddy just has a gas grill.  Going to smoke it on the gas grill for a couple hours, then finish it wrapped in foil in the oven.  I may get a whole brisket and cut it - depends on what Costco has available next week.  I've only seen flats there though I'd prefer a point.  The grill temp will probably be about 275 and finished at 300 in the oven.  Not sure what temp on the brisket.  I'm leaning to 203 but with it wrapped in foil it may be hard to check.





You can probe through the foil if you like.Get a full packer if you can find one, and if you can fit one on your grill.  Ask the butcher about full untrimmed packers if you don't see them out in the bins.Obviously make the heat as indirect as possible.  I assume you're going to use wood chips in a pan or something like that to produce smoke?Temp on the brisket doesn't really matter all that much, I've seen them done at 195, or 205, always depends on the individual slab o'meat.  I typically don't "crutch" my briskets (crutching = wrapping in foil) and just use a finger to probe the fat cap.  If your finger slides in like warm butter, it's done, no matter what the temp or how much time it's taken.Anyway, to answer your original question, I use a very simple rub-- 1 part salt, 1 part black pepper, 1 part paprika.  Apply liberally all over.  The paprika doesn't really add any flavor but acts as a carrier for the salt and pepper, to help form a nice bark.





I don't have probes (I know, I need to get them.  I bought a set which stopped working almost immediately).  I do use a Thermapen, but am wary of putting holes in the foil repeatedly.  Plan to use a packet of chips wrapped in foil for the smoke.  I've never smoked on a gas grill but understand it isn't too difficult.  As far as the rub - any thoughts on sugar in it?  I've seen rubs with and without, not sure if it has any difference that matters too much but I love it in my pork rubs.





I wouldn't do sugar on a beef rub. It works for some pork cuts, but not all.I use a standard rub of smoked salt, pepper, chili powder, cayenne pepper, smoked paprika, ground dried thyme, onion powder and garlic powder. All are the same 1 part except the salt, which is 2 parts.For some pork cuts I will add 1 part of brown sugar to that mix.Sometimes with beef, like a brisket, I just go with straight salt and pepper - 2:1.





Sugar can burn once you hit temperatures of 300 or more.  If you're staying down at 225 it should be okay, but it sounds like you want to go higher.Also, agree with badgerfan, I don't use sugar for beef rubs in general, and especially not for brisket.  As always though, you should do what you like, there's no single  "right way" to do it despite what most arrogant Texicans will tell you. 





Oh, and I'll often mix in about 1/4 part ground chipotle or 1/2 part ground ancho, but you have to know your audience.  Like cayenne, this will spice up the meat considerably.  Not everyone wants a lot of heat in their meat, so to speak.





A lot of this also depends on whether or not you are intending to use sauce, and also on what kind of sauce.A thicker sweet sauce is good with a spicier rub. To the contrary, a spicy vinegar sauce is good with a little sugar in the rub.It's all about balance.





Sauce?  On brisket?????





 utee94 wrote: Sauce?  On brisket????? I was talking in general terms, for pairing sauces and rubs.I don't sauce my brisket, but I make it available for people who do. In the case of brisket, I never offer up a sweet sauce. It has enough fat to tame the heat all by itself.I've seen many people use sauce on brisket, including that time we all met up at Ruby's (you were not there).Their sauce, which I happen to really like, can work on brisket. I tried it there for the sake of it.I have some in my cabinet too. I order it online.





Yes, there are weird people  even in Central Texas, that put sauce on their brisket. Cryin' shame I tells ya. And I'm sort of kidding.  I've actually posted the BBQ sauce recipe from my dad's BBQ restaurant, on this very thread. But I rarely put sauce on brisket.  If I have about 6 slices of brisket in front of me, I'll most likely eat the first 5 straight.  Then I'll take the last one, toss it on a piece of white bread, throw on some sliced onion and jalapenos, and then a squirt of sauce.  Fold that sucker over, and that's a nice way to finish the meal.





Heh. I go the opposite in 'Q joints.Get the fluff out of the way, and then it's straight meat.





I like beer with my brisket





Amen, brutha.





I wasn't going to use any sauce besides the drippings.





Oh you should definitely make some sauce.  What else will people dip their white bread into whilst enjoying the brisket?  You must also serve sliced white or yellow onion, jalapenos, and pickles.  Pinto beans, potato salad, and cole slaw on the side.And nanner pudding for dessert.I'm pretty sure there's no other way to serve brisket.





Shiner's Octoberfest is on the shelfis it worth the $8/sixer?





There are many better Oktoberfests out there IMO.  Also, for me, it's WAY too early to be drinking Fest.  It's still 100 degrees outside for goodness' sake!





cooling off nicely herebeen in the 40's overnightwaiting for the El Nino winter





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:23:59 PM
I wish I could smoke something for the tailgate.. But between traveling all week for work and having to haul supplies between states, I just stick to grilling. I save my smoking for at home weekends. Add pork shoulder is my meat of choice. Kids love it and I can eat it meal after meal.Also with all the 11 am games in the BIG, I'm starting to get better at breakfast tailgates.





Nothing wrong with shoulder for breakfast!





847badgerfan wrote: Nothing wrong with shoulder for breakfast!Nothing wrong at all, just let it smoke overnight, and it's good to go in the morning.Down here in Texico, we'd put that on a tortilla and call it a breakfast taco. UT Breakfast Tacos





I'm thinking like a griddled Johnny cake with pork shoulder and a peach salsa with lime juice and jalapeno.





you could roll it in a pancake and dip it in maple syrupsweet and spicy





FearlessF wrote: you could roll it in a pancake and dip it in maple syrupsweet and spicyWrap that in bacon, deep fry it, and then we're talking!





great idea





Just looked at the index on page 1, it seems I've never shared with y'all how to BBQ beef short ribs.  I did a batch recently that, and I'm being serious here, was the best food I've ever eaten.  I'm sorry that wasn't humble, but I don't care.  I'm dreaming about those beefers right now.I don't have time to tell you right now, but I will soon.





OK, the key to great BBQ beef ribs, is getting the right rib.  There are basically two kinds of beef ribs available at the butcher.  The first is called the "back rib."  These are small, and are primarily what you see in grocery stores.  Don't buy them.What you want is beef short ribs.  They're big, real big-- so big some people call them dino bones or brontosaurus bones-- and if you can get the butcher to cut them well for you, they're going to be really meaty.  A lot of butchers don't like to leave too much meat on them, because it means sacrificing some of the meat that would otherwise go to the ribeye and chuck cuts.  So getting meaty beef short ribs can get expensive.But it's worth it.There are two styles of beef short ribs-- short ribs off the plate, and beef chuck ribs.  The short ribs off the plate are better because these are next to the ribeye, but the chuck ribs are still great for BBQ (and that's what I used the last time I made them).Preparation is super duper easy.  Get your rack of beef short ribs (will most likely be either 3 bones, or 4 bones, depending on how it's butchered), and smear some hot sauce on all sides.  I used Cholula, but Tobasco or other Louisiana hot sauce works too.  Your rub is going to be kosher salt and coarse black pepper, I do about 1:1.  In the video link I'll provide at the end, you'll see (James Beard Award-winning) pit-master Aaron Franklin put the salt on first, and then the pepper, which he does so he can see exactly how much salt went on.  That''s fine too.  You can put it on pretty thick, there's a lot of meat and fat to absorb the salt and pepper, and you want a really good, crusty bark at the end of it.Pit goes to 285 (hotter than I do for brisket which is 225), and the ribs go on, bone-side down.  You don't even need to open that lid for at least 4-5 hours.After 4-5 hours, you can check for doneness with your temperature probe.  You're not really worried about the temperature, so much as the feel.  If the probe meets resistance and the meat still feels "tight" it needs more time.  If the probe slides in easy and the meat feels loose, it's ready to come off.  A small rack might take 5-6 hours, a large one up to 8 hours, at 285.Oh, and the first time you check for doneness, Franklin recommends spritzing the meat anywhere it's looking too crusty with water or other liquid of your choice (some folks use apple cider vinegar, works well, I used apple juice + apple cider vinegar).When they're done, you'll be able to probe easily through the front side of the rack, through the meat between the bones, and also easily through the membrane on the back side (bone side) of the rack.  Temperature will probably be between 198 and 204, but every rack is different, so the feel is more important.  Remove using a towel instead of tongs (to preserve the bark).  Let it rest for ~20-30 minutes, and then slice the ribs apart.  Finished products should look something like this:  Now, down here in Texico, we wouldn't put any sauce on this.  Certainly not before or during cooking, and typically not afterward either.  The meat should have so much juiciness, it makes its own sauce.BUT, if you really like sauce, I have a recipe for it somewhere further up the thread.Here's the link to Aaron Franklin's video for those that are interested: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFVu_XwLrew





and if you make 'em like that, and then elect not to make beef stock at a later date with those rib bones, you should be punched in the face.





Yup, makes great beef stock for sure.





beef ribs like that will ruin you for pork ribsmy favorite thing to eat, hands down





FearlessF wrote: beef ribs like that will ruin you for pork ribsmy favorite thing to eat, hands downI'll be headed over to John Mueller Meat Company for lunch on Thursday, and beef ribs like that are part of the plan! 





enjoyed some fabulous beef short ribs in Minneapolis last Friday nightShould have taken a few pics, but it was quite dark in the dining roomand the martinis were flowing with potato vodka!





Bought The Food Lab by Kenji Lopez-Alt.  Wonderful cookbook, if you like to read about the why of a recipe more than the recipe.





I've been fooling around with fried chicken.  A quick or long soak in butter milk, egg, salt, pepper, garlic powder, oregano, paprika, and cayenne.  Followed by a dust of flour, corn starch, and baking powder.  My main issues have been fry temp.  What works on a chicken tender beautifully can lead to too dark crust on a bone in piece.  I did a batch that I finished in the oven, but I didn't love that, either.





I've always just done it  in a large cast iron skillet the way my grandmother did, and it turns out well.But I have a buddy who became obsessed with it the same way I am with BBQ, and after a lot of experimentation, he decided that using a pressure cooker was the way to go.  And I have to admit it's great.





utee94 wrote: I've always just done it  in a large cast iron skillet the way my grandmother did, and it turns out well.But I have a buddy who became obsessed with it the same way I am with BBQ, and after a lot of experimentation, he decided that using a pressure cooker was the way to go.  And I have to admit it's great.Frying in a pressure cooker? I am intrigued.





Yup, frying in a pressure cooker.  He says that's how some of the chains like KFC do it and get such consistent results.  I've never researched to determine if that''s true, but he has and I have no reason to doubt him.Speaking of birds, I'll be hosting Thanksgiving for the extended family this year, and we're going to deep-fry one turkey, and BBQ another.  I'll try to post up some pictures this go-round.





http://www.food.com/recipe/jersey-disco-fries-507069An East Coast theme seems appropriate this week, what with the Huskers headed to New Jersey. So how about Jersey Disco Fries? Check out the recipe at food.com. Let's see … steak fries covered in chicken gravy and cheese. Tell me you're not intrigued.





FearlessF wrote: http://www.food.com/recipe/jersey-disco-fries-507069An East Coast theme seems appropriate this week, what with the Huskers headed to New Jersey. So how about Jersey Disco Fries? Check out the recipe at food.com. Let's see … steak fries covered in chicken gravy and cheese. Tell me you're not intrigued.Looks okay, but I'd rather cover those fries in chile con queso instead of Cheez Whiz, and I'd rather use pico de gallo over gravy.  And some jalapenos, serranos, gucacamole.  NOW we're talking... 





Turkey's been in the brine for 20 hours now, about to take it out, rinse it, and let it dry in the fridge overnight.  It'll go on the smoker at 325 tomorrow morning around 9, should be ready by 12:30 or so.





This is a recipe for Biggie Mama's tomato sauce, kinda, because I was 9 when she died. So, much of the stuff is based on a memory from 40 years ago, which is probably better than my memory from 40 hours ago. Some of the stuff, like the baking soda, is my deal. And I'm not sure what kind of tomatoes she used but in the summer she used the ones from her garden.This was my great grandma from Sicily, and yes, I called her Biggie Mama because she was the oldest grandma and also was about 4' by 4' or so.Anyway, the sauce: Extra virgin olive oil 1 large yellow onion, diced ½ tsp Crushed red pepper flakes (optional, or more if you like it spicy) Salt and black pepper 6 cloves fresh garlic, finely minced 4 Tb Italian flat leaf parsley, finely chopped 1 can of whole, peeled San Marzano tomatoes, 108 oz can Sugar (optional) Baking soda (if needed)   In a large stockpot, add about 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and bring to medium heat. Add the onions and red pepper flakes and season with salt and black pepper to your taste. Cook until the onions become slightly translucent. Add the garlic and cook for another few minutes, being careful to not burn the onions or garlic. Add the parsley and cook until just fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in the tomatoes to combine the mixture. Reduce heat to medium/low and cover. Simmer for one hour, stirring occasionally.   For a rustic sauce, use a potato masher to crush the tomatoes and onions. For a smooth sauce, use an immersion blender (if available) or a traditional blender (be careful to cover lid with a towel if sauce is still hot, or wait for sauce to cool).   When blended to the consistency you like, taste for salt and pepper. For a sweeter sauce, add sugar to taste. If the sauce is too acidic, stir in baking soda about 1/8 tsp at a time and taste. Cook for 5 minutes longer and serve over your favorite pasta or add meats of your choice for braising.





Looks good, will have to try that soon.  Thanks bf.





I had a successful debut using the Big Green Egg last week.  The brisket turned out very nicely, great smoke, nice bark.  I made some mistakes on the whole pork shank (though the clock and family schedule put me in a tough spot to finish it properly), but it was still pretty good, just needed a little more time.   the half chickens I grilled were delicious,  I am pretty convinced that Big Green Egg is far and away superior at indirect cooking than any possible gas grill set up.Regulating temp is definitely the toughest task.  Also getting a thermometer probe at grate level is key.  The built in (as suspected) thermometer was off anywhere between 15-40 degrees from the grate surface probe that I had.





well done!I'm sure if the debut was successful, the results will be fabulous going forwardI'd like to have one of those some day.  Just too busy golfing....... in the summer





MH should probably post some pictures and give us a list of all the accessories.Also... what does that thing weigh? I'd have to make sure my deck could structurally handle that kind of a dead load in addition to the live load I apply to it.





put it on the boat





 847badgerfan wrote: MH should probably post some pictures and give us a list of all the accessories.Also... what does that thing weigh? I'd have to make sure my deck could structurally handle that kind of a dead load in addition to the live load I apply to it.  If I could get a tutorial on posting pictures (what happened to the sand box thread we used to have?) I would be happy to do so.  I have a 'L' Egg and it weighs about 168 lbs.  Proper and precise assembly is very key (no, I didn't do it myself, my wife had that taken care of, that was part of the surprise). The XL is 200+ and I think the XXL is over 400 lbs.  I do have it on a metal 'nest', which is on locking wheels, which is a BGE accessory.  I noticed on the website, but didn't study, they have lots of useful tips/pointers for how to handle the BGE on a wood deck.  I have mine right on our back patio.I also have the stone plate insert which has some cheeky EGG name, which I've forgotten , which is what you need to do indirect heat.My wife also got me a few large bags of the BGE branded natural charcoal (chunks), and a nice cover (I do grill year round), so I don't anticipate moving this to the garage or storage.  I see there are a whole host of other 'EGGcessories' which I haven't yet shopped.   I can tell you the one thing I will get is the device that connects the grate to the stone plate, which then be lifted in and out in one piece and also give you a slightly raised grate. I watched some master of the EGG on a you tube video using it and I can tell that's something that is worth it.I used my own probe thermometers, which I can read from inside the house to monitor temps.    I have yet to do any direct grilling on it.





Thanks.What kind of thermometer do you have?FF... Gas mileage is bad enough on that boat.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:25:02 PM
First - gasoline is cheap!  so, is diesel fuelI need a wireless thermometer - maybe next year for xmasif I'm a good boy 





I believe BGE calls that do-hicky a "plate setter."  They're more than willing to sell you all kinds of accessories, that's where they make a ton of their money (like any other business).  But the plate setter is well worth it and the most important accessory you can buy, assuming you want indirect cooking, which obviously you do.Plenty of wireless temp probes on the market, I've had a couple and they work well enough but all tend to crap out after a few years.  Currently I just use a cheap $15 wired one, the probe goes through a potato that sits on the grate, and the read-out part sits outside the cooking chamber on the handy shelf my offset has.  My lid-mounted thermometer has gotten WAY out of whack over the years, it now reads almost 100 degrees too low, so if you think you're cooking at 225, it's really about 315.





Ah, yes the 'plate setter'.  I would argue there's no reason to get a BGE without the plate setter do hicky.I do agree that eventually all of these wireless probes crap out.  I'm currently using a 'Char broil' version somebody gave me (I think that's the Lowe's house brand of grill stuff.   It works fine, I'm sure it will suck before too long, after it is dropped or whatever.  There is nothing beating homemade workarounds.The lid mounted thermometers are about as good as Bank Thermometers at telling you the temperature outside.  However, as long as I know which way it is off, and by how many degrees, that's ok.  It's kind of like a clock that is four hours slow, and you just know it.  My lid mounted BGE thermometer is between 20-40 degrees warmer than the grate level probe and it was again last night when I made some chicken





My lid thermometer was right on for several years, when measured against the grate temperature with a separate probe.  Which of course, means that it was NOT correct for the actual temperature at the top of the smoker, but as you point out, knowing the approximate delta means you can still use it.So I stopped being a fanatic about checking the grate temperature (especially since my last wireless probe crapped out), and awhile back I noticed that for a couple of cooks in a row, my briskets were finishing up sooner than I expected.  That's when I busted out a new digital instant read thermometer and checked it, finding it was ~80 degrees off.Gotta tell you though, those briskets were still delicious, so I finally had to break down and admit to one of my BBQ buddies (who cooks hotter and faster because he's a BBQ competition pitmaster), that higher heat actually works just fine.  I was always a 225 degree religious fanatic, but 315 works just as well, and dramatically reduces the cook time.  I still go 225 most of the time because it's tried and true, but on those rare occasions when I can only find a really big brisket (14 lbs or more) then I won't hesitate to crank up the temps and avoid cooking all night.





After much research, shopping  and review, I've decided to not pursue the Big Green Egg for my home. There is nothing I cannot prepare on it that I can't accomplish now with the equipment I already have. I don't do a whole lot of smoking as I'm not around here in the summer and I've taken more to stove cooking in the cold months. I haven't touched my outdoor equipment since before Thanksgiving, actually. It just didn't make sense to drop that kind of money on another piece of equipment and all the Eggcessories. Maybe 15 years ago.. I should have bought one when I first saw it. Oh well.For the record, I have a Weber Genesis and a Weber Performer on my deck at this time.





That's a prudent decision.  Having overlapping equipment (at those price points) is not my kind of thing.  (yet my wife still thinks we need two shop-vacs....sigh).   As we all say in my biz,  'we can't have redundancies,' around here  My modest sized decade old gas grill has seen better days, so I know it is on its way out, but its still gonna bang out burgers/sausage for the rest of its days.





I just finally got the gas grill, and only because I won it at a silent auction for charity. I know I paid too much for it... but I was feeling good that night so whatever.As for the charcoal grill... That's coming up on 15 years old and it still looks new. You can't kill a Weber.





I made chicken parm last night.  I used boneless, skinless chicken thighs.  I bought chicken breasts and was going to slice them, but then I thought, why am I slicing raw chicken into the shape of boneless thighs?  Seeing how I had leftover thighs in the fridge from making fajitas, I went with those.  Turned out pretty well - the breading was flour, then egg, then a mixture of oregano, parmesan reggiano, and panko bread crumbs.  Further, instead of cooking it in the sauce, I baked it with mozzarella and more parm then served it with a sauce.  This maximized gooey and crunchy, two of the most important things in any chicken parm.





So I often wondered about this for chicken parm. I've had it dry out in the past so it seems like using the thigh prevents that from happening?Good call. I'm going to have to try that sometime. Did you brine at all? Buttermilk?





I won't speak for MaxSam, but I keep 'em thin, and simply eat more than one.   but otherwise, I would agree thighs are the best way to go, though a lot of people don't like the thighs for some silly reason.





I didn't bother with a brine. Thighs are tough to dry out





yup, I'm a breast guy when it comes to chicken, but the thighs are much better for chicken parm





Going to look at Big Red Kamado Grill on sale for $249.00 at Menards.  Thoughts?





I only know folks with BGE, so can't  really comment on any of the other brands out there.  One thing I've heard is that the off-brands have a tendency to crack under high heat, which is kind of the point, but that's just anecdotal so take it for what it's worth.





utee94 wrote: I only know folks with BGE, so can't  really comment on any of the other brands out there.  One thing I've heard is that the off-brands have a tendency to crack under high heat, which is kind of the point, but that's just anecdotal so take it for what it's worth.Thanks utee.  I bought it.  I seasoned it and used it once, so far so good.  It seems to be well insulated and the online reviews suggested that it may even be better insulated than the BGE.  I'll see how it holds up.  At $250 it was a LOT cheaper than the BGE and even significantly cheaper than most knock-offs.  First meal from it:I marinated chicken-brest in a mixture of diced peaches, pecan pieces, and apple-cider.  I then smoked the concoction over pecan wood brushing some of the leftover peach/pecan/cider mixture over it a couple times to maintain moisture.  It was VERY good.  I had veggies and cornbread for sides.





Sounds like an interesting tool in your toolbox.Maybe brine the chicken next time. I've been brining all the breasts I do now and it works really well. Pork tenderloin and chops too.





I brined some pork tenderloin and cooked them side by side with un-brined.  I actually preferred the un-brined.  Just for reference, this was for BBQ not grilling, I slow-smoked them at 225 for about 1.5 hours and pulled at internal temp of 140 (which is low for some people, but I always cook pork to 135-140 and haven't died from it yet  ).  The brined ones were not any moister. and were noticeably saltier, which is unusual because that's never been the case for me when brining fowl.Anyway, I do brine most fowl, and the brined turkey I BBQ'd over Tday was probably the best BBQ bird I've ever eaten.





I'm not sure I'd brine pork for smoking either. It's not hot enough to dry it out like charcoal can do.I like to include a brine to add flavor. I never use the full amount of salt called for, for obvious reasons, and it still works fine. I'll include an array of chiles in almost all of my brines. For Saturday's chicken I used ancho, habanero and chipotles (all dry).





I probably could have cut the salt in the rub, but since it didn't come out any moister, which is the main point, I don't feel the need to brine pork for BBQ anymore.  I did brine some thick chops that I seared in the skillet and finished in the oven, turned out really well, but I'm not sure it was better than the way I normally do it.For fowl, though, I definitely brine, and love the results.





I was driving west on I-40 just out of NC in TN and hit something, I know not what exactly, and the front tire went dead flat inside a minute.  I managed to exit and examine it, and tried to inflate it with air with no luck.  These are "run flats" and I drove carefully to the nearest town of any size on back roads and got it changed the next day.  The sidewall was torn out.  The wheel fortunately was OK apparently, as this happened two months ago locally and the rim was bent and had to be replaced.We had to stay overnight and the tire was almost $400.  Bummer.I am not a fan of these low profile tires.  These are 35s and there isn't much rubber between wheel and outer tire.





that is a bummerexpensive tire, lucky it was a run flat, otherwise you'd have been jacking and putting on the spare along side the interstateno fun





How'd it go?





847badgerfan wrote: How'd it go?It went well!  The new smoker works great.  At the price ($250), it was a bargain.  So far I have smoked skinless chicken breast, chicken legs/thighs, and ribs.  All were great.  I also baked cornbread in it because the oven was otherwise occupied and that worked great as well.  Next few things to try are pizza (I have two stones and can fit both in the smoker at once so I'll be able to do two) and then chicken wings (I just bought racks to hold up to six-dozen chicken wings so I'm planning on making six flavors of smoked chicken wings next time I have a group to cook for:Plain:   (just smoked chicken wings)Honey-Bourbon BBQ:  I made the sauce using local buckwheat honey and I love it but g/f and most of her family think it is too hot.  Honey-mustard BBQ:  I made this sauce as well roughly following the recipe I posted in this thread (see page 21).  Creamy Buffalo:  I'll just use Sweet Baby Ray's for this one.  Garlic-Parmesan:  G/f's favorite flavor.  I found a recipe online that looks easy and good.  HOT!:  My plan is a combination of smoked habaneros, jalapeno innards (left over from making the 'armadillo eggs listed in this thread, see page 18), honey, and vinegar.  I'll add the Garlic-Parmesan wing sauce recipe if it goes well.  FWIW:  LetsGoPeay's "Armadillo Eggs" recipe on page 18 is excellent.  He suggests to bake it and utee suggests to bread and fry it, but I've been grilling them at tailgates for the four years since he posted that and it works great.  I also recently did some in the smoker and that works too.  One tip, he mentions to freeze them and this helps a LOT.  If you don't freeze them it is hard to keep them together long enough to get them cooked.  Another tip, the jalapeno innards  (that you take out to put the cream cheese in) make a great 'heat' for BBQ sauce.  Usually, I make up a bunch of Armadillo Eggs at once when I need to make BBQ sauce then just throw them in the freezer and take them out as needed for tailgates and whatever else.  As far as smoking chicken wings, what do you folks suggest?  To brine or not to brine, that is the first question?  After that I'll probably smoke them over apple or pecan (mostly because that is what I have available).  Thoughts?





