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Topic: In other news ...

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CWSooner

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #560 on: November 14, 2020, 03:55:11 PM »
https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a34601800/last-3-on-the-tree-column-shift-manual-car/?src=socialflowFBCAD&utm_medium=social-media&utm_campaign=socialflowFBCD&utm_source=facebook&fbclid=IwAR0y4uARm3mfT5H6eFoV39YSrUPDGSSz2-w99P7pA9XJ9tKeUeYMAQfRUZo

The last 3 on a tree transmission available in the US as a new car, 1979 Chevy Nova.

How many here have driven one, a car or truck with 3-on-the-tree?
A then-old 3-on-the-tree GMC pickup is what I used in learning to drive.
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CWSooner

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #561 on: November 14, 2020, 04:04:47 PM »
I remember when myself and my other Purdue buddy attended our friend's wedding at Auburn.

School wasn't even in session, but in going to the bars the night before the wedding we realized that a "10" in West Lafayette was only about an Auburn "6".
In the summer of 1979, my buddy at Fort Benning and I drove to Auburn with the express