I'm pretty busy right now so it will not be right away, but I noticed when looking up some recipes on here that the index hasn't been updated in quite a while.  The last recipe included in the index is ELA's Tequila Lime Chicken on page 18, added on 8/22/12, so it appears that I have about four years and 11 pages of recipes to add to the index.  If you have anything you want included in the new-and-improved index be sure to add it in the next few weeks.  Also, if you have any thoughts on improvements for the index feel free to share those.  If they aren't too hard, I'll add them.  If they are then I'll just nominate you to be in charge of the new-and-improved index, LoL.





EastLansingAdam wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: Torch works pretty well on fish and shellfish, as well as cheese toppings.I'll endorse this, although I haven't done it myself.Are we talking plumbing torch with MAPP or bringing in the Acetylene?





ELA and Badge:You two had a discussion of wings back on page 11 (August, 2011).  Since I'm getting ready to smoke some wings I have some questions:Badge, you mention that grilling has less fat and that is part of the reason I want to smoke them.  My dad has a heart condition so he shouldn't eat fried wings.  Then you talk about brining them in "heavily salted water".  Well, dad shouldn't eat too much salt either so that might defeat the purpose.  If I skip the salt is there any point in brining them?  What if I go light on the salt?  I'm thinking that is going to be the worst of both worlds, not enough for the desired taste and too much for the desired healthy eating.  ELA, you questioned cooking them using Badge's method (20 mins on the grill then 20 mins in the oven at 350) then you said that you tried it and they "turned out perfect" but when badge said he was "glad you liked them." you said "well, I wouldn't go that far, but the problem was not in the method."  Ok, what did you mean?  Would you use the method again?  I think smoking them will be great for flavor but I wonder how people will react.  Most people are used to crispy wings because they are used to deep-fried wings.  It seems like badge's method is an attempt to get the crispy effect without frying, am I right?  I'm just looking for ideas here.





I don't always use the entire amount of salt in the water, and I rarely brine wings anymore these days. They are fatty enough so they don't dry out. I'd just season them and put them on. Pretty hard to screw up wings.





MisterBlack wrote: I smoked the salmon on Sunday, and it came out pretty good.I did a brine with kosher salt, but only had about 2 hours to let it soak.  It still did a nice job though. I made a wet rub using lime zest, lime juice, lemon juice, olive oil, crushed garlic, sea salt, black peppercorn, and thyme.  After the brining, I rinsed the salmon with cold water and patted it dry.  Then I coated with the rub and let it sit for a half hour while I got the smoker ready.I smoked the salmon skin side down, on foil, for 3 hours, keeping the temperature between 160 - 190 degrees.  I used Alder to smoke with.  About every hour I added another coat of the rub.  I had a pretty good size filet, big enough for 4 generous portions about 1 1/2 to 2 inches thick.  The flovor was very nice, and it was tender, not dried out at all.  I served it with homemade ceasar salad.  Overall pretty good dishMisterBlack wrote: The brine was 2 TBS kosher salt to 1 cup water.The rub was something like this (not exact , as I eyeballed it):zest and juice from 2-3 limes1-2 TBS fresh thyme1 tsp black pepper1 tsp sea salt1-2 TBS olive oilI juiced 1/2  of a lemon and added 1 clove crushed garlic becuase I had it left over from the ceasar salad and I figured it would add some flavor.I got the salmon from a store close to where I live.  I live in Florida, and to my knowledge there is no natural or man made places to fish salmon here, so I'm not sure where it came from, but I know it was fresh.  The skin didn't seem to have an affect on the flavor.I did this over the weekend, very good!  G/f's step-dad said it was the best Salmon he had ever had.





I was pleasantly surprised with my rookie effort on the BGE yesterday with two racks of baby back ribs.  Again, what a great device, especially for indirect purposes. What was most surprising was my wife's appetite with them.  Normally she pick at a few ribs and that's all.  She was startled to be caught eating them right off the bone.  I think that's the most I've ever seen her eat (ribs).  Generally she's big into 'smoked' anything.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:25:59 PM
MarqHusker wrote: I was pleasantly surprised with my rookie effort on the BGE yesterday with two racks of baby back ribs.  Again, what a great device, especially for indirect purposes. What was most surprising was my wife's appetite with them.  Normally she pick at a few ribs and that's all.  She was startled to be caught eating them right off the bone.  I think that's the most I've ever seen her eat (ribs).  Generally she's big into 'smoked' anything.Hope it works well for you!  We should compare notes sometime.





BGE is a great and versatile cooker.





Whole  packers went on sale this week for $1.97/lb, so I picked up a couple.  One went in the deep freeze for later, and one is going on the smoker for Mother's Day.  Also got a few racks of St. Louis cut pork spare ribs.Makes me wonder how low beef prices will go this summer?  Usually the best sales are the week before Memorial Day, 4th of July, and Labor Day, when back in the old days before beef prices spiked, they'd go on sale for $.99/lb.Anyway, maybe one of these days I'll sign up for a web photo hosting site and post up some pictures of the goods.





your facebook page will host pics





I ain't linking my FB page to this joint.  





medinabuckeye1 wrote: Ahh, the Akorn. Yes, I actually do hear folks say that these are even better insulated than a clay kamado. And all that with two shells of steel with some foam insulation in between.Good cooker. If you're not already on it, check out Kamado Guru. Great place to learn about how to make the most of these wonderful contraptions.





bwarbiany wrote: Ahh, the Akorn. Yes, I actually do hear folks say that these are even better insulated than a clay kamado. And all that with two shells of steel with some foam insulation in between.Good cooker. If you're not already on it, check out Kamado Guru. Great place to learn about how to make the most of these wonderful contraptions.I've been very happy with the insulation so far, but I haven't tried cooking in winter yet.  A friend has a cheap, uninuslated one and he says it is completely useless in winter because the heat zones are so bad.  Thanks for the Kamado Guru link.  I looked around a bit and I'll get back there at home when I have more time.





I'm thinking when my Weber pukes, I'm getting one of those. Of course, when my Weber pukes, I might be in diapers. So probably not.





Topolobampo Mezcal Maragaritas(from Rick Bayless via the Washington Post) Ingredients   Coarse kosher salt, for garnish   6 to 10 ice cubes   1 1/2 ounces Wahaka Joven Espadín Mezcal (see headnote)   1/2 ounce Torres 10 Imperial Brandy Gran Reserva (see headnote)   2 1/2 ounces limonada (see NOTE)   3 dashes Peychaud's bitters   Lime wedge or wheel, for garnish    Directions  Wet the rim of a cocktail (martini) glass. Invert it onto a dish of coarse salt to coat the rim. Fill a cocktail shaker with the ice. Add the mezcal, brandy, limonada and bitters; seal and shake vigorously until frothy and cold; tiny ice crystals will appear in the drink after about 15 seconds of shaking. Strain into the glass. Garnish with the lime; serve right away. NOTE: To make the limonada, combine 1 cup of fresh lime juice, 1/2 cup of sugar and 1 1/2 cups of water in a pitcher or glass container. Stir until the sugar has dissolved. Cover and refrigerate until well chilled. The yield is about 2 3/4 cups.   * 847 NOTE: Fresh limes are key int this thing. I know it's a pain in the ass, but man, ya gotta do it.





takes a few limes to produce a cup of juice, but it's not that toughpatience





847badgerfan wrote: Topolobampo Mezcal Maragaritas(from Rick Bayless via the Washington Post)IngredientsCoarse kosher salt, for garnish6 to 10 ice cubes1 1/2 ounces Wahaka Joven Espadín Mezcal (see headnote)1/2 ounce Torres 10 Imperial Brandy Gran Reserva (see headnote)2 1/2 ounces limonada (see NOTE)3 dashes Peychaud's bittersLime wedge or wheel, for garnishDirectionsWet the rim of a cocktail (martini) glass. Invert it onto a dish of coarse salt to coat the rim.Fill a cocktail shaker with the ice. Add the mezcal, brandy, limonada and bitters; seal and shake vigorously until frothy and cold; tiny ice crystals will appear in the drink after about 15 seconds of shaking. Strain into the glass.Garnish with the lime; serve right away.NOTE: To make the limonada, combine 1 cup of fresh lime juice, 1/2 cup of sugar and 1 1/2 cups of water in a pitcher or glass container. Stir until the sugar has dissolved. Cover and refrigerate until well chilled. The yield is about 2 3/4 cups.* 847 NOTE: Fresh limes are key int this thing. I know it's a pain in the ass, but man, ya gotta do it.Lots of sugar, looks pretty girly to me. 





I made a batch on Sunday and cut the sugar in half. It worked fine, but I like tartness (as does my wife).





Tart is fine.  Originally margaritas were made with the juice of (key) limes only, no additional sugar added.   I like them that way, or with some sugar, but I definitely don't like them when they get too syrupy sweet.





I like upside down margaritas





What's not to like?  





I believe that pic is from a place in beloved Lubbock 





I did more than my fair share of that in South Padre, and Matamoros, Mexico.  Good times.





Good timesso many that I finally had to shut it downI still have 4 pour spouts in the cupboard if neededI assume it might be even better today with the advances of better tequila





My wife got me a KettlePizza topper for my grill to turn it into a pizza over.  Anyone used those before?





Nope.But I did BBQ a brisket and 3 racks of pork spare ribs over the 4th of July weekend.  Had just enough leftover to cube up and save for some brisket enchiladas this weekend.





I'm still fooling with it.  I'm trying to get temps in the 1000-1200 range but haven't gotten close to that yet.





How would you get the temps that high? Is that really even possible?





coal might get you to 1,000 degrees 





847badgerfan wrote: How would you get the temps that high? Is that really even possible?I've read things from people I trust that it is doable, but I can't confirm it yet.  But I still have a few tricks to play.





Wood fires can get up to 1600 degrees.  Oak can burn 900-1200 degrees.  Even in my offset,  I've had the furthest point of my main cooking chamber up to 600-700 degrees without really overloading the firebox.  That was with mesquite, I was intentionally burning it down to coals before cooking.





Smoking a few racks  of baby back ribs and some chicken today on the green egg,  its a hot one today, fortunately I get patio shade by 2 pm est.   Actually fighting to keep the temp down today beneath 275 for a little while.    I've tinkered and done 235, 275, 250,  I think there's a decent range in there where you can't mess things up, though in a perfect world, I'd keep it closer to 235.  Yes, I do a variation of the 2-2-1 on these racks.  Pretty doggone consistent work product.Best thing, is when the people get here, the work is all done, save warming up the cornbread.





you got gravy for that cornbread?





FearlessF wrote: you got gravy for that cornbread?Hmm, I'm intrigued, may I subscribe to your newsletter?No,  our friends brought the tasty cornbread.   The ribs were crushed, even by one of the kids.   Four kids all 7 and under and only one of them has the wits so far to take down some ribs.   We've got work to do with this generation.  I threaten to send my girls to Food Camp.  I've even got their cousins worried about trying exotic foods like cole slaw, summer sausage and grilled cheese sandwiches.   I may actually start this damn Food Camp myself.





hah, reminds me when my brother was about 7 years old, thought gravy was too greasy and put butter on our Grandma's cornbreadI was never like that.  Interestingly, my daughters enjoy all types of food and not afraid to try things.  It's more an attitude than anything





My kids love ribs.  And brisket.  And smoked chicken, turkey, and sausage.They're not too big on cornbread, not sure why.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:27:00 PM
I get being a bit picky, and loving your staples as a kid, but its getting to be a standstill with the 7 yr old.  She could/would eat peanut butter sandwiches, pancakes, bread, tacos and cheese pizza for a year straight and be happy with it.I think the only food I tend to avoid is tuna, and olives, but even then I'll eat certain presentations of it (rolls, generally raw only, I would never turn down a piece of Toro).  Never tuna salad.  I don't understand why I don't like olives, I love briny flavors and mediterranean food (plus sea urchin, oysters, olive oils).  No olives though.





I don't like olives either, not by themselves anyway.  I can take them in prepared methods, like tapenade served on sandwiches and the like, but never by themselves.I also loathe pickles.  I like pickled jalapeno, pickled carrots, pickled cabbage, but not pickled cucumbers.  I'm not a big fan of fresh cucumbers either, though.Other than that, I'll eat pretty much anything.But yeah, my kids are pretty picky too, at age 6 and 8, especially concerning vegetables.  The boy loves green beans, and the girl loves broccoli, but neither likes the other green vegetable.





I can't eat liver as just liver. But I like things like rumaki (bacon) and such. I like foie gras too, when prepared right.





Yeah, preparation makes all the difference in the world.   Liver and onions sounds like a perfect combination, what could go wrong?  Liver, and offal in general are particularly challenging, as if it doesn't fit just right for your palette it can kill the meal.   Of course the best way to do (or introduce)  liver is in Braunschweiger, or just liverwurst.





Yeah, liver pate is interesting I guess, but I need a good cracker, mustard and raw onion to make it good for my palette.  I need to get back to posting some recipes here. We all do, actually. I've got a few new ones I made this summer that I'll get posted soon.





I live olives in my beer





FearlessF wrote: I live olives in my beerWeirdo dirt farmer. 





MarqHusker wrote: Yeah, preparation makes all the difference in the world.   Liver and onions sounds like a perfect combination, what could go wrong?  Liver, and offal in general are particularly challenging, as if it doesn't fit just right for your palette it can kill the meal.   Of course the best way to do (or introduce)  liver is in Braunschweiger, or just liverwurst.What's the difference





847badgerfan wrote: Yeah, liver pate is interesting I guess, but I need a good cracker, mustard and raw onion to make it good for my palette.  Cindy got me liverwurst back in May.Toasted Pumpernickel or Rye w/brown mustard and raw onion is exactly how I had it.It was pretty damn good for a change of pace.Somewhere the old folks are salivating





utee94 wrote: FearlessF wrote: I live olives in my beerWeirdo dirt farmer. Bug eater - get it right





------------------------------------------------ MrNubbz wrote:MarqHusker wrote: Yeah, preparation makes all the difference in the world.   Liver and onions sounds like a perfect combination, what could go wrong?  Liver, and offal in general are particularly challenging, as if it doesn't fit just right for your palette it can kill the meal.   Of course the best way to do (or introduce)  liver is in Braunschweiger, or just liverwurst.What's the difference---------------------------------------------Braunschweiger is always smoked. Often spreadable and frequently has pork in it along w liver. Some ttimes I think bacon too.Liverwurst is in a casing typically sliceable.





MrNubbz wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: Yeah, liver pate is interesting I guess, but I need a good cracker, mustard and raw onion to make it good for my palette.  Cindy got me liverwurst back in May.Toasted Pumpernickel or Rye w/brown mustard and raw onion is exactly how I had it.It was pretty damn good for a change of pace.Somewhere the old folks are salivatingonce again, very good pared with BEERlike olives





Olives are gross.But beer is delicious.





I broke down and bought a pressure cooker on Amazon Prime day.  I don't use it much now, but as the weather cools down I anticipate making all my chili and many other stews and soups.  Anyone with good pressure cooker recipes?





pressure cookers are good for Longhorn beef from Texas...it's a joke, utee





But probably true.  Longhorn cattle are a tough and stringy breed.  I know several people that ranch them, but I don't know anyone that actually eats them!  I'm curious how/why you use a pressure cooker for chili?  The long cook time isn't just to break down the meat, but also to meld the flavors.  I can't comment from personal experience, but I'd worry that pressure cooking chili would skip some valuable melding time.Like other similar dishes, actually refrigerating overnight and consuming the next day tends to enhance chili's flavor.





For not so tender cuts of beef, this can be great.....http://pressurecookerconvert.com/pressure-cooker-smoky-swiss-steak/





utee94 wrote:But probably true.  Longhorn cattle are a tough and stringy breed.  I know several people that ranch them, but I don't know anyone that actually eats them!  I'm curious how/why you use a pressure cooker for chili?  The long cook time isn't just to break down the meat, but also to meld the flavors.  I can't comment from personal experience, but I'd worry that pressure cooking chili would skip some valuable melding time.Like other similar dishes, actually refrigerating overnight and consuming the next day tends to enhance chili's flavor.Cause I ain't all day. I like a five hour cook, but I doubt the differences are very obvious and I can get it out on a weeknight.  Also, pressure cookers do have a reputation for getting a little more flavor out of meat compared to slower cooks.





I've never used one of those things. For chili I use a cast iron skillet to brown the meats and then a crock pot to slow-cook the mixture, usually for 12-15 hours, on low. Most of the cooking happens while I'm sleeping.





KFC Original Recipe, from the Chicago Tribune.





ground ginger is probably the only spice that throws me off.I wonder if  'oregino'  is simply a misspelling or something else?





The Trib chalked that up to spelling error.





847badgerfan wrote: I've never used one of those things. For chili I use a cast iron skillet to brown the meats and then a crock pot to slow-cook the mixture, usually for 12-15 hours, on low. Most of the cooking happens while I'm sleeping.You should get one.  I'm finding it pretty awesome for breaking down chuck roast quickly into a variety of things, taco fillings, pot roast, that sort of thing.  I've heard they are awesome for getting flavor out of bones, too, but I haven't gone that route yet.





Sounds interesting, but are they really as effective as a long cook in extracting/building flavors? That would be the key to me.Had a great Osso Buco they other day that I'm going to try and replicate. Seems like that might be a way to do it, as opposed to a long cook?





847badgerfan wrote: Sounds interesting, but are they really as effective as a long cook in extracting/building flavors? That would be the key to me.Had a great Osso Buco they other day that I'm going to try and replicate. Seems like that might be a way to do it, as opposed to a long cook?http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/01/ask-the-food-lab-can-i-make-stock-in-a-pressure-cooker-slow-cooker.html





847badgerfan wrote: I've never used one of those things. For chili I use a cast iron skillet to brown the meats and then a crock pot to slow-cook the mixture, usually for 12-15 hours, on low. Most of the cooking happens while I'm sleeping.15 hours?mine takes 3 hours





I use some ground beef, chorizo, fresh onion, fresh garlic and fresh peppers in my chili. After the 12-15 hour cook, all those things are completely broken down and invisible. All that's left is the cubed steak meat variety. The rest is a nice, thick and flavorful gravy.It's how it's done.





utee94 wrote: I don't like olives either, not by themselves anyway. They go great in chili w/beans





847badgerfan wrote: I use some ground beef, chorizo, fresh onion, fresh garlic and fresh peppers in my chili. After the 12-15 hour cook, all those things are completely broken down and invisible. All that's left is the cubed steak meat variety. The rest is a nice, thick and flavorful gravy.It's how it's done.I'm sure this tastes great but how much nutrients are left in the vegetable content after the meat has been cooked to perfection?Taking care of this Adonis like earthly vessel is a priority of mine





847badgerfan wrote: I use some ground beef, chorizo, fresh onion, fresh garlic and fresh peppers in my chili. After the 12-15 hour cook, all those things are completely broken down and invisible. All that's left is the cubed steak meat variety. The rest is a nice, thick and flavorful gravy.It's how it's done.you got that right - meat with good spicy gravymy cubed Tri-tip is cooked and tender after 3 hours and the chopped onion, garlic, & peppers are gravycrock pot on high - a nice 7 bubble simmerI could see 5 or 6 hours, 15 just seems too long, but it must work very well, because I know how the food you cook tastes 





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:28:00 PM
I grilled quesadillas in the pizza oven for Labor day.  They turned out ok.  Not as good as ones in the skillet, but all right.





I think the tortillas in a quesadilla require the skillet to achieve proper texture and crispiness. Oh, and my chili usually goes for 8 hours or so.





Speaking of using Skillets.   My favorite breakfast for dinner dish (or anytime for that matter).This is often a great empty the refrigerator dish, and works for all kinds of substitute ingredients, so don't take this as the only way to make it.Frittata (w/ bacon)10-12 eggs8 slices bacon2 shallotsa large bunch of 'greens'1 cup of cheese (parm or asiago)1 container of ricotta (full fat, maybe 12-16 oz)preheat oven , I do 350 degrees.Cook/fry some bacon (about 6-8 strips), save a few tablespoons of the bacon fat.   Let bacon dry on towels, eventually break it into 1/2 inch or so pieces.Slice a bunch of shallots really thin (about a cup maybe) and saute them using about a tablespoon of bacon fat in a big skillet (something that can go into the oven, such as All-Clad, or an iron skillet.  Saute on medium for about 4-5 min.A whole bunch of greens, really any kind (spinach, mustard greens, kale if you are so inclined, chard, whatever)  rough chop those, after you clean them of course.Take 1/2 of the greens and add them to your sautéed shallots until they wilt after a minute or so, add the rest of the greens and add them to this skillet and stir (toss in pinch of kosher salt now), and let them wilt and basically dry out, this takes about 10 minutes.    Put them onto a plate and they will cool a bit.   Wipe you your skillet, doesn't need to be totally cleaned out.Whisk a lot of eggs (10-12 is norm) in a big bowl.  Add 2/3 or 3/4 cup of parmesan or asiago, cheese, the wilted greens/shallots and 1/2 the bacon pieces.   I might pinch kosher salt here too.   Stir in some ricotta cheese (I use about 3/4 of a 16 ounce container.  It need not be perfectly blended in, Put another tablespoon of that reserved bacon fat back into your skillet, heat it at medium again.  Pour your egg mixture in the skillet.  Sprinkle the rest of bacon and your remaining greens on top.  Cook for about 5-10 minutes, or until the eggs begin to set in the skillet on the edges.Into the oven for about 15-20 minutes, until the whole thing has set.   Remove from oven.  Use silicon or soft spatula to loosen frittata on the edges and slide it out onto a platter.  I let it rest for a solid 10 minutes, before cutting into pizza slices.Tasty for dinner or breakfast, left overs good too.  Add Crystal hot sauce for fun, I do.





That looks good.We do some of that here at the harbor on Sundays, except we use a grill. 18 eggs and a whole bunch of leftover meats and veggies. Works out really good in a foil pan too.





utee94 wrote: Oh, and my chili usually goes for 8 hours or so.sure, but you use that tough longhorn beef that needs time to soften 





NOBODY eats that stuff, man. We do, however, keep Longhorns as pets.  





Well, I knew that Hooky Hornstein had a few of them as pets in the yardI figured as a tax break





FearlessF wrote: Well, I knew that Hooky Hornstein had a few of them as pets in the yardI figured as a tax breakYup, you can get an agricultural exemption depending on various circumstances.  Lots of people have "ranches" that are actually deer/dove leases.  





deer in Iowa taste good





I like venison chili.





I love venison chops, cut from the loin, on the grill





Great day to use the pressure cooker.  Made some black bean soup that turned out well.  All measurements are estimates as I used no measuring devices.3 cans black beans with liquid3 links garlic smoked sausage (I bought CostCo's version)1 onion, chopped3 cloves garlic, minced1 cup chicken stock (I used CostCo's organic)1 Tbsp chili powder1 Tbsp ground cumin2 teaspoons oregano1/8 cup apple cider vinegar2 teaspoons salt1 teaspoon ground pepper1 teaspoon fish sauceI put it on 30 minutes, and it came out wonderful.





Man, that sounds right up my alley.fish sauce.  very intriguing.   Do you do any searing or char on the sausage?





MarqHusker wrote: Man, that sounds right up my alley.fish sauce.  very intriguing.   Do you do any searing or char on the sausage?I did not, though certainly that could add something good. Cooking has been a challenge since I'm usually also watching three girls, so I tend to try things really easy lately.





I'm going to try that one.





yep, almost soup season





Did someone say soup weather?Although, it was about 90 degrees here in SoCal, but I decided to simmer beef broth for 6 hours and make pho.Used this recipe from Serious Eats, although I used filet rather than flank as the tender meat, along with sliced brisket from the simmer steps on the stock.





Looks good, I'd eat it.  I've made it a few times myself, using that recipe and and couple of others.  But I still can't get it to be anywhere near as good as my favorite place in town-- their broth is simply off the charts unbelievable.





man, it's lunch time here too 





I like to make pho. Very time consuming, but the end game is worth it.





bwarbiany wrote: Did someone say soup weather?Although, it was about 90 degrees here in SoCal, but I decided to simmer beef broth for 6 hours and make pho.Used this recipe from Serious Eats, although I used filet rather than flank as the tender meat, along with sliced brisket from the simmer steps on the stock.Where do you get beef shin?





MaximumSam wrote: bwarbiany wrote: Did someone say soup weather?Although, it was about 90 degrees here in SoCal, but I decided to simmer beef broth for 6 hours and make pho.Used this recipe from Serious Eats, although I used filet rather than flank as the tender meat, along with sliced brisket from the simmer steps on the stock.Where do you get beef shin?I changed the recipe a bit... I doubled the oxtail to replace the beef shin, and used 2# brisket instead of 1# chuck and 1# brisket. Here in SoCal, we have excellent Asian markets... But even so, I couldn't find beef shin.





Regular supermarkets here carry beef shank (shin is part of the shank), but beyond that, Mexican carnicerias should have it pretty much everywhere?  I'm surprised you couldn't find it in SoCal.





utee94 wrote: Regular supermarkets here carry beef shank (shin is part of the shank), but beyond that, Mexican carnicerias should have it pretty much everywhere?  I'm surprised you couldn't find it in SoCal.Admittedly, I didn't search that hard... It's beef broth. Substitutions aren't *that* meaningful.But I was at the Asian market, and didn't find it there. I didn't think of the Mexican market... Or the Persian market... I'll probably do more research when the time comes that I do a 5 gallon stock batch for freezing though.





Yeah, oxtail is plenty good enough.  But like anything, the more variety you have, the more complexity you can introduce.Like I said before, I've made pho several times, and it turned out tasty, but just not anywhere close to my favorite local place, which has by far the best broth I've ever had anywhere-- and that includes Vietnamese places in the Bay Area, the LA area, Houston (which has a very large Vietnamese population), and above all of those, in France, where Vietnamese food is simply unbelievable.   Except, not as good as this one place in Austin.  And since that place is so good, I finally stopped trying to make it myself, and just go there.  You know, I never thought of it, but I bet they could just sell me their broth by the gallon or something...





Live oak will prolly roll out a Oxtail Saison or sumsuch





MrNubbz wrote: Live oak will prolly roll out a Oxtail Saison or sumsuchOne can only hope!Had plenty of their Oktoberfest this week, which is delicious.





I'm smoking a turkey tonight for my family's early Thanksgiving on Thursday.  I'll see how it goes!





I've got some prime rib hanging out in the fridge.  Just having my wife's dad over for Thanksgiving so I shelled out for something good





I'm doing Alton Brown's Good Eats Roast Turkey for Thursday.





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 20, 2017, 10:28:58 PM
I intended to use that recipe this year as you had suggested, but the future son-in-law is deep frying a turkey in peanut oilnot about to tell him he can't cook for mehe's a lifelong Husker fan!





We BBQ a turkey, and deep-fry one, every year.  I typically do the BBQ and my dad and brother take care of the deep frying.  So good!





847badgerfan wrote: I'm doing Alton Brown's Good Eats Roast Turkey for Thursday.Same, well kinda. We'll be using the cooking method and aromatics from Alton Brown's Good Eats Roast Turkey, but using a dry brine instead of a wet one. This one here specifically: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/dry-brined-turkey-with-classic-herb-butter-recipe.html





I pressure cooked some ribs.  I put them in for 30 minutes and I think they were too tender.  Would probably do 20 minutes next time.  I didn't really season them - some salt and Baby Rays and some chicken stock.





Took a stab at making cajeta - a caramel sauce made with goat's milk.  I took the easiest possible path - a quart of goat's milk, a cup of sugar, a 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and an 1/8 teaspoon of kosher salt.  Put in pot over medium heat and occasionally stir until brown, thick, and delicious.  When you stir and can see the bottom of the pan, it is about done.  Rick Bayless recommends putting a cinnamon stick in there.  I had no cinnamon stick, so that was a no go.  I've also seen recipes with a vanilla bean.  In any event, it came out pretty delicious.  The goats milk certainly adds a dimension that regular caramel sauce doesn't quite have.





So some yahoo left a can of beautiful oysters in my fridge last Friday night ,  I need to find something good to do with these suckers.  Any ideas?





MaximumSam wrote: Took a stab at making cajeta - a caramel sauce made with goat's milk. I took the easiest possible path - a quart of goat's milk, a cup of sugar, a 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and an 1/8 teaspoon of kosher salt. Put in pot over medium heat and occasionally stir until brown, thick, and delicious. When you stir and can see the bottom of the pan, it is about done. Rick Bayless recommends putting a cinnamon stick in there. I had no cinnamon stick, so that was a no go. I've also seen recipes with a vanilla bean. In any event, it came out pretty delicious. The goats milk certainly adds a dimension that regular caramel sauce doesn't quite have.Sounds awesome, I'd try that.  And I'd skip the cinnamon anyway, but the vanilla bean sounds like a good addition.





utee94 wrote: MaximumSam wrote: Took a stab at making cajeta - a caramel sauce made with goat's milk. I took the easiest possible path - a quart of goat's milk, a cup of sugar, a 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and an 1/8 teaspoon of kosher salt. Put in pot over medium heat and occasionally stir until brown, thick, and delicious. When you stir and can see the bottom of the pan, it is about done. Rick Bayless recommends putting a cinnamon stick in there. I had no cinnamon stick, so that was a no go. I've also seen recipes with a vanilla bean. In any event, it came out pretty delicious. The goats milk certainly adds a dimension that regular caramel sauce doesn't quite have.Sounds awesome, I'd try that.  And I'd skip the cinnamon anyway, but the vanilla bean sounds like a good addition.I recommend it - ridiculously easy.  The local grocery sold the goat's milk - I've read using the ultra-pasteurized version is better as it is less clumpy.





 MarqHusker wrote: So some yahoo left a can of beautiful oysters in my fridge last Friday night ,  I need to find something good to do with these suckers.  Any ideas? Eat 'em!





847badgerfan wrote: MarqHusker wrote: So some yahoo left a can of beautiful oysters in my fridge last Friday night ,  I need to find something good to do with these suckers.  Any ideas?Eat 'em!





MaximumSam wrote: Took a stab at making cajeta - a caramel sauce made with goat's milk. I took the easiest possible path - a quart of goat's milk, a cup of sugar, a 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and an 1/8 teaspoon of kosher salt. Put in pot over medium heat and occasionally stir until brown, thick, and delicious. When you stir and can see the bottom of the pan, it is about done. Rick Bayless recommends putting a cinnamon stick in there. I had no cinnamon stick, so that was a no go. I've also seen recipes with a vanilla bean. In any event, it came out pretty delicious. The goats milk certainly adds a dimension that regular caramel sauce doesn't quite have.I love cajeta. In Mexico the Starbucks' even offer cajeta frappicinos which IMO are far superior to their caramel counterpart.





Taiwanese Beef Noodle Soup - Recipe





2 pounds of beef?  perfect!





Decided to eschew the green egg today for my Boston Butt (pork shoulder) and do an oldie but goodie, slow roast.  This gives you the chance to make some cracklins.  Take the 4 lb butt and score the fat cap, rub it with kosher salt, roast it at a high heat for a short while, foil it, bring the heat down and roast it for about four hours.   Add some aromatics to the roasting pan, return the roast to the pan to finish, and then make a gravy out of the jus.Pull the pork, mmm, mmm.  I'm sure my kids will sauce it up tonight, but it won't need it with the gravy.   The cracklins are just sublime.





I'm going to be using one of those to make Carnitas this weekend. I'm doing a slightly different approach to them in that I'm not going to braise them in fat, but rather put some smoke on them, then slow roast, then deep fry to crisp.I'm going to use a garlic sauce to finish them.





Yeah, that won't be any good.  slow roasts give you the best base for sauces you could ever ask for.  A lot less burnt bits, versus the brown bits, much easier to deglaze.





I'm winging in the green egg today w a 3.5lb chuck roast.  I think I'll finish inside in the oven w the veggies potatoes , stock and red wine, herbage. 100% improv.





Damn nice payoff today, even if the potatoes and carrots were way past doneness. Got egg fired to 400ish, seared the 3.5 lb english style chuck roast, dry rubbed, I use yellow mustard as base, and then my english roast rub for about 6minutes a side, inserted the ceramic plate for indirect, pulled back throttle on egg to barely 300 and left the roast for a few hours while I went for a hike w the kids. Pulled the roast at 160 degrees internal, oiled the la creuset dutch oven and put the roast inside on medium heat to sizzle and leave the browned bits in bottom for a few minutes,  remove roast,  sweated a whole diced onion and an entire garlic clove, deglazed with 1/2 a bottle of red wine and about 3 1/2 cups of beef stock, added rosemary/thyme sprigs and returned roast to the dutch oven and into the oven at 350 degrees.   Once roast was at 180 ish I added the carrots, red potatoes (quartered) and a cup of celery.  The only rule I had on this was as always to take the roast to about 202-204, the best temp to get it to where you can pull it apart with little fuss.   It took longer than an hour to get those final 20 degrees or so, thus the carrots and potatoes were way too soft.   Oh well.   Pull the dutch oven out, transfer roast to a aluminum sheet  tray (the kind Badge and i love) and separate the veggies into its own serving pan (covered in foil).  Strain the liquid into a large vessel (you're gonna get 3 cups or so).  While the fat separates, clean up your work station, while the meat rests, then either have somebody pull your beef apart, or have them make the gravy, or just make the gravy and pull the beef later yourself.   Make a roux, 2tbl butter, 4 tbl flour, melt butter add flour and whisk continuously until you have your nutty roux, then, I add my liquid gradually over medium heat, whisking constantly,  and salt/pepper to taste.  This stuff is luxurious gravy, one of the best gravies I've ever made.   Pretty good bark on the meat, and chuck roast has very little fat within the meat, so yeah, it isn't going to be as juicy and succulent as a good brisket, but it really retained moisture pretty well and takes a gravy better than any meat IMO.   Since my kids suck at eating  stuff like this, I'll have some good leftovers all week, so long as I have the gravy.  





nice workI ate a bit too well on the trip to Texas last weekneed to refrain from large meals for a week





Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on July 12, 2017, 07:38:12 PM
Just made this on Sunday

Garlic Beef and Veggie Ramen (http://www.chelseasmessyapron.com/garlic-beef-and-veggie-ramen/)

I first noticed when I read the instructions something strange... "That don't look like no soup!"

And it's true. We think of ramen, we think of soup. This is more of a stir-fried noodle dish using ramen noodles.

But it's freakin' delicious, and actually very, very easy.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on August 01, 2017, 01:25:02 PM
I added the index from the old site. At least that way we can know what is in here.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on August 01, 2017, 01:31:09 PM
You are el hombre. :)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on August 15, 2017, 11:24:31 AM

This was a recipe from BuckeyeCMO.


BUCKEYECMO's ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND PEPPERS


2lbs hot Italian sausage
2 large red peppers
2 large yellow peppers
1 large onion
4 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons tomato paste
28oz can of chopped tomatoes
1/2cup of marsala cooking wine
1tsp. of oregano
fresh basil
1/2tsp. of red pepper flakes
salt and pepper
2 tablespoons of olive oil


I cut up all of the vegetables the night before, so as to eliminate as much prep work as possible. This recipe really only is convenient if you have a large grill. I cook the sausage on the grill just like anything else, and then set it aside and cut it into bite size pieces. Take the peppers, onions and garlic which should already be cut from the night before and wrap it all in aluminum foil with the olive oil, salt and pepper. Cook the veggies on the grill until all are almost done. Add the sausage, the peppers/onions mixture and all of the remaining ingredients to a larger pot and let simmer on the grill until the sauce thickens and the flavors mix together. Serve either on hoagie buns or as a side.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: fezzador on August 30, 2017, 01:03:38 PM
My wife makes some pretty tasty pizza sticks.  I never tried making them myself, but I think all that's needed to make them is a can of Pillsbury pizza crust, a jar of marinara sauce, mozzarella cheese sticks, and (optional) garlic butter and pepperoni.  She would wrap up the cheese sticks and pepperoni slices in dough rectangles (roughly 5" x 3"), put some garlic butter on them, and put them in the oven at 450 for about 10 minutes.

The marinara can be used as a dipping sauce, or placed in the wrap.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: ELA on August 31, 2017, 06:39:12 PM
French Onion Soup
2 1/2 lbs yellow onion
3 tbs butter
1 tbs canola oil
little bit of sugar, salt and pepper
2 cups red wine
8 cups beef stockbay leaf
6 slices of course bread
3 cups gruyere cheese

Melt the butter in a pot and add sliced onions, sugar, salt and pepper over mid-low heat til carmelized.

Add the wine and incread heat to mid-high til half the wine is cooked off

Add the bay leaf and beef stock, lower heat and simmer for 35-45 minutes

Toast the bread in the over for 8-10 minutes and 400 degrees, turning halfway through

Add the soup to bowls, removing the bay leaf.Put one piece of the bread in each bowl and cover with about a half cup of the cheese

Bake for about 12 minutes, but keep an eye on it, you want the cheese fully melted but not burned and the toast becomes lightly browned, again not burned.






Great recipes!





Looks good Adam. Let me know how it turns out with the red wine. I always use Cognac. I also put garlic in with the onions in step one.My guests loved it last night. What a coincidence you went to a farmer's market like me yesterday, 1000 miles apart!
So I've been hankering for french onion soup, and I'm going with this one I made a couple years ago.  Perhaps with badges suggestion though.  Any others with thoughts
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on August 31, 2017, 08:04:21 PM
4 Vidalia and 4 Red. Two cloves of garlic. Chopped thyme. Cognac. Beef stock. Toasted French bread. Gruyere. Broiler.

Save some Cognac for drinking.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: ELA on September 01, 2017, 09:43:24 AM
64 as a high and rain all day tomorrow too, easier to get into to soup on a day like that than your typical opening weekend.

Love it.  I think every fall Saturday should have a low of 35 a high of 55, with rain maybe about 1/3 of the time.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: WhiskeyM on September 01, 2017, 02:23:53 PM
64 as a high and rain all day tomorrow too, easier to get into to soup on a day like that than your typical opening weekend.

Love it.  I think every fall Saturday should have a low of 35 a high of 55, with rain maybe about 1/3 of the time.
This is the only time of year I miss Pittsburgh.  I love the fall.  There's a certain smell in the air.  Hooded sweatshirts become perfect cover.  The entire metro area is ready for football.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on November 28, 2017, 08:38:38 AM
HOMEMADE EGG NOG

I'm not sure if I've ever posted this before?  We're about to do our big family Christmas party this Saturday, and that means HOMEMADE EGG NOG.  From the time she was a little girl, my i s c & a aggie wife's big German family always gathered at her Great Uncle George's house on Christmas afternoon for cookies and eggnog, after opening presents and having Christmas dinner (lunch) at their own various houses.   Even the kids were allowed some small cups, although it's quite boozy.

I should preface by saying that I always hated-- and I mean absolutely despised-- egg nog as a kid.  So when my wife told me she had a great family nog recipe, I just sort of nodded and smiled and humored her by trying it.  And I was completely blown away.  There's just no comparison between fresh homemade egg nog and the storebought stuff.  So now I love egg nog, but only homemade.  And our annual Christmas party is officially known as "A Toast To George" in memory of her Great Uncle George, his egg nog recipe, and the family and fellowship that my wife's family grew up with.  Anyway, here's the recipe:



24 eggs
2 3/4 cup sugar
1.5 pints heavy cream
2 quarts light cream
1 fifth bourbon (~750ml)
1 cup dark rum or to taste


1) Using stand mixer, cream egg yolks with sugar. Add whiskey. Pour into large container.
2) Whip cream, pour into same container and stir.
3) Whip egg whites, pour into same container, blend with other liquids already in there.
4) Stir in rum to taste
5) Keep chilled while serving, we usually place our punch bowl in a wide glass serving dish with ice in it.

When my wife makes this, she generally has to do a couple of batches each in the stand mixer for the cream and the egg whites. She also uses a (well-cleaned and sterilized) medium-sized kitchen trash can for all the ingredients, and then pours into gallon containers and keeps refrigerated for a day before our party. She usually at least doubles the above recipe though, so YMMV on size of batches and size of containers.

If you're nervous about raw eggs, you can buy already-heat-pasteurized eggs at most markets, or you can actually do it yourself at home and save some bucks. We've done both and have never noticed any difference in texture or flavor.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on November 28, 2017, 10:46:36 AM
thank you @utee94 (https://www.cfb51.com/index.php?action=profile;u=15) ... my wife, without my consent, scheduled her firm's Christmas party at our place... they're renting a party bus to pick up and drop off, so i imagine there will be quite a bit of drinking- and i am SO making this!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on November 29, 2017, 02:00:16 PM
thank you @utee94 (https://www.cfb51.com/index.php?action=profile;u=15) ... my wife, without my consent, scheduled her firm's Christmas party at our place... they're renting a party bus to pick up and drop off, so i imagine there will be quite a bit of drinking- and i am SO making this!
Oh I love hosting company Christmas parties!  If I must attend something awkward and potentially embarrassing, I'd much rather do it in the comfort of my own home, where everything's under my control! :)



We always make ours the night before, it mellows out and tastes even better the next day.  And we invite "special guests" to the nog-making "pre-party" which is usually more fun than the part itself, simply because it's fewer people and it's our tighter group  of "the kids" which is my brother and his wife, my BIL and his wife when they're in town, and a couple of close friends and their kids who are best friends with our kids.  We have a tradition of drinking nog directly from the trash can where it's stirred up, and also doing shots of the whiskey as it goes into the nog.  That will be this Friday night and I'm totally looking forward to it.




Anyway, hope you enjoy the recipe!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on November 29, 2017, 07:19:55 PM
HOMEMADE EGG NOG


If you're nervous about raw eggs, you can buy already-heat-pasteurized eggs at most markets, or you can actually do it yourself at home and save some bucks. We've done both and have never noticed any difference in texture or flavor.
so, if I'm not nervous about raw eggs, just mix them as is?
Thanks
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on November 30, 2017, 02:25:05 PM
so, if I'm not nervous about raw eggs, just mix them as is?
Thanks
Yup.  Honestly in the 13 years or so we've done this party, we've pasteurized our own eggs once, bought pre-pasteurized eggs 3 or 4 times, and "risked" it with raw unpasteurized eggs the balance of 8 or 9 times.  So far, no illness or death.  Plenty of hangovers of course, but no illnesses attributed to the eggs.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on November 30, 2017, 02:42:51 PM
I will risk it.

Thanks
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on December 01, 2017, 09:40:03 AM
Pre-party is tonight.  I'm about to hit the store and pick up 5 dozen eggs, 3 quarts of heavy whipping cream, 6 quarts of half and half, and a big bag of sugar.

Whiskey and rum are already stocked in the liquor cabinet, but just for reference it'll be an entire handle of bourbon, and about half that of rum.  Oh boy...

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on December 08, 2017, 01:00:28 PM
so... the party is tonight- and i just finished making this eggnog... and... i gotta go back to the store (or send the kid) as i'll be needing at least a dozen more eggs, another pint or so of heavy cream... and couple pints of light cream... why asks you?  because that stuff is GOOD... (and i need to drink a LOT of coffee... i'm going to be out cold before anyone even shows up). 

though i don't recommend it for any reason other than this, but... vanilla jim beam really filled in well along with a half fifth of Captain spiced (regular).  i could see me making this year 'round if you want to know the truth.  next time i'll make it with rumchata instead of captain... 

oh- and i added a couple tablespoons of both ground nutmeg and cinnamon.  

@utee94 (https://www.cfb51.com/index.php?action=profile;u=15) - thank you... this is really good stuff. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on December 11, 2017, 02:48:14 PM
raw eggs?

I just printed the recipe here at work

got my shopping list - a friend of mine has free range laying hens and usually needs to unload eggs
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on December 11, 2017, 05:31:43 PM
Glad you liked it, drew.  We always have fresh whole nutmeg and a grater, we don't put it into the nog because believe it or not some folks don't seem to like it, but I grate on quite a bit when I pour myself a cup of it.

Fearless, I'd imagine fresh eggs would only make it that much more delicious.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on December 27, 2017, 01:14:59 PM
Badge,

I don't remember tasting Stella's spicy cheese bread when in Madison???

featured on BTN Campus Eats

(https://img.buzzfeed.com/buzzfeed-static/static/2016-06/26/16/asset/buzzfeed-prod-fastlane01/sub-buzz-3567-1466972504-1.png)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on June 12, 2018, 09:42:40 PM
http://www.nibblemethis.com/2018/06/competition-style-brisket-on-kamado.html (http://www.nibblemethis.com/2018/06/competition-style-brisket-on-kamado.html)


Competition Style Brisket on a Kamado Grill
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on June 12, 2018, 10:51:58 PM
I like and will try the technique they use with respect to the laying of the wood.  Sometimes I feel I'm a little skimpy on the wood.    I'm simply not committed to the rest of that routine.  I've only smoked brisket on my BGE, and it seems 3/4 turn out more or less 'very good'.   By no means are the 'competition' quality briskets, but they sure taste great.

I try and follow a pretty battle tested routine on it, and the only trouble I have is one of two things.   1. when the brisket seizes (uh oh) I'm not convinced there's anything you can do (I've tried to go to school on this with folks, lot of mixed ideas), or 2. and this is where maybe I should try the butcher paper, the bark gets soggy,  that's a big bummer when it happens.  the bark is my favorite part.  Like I said, 1/4 times I run into trouble.   This guy is obviously a pro.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on June 15, 2018, 12:02:32 PM
I have a method that I use and it always turns out very tasty and tender.

Texans would not approve, but they ain't eating it anyway. I am, and I approve.


I start on my Weber kettle, using indirect heat and a lot of wood for the smoke. I let this go for about 2-3 hours until there is no more smoke, and then finish it in the oven. No, you don't get the same bark, but the bite is really good. Every one of them.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on June 15, 2018, 08:53:31 PM
that ecoque gen 2 i landed does a great job and takes much of the mystery out of smoking (this far). 

i smoked a 18# rib eye roast last weekend.  took it to 120* over about 5.5~6 hours.  the heat of the smoker never broke 240, and the meat took a slow steady climb to temp.  i killed much of the smoke at a meat temperature of 100, and let her stand wrapped in foil and a towel, and in a cooler for about an hour.  

the bark was perfect and the smoke ring well defined.  i used hickory.  i couldn't be happier than i was- unless i can complain about pulling it too late.  it was a little past medium rare.  we had sandwiches, then big cuts, then quesadillas, then i just stripped several cuts and made finger bites... and of course an omelet or two... i was very pleased. 

this weekend i'm going to try ribs in that thing... pork ribs... 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on June 18, 2018, 08:30:37 AM
How'd the pork turn out?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on June 18, 2018, 09:16:30 AM
i did pork ribs and a whole chicken yesterday, and Saturday night i tried out the pizza oven... 

the ribs were superb... the chicken was okay (not really a chicken fan) but the texture was.... different.. pulled it at 165* internal and tossed it on grill with full out flames on it for a few minutes to do whatever it is that does to the skin to make it edible... i was really happy with those ribs, though. 

the pizza turned out pretty good!!! i've got that griddle, and prepared some italian sausage on it, along with some andolini sliced like pepperoni, and peppers and onions... i used some Pillsbury pizza dough instead of making my own and cooked it for 5 minutes @ 475* and pulled it... dressed it with sauce (wife's recipe from garden) light layer of mozzarella, a pile of fixin's, more moz, then pepperoni and andolini..... another five minutes... those things were fantastic too... 

I got that ecoque from amazon for $2600 and i was worried it wouldn't work out, but... it has and it will.  I have yet another rib eye roast i'll smoke over the 4th, and a couple other cuts i'll be doing over the summer.  

i HIGHLY rec that thing.   
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on June 18, 2018, 11:42:36 AM
question:

regarding 8 inch and 10 inch teflon fry pans or other teflon cooking pans

what's the sweet spot for price?  I see pans for $20 and pans for $180

Cincy says I can buy good wine for $30/bottle

in the past I've gone with the cheaper pans and considered them disposable after 5 years or so
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on June 18, 2018, 11:52:41 AM
personally, i'd stay clear of teflon anything- a good stainless or better yet cast iron is the way to go.  will last forever.  teflon won't and it's but one mistake from being worthless. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on June 18, 2018, 12:41:46 PM
I have and use Cast Iron - skillets and dutch oven

I like the non-stick surfaces for eggs and other quick easy items - convenience
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on June 18, 2018, 12:52:28 PM
Those copper looking thingees are getting a lot of positive play lately. My brother likes his.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on June 18, 2018, 12:56:45 PM
saw those in the store for big dollars - was wondering if they are worth it
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on June 18, 2018, 01:10:47 PM
I'm talking about the ones available from copper chef and others like it.

$20...
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on June 18, 2018, 01:13:48 PM
yeah those hand peened copper sets are unbelievably expensive... but are heirloom quality. 

the copper bottomed ones are realistic... and i wager just as good for cookin'... 

a well seasoned cast won't stick.. I roll fried eggs right out of mine.  for a store bought ready non-stick, the ceramic coated ones are far better than teflon, but you gotta properly care for them, and a good scratch or two is going to wreck them (just like with teflon), but unlike teflon, you can cook things with oils in them without ruining them.  
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on June 18, 2018, 01:45:38 PM
  for a store bought ready non-stick, the ceramic coated ones are far better than teflon, but you gotta properly care for them, and a good scratch or two is going to wreck them (just like with teflon), but unlike teflon, you can cook things with oils in them without ruining them.  
thanks, I'll try this
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on June 23, 2018, 10:19:25 PM
11# brisket today... Started at around noon.  Its a quarter after 2200 now, and its jist coming out of the stall... I'm guessing two more hours or so... I didnt do the texas cheat, but just waited it out.  

Cowboy beans are waiting as a side... Spiced them up with some ground north country venison and concoction of spices that are proprietary... 

Seriously... The wait is killing me!!!! A little sliver fell off when I rotated it at 170.,, it was fantastic!!! 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on June 24, 2018, 11:08:33 AM
Brisket turned out really freakin good. I'm telling y'all this smoker oven thing is the ticket.  Was a bit shocked how much was lost during the cook, though.. It started out 11# but I bet it only rendered 6 or 7.... Those things shrink quite a bit, huh? 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on June 24, 2018, 11:19:46 PM
good that it's only a couple bucks a pound
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on June 25, 2018, 04:20:13 PM
good that it's only a couple bucks a pound
That's what always makes it hard to smoke beef short ribs...
Tons of lost weight during cooking, AND you're paying for bone in the price... And unlike the $3.29/lb prime brisket, it's often $9/lb or thereabouts for prime at Costco... 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on June 25, 2018, 05:01:19 PM
That's what always makes it hard to smoke beef short ribs...
Tons of lost weight during cooking, AND you're paying for bone in the price... And unlike the $3.29/lb prime brisket, it's often $9/lb or thereabouts for prime at Costco...
funny... I bought the brisket from lowe's foods as they generally have a good selection of cuts... I bought a rib eye roast from them too, just because... but anyway:  you speak of paying for bones, and I get tickled when i see those massive tomahawk ribeyes.  don't get me wrong, i love a rib eye, and especially a bone in, but.... the steak is likely three pounds from the look of it, and it has at least a 30" bone hanging out of it.  I bet the bone is at least another pound... and @ $24.99 a pound.... it's just too funny to me.  
that 11# prime brisket was $37... that's not terrible but it isn't great either.  I can get the same cut from my connection in UP of Michigan for about $1.50/lbs.. and the last quote I got from him for prime cut standing rib eye roast was $9/lbs, and choice for $4.50/lbs... which is the reason I need to start selling the stuff on the interwebz- that and the plethora of seafood connections i have here local off the outer banks.  
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on June 26, 2018, 01:47:32 PM
same reason I need to start buying from you
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on June 26, 2018, 02:31:31 PM
It's about the end of the year for this as we get into summer, but this is a recipe that my wife found and we both enjoy... And the kids (10 & 5) like it too. The pepperoncini don't make the dish spicy, but give it a nice little acidic zing.

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/246721/mississippi-roast-slow-cooker-pepperoncini-pot-roast/
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on June 26, 2018, 05:06:11 PM
Don't forget to keep those bones for beef stock. It's the best beef stock you can ever get.   No better way to carmelize onions or make a real brown sauce.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on June 26, 2018, 05:19:01 PM
Agree on the stock.

Also agree on buying food from Drewbie Doo's food store on this site.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on June 26, 2018, 05:54:27 PM
Don't forget to keep those bones for beef stock. It's the best beef stock you can ever get.   No better way to carmelize onions or make a real brown sauce.
Oh yeah. If I ever make short ribs, those bones stick around in the freezer for when I'm making pho or other beef soup.
Not going to waste those bones that I paid $8.99/lb for!!!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on July 06, 2018, 11:28:44 AM
Interesting challenge today.  I need to smoke some ribs on the Egg, and drive about 75 minutes, where we will eat them for dinner. There will be other meat/food by others. The kicker is we won't eat dinner until 7pm and I'm heading down around 1pm.  I've decided to do a 2-1-  at about 300, cooler w wrap and then drive, and then 1 on the gas grill at the lake to finish.  I suspect this won't be ideal, but what the hell it's all family.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on July 06, 2018, 12:45:28 PM
the Egg won't fit in the truck?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on July 09, 2018, 11:02:32 PM
The ribs turned out to be pretty good.  They were a little crusty on the edges, which the men who ate the ribs were all down with.  There's a guy in the neighborhood that loves smoking his ribs like this he calls it 'turbo' smoke, he goes to near 350 degrees for two and half hrs and then does his finish (rarely foils).
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on July 14, 2018, 11:25:54 PM
Smoked 14# whole sirloin tip today... Outstanding.  A little chew required than the prime rib, uet still excellent.  

Now here is something i did today on the direction of a friend.  It was fantastic.  I mean really good.  Two ingredient bread in 25 minutes. 

Take a cup of ypur favorite ice cream.  I ised butter pecan because I had it.  3/4 cup of self rising flour.  Mix well.  350* for 20 minutes... Freakin outstanding.  It cooked up in the pizza oven and really really surprised me. Ots nowhere near as sweet as you'd think, but I wager it would be with the right ice cream.  Who'd have thunk it?  
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on July 25, 2018, 01:54:47 PM
Brisket turned out really freakin good. I'm telling y'all this smoker oven thing is the ticket.  Was a bit shocked how much was lost during the cook, though.. It started out 11# but I bet it only rendered 6 or 7.... Those things shrink quite a bit, huh?
Wow, just realized I missed a bunch of posts over the past month+.
Yeah, a full packer-trimmed brisket shrinks quite a bit.  All that fat renders, while the collagen turns to gelatin and shrinks a bit, too.   That's what makes it so perfect for a long cook.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on July 25, 2018, 01:58:31 PM
The ribs turned out to be pretty good.  They were a little crusty on the edges, which the men who ate the ribs were all down with.  There's a guy in the neighborhood that loves smoking his ribs like this he calls it 'turbo' smoke, he goes to near 350 degrees for two and half hrs and then does his finish (rarely foils).
I'm assuming pork spare ribs?  I still prefer to go 225 and use 3-2-1 (really a lot less than 1 typically, maybe .5 max).  
But for beef ribs and brisket, I'm smoking at 285-300 now.  Goes quicker, and no discernible loss in quality.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on July 26, 2018, 11:59:07 AM
I'm assuming pork spare ribs?  I still prefer to go 225 and use 3-2-1 (really a lot less than 1 typically, maybe .5 max).  
But for beef ribs and brisket, I'm smoking at 285-300 now.  Goes quicker, and no discernible loss in quality.

yes and I concur.   That would be my own standard procedure (225 and 3-2-1), and like you I've been going a lot less than 1.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: WhiskeyM on July 31, 2018, 01:20:20 PM
Beef ribs (short ribs, plate, in particular) are easily my favorite cut to cook.  They are absolutely delicious, and can be prepared a variet of ways.

Of course they are very popular now, and the price has shot up a good amount.  The same thing happened with skirt steak years ago.  I remember buying skirt for around $4 - 5$ per pound.  Now it fetches $8 - $10 per pound.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on July 31, 2018, 01:44:08 PM
i had my first massive run-in with the ecoque this past weekend... it wasn't, per say, the ecoque's fault... but... 

brisket- a 14# packer, trimmed and purty... wood fire to temperature, flopped that bad bear in the cooker... I FOUGHT with that thing to maintain a temperature below 350*... for 18 hours that thing smoked... the internal temperature never exceeded 170*, which was me thinking it was just in the mother of all stalls.... but it wasn't.... the cooker was never over 190*... at 18 hours i pulled the thing with an internal temperature of 170*, and it was well blackened with the smoke... 

the temperature gauge for the cooker is a digital one- and it was just shy of 200* off, reading the cookers temp @ 350~370, when it was actually in the neighborhood of 190*... I found this out at the end when i opened the door and shot it with a IR temp gun on a non-reflective surface in there..... I was not a happy camper... 

punch line:  the brisket isn't bad at all- it's not what i would usually call 'brisket', as it was more akin to 'roast' in the end, with fat flopping about (never rendered/reduced).... so... i made a bunch of sammy's and went on about my business, and ordered a better quality temperature gauge... now I have them in triplicate... that ain't ever happening to me again, y'all. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on July 31, 2018, 02:27:25 PM
Good lesson learned.  I always keep a probe thermometer (w/ wire) inside the egg to keep the other two readings honest (the dome, and then another digital read I get on a wireless display, which allows me to stay away and not worry so damn much about the temp.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on July 31, 2018, 04:21:43 PM
Yeah, when I got my Kamado Joe, the dome thermometer was damn near perfect. Now it reads ~50F low. 

That reminds me, though... Need to replace my Maverick ET-732 probes before I smoke something again. Off to Amazon I go!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on August 01, 2018, 05:15:53 PM
Beef ribs (short ribs, plate, in particular) are easily my favorite cut to cook.  They are absolutely delicious, and can be prepared a variet of ways.

Of course they are very popular now, and the price has shot up a good amount.  The same thing happened with skirt steak years ago.  I remember buying skirt for around $4 - 5$ per pound.  Now it fetches $8 - $10 per pound.
Wow, skirt steak is $8-$10 /lb for you?  It's still regularly down around $3-$5/lb down here, but I still agree with your point, because I can remember when it was $.79/lb.  I blame Chili's for making fajitas so popular it drove up the price on this otherwise humble cut of meat.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on August 01, 2018, 05:19:17 PM
And for BBQ thermometers, get yourself something like this.  You can get cheaper, and a lot more expensive, but the key is the remote wireless dual probe.  One goes in the cooker at grate level, one goes in the thickest part of the meat.

https://www.amazon.com/Maverick-Range-Wireless-Smoker-Thermometer/dp/B00FOCR4UI

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on August 01, 2018, 06:17:06 PM
Wow, skirt steak is $8-$10 /lb for you?  It's still regularly down around $3-$5/lb down here, but I still agree with your point, because I can remember when it was $.79/lb.  I blame Chili's for making fajitas so popular it drove up the price on this otherwise humble cut of meat.


I've found everything beef to be ridiculous. Freakin' chuck roast is way up there around $8/lb. Flank is ~$8-9/lb. Tri-tip is $8.99/lb at Costco (that's Prime, but still--it's the same price at the grocery store for Choice). 

If I can buy tri-tip for $9/lb, why would I spend $8 for chuck, which is basically stew meat?


And for BBQ thermometers, get yourself something like this.  You can get cheaper, and a lot more expensive, but the key is the remote wireless dual probe.  One goes in the cooker at grate level, one goes in the thickest part of the meat.

https://www.amazon.com/Maverick-Range-Wireless-Smoker-Thermometer/dp/B00FOCR4UI



I have the Maverick ET-732. But those probes can be a bit delicate, and my ambient probe just died on me. So I just need the probes as replacements, not a whole new thermometer.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on August 01, 2018, 07:12:13 PM
true enough, all beef is pretty crazy these days.

I replace my probes every few years.  I always wrap the metal cable in foil so that only the probe tips take the heat, but even then, they definitely don't last forever.

But one thing's for sure, it's FAR more accurate than using any thermometer mounted to the cooker itself.  Even the best of those, can go bad quickly, and aren't at the same level as the grate/meat anyway.

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Kris60 on August 28, 2018, 07:37:14 PM
Didn’t read through this whole thread but I need some ideas for cooking chicken on the grill.  Specifically chicken breasts.  Mine always turn out “meh.”  I usually just put lemon pepper and salt on them or store bought bbq sauce.

I admit I’m not a super griller.  Cooking and/or recipe ideas appreciated.

Also, got a smoker for Father’s Day and have just used it once.  Cooked wings in them from a recipe I found online.  They turned out great.  Would welcome any feedback on what else to cook in it and how to do it.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on September 04, 2018, 11:20:37 AM
I did a chuck roast (2.75 lbs) last week w/o braising liquid.  (Ok, there was 1/4 cup of butter)  It was damn good.

season, sear and brown the roast both sides in a dutch oven.  (set aside on a plate)
a squirt of oil in the dutch oven, and add the mirepoix  (diced onions, celery, carrots, I know the cajun mirepoix has bell peppers), about a 2:1:1 ratio.    Scrape up the brown bits as the aromatics do their thing.

Toss in a 1/4 cup of butter and your herbs (I used thyme and garlic gloves in a cheese cloth bag).  until the veggies are tender, put the roast back on top, cover with a lid and in the oven (275 degrees) for 2 1/2 to 3 hours.    I added small potatoes (ping pong ball size) with about an hour to go. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: SuperMario on September 09, 2018, 08:31:54 PM
Made chili for the first time in my life today. Used an instapot and had very low expectations, but have to admit it was pretty darn incredible. I’ll post the recipe once I can move off the couch. 

Not sure how many of you use an instapot, but it’s a must for good quick meals when you have kids
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on September 11, 2018, 08:33:19 AM
Instapot is a pressure cooker, right?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on September 11, 2018, 02:03:22 PM
Yes, but they are electric unlike the traditional ones.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on September 11, 2018, 03:21:52 PM
I may look into one of them.

seems like traditional slow cooking may lend to better flavors and textures.  Maybe not
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on September 11, 2018, 03:30:02 PM
I was gifted an Instapot last year.   I studied it for a bit and concluded, I don't need or want this.   I took it back for some other essentials in my kitchen and these two ladies almost got into a fight at Sur La Table when they saw that I was returning it.   I'm not above bulky non-daily use items in my kitchen ( I do have an Air Fryer which I like a lot).
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on September 11, 2018, 03:32:35 PM
I learned from studying it, and talking to others that use it.
1. learning curve
2. can lead to some messiness
3. Capacity concerns (my slow cooker and La Cruscet can hold much more.
3. deal breaker for me:  can't maintain/retain certain textures,  everything is gonna be soft, which works for some dishes, but I just don't make soft boiled eggs, or rice all the damn time.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on September 11, 2018, 03:43:39 PM
I may look into one of them.

seems like traditional slow cooking may lend to better flavors and textures.  Maybe not
Correct. This is one of those items that you really don't need. If you want soft meat, just throw a frozen roast in the crock pot with some other flavoring stuff and when you get home from work, you'll have soft meat.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on September 11, 2018, 10:35:37 PM
that's how I roll during winter months

if the instapot is crazy fast, I suppose I could through something together after work and still have it ready in time

if a crock pot takes 6 hours, can you do that in 1 hour in the instapot?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on September 12, 2018, 08:53:39 AM
I've made some awesome risotto in the instant pot. 

Also some coca cola braised short ribs finished in an hour or so that came out amazing  
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on September 12, 2018, 09:52:10 AM

Also some coca cola braised short ribs finished in an hour or so that came out amazing  
That's what I'm talkin bout............
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on September 13, 2018, 07:52:59 AM
I have an electric pressure cooker, had it for almost 20 years I guess?  Makes great rice.  I rarely make rice.

I also have a standard pressure cooker, it was my grandmother's and then my mother's.  You can make awesome fried chicken in it, which is what they did.  Like, restaurant-quality crispness and super-delicious.  But I also rarely make fried chicken.

I have a huge kitchen with room for these rare-use devices, but I still find it cumbersome and annoying to use them.  I use my enameled cast iron French oven (le creuset knock-off) and my standard slow cooker way more often.

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on September 13, 2018, 02:48:56 PM
I also have a standard pressure cooker, it was my grandmother's and then my mother's.  You can make awesome fried chicken in it, which is what they did.  Like, restaurant-quality crispness and super-delicious.  But I also rarely make fried chicken.

us derned Yankees call that "broasted" chicken
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on September 14, 2018, 11:31:19 AM
Learn something new every day!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on October 16, 2018, 11:02:15 AM
i think i've bitten off at least as much as i can chew... 

there will be a party at my joint 10/27 that will be a crowd of at least 50 people.  there will be a bouncy house for the kids, and at least three corn hole sets set up for a tourney, and of course there will be football on the bar tube, and after nightfall on the movie screen... 

I'm prepping chow... 

please lend an assist if any of y'all have suggestions.  so far I've got: 

smoked: 
ribeye roast, about a 20 pounder
sirloin, about 8#- for queso's
pork tenderloin, both sliced and for queso's and ciabatta bread mini-sammi's. 
smoked sausages, split down axis for serving

grilled:
hot dogs for kids
hamburgers for freaks and kids
chicken breasts for quso's

sides:
homemade baked cheese mac
corn bread
rolls
cowboy beans (basically baked beans of various flavors and venison/bear/ground beef mixed w/ jalapeno's and a few onions) 
homemade coleslaw

appetizers: 
cheese/cracker sliced sausages spread
chili and corn bread sticks
shrimp and cheese grits cups
various sliced fruits

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on October 16, 2018, 11:15:10 AM
sounds great, a bit too far for me to drive after the Sharkwater party

put the cowboy beans in the smoker for a bit more flavor
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on October 30, 2018, 02:57:46 PM

Didn’t read through this whole thread but I need some ideas for cooking chicken on the grill.  Specifically chicken breasts.  Mine always turn out “meh.”  I usually just put lemon pepper and salt on them or store bought bbq sauce.

I admit I’m not a super griller.  Cooking and/or recipe ideas appreciated.

Also, got a smoker for Father’s Day and have just used it once.  Cooked wings in them from a recipe I found online.  They turned out great.  Would welcome any feedback on what else to cook in it and how to do it.

sir- you gotta trust the temperature and a scale... weigh it and compare the cook time to a chart against the temperature of your grill... poking chicken breasts with a temp probe is a bad idea as they drain all the goodness out, so... either make a sacrificial breast in the hottest spot you intend to check (which gives you a few precious moments to collect the others before they cross the line) or trust the temperature and weight... this is the only 'trick' i know sans experience... i've done so dang many of these i can poke at them with a utensil and depending on how they move i will know if they're done or not.  < even that said, if i want to be real careful (special event?) about it i STILL weigh and compare temperature to weight.  

~break~

party went well... the wife ended up doing her mac-n-cheese, which is fantasticly spiced with dried red pepper and with cream base, unlike most cheese-n-mac you've ever encountered... i did cowboy beans (baked beans, helluva lotta spices, ground beef and ground venison)... the i smoked two sirloins both in the 10# range, cleaned then rolled in olive oil, covered with salt and pepper and my own rub- then, coffee ground to espresso quality... turned out fantastic.  cooked until internal temperature was 124*...

the quesadillas were a big hit and took every piece of the sirloin prepared... real simple- flour tortillas covered with provolone or mozzarella shreds, a dose of sweet onion diced along with dived bell peppers, a touch of fresh jalapeno's- all glazed on the griddle alongside the flour tortilla'a, a few strips of sirloin added after being warmed a touch, more cheese drifted over the top and the tortilla folded over itself and served hot.    

i highly recommend trying these.  

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on October 31, 2018, 09:58:53 AM
I'd kick Bobby Stoops for one of those quesadillas right now.

They sound fabulous
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on October 31, 2018, 10:08:40 AM
i made three queso's more last night for dinner around 10:30p... my eve's have been consumed by construction and renovation since the storm so dinner's are late if at all... the absolute best part of it is they take literally three or four minutes to construct and cook on the griddle, and clean up takes less than five minutes, too.  this consumed the last of the smoked sirloin, unfortunately... that part takes about three to four hours.... 

i'd love to tell you those things were carefully calculated, but they started in effort to kill off the fridge in the barn of produce and odds-n-ends... and i had the ends off a rib-eye roast i'd smoked a few days prior.  i think i served maybe ten people with that- but the very next smoked rib-eye i did was ALL dedicated to quesadillas.... they are really really good and SO simple.  

cost alone, and because it impacts little, I swapped over to sirloin- but i've done them with brisket ends, and tri-tips.  i've settled on sirloin, though, as the best and maybe better than ribeye in that application. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on October 31, 2018, 10:58:48 AM
Sirloin is the most unappreciated cut of meat
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on November 02, 2018, 12:33:38 PM
Didn’t read through this whole thread but I need some ideas for cooking chicken on the grill.  Specifically chicken breasts.  Mine always turn out “meh.”  I usually just put lemon pepper and salt on them or store bought bbq sauce.

I admit I’m not a super griller.  Cooking and/or recipe ideas appreciated.

Also, got a smoker for Father’s Day and have just used it once.  Cooked wings in them from a recipe I found online.  They turned out great.  Would welcome any feedback on what else to cook in it and how to do it.
John Henry's "Texas Chicken Tickler" rub is really nice on chicken.
Question 1: Do you cook skinless, or do you cook with skin on? Skin on creates a lot of different considerations because getting the skin appropriately crispy is it's own job. 
So, assuming you're just grilling skinless chicken breasts, part of the problem is that they're often just "meh" to begin with. Especially if they're wimpy and thin, which doesn't make it easy to cook them through and keep them juicy. 
I recommend the Kirkland frozen chicken breasts, actually. They're individually vacuum-sealed, so you can pull them and defrost on demand. They're good sized, so you can actually cook them through without ending up dry and tasteless.
Then, the next step is browning. Since you're doing this on the grill, you want something on the outside to at least contribute some browning. Some olive oil or grapeseed oil helps the rub to adhere and helps promote browning. 
This is one of those cooks that I'd promote 2-zone cooking. On a gas grill, get the burners on one side as hot as you can and keep the burners on the other side turned off. On a weber kettle, move your charcoal all over to one side and get it roaring hot but leave the other side free of charcoal. 
The goal is to sear first, and then more gently bake the rest of the chicken breast. So you get them over the really hot burners/coals for 60-90 seconds to get the outside to brown, flip them to get the other side for 60-90 seconds, then move them over to the cool side of the grill. 
After that, it's cook to temp. I disagree with @Drew4UTk (https://www.cfb51.com/index.php?action=profile;u=1) that I think poking with a good meat thermometer only lets out a miniscule amount of juices, and I recommend doing so. Get the inside to 145-150 degrees and get them off the grill. I know everyone says 160+, but that will leave you with dry, stringy, tasteless chicken. The key is that after you get them off the grill at 150, let them rest several minutes. This is good practice with every meat to allow the juices to reabsorb into the meat, but 2.8 minutes at 150 degrees IT will pasteurize your chicken (https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/07/the-food-lab-complete-guide-to-sous-vide-chicken-breast.html). Plus, carryover cooking will take the internal temp up a few more degrees anyway. 
-----------------
One more suggestion. Skip chicken breast entirely and get some thighs. They're MUCH more delicious, and the dark meat stays succulent and juicy up to higher temps, so you generally cook them up to about 175 degrees internal, and they'll remain moist.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on November 02, 2018, 02:05:22 PM
agreed, skin on the chicken helps a lot with keeping in the juices - breast or thigh
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on November 08, 2018, 01:10:05 PM
The boneless skinless all-white meat thing is from the olden days when the nutritionists were telling us that all fat and any fat was bad for us.

Turns out that, like everything else, moderation is the key.  A little bit of fat is fine, and adds a ton of flavor and moisture.

All that to say, yeah, bone-in skin-on thighs are awesome on the grill, in the fryer, etc.
Title: holiday ham holy hell!!!!
Post by: Drew4UTk on December 17, 2018, 09:36:03 PM
i bought an 11 pound spiraled ham and carried it to the smoke pit.  i'd found a recipe? on the interwebz and decided to give it a shot for a party we tossed last friday.

gents.... this is amazingly good... it was gone in an hour.  

rinse ham and dry with towel.  if it's not cross cut during the spiraling, cross cut it but not terribly deep.  

lather it in processed mustard- good ol' french's or it's like.  roll it in a good rub that really doesn't matter so long as you like it- i used a salt, black pepper, red pepper chips, cayenne, brown sugar, cinnamon ect.... just a 'rub'... mix yourself some orange juice with chicken broth, more rub, even more cayenne, and inject it liberally. 

overnight it in the fridge in a tinfoil tray.

get a mixing bowl and mix dark brown sugar, more mustard, raw honey, more cayenne, more rub, a dash of minced ginger and a dash of minced clove- and a couple shots of bourbon- bring to heat enough to mix it all very well- you want the consistency of commercially available bbq sauce (thick kind)... rest it in the fridge, too.  

next day, allowing for six hours time, fire the smoker with hickory lumps and maple chips.. add a tray below with orange juice, chicken broth, and mustard... full smoke absolutely no hotter than 230*... this is important as you want it to glaze with a caramelized crust and not have a hint of burn.   at hour two mop it down with glaze, and every hour to hour and a half afterward... 

when you reach 110~115*, pull that baby out and break a cardinal rule: slice it.  thin.  baste it once more.  no more than half an hour after this in the smoker still with full smoke.  

i can't tell you how good this is.  

here is a pic, though: 

(https://scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/48239733_10157196959033755_3111194130772918272_n.jpg?_nc_cat=106&_nc_ht=scontent-iad3-1.xx&oh=0f1473ad74e6b76f0bd3114ff67388f0&oe=5C9BA7CD)
 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on December 19, 2018, 12:03:18 PM
pic is worth 1000 words
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on December 19, 2018, 12:07:54 PM
I'd put that in my mouth.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on December 20, 2018, 03:05:20 PM
one slice at a time
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on January 09, 2019, 10:42:06 AM
I learned a lesson... the kind that only comes with experience and dabbling instead of academic... I'll share it with y'all, but I don't expect it to be accepted until you've experienced it for yourselves. 

so... smoked a whole sirloin last weekend.  It turned out better than anything I've ever smoked.  The bark was perfection and the ring was apparent and uniform and to a depth of perhaps an eighth of an inch.  The wood used was an oak/maple mix of my own blend.  The sirloin was rubbed well with coarse salt and black pepper, and some of that montreal steak seasoning.  nothing special.  i took the 11# cut up to 112* internal, and then wrapped it in foil, then a towel, and then a cooler for another hour.  The smoker rendered a medium rare masterpiece of 'sweet' smoked heaven.  not a bit bitter. it's the first time i've ever successfully smoked without a hint of 'bitter'... here is the lesson learned.  

Quote
BLUF (bottom line up front) : It's ALL about the fuel.  Without getting into the chemistry specifics which i have little grasp of understanding, wood is chock full of naturally occurring chemicals.  These impart the bitter taste, and they often cause wafts of thick white to light gray smoke.  This is bad.  Many counter this by smoking 'full smoke' only partial cook time, and attempt to bypass the smoke during later phases. Many 'soak' wood chips to smoke.  This is wrong.  The way to dispense with the bitter flavors is simple: only burn natural wood fires that have been rendered to charcoal.  there is little smoke, there is zero need to 'soak' chips, and the chemicals that impart the bitterness are long gone before you even drop the match at cook time. 

my set up is a wood fired ecoque gen2 smoker/pizza oven.  It's made everything from brisket to applewood smoked bacon, to breads and homemade pizzas.  it works great and i am happy with the purchase.  there is no gas involved, and there is no 'briquettes' to be used.... you only want to use clean and natural fuels, and always as dried out (seasoned) as possible fuel... and that's what i've been doing.  no matter how seasoned, though, the smoke stack never lies- the smoke coming out of that thing can be described, at times, as clouds- white, pillow like, thick and consistent.  this is a bad thing.  

I was reading a study offered up by aTm (if you can believe it) about how 'types of woods aren't as important as origin of woods'... i found this interesting to say the least.  the basic premise is "Oak from one location geographically may be better suited than Hickory from another or vice versa, and it may be better than apple or any of the fruit woods depending on it's geographic origin."... they went as far as to say "hickory from some places properly seasoned imparts a sweeter flavor than, say, cherry from another"... here is the key though, and it was strongly stressed: "It really doesn't matter what wood- so long as it is a hardwood- as people talk a lot about the subject the truth of the matter is they can't truly distinguish one way or the other what wood was used, but they can absolutely tell if that wood wasn't properly prepared prior to being used in the smoker".   

for this evolution planned for the Sirloin described above, the plan was to use solely charcoaled lump with only spits of 'fresh' silver maple the size of pencils or so, and to NOT add any more 'fresh' wood after the start.  the smoke was not apparent at all throughout the cooking process- it could be smelled, but even ten feet away from the stack it was barely visible.  Opening the chamber a few times during cooking usually results in vision clouding breath holding efforts to 'wait it out' before you can inspect progress- but not this time.  there was certainly trapped smoke, but it was there and gone as soon as the chamber was accessed.  ... I had my doubts about this based on what i was seeing, but i figured it prudent to not change gears mid race. 

as mentioned, the results are perhaps the best smoked red meat i've ever had from any location at any time... I'm not trying to brag, as all i really do is observe the process anyway, i'm just saying straight up that patience and using the right material makes all the difference in the world.  not a little difference.  a massive huge gigantic difference.  one that makes you think it's time to hang that 'smoke master' sign above your pit.  that, of course, won't happen- but there was much fanfare over that sirloin and people not only familiar with smoked meats but my efforts in the arena that were as stunned as i was over how good it turned out.  Lump charcoal only. next time, I even think i'm going to abandon the sprigs of silver maple, to be honest.   

the irreplaceable keys to all of this: 


Quote
Don't trust store purchased lump charcoal.  Don't expect to find something near as natural and prepared as what you can do for yourself. 

Starting with a metal barrel, preferably a metal trash can no bigger than 20 gallons or so (you can use a drum, but where has that drum been and what was it used to store?) remove the lid and cut six or so 3" holes around the perimeter- revolver style.  Place a couple fire bricks under either side of the barrel in the fire pit  (not the smoke pit- a bonfire type pit) to keep it a foot or so off the ground, and build a stack of limbs of whatever sort, split wood, whatever all around and under the barrel/can.  fill the can with your smoking wood cut in no longer/thicker than 6" chunks, and fill the can 3/4 full.  secure lid.  ignite the fire pit.  keep it fed and burning strong.  at around 700* the wood in that can will start to off gas flammable gas- and this is fun: ignite it- it will burn like a torch until it's gone long gone.  Let the fire roar with the torch looking fire burning atop the can until it dies completely- which is at least 24 hours...
after the fire is absolutely dead, pull your can out and dump the contents into a bin for storage.  you now have absolutely clean and prepared all natural charcoal lump to cook with.  
it's easy to ignite in the smoke pit's cooker (you'd think it infused like a briquette it's so easy to light) and it burns exceptionally clean.  It will burn hotter and not for as long- but since it's natural and free of any type of chemical, but you can always add more to the fire as it will burn without any ill impacts... 
it doesn't matter so much the type of wood you use- oak, hickory, maple, apple, cherry, mesquite- as we've been told for years and years.  what matters is the origin of the wood (if you subscribe to aTm's study) and CERTAINLY the 'state' (condition) it's in when you fire it.   for the love of all that's holy, you've gotta try this. 
note on wood chips popularly sold in bags: the common thought is to soak these.  this is wrong.  you don't want anything to do with what's in that smoke when it comes to food... it is a certain way to get that bitter flavor.  you also don't want to burn them dry- because it is rarely seasoned to the proper expectation.  it will burn with clouds of white smoke.  you don't want to set them on indirect heat with intent to 'cook' the flavors out of them... that's another way to get those chemicals on your food that render bitter.  you can either stay completely away from them, or run a mini-kiln out of them making them charcoal just like described above.  otherwise, these are basically a waste of money and/or effort. 

I'll never smoke another way, and I can't wait to use this method on a massive brisket i've got staged right now, and on a piggy i'm getting as soon as the farmer down the road harvest them (should be a few weeks) as I'm looking forward to that sweet smoky flavor recently discovered on a pork belly turned into bacon goodness. 
i hope this is at least tried by someone here, so you can experience it for yourselves.  it is the only way to do it, i'm thinking.  i'm also thinking after you've done it you'll agree... 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on January 09, 2019, 11:21:25 AM
That's a lot of words, but I certainly agree with the concept, you don't want bad white smoke.  But there's no need to use strictly charcoal to get there.

I always start my fire with lump charcoal, and surround with split logs.  There will be zero charcoal left by the time I put the meat on 45 minutes later, only the logs burning to coals.  The next series of split logs that will be going in, sit on top of the firebox to warm up.  When I'm ready for more fuel, the splits from on top of the firebox go into the fire, and they ignite quickly and burn clean, so no bad white smoke.  Continue that rotation until the cook is done.  Pre-heating the splits is the key to clean fires.  Well, and obviously having properly seasoned/dried wood.

30+ years of doing it essentially this way, since I was a teen learning at my dad's BBQ restaurant, no white smoke, no bitter.  

One place I'll disagree is that the type of wood DOES matter-- most especially, mesquite.  It burns hotter and quicker than other woods, and tends to impart a much stronger flavor.  Consequently I typically only use if for grilling,  but I'll also occasionally use it to smoke something that is only going to spend a short amount of time on the cooker, like pork tenderloin or whole chickens.

Good info though,thanks drew!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on January 09, 2019, 02:55:12 PM
@utee94 (https://www.cfb51.com/index.php?action=profile;u=15) You're working with an offset smoker, right? 

@Drew4UTk (https://www.cfb51.com/index.php?action=profile;u=1) I agree with utee. It's not *necessarily* the wood. The key is that wood contains ALL those volatile organic compounds [VOC] that generate the billowy white smoke, and you do NOT want those on your food. Charcoal has already burned off those VOCs, so charcoal can burn much more "cleanly". But it's not like hardwood can't burn cleanly, you just need to be running at much higher temperatures. 

Think back to when you make a campfire. When you first light it, you're throwing off HUGE amounts of that billowy white smoke. But once you get a good bed of coals, the fire is hot enough to combust all those VOCs, and the smoke is no longer white and billowy. And once the fire is hot enough, throwing another fresh log on the fire doesn't result in the billowy white smoke, because it's not a matter of the wood, it's a matter of the heat.

That's why utee is correct for his smoker, because IIRC, he's using an offset smoker. An offset smoker isn't strongly insulated (although most of the bigger ones is 1/4" steel, so they are somewhat efficient), but more importantly the firebox is offset to where the food is. With the firebox not being underneath the food, you can run a hot fire in your firebox [hot enough to burn off the VOCs] and still keep a cooking chamber at a much lower temp. And because the fire is hotter, when you're adding fuel, you can throw your splits in there without pre-burning them. Offset smokers tend to end up, then, with much more smoke flavor than insulated smokers, because they're able to use wood rather than charcoal as a heat source. But they don't have that nasty bitter flavor, because the VOCs are being combusted rather than desposited on the food.

On the other hand, I have a Kamado grill [similar to Big Green Egg]. With 200# of ceramic insulation, if I had a fire burning hot enough to burn off the VOCs, the cooking chamber would be running WAY too hot to actually smoke food. So I use lump charcoal to keep the fire small and clean. *HOWEVER*, that doesn't mean I don't use wood. When smoking, I will add in some hardwood chunks in the firebox. With the fire burning so small, those chunks smolder rather than ignite, which allows them to still burn cleanly enough to produce smoke flavor without big billowy white clouds of smoke. This does mean that the smoke flavor isn't typically as pronounced as a stick-burning offset smoker, but it can still be quite delicious. 

Very similar to the kamado IMHO are the insulated cabinet smokers like Stumps. These are insulated, so also run off charcoal as their primary heat source rather than hardwood, and for the same reason. 

I don't understand the way the Ecoque works, but I suspect it's a lot more similar to the insulated cabinet smoker than to an offset. As a result, it might be difficult to create a fire hot enough with wood to burn off VOCs and yet small enough to keep your cooking chamber from overheating. However, using charcoal as your primary heat source with a little bit of hardwood for flavoring would be an ideal way to smoke. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on January 13, 2019, 10:28:20 PM
I generally support utee/bwiarny on the smoke/wood talk here.  I remember when I got my Egg, I was directed a certain video, and it was most helpful for showing me when the Egg is ready for the meat.  The (brief) takeaway was to simply look at the smoke coming out the top, as has been stated, you don't want the billowy white smoke, once that smoke has turned 'blue', you're ready for smoking.    Now that's anywhere between 20-45 minutes in my experiences.

I usually get my wood chunks from a local butcher shop (buy them as needed), and they rest in the egg with the Egg lump charcoal.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on January 13, 2019, 11:16:04 PM
I generally support utee/bwarbiany on the smoke/wood talk here.  
Generally?!?! 
You mean with the exception of when you're wrong? 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on January 13, 2019, 11:21:44 PM
I don't have as much to say as you guys on the topic but subscribe to your general concept of wood use when cooking .  I just won't post 500 words on it.:)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on January 16, 2019, 06:46:53 PM
Yes indeed, I'm running a pretty large offset stick-burner.  Excellent points on the differences between a setup like mine, and one of the ceramic BGE style cookers.

I really love the BGE, several friends have them and they not only make very good BBQ, but they're versatile in that they can be used as pizza ovens and for other very high-heat applications.  I'll likely get one someday.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on January 17, 2019, 12:15:34 PM
Yes indeed, I'm running a pretty large offset stick-burner.  Excellent points on the differences between a setup like mine, and one of the ceramic BGE style cookers.

I really love the BGE, several friends have them and they not only make very good BBQ, but they're versatile in that they can be used as pizza ovens and for other very high-heat applications.  I'll likely get one someday.
Agreed. When I got the kamado, I had a gas grill and a propane smoker. The gas grill was on its last legs, such that I knew whatever grill I got would be a replacement for it. And I wanted to consolidate away from the propane smoker, so the plan was to sell that.
So I wasn't looking for a "smoker", I was looking for a versatile grill. The kamado is that. It does everything well--perhaps not AS well as dedicated cookers for each type of cooking, but it's a better smoker than a gas grill, better at searing than a gas grill or a pellet grill, and better at "grilling" than an offset smoker. I wanted "one grill to rule them all", and the kamado was best at that. 
I'd love to have an offset smoker. But I don't often smoke in high enough quantities and frequency to justify the cost of a "big" one, and I generally don't like the build quality of the "cheap" ones relative to my kamado, so I don't see it in my near future. If I was regularly entertaining a 20+ extended family or throwing big parties--or if I lived close enough to Purdue to justify a trailer smoker for tailgates, it might make sense for me. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on January 17, 2019, 12:38:55 PM
Charcoal/wood is not permitted at the condo building we moved to, despite the fact that my patio is 20'x50' (not a balcony, obviously). I appealed and the association denied me. So, I had to give the Weber Performer away. Maybe someday I can get back into natural cooking, but not now. The best I can probably pull off is to get a "smoker" box for my Genesis. Oh well.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on January 17, 2019, 01:05:59 PM
Charcoal/wood is not permitted at the condo building we moved to, despite the fact that my patio is 20'x50' (not a balcony, obviously). I appealed and the association denied me. So, I had to give the Weber Performer away. Maybe someday I can get back into natural cooking, but not now. The best I can probably pull off is to get a "smoker" box for my Genesis. Oh well.
Where do they fall on the question of pellet grills? My father-in-law moved into a retirement community and they didn't allow charcoal/wood, but he managed to get them to agree that a pellet grill was different than those... (Not sure how, since it burns compressed wood pellets, but if you make the argument creatively enough, maybe you could win it.)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on January 17, 2019, 01:46:46 PM
somehow I'm not worried about Badge

He will preserver and continue to eat well
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on January 19, 2019, 12:03:19 PM
I just loaded a massive brisket in the smoker... it barely fit... dang thing must be 20#.  

12~15 hours from now, I should be pulling a purty chunk of chow out of that thing!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on January 19, 2019, 06:58:34 PM
dropped that brisket in the smoker at noon- it's just now starting to come out of the stall... powered through, no crutch.  kept the temperature in the 300 range nice and steady- used nothing but homemade charcoal and some maple splits.  

I'll come back and edit this when she comes out and again after i cut it... i've got high hopes for this one!!!

as promised:
(https://scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/50428414_10157286737673755_3496311869541449728_n.jpg?_nc_cat=104&_nc_ht=scontent-iad3-1.xx&oh=d19ac3577efaa5a2c49084398eec34b9&oe=5CC55D0C)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on January 19, 2019, 07:21:53 PM
Shipping is an option. Selling brisket on the site could be a good thing amigo.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on January 19, 2019, 07:35:29 PM
Shipping is an option. Selling brisket on the site could be a good thing amigo.
if my connection up in your neck of the woods (well, further north) was reliable, I'd be all over it... he has great products, but not a lot of ambition.  
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on January 19, 2019, 08:02:27 PM
Couple of good places down here in Texico will ship you cooked brisket.  It ain't cheap, but...

Looks really good, Drew.  I don't crutch very often either.  I do usually place a bit of foil over the thin end of the flat after a few hours, to keep it from getting overdone.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on January 19, 2019, 08:40:54 PM
(https://scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/50223134_10157286884823755_1546524183196860416_n.jpg?_nc_cat=111&_nc_ht=scontent-iad3-1.xx&oh=754150e612f72911f14aa4249e31ee51&oe=5CCF3D6E)

by the way.. thing isn't burned though it looks like it- i use an espresso rub... y'all should try that if you haven't.

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on January 19, 2019, 10:42:05 PM
now I'm hungry!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on January 19, 2019, 10:47:12 PM
great googlee mooglee i ain't.... i'm stuffed... and, i've been minding that smoker so much today i bet i have a smoke ring too... 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on January 19, 2019, 11:09:59 PM
good work and corngrats
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on January 19, 2019, 11:13:38 PM
I haven't done an espresso rub yet but I've heard good things... 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on January 19, 2019, 11:29:20 PM
I haven't done an espresso rub yet but I've heard good things...
i use it a lot... every once in a while i can actually taste it as coffee flavor, but most times it blends right in.   the flavor is not like coffee, but it does add a different dimension that's hard to nail down in terms of flavor... it's one of those strange things culinary types talk about pairing that end up pairing very well but you'd never guess it prior... like jalapeno pepper jelly and cream cheese on a cracker- just doesn't make sense but it certainly does after you've tried it.  there are more comparison's, but that is first one to come to mind.  If I were to tell the whole truth and nothing but, though, i'd wager the powdered coffee bean (which is what I'm talking about when i say espresso) is more or less being used to absorb and seal than anything else.  
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on January 20, 2019, 01:16:00 PM
My Brother who has lived in Texas long enuff to have learned a few things about BBQ smoked a #14 brisket while I was there a couple weeks ago.  I brought it back and cubed it up to put in chili.


(https://i.ibb.co/ZNmMCkr/MVIMG-20190106-100612.jpg) (https://ibb.co/ZNmMCkr)



(https://i.ibb.co/9ZVt5QT/IMG-20190113-110041.jpg) (https://ibb.co/9ZVt5QT)



(https://i.ibb.co/6H0fyjN/IMG-20190113-111310.jpg) (https://ibb.co/6H0fyjN)


umm, that's NOT my brother in the top pic by the smoker
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on January 20, 2019, 01:37:11 PM
so, this morning I substituted the smoked brisket for the usual browned tri-tip I use for my chili

chili was in the pot at 10:30, ready to serve at 1:30.   Ram's kickoff at 2pm


(https://i.ibb.co/ThbzsMk/IMG-20190120-102001.jpg) (https://ibb.co/ThbzsMk)



(https://i.ibb.co/wMcrRDW/IMG-20190120-102014.jpg) (https://ibb.co/wMcrRDW)



(https://i.ibb.co/Bq5PXGd/IMG-20190120-102030.jpg) (https://ibb.co/Bq5PXGd)



(https://i.ibb.co/9n8yrm1/IMG-20190120-102421.jpg) (https://ibb.co/9n8yrm1)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on January 20, 2019, 01:48:29 PM
Nice!! Def chili season, huh?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on January 20, 2019, 07:49:39 PM
I recently did the same, with smoked brisket point cubed into the chili. Left it all day in the slow cooker. I think it caused the meat to dry out. Because it was already cooked, I think it ended up overcooking with that much time. 

I think your plan of only cooking ~3 hours is better. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on January 20, 2019, 10:37:28 PM
Nice!! Def chili season, huh?
9 degrees above at the moment
forecast 1-3 inches of snow tomorrow
Chili season
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on January 21, 2019, 04:43:02 PM
I recently did the same, with smoked brisket point cubed into the chili. Left it all day in the slow cooker. I think it caused the meat to dry out. Because it was already cooked, I think it ended up overcooking with that much time.

I think your plan of only cooking ~3 hours is better.
yes, with the meat already cooked, you just need to cook the minced onion and let the chili powder and spices simmer into the meat.  2 hours might have been enough
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MrNubbz on January 21, 2019, 04:47:21 PM
Damn FF what was in the pot?Briskett & V-8 which I add too my chili if it needs liquid.That or a good Porter
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on January 21, 2019, 06:06:25 PM
mostly chicken broth, chili powders, cumin, minced fresh onion, minced fresh garlic.  The red color comes from a small can of tomato sauce

I had V-8 in my bloody mary yesterday
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on January 22, 2019, 01:25:26 PM
yes, with the meat already cooked, you just need to cook the minced onion and let the chili powder and spices simmer into the meat.  2 hours might have been enough
Yup.  If I'm making BBQ brisket chili, then I usually still do about half the meat as standard uncooked cubed beef (and chorizo for the grease) which cooks all day, and do the other half as cubed/diced brisket (or rib meat), and it only goes into the pot when there's maybe 2 hours left.
But, since it doesn't have as long to meld, that combination is actually much much much better the next day after being refrigerated and reheated.  That's true of most chili and stews, but especially true for the BBQ brisket chili.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on January 22, 2019, 02:00:22 PM
good idea about the 2 hours

as for the chorizo, it's similar to bacon, it just makes anything better

many times I'll add some pork sausage to add some pork fat/grease

the pork grease helps some of the heat stick to the tongue
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on January 22, 2019, 03:20:28 PM
Yup, I typically  brown chorizo and reserve the meat, and use the fat to sear the cubed beef.  I sometimes do this with bacon as well and my last batch I browned a pound of bacon, a pound of chorizo, and then seared all my cubed meats in the bacon/chorizo grease.  And reintroduced the chorizo and diced bacon much later in the cook.  That was a pretty fabulous batch, I must say.

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on January 22, 2019, 03:25:59 PM
I've been using ground sirloin to thicken the sauce lately. It's not noticeable (as ground meat) after a long cook, but the sirloin adds a ton of flavor and texture to the sauce.


Chorizo, 1/4 ground sirloin, 1/4 cubed flank, 1/4 cubed short rib and 1/4 cubed sirloin is now my go-to meat mixture.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on January 22, 2019, 03:34:59 PM
I've been using ground sirloin to thicken the sauce lately. It's not noticeable (as ground meat) after a long cook, but the sirloin adds a ton of flavor and texture to the sauce.


Chorizo, 1/4 ground sirloin, 1/4 cubed flank, 1/4 cubed short rib and 1/4 cubed sirloin is now my go-to meat mixture.
Sounds like a good mix.  The structure of the ground meat just fades away in a long cook, but should definitely provide some texture and flavor. 
When you use raw brisket, which of the above do you replace?
And I, too, like using short ribs as part of the cubed beef.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on January 22, 2019, 03:48:10 PM
I don't use raw brisket for chili anymore. Only for a cook, or for burgers. Similar mix for those - brisket, short ribs and flank. Although for the last grind I used brisket, short ribs and tenderloin scraps (from my Christmas trimmings).
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on January 22, 2019, 04:02:59 PM
I never make any kind of chili anymore without beef stock.  I suppose I might use a chicken stock if I didn't have beef.  I can't believe i once did make chili w/o stock.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on January 22, 2019, 04:45:48 PM
I never make any kind of chili anymore without beef stock.  I suppose I might use a chicken stock if I didn't have beef.  I can't believe i once did make chili w/o stock.
I consider the onion, garlic and ground sirloin that all disintegrate (into the beer) to be my beef stock.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on January 22, 2019, 07:52:46 PM
That would be acceptable for sure. 

We tend to make white meat chili as well thus the beef stock performs a more noble service for me.  Let me pretend we are having beef.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on January 22, 2019, 08:05:14 PM
I haven't used beer in years, but I need to remember to go back to it when not in competition
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on January 22, 2019, 08:57:17 PM
I use both beer and stock.

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on January 22, 2019, 09:09:54 PM
beef broth and chorizo are on my list to try soon

maybe with the cubed smoked brisket for the super bowl party
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on January 22, 2019, 11:19:55 PM
what's your range of beer for your chilis?  I pretty much stick with any non flavored lager, I wouldn't want to waste a tasty malty porter or interfere with any strong hoppy ale.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on January 23, 2019, 07:57:41 AM
Depends on what I'm going for.  I definitely don't ever use a bitter American IPA, I don't like that flavor in beer by itself, and I don't want it in my chili.

But don't be afraid to go with something dark and malty, the entire point is to build up the depth of the flavor profile. There are plenty of chili recipes that call for things like cinnamon, allspice, cloves-- I don't typically include those, but I will definitely use some of the winter/Christmas beers with those spices in them when making chili. So my batches around the holidays usually have something like that in them, but later in the winter season I typically go with lagers, with Czech pilsners being the most common.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on February 03, 2019, 10:55:54 AM
My wife 'accidentally ' ended up w a pack of chicken thighs.  Those are getting smoked today, it's 55 degrees!  I'm going to rub some chili crunch on a couple of them.  

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 03, 2019, 11:03:21 AM
I'm almost out of Chile Crunch. As you advised, that stuff is LEGIT. Highly recommended. 


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lKEqq%2BJr7v%2BCDyqp0%2FP%2FgHc%2FwBhNNKV0%2Fxrf%2BYgJKTmQKw9QQelQtoWugkR%2BL4iVGWD3kqlR6n2rlPtMwQKWLqOFDMSFHoPSo3eRn3%2Ba68bSoPDD0PqKpzqX0tYSymrb%2FgnXDRfEOAf%2BEtgAPQi%2BlO4e1X7CaPQba4bU%2FEcmpyzLtVGy8cP%2B0N3Uj6j%2BtefjepU%2BdKQvRS5wKjlRZpfNkLE%2BhbIH%2BFCqVL7r7g%2Fsmp%2FTOs%2FtSzs7qULYC8tJZjJBCqq5hB7AdF9gKvxDTLh5Lq9imuJbgkgyBgkC9gCATkDtxiuNsb%2B70yV5bKcxPKhSQDBVl9CCMGoWnnMjSefJ5jnc7Fyd59%2B1Q1K2ktfwL%2Fs2rfb8TrpJolcC3N00O7LOY2yqA%2FMc5G4ds4FXb270wLK5KW6iTdGske0qmPutnHPX1rg5HM6lZMkEY%2B8ePp6VLNcNdWqWs6Bol56ncfcmi0tLP1%2F4Af2dV6pfedbb6npl3btIssDopwhKDIPbj3q6J4NMuJL7TZTB5YBZFkyrNxkFf8ACuHs4o4HzGn4E5Fa6ANayEnoCetaU4cs7pmVTB1FGzX4ns8MqzwRzL92RQw%2FEVJVPSTnSLPPP7hP5CrdemeC9GLRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABXmHiBs%2BK9SHpt%2FwDQRXp9eTa%2B0n%2FCaaqqk4%2BX%2FwBBFZVdj0Mvdqjfl%2FkZl1xVByTVq480S4OTGSTk1UbrXDJWPqqMrobyeFUk%2BgFNw%2FTy3%2FKr1hLPFZXAtrhreWWeGPzEJBAJYdu3fHtXQN4Y1tG2t4nd8d9jj%2F2auWpWjB2k7feZ1cXGlLlZyGH%2FALjfkaDv%2FuN%2BVdX%2FAMI3ro6eJT%2BKv%2F8AFUv%2FAAjev5B%2F4SYgf7r%2FAPxVZ%2FWqf8y%2FH%2FIy%2FtGHY5I7v7jflSDP90%2FlXXnw7rnH%2FFSMfXhv8ab%2FAMI7rw6eJD%2BIb%2FGj63T7r8f8g%2FtCH9X%2FAMjkSSB90%2FlTd3sfyrrz4d8Qdf8AhI%2F0f%2FGg%2BHfEBXjxFz7hv8aPrdP%2BZfj%2FAJDWYU%2F6v%2FkceHAPQ0u7nofyrrV8PeIx18QRn8Go%2FwCEf8Rk8%2BIEx7BqSxlN%2FaX4%2FwCQ%2FwC0Kf8AV%2F8AI5It7H8qM%2Bx%2FKuuPh7xEeniID8GP9aQ%2BHdf%2FAOhjz%2BDf40%2FrdP8AmX4%2F5CWYU%2F6v%2Fkchk%2Bh%2FKmnJ6K35V1%2F%2FAAjviHv4iH5P%2FjSf8I54g%2F6GP%2F0P%2FGj63T%2FmX4%2F5B%2FaFP%2Br%2FAORyHzd0b8qQhz%2FA35GuwPhvXh08SN%2BO%2FwDxpP8AhGtcyN3iZ%2FwV%2FwD4qj63D%2BZfj%2FkL%2B0IHI7ZP%2BeT%2FAPfJpQGDYZWU%2BjDFdgvhXWZHC%2F8ACUzLk9drn%2F2euavZpp7ezNzM88qCRTI5JJw5Hf8AlW1Ospuyf5l0sWqsuVEcbEHIr0D%2BwNMS1wtpcMrIMsZgA36156h4r027mt30v7NK7ITGM7Rz0zmvQoJO9zzM2qThy8rtudfp6hNOtlUYURKAM5xxVmq2nqq6dbKv3REoH0xVmus%2BeCiiigAooooAKKKKACiiigAooooAKKKKACvJdfkdfG2q4A28c4%2F2RXrVeS67OY%2FG%2BrAjI%2BXv%2Fsisqux6GAdqj1toZE8jsygqACOf1qox5NWp5%2FMcJtxk8nPtVYjmuGW59Rh2nHR3JrPPkkf9Plv%2FADavRZv9aa87sgDFn0vLf%2F0Jq9ElP7w465rx8buvn%2Bh5mO%2FjfIZRVKbVoY7uW0t7a5vprdQ1wLZARDkZAJJALY52jJ9qLbWLS9v4rC3SZpprcXSMyYUwnoxJ5HPGDzXJyTtexwcyLhpKzj4g0%2F7Jd3hS5EFhJ5N0TFzG%2FcY74yOR61I%2Br2sd5Z2Tx3AuL9S9svl8MoGSSe2Byc1Dpz7C5kXDQOlVNQ1S00ua3huxKXu38uARRl97%2FwB3joamtrhbsSeXFNG0T7HjlQowOAeh7YI5rJxko81tCr9CSl7VRfWLT7VPa2sVzfy2p23JtYS6xN%2FdLcAsPQEmm%2F29p3mWkafaJXv1ZrQJA2ZQv3hgjII7g4pRpVLr3WLmXc0DSGs%2F%2B39LOlz6oskrWtrIYrn90weBh1DKeeOPzqeW%2FhitLe6eKfy7plWMBPmBb7u4ds5FW4TW68gTRYpOlVbTU7O%2B1S70qF2W%2FsgGmhkXadp%2FiX1HI%2FMVG2tWMenyahcGW3t0mMA8xDvlkB27UUZLHII49D2qlTne1n%2Fw%2Bw%2BZF09KQ9qz5tbhtYpXvbG9tTDCbhleMEmMEBmBBIyMjIzn2p76tBE2nCS2uM6n%2FwAewwvpn5uePl5%2F%2BvxVezn2DmRoxgiRc15nPn7Pa%2FWT%2FwBDau%2F0hb9Jpvt5Y5f5cnvznHt0%2FwA5rgJ%2F%2BPa0%2Bkn%2FAKG1ehglabXp%2BTO7Aa1BqnjFekXc3lWS7oodhRf3khA7e9ebp9K9Iu4s2%2B8zxRgqucqN3A%2FM17uH6mGcfY%2BZ21ic2FueOYl6fSp6htAVs4AeojX%2BVTV1nghRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABXkuuSIPGmr7hnBUdPYV61Xkut%2BW3jbVl6tlePwFZVdj0cvv7R27fqjGmljZgFTDZwTjp%2BNVyfmqxOYPM%2BQjfnAxVdh1ANcMtz6ehfl1ZPZAmMDsb22%2F8AQmr0VyBPk%2BtedWPES4P%2FAC%2FW3%2FoTV6HN%2FrTXj474l8%2F0PMx38b5HO6Te2%2BgajrGn6rMLR7m%2Be8t5peEuI3A6N0LLjGOtG6K8%2BISpFdS2oOlqFaLCEnfnYQwODt5xjNdAHIUKeQOme1KWJTaeRnNc%2FtU25W1at%2FS%2FQ8%2Fl6HFLcQL4S8Up55kJv32M2N8oJXDcdc4PQdjWjfXltH4m8LzyXEaQraTFpWYBVBTAye2TxXSlyWVj1UYFMzgMMDDdeOtU66bvbv8AirE8hzHiTULW6uPD08FyEh%2FtMgXIxhQowXBORjJxk8V0GkXUMnmKt%2F8A2h5MrB7nghtx3AZHHAYDj0qbfjPA5GOnakPIwAPoBXNUqKVNQS2%2FzKSs7nK%2BD7620DSpvD%2Bs3UWn6jaXMjt9ofyxcKxyJFY8Nnp68CrGrXME%2Fi3wz9juooWeK6MUu0FYi6KEYqexIOM9a6JiJFUSIr7fu7hnFLuJVgQPm68U%2FbxdV1bau99dNVbsLktHlucgu678EeINIW0Zddh8w6hCuWa4kJz5q9yGGCMfQdq1IdX0%2FV7HS7bTbpbm4Z4WaJOWiCYLFx%2FDjBHPcgVtlySrfxL0Pems33sBVLfeIGM1Uq6ldtdb79f8v%2BGBQt1Ocu7L%2B17i%2B1HRJ411vSb0tA4IImXy0zE%2FqrYIHoQR61Smu5rvR9B8TLYzeRZ6jPNd2iqWeEM7gtjqdh9u%2FauuY5xjjHSl8xvM3g%2FMevvVxxFklbb8rWa%2FG%2FkDpmHr%2Br6bfeF9V%2BxXkV2Tavgx%2FN97gLnsSccdfyqhKkcN54SlW%2BubkPkkSsGWIGPb2Ax8xxzXU7ipBXAwc8DvSF2G7H8XWlGsoLlS01691bsU43dySPPnj615lKR9ksv9x%2F8A0Y1emQ%2F60V5jJ%2Fx6WPoYm%2F8AQ2rrwHxP5fqd%2BB%2FiCp2%2Btek31hLc2yyrNGmVG3dEWK4%2F4EPevNo8ZH1r0fUBL5Bw5CbAwAY56dgO2a9%2Bh1MM4%2Bx8zubXP2SHJydi8%2FhUtRW2DaxEdNi4%2FKpa6zwQooooAKKKKACiiigAooooAKKKKACiiigAryLXAi%2BOtVcuAeBt98CvXa8i1yFG8b6s2eSRk%2BnArKrsehl9%2FaOy6GTJFGG3IxJB9agPQnvUzReVI5HKnoe9QnGDXDLc%2Bpoq0drE1kMxL0z9vtv%2FAEJq9Cm5lNee2X%2BoH%2FX%2FAG3%2FAKE1ehTf60142N%2BJf12PLx38b5DKd2pvSl7Vwo4haQ0UjsqIXkYIi%2FeZjgCmIQ0Cqf8AbGmlwoul5zhsHace%2FSrgCldwkTZ1LbhgD61nOLjuinGUd0Nd0jieaVxHEgy7t0ArOfX4AV8q2leNl3K7EJuHsDyfqKoapqMd9NEgDtarIVhiA%2F4%2BZB1JHdVwcDuePpUkTeCfPN1IzZGwMXjBwDvHRegJzjJxwNm2t6VBaOZ006C%2B2dLaX9tf7lhYrKgy8Mg2uo9cHt%2F9b1qfBYhRXJTYUQ3FrKIorUKkUo%2F1m7JwQv8AEhORjvjd1PN3U9dE2gvFJi2v5isTx525B5JU88EAjPTmrnhnzLl6%2FgEsO7rl2f4Fn%2B3oG1J4ECNZxnY90GyN3qOxHXJ7bSe1aeVKhkYMrDKspyCPUVyaJp4gjS4m2wIBuVAAWP8AdO4gY4X24x610tk2%2BxiZYPs6MMpHuz8p6H8ev41NanGNnEVanGNuUnPSmk8ilPSmnrXMc5LD%2FrV%2BteZOc2Vh%2FwBcT%2F6G1emw%2FwCsFeYnmx0%2F%2Fr3%2FAPZ2r1cBu%2Fl%2Bp24H%2BIxyckcd69F1lY2ghEpb7owAcZ5%2Bn%2BFedxffX6ivRdQabAVSpXcoJLYKjuBjmveodTnzh6w%2BZ3duMW8Y9EH8qkpkPEKD%2FZH8qfXWeCFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFeQa7AX8aauwYDJA5r1%2BvKNXhlfxjqx2MFJyHI44FY1naJ6OXqLnLm7GNLkLz%2BlVX4U1bmOQTz15qo%2FQ1ws%2BqhsS2GTAP%2Bv62%2F9CavQ5v9aa88sD%2B6Uet9bf8AoTV6HL%2FrWrx8b8S%2FrseTjv43yG0HpSUpriRxAOeKxNf1FARYRkPz%2B%2BU5AJAztJxgAD5j9MHjNad9fR6bZtcSMisSEi3sFUuemSeg7k%2B1ZGhaZJNjUtQEmXwyK77vMbkFjnnB4wOM4HFa00ornlsjelGMU6ktlt6lGRXFuJJVkQbNsUzKVTB4OW%2Fi5GRuAH0BqGVYYpIracYaVUkdyrokakgZ%2BRgCBnAPfH0J7JpGO7dyGGGB6EelZFzoK%2BVjT5EiXJb7NMu%2BLJ7qOqnGeQQT69c1DExektDaGITeuhivHfRXjW6%2BW%2B7KS7gFWJU5O7j5VUc8cEgDDZrR0zT3u45Lq3kezt5CdkrRhpbg%2FwB9ycnHovQD1qS30CSQldQMa2%2BQTHEzM0uDkbmYkkA8gZwPTNbbHdjgAAYAHYVnUrrRRJq1tLROb1DTZ7ZhN5abgCEmjQmLJ4%2BeMcD6qO44bkikjKFMcYaYgho3eUSb8jnGM5wPQc4xjBOOwzwR1BGCD3qu1lZmfzzbJ5uSd2O56mtI4mytJChiXa0jF0jQY3CX18zOpYsluygZ5ypbHPHpk%2FzrfJLMSTk0OSzEnk03rXPOpKbuzGdSVR3kBPFNNOPSmk81BBJCT5oNeYA5sdP%2FAOvb%2FwBmavTozh8%2BgrzEcWOnDt9mH%2FoTV6mA3l8v1O3AfxGSxfeTH94V6FqLohcszcMAyZwOeM%2B9eew%2FfT%2FeFeiaoGDLsCneV3McAqe3ua9%2FD9TmzjeHz%2FQ72L%2FVJ%2Fuin01OI1%2Bgp1dR4QUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAV5hq2pyw%2BLNSiaNXEbZjboUOP1616fXk2v4Hi%2FUPUmuevFSjqell0VKpJPsZl7J50ry7BHu%2FgXoKoy1cnzzVKU5%2Btcb0PqKeiRNY%2FcjHrf23%2FoRr0KX%2FWmvPLHIWL%2FAK%2F7b%2F0I16HN%2FrT9a8fHfEvn%2Bh5WO%2FjfIbS02ndq4TiGSQwzMjTQpKYzuTeobafUZ705mZmLMSSaKTrUyvYTENHaqV7Pex3US2kLtAg%2F0hgoO4twuM8%2FKRk47EZp1re%2BbdQpKJfLkgXBMDKPNyd2Tjjt14qXTfLcLot0YNZAutb%2FAHkHlO00gkNvKIgFGZAF3Z4DKm888MNvepLW5vViW6vHuPKMwSSJoRmNfKzxtXJ%2FeHGeegpqi1rdC5kamOKY2fSsxLjWY8yyxtKNoVYdo5fylPQKCB5hYE7iO2PSazuLsyC3vll8wRgbzFhXcFgzblG0ZAU4z34q5U2le6BO5bNJmlJpufzrMsUnimk8ijoOtIe1AD1JG4%2BimvMx%2FwAeOnj0tR%2F6E1el5wjn%2FYP8q8z%2FAOXSw%2F69V%2Fma9XAby%2Frud2B%2FiMlg%2FwBbH%2FvD%2BdeiX7h50Eb7SrAOnTcQepx16153BzLEP9sfzr0DUJs3IiUojhhgiLLEdeWJwPyr38P1OTOPih8%2F0PQx0FLRRXUeGFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAJXk%2FiH%2FAJGy9%2F3mr1mvI%2FEDA%2BLL72dv51jW%2BE9LLf4r9DMuOlUpOtXbjpVGQ1ws%2Bpp7E9h0g%2F7CFt%2F6Ea9Dl%2F1pFee2H%2FLD%2FsIW3%2FoRr0GX%2FWmvHx3xI8rHfxvkNFOHIptKDjmuA4SD7TI7lorfzLZX2PNvAIx1YDuoPB57Glju7aWPzI5cxnbglSPvHC8Ed6jk09JUeJp5hA%2B4iJSAFLZyc9T1J54GaJ7FLiV3aZ1VzkxqBgHZsB9eByB61bUGW%2BQUX9oYy6zZVccBGycgkEDGSCAenoaF1K2d3jMu3awUMQdr5APB6fxCkeyU3IuYpXhlC7AVAOEwBgZ6dOvufWmXFhvtDDE5DnzAHY%2FcLnJf3I7Cs3GmNKBPJdRxwvJuLhX8vavJZ842j3z%2BFIbtowxvImt2XpzvDjrkY9O%2FpSPaxm2igiZovIIaJ%2BpDDufXOTn6mmtZszBzdS%2BYVZZH45VsZCj%2BH7o6fr1qIqBK5R5vrUSGI3KhgOSc7RxuPzdOhz1qD%2B1LZmddzKkbbWZlYHPy8bcZ6so%2FGiXTLaW3SDc6LGzMmOzMQc%2B%2BMYA9KUWSC4Fw8ryS7t7McDJ69Pb5f%2B%2BRWtqaKXINXUbOQMySsduOPKYE5zjAxk9G6dMGoZtWs4YndWeUom4BEOG%2BUMADjGcEGnSaXbSBAWcGNVRSQG4AI6EYz8x59aH062eMR%2FOFBLDB7kj%2FAOJA%2BmRTXs79Rr2fmWTkDPc9qQnkc0p55pp4NZGY5j%2B7k%2F3G%2FlXmp%2F49rH0%2BzL%2FM16S5%2Fcykf882%2FlXmrf8AHvZf9eyf1r1sB9o7sB%2FEZLb%2FAOui%2FwB8fzr0W9uLhZQiIREHAZ9uM%2B2a87t%2BZ4f%2Bui%2Fzr0LUIg067bV35XLs%2BI%2Ble9Q6nJm%2FxQ%2Bf6HoVFFFdR4YUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAV4x4hklj8Z35I%2BTznA9zmvZ68c8Q%2F8jben0nesa3wnp5ar1Xr0M55jIzKy7SP1qs%2FWrc5zn%2BdUnrhlufT0k1Gzdye0ljt4op5mCQx39uzueigEkk%2FhXZN4k8PSOSut2fPrKB%2FOuJt725sw4tpTGHxvGAQ2OnB%2Bpp51S7Iywgb6wIf6VxV8Oqru%2Fz%2FAOAc%2BIwkqs%2BZM7ZNb0V%2BV1ixP0nX%2FGpl1HTXHy6naN9J1%2FxrgTqDHlrOxb62qf4UxrqJvvaXpzf9u4H8q5%2FqSOZ5fU7o9FW4tG4W8tz9JV%2FxpwaI9J4j9HFebGW0J50bTj%2F2yP8AjTc2HfQ9P%2F74f%2F4qj6j5%2Fl%2FmS8vq9z03aGbAdD9GFKYX6V5gRp3fQrD8A%2F8A8VTSml%2F9AGy%2FAv8A%2FFVLwHm%2FuX%2BYf2fVPUfJYdx%2BJoMR9R%2BdeWlNM%2F6ANj%2BO%2FwD%2BKp8UVjK6xQeHrJ5G%2B6iiQk%2FT5qlZfbeX4L%2FMX1CsemMoH3nQfVhUbvEOs8Q%2F4GK85jtbedPMi8O2LJjO4hwO47t7H8qVrWONY2Ph7TwJf9XhWO%2F6fN7Gm8Ctub8v8w%2Bo1L7o9Aa5tV5a8tx9ZV%2FxqFtR01fvalaD6zL%2FAI1w0Vq0zbYtA08NtVhuTbkMMrjc3OQCfwpgLhJZI9I03ZCcOywKQD7c8%2FhmksFH%2Bb8h%2FUp%2FzI7Ztb0RPvazYj63C%2F41E%2FiXw%2Bp51qzP0kB%2FlXHrc3hG6PTLYLt35WyXG3%2B906cdakhn1SZd8TWsa4zzHGp255PToKt4KC3f4r%2FIbwMlvJHSzeLvDiwygamrkowASNzk4%2Blcc6ssFkGG0%2FZk4P41ekuNaiKBNS3SMxUJE23bgZySQABgg9eM81Tu%2FtJuybyV5ZyAS7ncSMdM%2B3SuvD0o0%2Fhe%2Fn%2FwEdGGw%2FspN3vcfbEfaIieAJFJPoM12mp6lpj3cAa6SZnmUIkTs4JHAx0A%2FOuKh6jipYYw2s6bvlDYuFwo5716VKTRzY%2BjGpaUulz6AooortPmAooooAKKKKACiiigAooooAKKKKACiiigBK8f8R8eJb8%2Bk7%2Fzr2CvHPE80UfiS%2FWRghM7YLfWsayvE9LLZKNV3dtDNlfcvvVVjmpWKsuVkRs9g3WotjnnFcLPqqdmtGMPApM8c04q2OlRkNzxUHQkwBoNIAfSl60CsB60UUnNMYUGg5pKAFp9vO1tcLPHkOoO0g4IJBGc%2FjTKShq%2BjE1dWZoNqsckXlyWuAQN2zaQWyxJAZTjJc9OlUvtDK1oyrhrQYBz9%2F5i34dcUw001KhFEqnFbIuzas8s0MhgVRBK0iqG6qfur%2FwEZAPvVeG9aDT5rJUysxOW3YHIxyO%2BMcelV2amkn04pezha1hezilZIvNqzNbtA1uvzLtLhyCDgAkegIUcfX1qKPUmgjVEt4nI2ks4PO08dDyPY1VpvOafs4bWF7KNrWLSXzC6juJIldU3fugcBg2cgk59e%2BabPcPdXDTuAC38I6CoMH0NPQE8AdKpRSdyeRJ3SLEJwQelX9KgjfWbJtvIuFPPPesxW7F1X6mtbQJo5NbsIkYMxuEGR061vBO55%2BLnBQd2j3Siiiu8%2BSCiiigAooooAKKKKACiiigAooooAKKKKACvEvEqs3izUI7yTMJmkIwORzwPyr22vGfiHZXOmeIZ7mWGQW9w2%2BOcL8pJ6jPqKiaujWk7SOYuIbeJlaC4IZyGTP8ACf8ACq89nNJfNKW2hh1VuaqXEvmjG9Tjp2xSC8mVgz4cLyMVy2ktUdilBvUlkgu2Y7Jplx3DkCphFfAACaQMn3lLcH3qjHeyxO77ciQYxn7tTpqbuUaQMNoxkdPrSlzW2LjOz0k%2FvJrg30MiEXTKjHkEAkVZDypKkk1xi3xhhtGST6cVUe8RpDI1wrMcDDZH40w3KyHazKwVsk54%2FCs91Zo2Vaotpv7ye%2Fv5FkH9nNvjHDMycZ%2Bh5qudR1IAHEfIz%2Fq6k%2B0hpjIql4%2BnAxn8D1oR5pIWZUTZnCjgMPwqlyxVmg9viHtN%2FeLFqF48as8alixG0J1pF1SUyFcR49SpFTLqJjt96RgsAFBcYAPcikmtWjtZprh4ZiwGdg%2BbkjoanmjfXQr6xXS%2BN%2FeNW8nMQkk8tST90A5A%2FOiXUtir5eCSOcqeD6dai%2BwWkyLGkspuJOAGPAH1NPMtrpkkcNoBM20hi65y1NOLew3iq9vjZC%2Bq3iYUpGWJGAFPSkTUr2aTYgiLE4A24%2BvU06S9MojYIBKHO%2FjHFNknEhYlUjlB%2FwBWAMBfrWvudjL6ziH9t%2FeSW13cTj5pEHvtxSLcXWxTJKoLE9FHSqs18fNXco6YwFqWa9EqptwPXgcUuVJg8TWa%2BN%2FeE97JGyLDcFy3LfL90%2BlOLy%2BQXknYDHUHBzVV72aZg0ixjsdlRz3jSuoCnCjHuTVWu0rGftqlm3N%2FezQsit9DGsk8kcm4KwDcmrd%2FaIkotWVlgDAnv27%2FAI4rIsLryWd5kYuRgYq7NqJnRgxZmLA7vYdqxlGXtNNhKacfeepLFZ3DO%2FyxoIz3OMjt%2Blamks1rqNhNZOs0qzAsgHT0x684rHju5QGygDP1JbpXSeCIkm8T6fDFukl81WO0cKByT%2BQrohfqYVOW2h7vRRRXScYUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUySOOaNo5UWRGGGVhkEe4p9FAHK6p8NfCmqs0j6aLaVv47VzHj%2FgI%2BX9K4bxJ8ILrTbRrvw%2FPJqWw%2FPaT7VkK9yrDAJ9iB%2BfB9jpKlxTLU5I%2BYbrQ9ct4muJfDuq20KD53ltXCp7k4ql5kkEgimtZInOMqSwbkZGQTxkcj1FfVlMlijmTZLGsi5B2sMjI6VPIV7Xuj5Tj1O3DHMJkH93f0%2FMUrX1u2AbWXI7h%2Bv6V9QXeiaTfytLeaZZ3EjrsZ5YFZiuMYyRnGKxpfhv4OmSJG0G2UQyF12ZXJ9Dg%2FMOOhyKOQPaLsfOhvEQgwq3zdRJyPwpRdIOZXc8c%2Fuxj%2BYr6DuPhb4MuBL%2FxJljaXkvHNIpU%2FwCz82B%2BAqCH4ReDIWQnTpZNhyRJcyEN9RmlyMfPHseDi4ttgG9lzzjyv%2FsqSK5sg%2F7y4kVe5WJjj8Nwr264%2BDXh155J7S71GzZjlFjmVkj9gGUnH1NNPwc0cjA1jVRu%2FwBblojv%2FwDIfFHIw50eMNPpQj3fa7gt2DQnBHrnd%2FSg3OmBQPtT7vRoW4%2FWvZv%2BFMaEbhmk1LU3g2%2FJF5iDY2OudvryB6%2Bo4pi%2FBfSSGkl1nUnuGP8ArP3QXH%2B7sP50cjFzo8eefR2QbLuTd%2FETEQPw5pQNI2ApezMx7NBge%2BCW5r2iP4OeGUZMz6i6L99GmXEh9SQoI%2F4CQKjX4M6EEdW1TVWyMRnzI%2F3Yznj5KOVj54njRbS48ZmuGJ6jylA%2FnSGfS0OJPtbE84jjTP617bb%2FAAg8NxLHHNcajcwoD%2B5lnAVmP8R2qDnp3xx0qc%2FCjwsYyuy93k%2F6z7ZJux%2Fd69KFCQc8Twd7nSTgRm%2BHPR1T%2BlI1%2FpqjatpOzerzY5%2BgFe%2BL8KPBY3b9JaTcAMvdSkjHp83FaUPgPwlb7DH4d07KAAFrdWPHTr1Pv1p8gudHzZFeRXEqw29vLJI5wkabmZj6Ad67XR%2FhZ4s1aBZ5Le20yNsEC8dvMx%2FuqDj6HBr3a2srWyTZaW0Nuv8AdijCj9Knp8iF7RnmGl%2FBW0iKvqmsz3BHJjto1iX8SdxI%2FKu50Twxo3hyMppdkkBYYaQku7fVmJOPbpWrS1SSRDk3uFFFFMQUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFAH%2F%2F2Q%3D%3D&hash=9982e7bcbfbfd04a84335f28d787b705)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on February 03, 2019, 12:29:08 PM
guess I'm gonna have to order online and pay shipping

nothing close to NW Iowa
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 03, 2019, 12:42:42 PM
I get it through Amazon Prime.


https://smile.amazon.com/Chile-Crunch-Salsa-Mexican-Condiment-Delicious-Salsa-Bold/dp/B00KQPPUFO/ref=smi_www_rco2_go_smi_b5171374337?_encoding=UTF8&hvadid=%7Bcreative%7D&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=%7Bdevicemodel%7D&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvnetw=o&hvpone=&hvpos=%7Badposition%7D&hvptwo=&hvqmt=e&hvrand=%7Brandom%7D&hvtargid=pla-4584482455480945&ie=UTF8&linkCode=df0&tag=bingshoppinga-20&th=1
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on February 03, 2019, 07:56:36 PM

(https://i.ibb.co/54Lvb8c/20190203-181404.jpg) (https://ibb.co/54Lvb8c)

roll a die 2 sided (https://freeonlinedice.com/)
Good heat w the chili crunch
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on February 09, 2019, 12:34:43 PM
in the smoker today are two racks of baby back ribs, two racks of beef short ribs, and some slab cut dino beef ribs. fix'ns will be cowboy bean (baked beans w/both ground chuck, ground venison, and smoked sausage sliced in it, seasoned obviously)- quartered 'taters seasoned and baked in butter in the smokers oven- which makes the outside crispy and the inside very soft- and some rye marbled sourdough bread from the bakery (i'd never attempt such a thing on my own) ... 

stand by for pics later- got the smoker to temp around 10am and dropped in the goodies about 1130 or so. it'll be six or so tonight- except for the short ribs- they'll be a snack around game time (4pm).  
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on February 10, 2019, 02:31:30 PM
I've been using the Instapot for beans lately. Beans, onion, garlic, seasonings, and some sort of pork - an hour cooking and some great eats. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on February 10, 2019, 02:49:55 PM
I've been using the Instapot for beans lately. Beans, onion, garlic, seasonings, and some sort of pork - an hour cooking and some great eats.
Sounds good... I assume this is cooked under pressure, not as a slow cooker, right? Beans straight from raw?
And when you say "some sort of pork", are you talking like a bacon or pancetta as flavoring/fat, or are you talking about some big piece of pork that becomes its own part of the dish?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on February 11, 2019, 07:00:52 AM
Sounds good... I assume this is cooked under pressure, not as a slow cooker, right? Beans straight from raw?
And when you say "some sort of pork", are you talking like a bacon or pancetta as flavoring/fat, or are you talking about some big piece of pork that becomes its own part of the dish?
Yes, dry beans straight into the instant pot with no soaking.  And both, really, I used some smoke sausage, which more or less disintegrates after that long, so on another batch I cooked the beans then put the sausage in for five minutes, which flavored the dish without destroying it.  Yesterday I used a package of smokes ham hocks which was on sale at Kroger.  I've just been using water for the liquid.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on February 20, 2019, 09:12:16 PM
Does anyone make chili sauce? Been perusing various recipes and think I want to give it a go.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on February 21, 2019, 08:09:54 PM
Does anyone make chili sauce? Been perusing various recipes and think I want to give it a go.
Are you talking about stuff like Heinz chili sauce? 

if so, what do you use it for?  The only thing I've ever used it for is this one old recipe for an appetizer that uses lil smokies or meatballs simmered in a sauce that includes that Heinz chili sauce, some currant jelly, lemon juice, a couple tablespoons of yellow mustard, and pineapples.


Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on February 21, 2019, 11:34:36 PM
I'll admit, I don't think I've ever used Heinz Chili Sauce for anything but a sauce for slow cooked meatballs or smokies.  We must have similar recipes.  
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on February 22, 2019, 08:42:31 AM
Yup, I've seen variations of it over the years, from several different regions across the country.  Mine is a recipe that my mom used a lot back in the 70s/80s when entertaining at cocktail parties.  
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on February 22, 2019, 09:43:37 AM
Are you talking about stuff like Heinz chili sauce?

if so, what do you use it for?  The only thing I've ever used it for is this one old recipe for an appetizer that uses lil smokies or meatballs simmered in a sauce that includes that Heinz chili sauce, some currant jelly, lemon juice, a couple tablespoons of yellow mustard, and pineapples.



I'm not sure I've ever had Heinz chili sauce, but I suppose that qualifies.  Sriracha, New Mexico green or red, the stuff covering the meat in Texas chili, basically any sauce made primarily with chili peppers.  
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 22, 2019, 09:58:23 AM
I've used that sauce as an ingredient for cocktail sauce. It has a sweetness to it that balances the horseradish and cayenne heat. I can't imagine using it solo though.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on February 22, 2019, 10:22:24 AM
I've used that sauce as an ingredient for cocktail sauce. It has a sweetness to it that balances the horseradish and cayenne heat. I can't imagine using it solo though.
I do not like the sweeter versions.  I hate the Rooster sriracha that was everywhere for a while.  But ones that are more vinegary or garlicky, I'm a fan. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on February 22, 2019, 10:24:43 AM
I'm not sure I've ever had Heinz chili sauce, but I suppose that qualifies.  Sriracha, New Mexico green or red, the stuff covering the meat in Texas chili, basically any sauce made primarily with chili peppers.  
Ah, well in that case, for sure.  I make sauces from dried chile peppers all the time.  Texas Red chili, of course.  And also the enchilada gravy I make from scratch for my enchiladas.  
Both basically start off by reconstituting the dried chile peppers.  And then adding the appropriate spices/fats/meats to make either the gravy or the chili.
The Heinz chili sauce is something else entirely, way more tomato-y. Like badge said, it's more like a base for shrimp cocktail sauce (I've never used it that way but that's a great idea, my cocktail sauce starts off with ketchup).  
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 22, 2019, 11:35:33 AM
Yeah, I use the chili sauce in place of the ketchup for my cocktail sauce. That's the only thing I use that stuff for, to be honest, but I think my Ma used to use it to make a crab dip. The one that has the crab meat over cream cheese, covered by the sauce. I'm sure many here have had this thing. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on February 22, 2019, 11:44:14 AM
Ah, well in that case, for sure.  I make sauces from dried chile peppers all the time.  Texas Red chili, of course.  And also the enchilada gravy I make from scratch for my enchiladas.  
Both basically start off by reconstituting the dried chile peppers.  And then adding the appropriate spices/fats/meats to make either the gravy or the chili.
The Heinz chili sauce is something else entirely, way more tomato-y. Like badge said, it's more like a base for shrimp cocktail sauce (I've never used it that way but that's a great idea, my cocktail sauce starts off with ketchup).  
I figure I'll be starting with dry chili peppers, garlic, and vinegar.  Want something a little punchier and thicker, that could be used as a condiment.

I looked up Heinz chili sauce and see it doesn't appear to actually contain chili peppers, so I suppose it is a bad example.  It might be a historical thing, because my uncle made all sorts of canned jellies and sauces and made a chili sauce that I'm pretty sure also contained no chili peppers.  Anyways, not what I'm going for.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 22, 2019, 11:52:10 AM
(https://www.cfb51.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.coloradohomesmag.com%2FChileCrunch.jpg&hash=5d8a39545f4058f735c0e25f11f94835)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on February 22, 2019, 11:58:30 AM
(https://www.cfb51.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.coloradohomesmag.com%2FChileCrunch.jpg&hash=5d8a39545f4058f735c0e25f11f94835)

Never had it - any good?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 22, 2019, 12:15:14 PM
It's fantastic. I was thinking I should get another jar soon, since I'm almost out, but I might actually try to make my own this weekend. I have the stuff to do it, I think.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on February 22, 2019, 12:53:46 PM
It's fantastic. I was thinking I should get another jar soon, since I'm almost out, but I might actually try to make my own this weekend. I have the stuff to do it, I think.
What is the source of the "crunch"?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 22, 2019, 02:49:14 PM
The crisp chilis, shallots and garlic.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on February 22, 2019, 08:36:04 PM
I ordered the 3-pack
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 22, 2019, 09:34:11 PM
I ordered the 3-pack
Hopefully through our Amazon link. :)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on February 22, 2019, 09:37:00 PM
Yes, I ordered the 3 pack, and believe that was my recc. when I told you fools about the Chili Crunch.  It is addictive stuff.

I guess Mom would've used Heinz Chili sauce for cocktail sauce,  I just either get, or buy a bottle St. Elmo's cocktail sauce.  You can't top it, so why try.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on February 22, 2019, 09:37:39 PM
I figure I'll be starting with dry chili peppers, garlic, and vinegar.  Want something a little punchier and thicker, that could be used as a condiment.

I looked up Heinz chili sauce and see it doesn't appear to actually contain chili peppers, so I suppose it is a bad example.  It might be a historical thing, because my uncle made all sorts of canned jellies and sauces and made a chili sauce that I'm pretty sure also contained no chili peppers.  Anyways, not what I'm going for.
With the chiles, garlic, and vinegar, sounds like you're going more toward the Asian-style chili garlic paste?  Like Huy Fong and others make?  I've never done that, but the recipes I found call for fresh red chile peppers, not dried, just to be clear.  Reconstituted dried chile peppers could also be used to make such a sauce, but it wouldn't be exactly the same.
Here's a recipe: https://www.chowhound.com/recipes/chile-garlic-sauce-31375
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 22, 2019, 09:58:26 PM
Yes, I ordered the 3 pack, and believe that was my recc. when I told you fools about the Chili Crunch.  It is addictive stuff.

I guess Mom would've used Heinz Chili sauce for cocktail sauce,  I just either get, or buy a bottle St. Elmo's cocktail sauce.  You can't top it, so why try.
I've got that down. Would you like the recipe?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on February 23, 2019, 12:06:28 AM
I love making my own stuff , sure.   But there s not much of a secret.  Horseradish has got to be fresh and you won't get much shelf life out of homemade once you get past a weekend.  I use a bottle or buy a pint.  St. Elmos is two blocks from my office.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on February 23, 2019, 08:04:38 AM
With the chiles, garlic, and vinegar, sounds like you're going more toward the Asian-style chili garlic paste?  Like Huy Fong and others make?  I've never done that, but the recipes I found call for fresh red chile peppers, not dried, just to be clear.  Reconstituted dried chile peppers could also be used to make such a sauce, but it wouldn't be exactly the same.
Here's a recipe: https://www.chowhound.com/recipes/chile-garlic-sauce-31375

Yes, something along those lines  I would probably use dried, though, simply for the more and different flavors I can get out of those.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 23, 2019, 08:30:00 AM
I love making my own stuff , sure.   But there s not much of a secret.  Horseradish has got to be fresh and you won't get much shelf life out of homemade once you get past a weekend.  I use a bottle or buy a pint.  St. Elmos is two blocks from my office.
Yep, nothing like fresh horseradish for sure. I think I'll get some today, since I'm doing shrimp cocktail tonight anyway. Thanks for the inspiration!!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on February 23, 2019, 08:41:53 AM
Hopefully through our Amazon link. :)
of course
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on February 25, 2019, 06:59:50 PM
Yes, something along those lines  I would probably use dried, though, simply for the more and different flavors I can get out of those.
Yes it's probably easier to get a variety of dried, than a variety of fresh.  But it's definitely not going to taste identical, just keep that in mind.
Before you reconstitute, always be sure to toast in a hot, dry skillet, or in an oven around 225, for a minute or two-- just when you can start to smell them.  That will bring out the oils once again, and then you can steep them in the hot water until they're rehydrated.

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on February 26, 2019, 01:20:43 PM
Yes it's probably easier to get a variety of dried, than a variety of fresh.  But it's definitely not going to taste identical, just keep that in mind.
Before you reconstitute, always be sure to toast in a hot, dry skillet, or in an oven around 225, for a minute or two-- just when you can start to smell them.  That will bring out the oils once again, and then you can steep them in the hot water until they're rehydrated.


Serious eats recommends roasting in the oven or microwaving depending on the bulk.  For this quantity I'll probably roast them.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 26, 2019, 08:28:43 PM
I like the pan method better, because you can start to smell them - and that means they are ready for the water. Much more control that way. Bayless does this too, and well, he's Bayless, and we're not. So..



I did make the cocktail sauce this past weekend, for my shrimp. I used about 1/2 horseradish to 1/2 Thai chili garlic paste. A little Worcestershire and a little lemon juice, and that was it. Yeah, it was spicy, but the shrimp were big and stood up just fine.



As for the shrimp, I do not boil them - ever. I roast them in the oven at 400 for about 8-10 minutes. A little oil spray and salt and pepper. They come out so much better this way, and I serve them warmish, not cold.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 26, 2019, 08:43:41 PM
If you don't have this, get it. Oh, and make sure to search for it on Amazon through OUR site please.


(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71zYm6lrfcL._SX679_.jpg)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on February 26, 2019, 10:47:13 PM
You know badge, people were making Mexican food long before Bayless did.  Like, my dad.  And his mom.  And her mom. :)

Anyway, I typically use the oven because I'm typically doing a lot of them. But if it's a small batch I'll use the skillet because it generates less heat/uses less fuel.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 27, 2019, 01:28:15 PM
How many Michelin STARZ does your grandma have?


:wee_hee:



Anyway, the guy spent 7-8 years straight in Mexico doing research and experimenting with the food there. He's really good. If you ever get up here, be sure to go. Unless you just don't like him because he's a Sooner...
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on February 27, 2019, 02:07:19 PM
well, that's plenty of reason right there
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on February 27, 2019, 02:07:45 PM
If you don't have this, get it. Oh, and make sure to search for it on Amazon through OUR site please.


(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71zYm6lrfcL._SX679_.jpg)
for spraying olive oil?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 27, 2019, 02:12:02 PM
I have one for olive and one for canola.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on February 27, 2019, 02:28:22 PM
How many Michelin STARZ does your grandma have?


:wee_hee:



Anyway, the guy spent 7-8 years straight in Mexico doing research and experimenting with the food there. He's really good. If you ever get up here, be sure to go. Unless you just don't like him because he's a Sooner...
I don't care about him one way or the other.  And if you needed Michelin stars to make good Mexican food, then the hundreds of delicious restaurants I've been to in Mexico and the US apparently don't make good Mexican food.
I really don't know anything about him other than what you've occasionally mentioned.  From those statements, it sounds like he might actually be getting a couple of things correct, which is a good thing. More power to him.  I'll continue to eat delicious Mexican and Tex-Mex sans Michelin stars.  That's my cross to bear, I suppose. :)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on February 27, 2019, 02:47:09 PM
Charley didn't mention Michelin stars while at Ojos Locos
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 27, 2019, 05:24:36 PM
I don't care about him one way or the other.  And if you needed Michelin stars to make good Mexican food, then the hundreds of delicious restaurants I've been to in Mexico and the US apparently don't make good Mexican food.
I really don't know anything about him other than what you've occasionally mentioned.  From those statements, it sounds like he might actually be getting a couple of things correct, which is a good thing. More power to him.  I'll continue to eat delicious Mexican and Tex-Mex sans Michelin stars.  That's my cross to bear, I suppose. :)
So, you really don't like Sooners, eh?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on February 27, 2019, 08:00:09 PM
How many Michelin STARZ does your grandma have?


:wee_hee:



Anyway, the guy spent 7-8 years straight in Mexico doing research and experimenting with the food there. He's really good. If you ever get up here, be sure to go. Unless you just don't like him because he's a Sooner...
Badge, how does this menu compare to his Chicago joints? https://www.redorestaurant.com/
Wife and I have been talking about checking that place out for a while, just never have made it over there.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on February 28, 2019, 02:06:43 PM
So, you really don't like Sooners, eh?
Like every good Longhorn fan, I loathe Sooners.
But I quite honestly had no idea he was a Sooner until you mentioned it.  Like I said, I don't know anything about him, other than what you've mentioned about him on the message board forums.  Nobody  down here knows anything about him (other than he's related to Skip Bayless, I suppose).
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on February 28, 2019, 02:12:58 PM
One of these days I will conquer the mole sauce and probably use his recipes.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on February 28, 2019, 02:15:30 PM
Going to start making some burger grind this weekend. Brisket point and chuck roast mix. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 28, 2019, 02:18:29 PM
Badge, how does this menu compare to his Chicago joints? https://www.redorestaurant.com/
Wife and I have been talking about checking that place out for a while, just never have made it over there.
It looks like a combination of a lot of his places here, to be honest. The happy hour menu looks like something from Xoco, while the dinner menu has elements mostly from Frontera, with a touch of Topolo.

The bar menu looks pretty good, even without many mezcal options. Maybe they could make you a Topolo margarita by request??

I'd go for happy hour and take it from there.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on February 28, 2019, 02:18:33 PM
Going to start making some burger grind this weekend. Brisket point and chuck roast mix.
What kind of grinder do you have?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 28, 2019, 02:19:25 PM
One of these days I will conquer the mole sauce and probably use his recipes.
The mole at Topolo has 28 ingredients. It will be an all-day deal for sure. But wow, is it good.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 28, 2019, 02:22:34 PM
What kind of grinder do you have?
You didn't ask me, but I have a Warner. Does the job. If I had the Kitchenaid mixer at the time, I'd have probably opted for the attachment and left it at that. The plain old meat grinder us a unitasker, which kitchens should not have. Oh well. There's nothing else it can do but grind meat/sausage. I keep it up high on the top shelf.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 28, 2019, 02:24:16 PM
Going to start making some burger grind this weekend. Brisket point and chuck roast mix.
Lately I've been using brisket, short ribs and whatever trimmings I get off of tenderloins. Be curious to see how yours comes out. Should be enough fat, I'd think.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on February 28, 2019, 02:25:51 PM
Like every good Longhorn fan, I loathe Sooners.
But I quite honestly had no idea he was a Sooner until you mentioned it.  Like I said, I don't know anything about him, other than what you've mentioned about him on the message board forums.  Nobody  down here knows anything about him (other than he's related to Skip Bayless, I suppose).
Not sure how one brother can be such a cool cat and the other a complete tool. But, that's them.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on March 01, 2019, 06:50:14 PM
What kind of grinder do you have?
Kitchenaid attachment.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on March 01, 2019, 06:51:59 PM
My wife has been wanting a meat grinder, and I have the KitchenAid so I'll probably go for that.  Kenji from Serious Eats recs keeping it in the freezer - have you done that?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on March 01, 2019, 08:19:30 PM
smeared a couple teaspoons of the chile crunch on a boneless skinless chicken breast and baked it in the oven at 375

nice!

not much heat, but good flavor
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on March 01, 2019, 08:46:08 PM
My wife has been wanting a meat grinder, and I have the KitchenAid so I'll probably go for that.  Kenji from Serious Eats recs keeping it in the freezer - have you done that?
It's not about keeping it in the freezer. It's about putting it in there before you use it. Same with the meat. Put the meat in the freezer a little while to get it VERY cold (but not frozen or it won't grind). The idea being that heat of the grind will partially melt the fat in the meat which you want to keep intact. So the colder that everything is (without being frozen solid), the better.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on March 01, 2019, 08:50:18 PM
My wife has been wanting a meat grinder, and I have the KitchenAid so I'll probably go for that.  Kenji from Serious Eats recs keeping it in the freezer - have you done that?
YES!!!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on March 01, 2019, 08:50:47 PM
Lately I've been using brisket, short ribs and whatever trimmings I get off of tenderloins. Be curious to see how yours comes out. Should be enough fat, I'd think.
Yeah, the big thing is that the Costco ground beef is 88% lean, and that's just not right for burgers. I figure a brisket/chuck mix will be closer to 70/30. I feel like the cost of short rib and tenderloin is just too rich for a burger blend.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on March 01, 2019, 08:51:23 PM
It's not about keeping it in the freezer. It's about putting it in there before you use it. Same with the meat. Put the meat in the freezer a little while to get it VERY cold (but not frozen or it won't grind). The idea being that heat of the grind will partially melt the fat in the meat which you want to keep intact. So the colder that everything is (without being frozen solid), the better.

Ed Zachary.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on March 01, 2019, 08:54:00 PM
Yeah, the big thing is that the Costco ground beef is 88% lean, and that's just not right for burgers. I figure a brisket/chuck mix will be closer to 70/30. I feel like the cost of short rib and tenderloin is just too rich for a burger blend.
I'm thinking I get 75/25 on mine. I'm not grinding tenderloin - just the trimmings. I like to buy tenderloin, so I can control what my filet migon is.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on March 02, 2019, 08:01:34 AM
It's not about keeping it in the freezer. It's about putting it in there before you use it. Same with the meat. Put the meat in the freezer a little while to get it VERY cold (but not frozen or it won't grind). The idea being that heat of the grind will partially melt the fat in the meat which you want to keep intact. So the colder that everything is (without being frozen solid), the better.

Yeah, I know the idea.  My issue is I don't have a dedicated freezer and the fridge unit is constantly filled, so not much space for appliances. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on March 02, 2019, 08:27:02 AM
I would just set it on the back porch or even in the attached garage this morning

4 above this morning

3 of my good friends went together and bought a semi commercial grinder - it's accessible to me at any time.  I should make more of this opportunity
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on March 13, 2019, 08:33:42 AM
Investing in a good chest-type deep freezer unit is a great idea, if you have the space.  Does a much better job at keeping things like... oh... sides of beef and such. :)

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on March 13, 2019, 10:08:29 AM
I bought an old chest freezer back in 89 when I bought my house.  It was old then.  Got it for $25, the older couple just wanted it out of their basement.  Luckily I have a walk-in basement.

It's still humming along.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on March 13, 2019, 12:13:25 PM
I had a chest freezer when the boys were still home. We no longer needed it, so I gave it to one of them.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 13, 2019, 12:18:18 PM
i just got, for free, a chest freezer made for tubs of ice cream in retail... happened to be right place right time thing.  it's likely four feet long, three high, and with a clear plastic lid likely at a 25* angle..... perfect for storing and organizing big cuts of beef or pork.   
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on March 13, 2019, 01:17:18 PM
I've had issues with chest freezers and fridges because I use them in an unintended way. For fridges, I use them for fermenting beer with an external temperature controller. It causes a lot of issues because it cycles the compressor too much. I used to use a chest freezer as my kegerator, but it ran into the same problem because I had to modify it to run at 40 degrees instead of sub-zero temps. And it was coupled with the fact that it was in a roasting hot garage during the summer rather than in an environmentally controlled house. 

So I've gone through a few. I now use a convertible fridge/freezer for the kegerator that is DESIGNED to run at fridge temps, and I bought that new instead of from Craigslist, so I expect that to last a while. I still use a fridge in the garage for fermenting, but those are cheap off craigslist until they die.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on March 13, 2019, 01:25:18 PM
hysteresis is the issue with purpose built chest freezers... for them to work properly, they've gotta be full.  otherwise the hysteresis/temperature-delta-to-thermostat-trigger-on/off relationship causes wild fluctuations.... so.... keep it full.  good enough reason as any, huh? 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on March 13, 2019, 01:45:31 PM
I've had issues with chest freezers and fridges because I use them in an unintended way. For fridges, I use them for fermenting beer with an external temperature controller. It causes a lot of issues because it cycles the compressor too much. I used to use a chest freezer as my kegerator, but it ran into the same problem because I had to modify it to run at 40 degrees instead of sub-zero temps. And it was coupled with the fact that it was in a roasting hot garage during the summer rather than in an environmentally controlled house.

So I've gone through a few. I now use a convertible fridge/freezer for the kegerator that is DESIGNED to run at fridge temps, and I bought that new instead of from Craigslist, so I expect that to last a while. I still use a fridge in the garage for fermenting, but those are cheap off craigslist until they die.
Get a Sub Zero. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on March 13, 2019, 02:17:54 PM
or buy one that is older than you are

those things just run
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on March 13, 2019, 03:04:14 PM
Get a Sub Zero.
🙄
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on March 13, 2019, 03:56:53 PM
I really like the one I'm using now. Everything keeps longer in that thing.

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on March 13, 2019, 06:40:37 PM
I'm sure they're lovely. But I'm not in the market for a >$5000 refrigerator right now. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on March 13, 2019, 09:12:04 PM
I'm sure they're lovely. But I'm not in the market for a >$5000 refrigerator right now.
Double that quote. They start at around $10K. BUT - they last forever. The one I'm using is a 2006. 
I went through 3, in 10 years. GE, Maytag, and finally Samsung, and even that one was for.. the birds. Repair was in the house at least 4 times in 3 years. Supposedly "high end". Bulljive. Combined, they were $10K, the latter being about $3.5K.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on March 13, 2019, 11:51:05 PM
The built in gigantic fridges are great, but they are quite pricey.   I still keep a freezer chest going for the sides of beef and what not.   As I like to say, I'm Long Beef, so if the power goes, I've got to act quick to hedge.   It's like running a Fund and there's massive redemptions.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on April 02, 2019, 12:43:56 PM
Saw a recipe about "chili crisp" that might be like something mentioned earlier.

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2018/04/homemade-spicy-chili-crisp.html
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on April 07, 2019, 12:30:31 PM
So, I was getting tired of winning my family's annual enchilada cook-off with my brisket enchiladas, and decided to do something different this year.  The solution-- BBQ duck enchiladas with Tex-Mex red chile gravy.

Oh my, they not only kicked the crap out of the rest of my family's entries, and they were not only the best enchiladas I've ever made, but they were the best enchiladas I've ever eaten, any time, any place.  I'm not trying to brag here but... oh well, yes I am. ;)

The BBQ duck was fantastic on its own.  I picked up a fresh 5 lb bird from my nearest Asian grocery, it was way cheaper than all of the white-folks stores.  I just used my standard BBQ rub of salt, pepper, and paprika, and rubbed it inside and out.  I also stuffed the cavity with some onion, crushed garlic cloves, and a quartered blood orange.  I pricked the skin so that as the fat rendered, it would have a place to escape, and then I captured that tasty smoked duck fat goodness in a pan below the bird.  Cooked it at around 275-300 for almost 3 hours, until it hit about 168 in the breast.  Let it rest, then chopped/pulled it to make the filling.

And then I added some of that duck fat back into the chile gravy instead of the normal vegetable oil, and it's the best gravy I've ever made.  Rolled the enchiladas and topped with some simple monterrey jack cheese, and the entire mixture was just unbelievably tasty.  

I highly recommend anyone that enjoys BBQ and enchiladas and duck, try this out. :)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on April 07, 2019, 02:06:46 PM
You did this duck whole, and took it apart later?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on April 07, 2019, 02:54:49 PM
Any chance you'd share the brisket enchilada recipe, @utee94 (https://www.cfb51.com/index.php?action=profile;u=15)  ?

As my wife has a poultry allergy, duck enchiladas sound wonderful but aren't useful to me. But brisket enchiladas sounds delicious too! 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on April 07, 2019, 07:43:02 PM
Damn.  Duck is my favorite protein.   I've wanted to smoke one lately.  Now I will.   Yes to shopping for duck at Asian marts, particularly whole birds.   I still buy a local farms duck breast, and those are white Indiana farmers.  Great use of the fat too.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on April 07, 2019, 07:58:43 PM
duck fat is heavenly
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MaximumSam on April 08, 2019, 11:05:15 AM
I had an enchilada in Paris that was the best I've ever had.  I wanted to ask how they made it but they didn't speak much English.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on April 09, 2019, 08:37:23 AM
You did this duck whole, and took it apart later?
Correct!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on April 09, 2019, 08:40:22 AM
Any chance you'd share the brisket enchilada recipe, @utee94 (https://www.cfb51.com/index.php?action=profile;u=15)  ?

As my wife has a poultry allergy, duck enchiladas sound wonderful but aren't useful to me. But brisket enchiladas sounds delicious too!
Brisket enchiladas are pretty much the same, but I use chopped brisket as the filling.  When I do that, I use a mixture of the lean and fatty cuts, and also make sure to include plenty of bark chopped up into the mix.  I'll also mix in some pork or beef rib if I had any of that leftover from the cook.
Are you asking specifically about the sauce and/or construction, though?  I know it's been posted around here before but I can always re-post it.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on April 09, 2019, 08:42:35 AM
I had an enchilada in Paris that was the best I've ever had.  I wanted to ask how they made it but they didn't speak much English.
I had some really fantastic New Mexican food in Leuven, Belgium.  Their green chili was so good, every bit as good as I've had in Santa Fe.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on April 09, 2019, 09:05:32 AM
that just doesn't seem possible
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on April 09, 2019, 04:22:44 PM
that just doesn't seem possible
I found it shocking, that's for sure.  
On the flipside, the very worst Tex-Mex I ever had was in Nantes, France.  My local field service engineers insisted on taking me since I was from Texas.  They served fajitas extremely rare. And cut them with the grain.  Truly horrifying.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on April 09, 2019, 04:26:51 PM
Are you asking specifically about the sauce and/or construction, though?  I know it's been posted around here before but I can always re-post it.
Yes, would appreciate it. I haven't seen it previously.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on April 09, 2019, 07:22:01 PM
Alright, someone on another message board asked me for the same, so here goes.  I've actually tweaked my gravy over the years, and this is the current method:

Step 1) The dried chiles. It varies a little depending on what I have around, but the basics are always the same, and for this batch I used 5-6 anchos, 5-6 dried New Mexican red chiles, 5-6 Guajillo, and 5-6 chile de arbol.  This is enough dried chile to make a large batch, enough for 2 pans of enchiladas.  Remove stems and seeds on all of them, then toast on a comal (if you're super-cool and have one) or in a hot dry skillet, or a 225 oven (which is what I use because I'm typically processing a bunch of chiles and don't want to wait and I'm also not cool).  Toast them just until fragrant, a couple minutes in an oven, and even less than that on the range top, flipping them to get both sides.  I also toast about a teaspoon of ground comino and 1/2 tsp of Mexican oregano and set them aside.  While you're toasting, heat up a pot of water to near-boiling, and then steep the dried chiles in the hot water for maybe 20 minutes.

Step 2) Char some onion, garlic, and tomato.  I quartered two roma tomatores, about 1/2 of a medium white onion, and smashed 4 cloves of garlic.  Then heated them in a skillet and flip them, until they charred on all sides.

Step 3) Blend.  Take your chiles, charred tomatoes, onion, and garlic, and toasted oregano and comino, and around 2 cups of the delicious chile-flavored steeping water, and blend until smooth.  Make sure to use a strainer spoon to transfer the reconstituted chiles, and ensure that none of the seeds make it through.  I also add maybe 1/2 tsp of salt and 1/2 tsp of black pepper at this step, so it gets thoroughly mixed in
.
I'll admit that this step is about 1000000% easier now that I have a Viatmix blender.  Previously I used our house blender (a standard old-school beehive Osterizer) and blended for... well, forever.  I got it as smooth as possible, and then pushed that mixture through a fine mesh  tea strainer to make sure that little bits of skin don't make it through.  But now, I just blend with the Vitamix until it's really, really smooth, maybe 60-90 seconds.  That might even be too long but why rush it? 

Step 4) Fry.  I usually use around 1/4 cup of vegetable oil, but this time I had the rendered duck fat, so I used about 3T of duck fat and 1T of vegetable oil. Get it good and hot, so that as soon as you pour the blended mixture into it, it starts to fry.  Let it fry as-is for a couple of minutes, stirring a little bit to make sure all of the blended mixture gets a chance to fry.  Then stir it up thoroughly and simmer for around 20 minutes.

Step 5) Taste, adjust, and thin if necessary.  After about 20 minutes, go ahead and taste the sauce.  It might need a little more salt, since I only added 1/2 tsp in the blend I might add another 1/2 tsp here. Salt wakes up food but I definitely want the chile peppers to star here, not salt.  Also check for thickness, it should be pretty silky and smooth but if it's too thick, you have some choices.  You could add some plain water, or some of the steeping water that you reserved, or you could also add some chicken stock or beef stock if you feel like it needs that.  This bit is definitely to taste.  I usually go with more of the steeping water, but at times when I've felt it needed a little more depth of flavor, I've used chicken stock and it helped round out the flavor profile. 

Step 6) Don't eat it.  Yeah, that's what I said. (https://www.surlyhorns.com/board/uploads/emoticons/smile.png)  This one's tough and I rarely have the time to do it, but like chili or many stews, it's better the next day.  Refrigerate and re-heat the next day if possible.  If that's not possible, then letting it cool and refrigerate for a few hours, still helps.  It also tends to thicken up though, so be ready to add more water or stock to loosen up the mixture.  Just not too much, because you don't want to dilute the flavor of the gravy too much.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on April 09, 2019, 07:30:13 PM
I really want a Vitamix. Hard to justify though. I don't use a blender enough, and the Kitchenaid I have ain't too shabby.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on April 09, 2019, 07:42:19 PM
The construction of the enchiladas is pretty standard.

1) Buy some good-quality corn tortillas, a 10-pack if you're doing one pan, and 20 if you're doing 2.

2) Grab your standard pyrex baking dish (or metal baking pan or aluminum foil pan) and coat with non-stick spray.

3) Heat up your enchilada gravy to warm in one shallow sauce pan, and heat up some vegetable or oil in another-- enough to coat the bottom and deep enough that your entire tortilla can submerge.  You're going to very lightly fry your corn tortillas in the oil, and each tortilla will pick up some of the oil, so be ready to add more if necessary.

4) Grab TWO sets of tongs.  The first is for the oil.  The second is for the sauce.  If you use only one set, and some of that sauce slides into the hot oil, it's going to splatter all over. 

5) Get your assembly line ready, it should look like this: Hot oil, hot chile gravy, warmed filling, shredded cheese of your choice.  For the BB duck I wanted a mild cheese that wouldn't overwhelm the duck, so I used Monterrey jack.  For my brisket enchiladas I like to use a medium cheddar, it's a stronger cheese but the brisket holds up to it quite well.

6) Take your first tortilla with your first set of tongs, dip into the hot oil and fry for a few seconds, then flip it over and fry the other side.  You're not trying to make a hard tostada shell here, actually the opposite.  Lightly frying actually makes the corn tortilla more pliable without breakage, and it also makes it stiff enough that it won't fall apart.  With that same set of tongs, remove the tortilla and let it drain well.  Then drop it into the warmed chile gravy.

7) With your second set of tongs, get both sides of the tortilla lightly coated with the gravy, then move to the pan and place in an open u-shape. 

8) Place a small spoonful of your filling along the bottom of the tortilla, then sprinkle in some of your shredded cheese.

9) Roll the tortilla until it's completely closed, with the seam side down.  Your hands might get a little messy. That's okay, you're allowed to lick the tasty chile gravy or meat filling or cheese-- but you better wash your hands after that!

10) Continue the process until the baking dish is full.  Then cover everything with more of the gravy and plenty of the cheese.  It's also common to add finely chopped white onion to the top, but I always ask my guests to make sure they like that.  I'm a big fan of the onion so if it's just for me, I always add them.

11) Toss that baking dish into the oven at 325-350 until all of the cheese is bubbly and melty.  Pull out, and serve.

Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on April 09, 2019, 07:44:02 PM
I really want a Vitamix. Hard to justify though. I don't use a blender enough, and the Kitchenaid I have ain't too shabby.
You-know-who went and bought one without asking.  I gave her a hard time, but she gives me the old "I told you so" every time I make enchilada gravy (or Texas red chili since I start with reconstituted chile peppers for both).
Ultimately, I've had to tell her-- she was right.  :)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on April 09, 2019, 10:48:05 PM
Very nice Utee, thanks for the effort.  I'm going to make that sauce.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on April 09, 2019, 11:55:06 PM
Coolio, hope you like it!

My i s c & a aggie wife can never wait and let me put the gravy on the enchiladas.  She just grabs a bag of tortilla chips and eats it right out of the hot skillet, like a warm salsa.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on April 10, 2019, 12:27:19 PM
Thanks @utee94 (https://www.cfb51.com/index.php?action=profile;u=15) !!

Sounds delicious... I threw it all into a Word document and it's going into the cookbook, forever to be titled "utee94's Brisket Enchiladas"
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: CWSooner on April 10, 2019, 04:42:54 PM
Utee:

Maybe I'm missing something, but I can't tell the difference between the filling and the gravy there.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on April 10, 2019, 05:18:22 PM
In this case the filling is either the smoked duck as I did, or smoked brisket as bwar was talking about.  The gravy is the sauce.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: CWSooner on April 10, 2019, 06:48:10 PM
SMH.

Thanks for helping me see what should have been obvious.

I'll blame it on bwarb and his name for the recipe.  Yeah, that's what threw me off track!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on April 10, 2019, 07:43:57 PM
I blame ol bwarb for a lot of things. ;)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on April 10, 2019, 09:37:34 PM
I blame ol bwarb for a lot of things. ;)
Your just saying that because I like brewing all these IPAs. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on April 10, 2019, 10:31:38 PM
true
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on April 10, 2019, 11:11:05 PM
Your just saying that because I like brewing all these IPAs.
...well... maybe...  :86:
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: Drew4UTk on July 20, 2019, 04:20:05 PM
y'all can say what you wish and lay whatever claims you may, but it is my position that the measure of a pit is baby back ribs.  Most would say brisket, but i just don't see what's so difficult about brisket- except maybe the differing techniques that complicate it such as whether or not to inject, whether or not to use the texas cheat or to power through the stall... i DO have an opinion on those, but it's not something i am dead set on by any measure.  

beef ribs are a little tricky, but not so much... basically hold the temp under 230 and pull them between 200 and 203.  not much to it. well, you can choose whether to mop them (which i do) and when to start and stop.  but... nothing to it.  

pulled pork they love so much around here is about the simplest thing you can do... throw a cleaned carcass-of-pig on the pit and hose it down with a concoction of vinegar, hot sauce and peppers, and sometimes mustard, and do it every hour or so as it cooks in it's own fat.  there is no need to be pretty- it's gonna get pulled off the bone and chopped, folded into a sauce (or not) based on where you were born (be it vinegar, mustard, or tomato based).  

standing rib roast is likely the most expensive thing i smoke other than some cigars... but there are just four rules- 1) the simpler the rub the better, salt and pepper and better fresh cracked. 2) temperature not to exceed 300*.  3)for the love of all that is holy pull it before it hits 125*.. like, 118* even. 4)let it stand at least an hour, but more like 3 or 4 at a minimum.  wrapped in foil, a towel, and in a cooler.  redistribution of those juices and some of them congealing with the bark is the mark of it done well.  

but those baby back ribs.  which, as you may have guessed, are in the smoker right now.  have been since noon.  they're doing their version of the stall right now at 162* as the piggy fat renders, but it ain't nuthin like a briskets.  i rubbed them but good with my wife's own recipe- which is pretty dang good.  I started mopping them around 120*, and do it once every 10* until they touch 180~185.. I take them to 190~195*, as i've found they start converting but not so much that they fall apart.  I like a little tug, and for that reason i leave the membrane on when slow cooking them.  i like them however, but my preferred is dry- hence the mopping stops short enough of serving temperature for most of it to absorb or evaporate.  also, and i don't know how significant this is, but i'll build a small fire early and tanking them from room temperature to around 100* pretty slow, and then start charging the fire to its peak of 230* and holding it until at least the 180* mark..... and i never feed it again.  if i do it right, which isn't often, the temperatures cross zero as i call it (given my penchant for tuning engines- crossing zero is perfect lambda i.e. stoichiometric ratio) and 195* will be both the temperature of the ribs as well as the smoker when they come out.  by my measure, baby backs are the hardest to do by a far measure... it's not only just cooking them low and slow- it's also infusing flavors in just the right measure and intensity.  

i hope these things are good... They're 163* as of now.  they've likely got another three hours or so.  i had nothing to do but type this thing up whilst watching.... and waiting... and drooling.   
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on July 21, 2019, 09:13:04 AM
it sounds like you know what you're doing

with a little luck you will have perfection soon

good luck

I think pork ribs, beef ribs and even brisket can be "the measure" of the pit if you are looking for a specific perfection

I agree that the pulled pork roast is easier and certainly easier to cover flaws
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on July 29, 2019, 08:39:07 AM
Pulled pork is crazy easy.  I've never done whole hog, but there's absolutely nothing more forgiving than a pork  butt IMO.  I do NOT sauce pulled pork, I save the drippings and reintroduce.  Tastes way WAY better than adding vinegary shit like they do in the Carolinas.  I'll serve with bottled sauce for anyone that wants it, usually those bottles remain unopened on the counter.

Baby backs just aren't very popular around here.  I like them ok, but much prefer pork spare ribs.  I actually prefer them NOT to be St. Louis cut so that I can trim them myself, save some bits of the country steak, and get the delicious meat in the rib tips.  But these days all the grocers are carrying pre-cute St. Louis in the cryovac packs, so if I want full spares I have to ask the butcher separately.  

Brisket is easy for me, and should be easy enough for anyone, but people still get it wrong all the time.  Usually they undercook it, so that it's tough and dry.  Brisket is counter-intuitive, it absolutely MUST go long in order to be tender and juicy, and the end product is going to be somewhere between 198 and 206, but I don't measure by temperature but rather by the softness of the fat cap and the ease of the probe. 

But to me, the crowning achievement in BBQ is the beef rib.  Like brisket, they're not particularly difficult IMO, but so many people get them wrong.  I actually cook up at 285.  Never wrap, never crutch.  They take about 6-8 hours depending on their size.  I'll occasionally spritz  with water and a little apple cider vinegar if i'm afraid the ends might be getting too crispy.  I don't do beef ribs often, partially because they're just do darn expensive, but when it comes to incredibly meaty beefy BBQ flavor, there's nothing that can beat it.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: CWSooner on September 24, 2019, 10:00:33 PM
What do you think of Stiles Switch BBQ in Austin, Utee?

The Oklahoman's Berry Tramel liked it--including the beef rib--when he was in Austin for the oSu game, as he discusses here: https://oklahoman.com/article/5641932/stiles-switch-bbq-was-the-reward-for-fighting-traffic-on-i-35 (https://oklahoman.com/article/5641932/stiles-switch-bbq-was-the-reward-for-fighting-traffic-on-i-35)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on September 24, 2019, 10:19:32 PM
near ThreadGill's, been there

also not far from where I met Hooky for lunch last spring/winter

I'm interested in Utee's opinion

will also ask my brother

most places serving a beef rib, know what's up
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on September 25, 2019, 02:37:03 PM

near ThreadGill's, been there

also not far from where I met Hooky for lunch last spring/winter

I'm interested in Utee's opinion

will also ask my brother

most places serving a beef rib, know what's up

Well, yeah, it's literally next door to the Yellow Rose gentlemen's club... ;)

Stiles Switch is pretty good, worth a visit.  With so many places doing the food truck business model (including Franklin even though that's now technically a brick and mortar), SS is one of the rare good places that serves full restaurant hours including lunch and dinner service. The beef ribs are legit, as is the brisket.  Pork ribs are ok.  8:30 is a little late to be hitting a full service BBQ restaurant since they've probably timed the food to be optimal between 6 and 8, so that might explain why Tramel and crew thought their beef rib was a little "off."

Anyway, SS isn't as good as Franklin or the other top tier places in Austin, but it's better than pretty much all the other places that offer full all-day meal service and don't just sell 'til they run out.  And that's worth something.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on September 25, 2019, 03:05:19 PM
haven't been inside the Yellow Rose, Hooky and I were getting a bit too old for that apparently

I've driven by a few times

I have had some good food at Threadgill's - not great, but good

was there for lunch, wasn't any live music at the time
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on September 26, 2019, 12:42:35 PM
Threadgill's is pretty good.  There's really surprisingly few southern comfort food/soul food places in Austin.  Not sure why, but I suppose it could be that Tex-Mex fulfills more folks' "comfort food" quota and there's not as much room leftover for the more traditional American comfort food joints.

Dot's and Hoover's are my two favorite, but they're very small mom and pop joints.  They used to be hidden gems and now the city is so large they just get completely overrun.  Threadgill's would certainly be in my top 10 and an assortment of diners/greasy spoons make up the balance.

And as you point out, live music only in the evenings.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on September 26, 2019, 01:15:17 PM
Threadgill's is pretty good.  There's really surprisingly few southern comfort food/soul food places in Austin.  Not sure why, but I suppose it could be that Tex-Mex fulfills more folks' "comfort food" quota and there's not as much room leftover for the more traditional American comfort food joints.
Seems odd... Southern food / soul food is totally the "in thing" among white hipster woke millenials...

And it *is* Austin, after all ;-) 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on September 26, 2019, 05:50:16 PM
Seems odd... Southern food / soul food is totally the "in thing" among white hipster woke millenials...

And it *is* Austin, after all ;-)
Is it? I guess maybe elsewhere?

Here the woke hipster millenials prefer to stand in line for BBQ and then take thousands of pictures of their food.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: CWSooner on September 27, 2019, 08:05:51 AM
Seems odd... Southern food / soul food is totally the "in thing" among white hipster woke millenials...

And it *is* Austin, after all ;-)
Isn't that "cultural appropriation," or something equally nefarious?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on September 27, 2019, 09:58:05 AM
Well if we're talking Southern food, then I don't think you can call it "cultural appropriation" if it's white folks making the recipes of other white folks.

Now, if you call it "soul food" then you're probably in trouble.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on September 27, 2019, 02:52:52 PM

The ‘Sooner Swirl,’ Norman’s iconic cocktail, will ‘get you where you want to go’

(https://cdn.theathletic.com/app/uploads/2019/09/19234255/Oklahoma_Swirl4-e1569287903597-1024x681.jpg)



The Mont’s bar area. A Taylor Model 342 Frozen Uncarbonated Beverage Freezer, it holds margarita in the left chamber and sangria in the right. And contrary to what one might think, there is no middle spout that pulls from both sides like a soft-serve frozen yogurt machine.

No, when you order a Sooner Swirl, it receives a little more care than that. The Mont’s bartenders are precise: Four pours from each side, alternated, and with the glass tilted just right.

“They’ve perfected it, how to pour it, how to tilt the glass,” says Susan Oakley, a former employee who now is a game-day regular. “It’s also cool because people can ask for more margarita or more sangria. Some people would order a margarita with a splash of sangria.”

The Mont is a Norman landmark, situated on the corner of Classen Boulevard and Boyd Street, just off...
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: CWSooner on September 29, 2019, 05:45:07 PM
The Mont opened up--taking the place of a pretty nasty Tex-Mex place--when I was at OU.  I went there a lot back then, have been back a few times since.  I've never had the Sooner Swirl.  I'll have to try it next time I'm there.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on September 30, 2019, 02:34:49 PM
possibly 09/18/2021?
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: CWSooner on September 30, 2019, 09:55:18 PM
I certainly hope so!
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on October 14, 2019, 07:39:20 PM
How I grill racks of lamb...

I've been working on this for quite some time, and thought I'd give my own primer on how I cook lamb. I think I've got a pretty foolproof method.



If done this way, you should hit perfect medium rare every time. And unlike cutting first and grilling the chops individually, it's a lot easier to time it properly without overcooking. 

Shown here with some grilled asparagus that I managed to do without overcooking for once, and my wife made a nice Greek veggie salad. 


(https://scontent-lax3-1.cdninstagram.com/vp/e4d64248e153f3164013175958fdada3/5E228616/t51.2885-15/e35/73264631_760585341070462_4110965321967064957_n.jpg?_nc_ht=scontent-lax3-1.cdninstagram.com&_nc_cat=110)
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on October 15, 2019, 09:41:49 AM
Rack of WHAT?  We'll ALL have some of that!






Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: FearlessF on October 15, 2019, 09:46:06 AM
I'll take a plate just like the one in the pic
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: MarqHusker on October 15, 2019, 09:49:10 AM
I find rack of lamb to be one of the easiest meats to nail for doneness.    You've summarized it well.  It seems to have an aura about it that people find it to be intimidating.

I love Ina's rub and prep for lamb. In fact I served that for some of our fellow posters a few years ago. 
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: 847badgerfan on October 15, 2019, 09:57:50 AM
I'll take a plate just like the one in the pic
Maybe not as much asparagus. Smelly pee and all that. :67:
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: utee94 on October 15, 2019, 10:10:40 AM
Mustard goes great with lamb, I'll use ground mustard seed in a dry rub, or even plain ol' wet yellow mustard as the base layer, same as I do for pork ribs.
Title: Re: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.
Post by: bwarbiany on October 15, 2019, 01:06:22 PM
I find rack of lamb to be one of the easiest meats to nail for doneness.    You've summarized it well.  It seems to have an aura about it that people find it to be intimidating.

I love Ina's rub and prep for lamb. In fact I served that for some of our fellow posters a few years ago.

Just looked it up. Looks like Ina's rub would be freakin' delicious. I'll have to give that a shot.

As for nailing for doneness, I think it's very easy if you use a thermometer. If you're trying to cook to time rather than temp, or if you're trying to cook to "feel", it's much harder. Lamb is a much smaller cut of meat than, say, prime rib, so the time window between undercooking and overcooking is very narrow. Ina's recipe says exactly 20 minutes at 450 degrees, but that's assuming your oven is accurate. It also that your racks are the same size as what Ina tested on, which is difficult because Ina doesn't say what size she recommends, and there can be a lot of variation, particularly between Australian/New Zealand lamb (grass fed and smaller) vs American lamb (often grain-finished and larger). And of course it assumes that they were trimmed the same way, etc. I.e. if you trim lamb to "lollipop" size the way I do, it will naturally cook faster than if it's trimmed the way Ina shows it (https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/rack-of-lamb-recipe-1914142) in her Food Network recipe, where the fat cap is left on. 

And this is especially important when you grill rather than roasting in an oven, because it's a lot harder to pick a "precise" temp on the grill, especially if you do it the way I do it first and sear it directly over high heat. I can't translate Ina's recipe of 450 for exactly 20 minutes to a grill where I sear it over ~600 degrees for 5-6 minutes total and then put it indirect at an unknown temp. Granted, Ina's recipe is for oven-roasted lamb, so that's fine, but if you like the taste of searing over direct heat, then you need to know up front the temperature you're trying to hit. 

I wish more recipes online would not only convert to measure ingredients by weight instead of volume [where appropriate], and would convert to giving you the exact internal temperature to cook to for appropriate doneness than by time. Recipes assume that home cooks don't have a precise scale or a proper leave-in oven thermometer or even an instant-read thermometer, so they want to make it "easy" instead. 

But yes, with a thermometer you can hit perfect doneness on lamb very easily. 

If I'm spending $14/lb on racks of Australian lamb, cutting away and discarding big portions of the fat cap and obviously some of that weight being paid for is bone, I'm going to use the technology necessary to make sure I don't f&#@ it up and undercook/overcook it. Especially since we were having company over and I'm potentially being judged if I do it wrong.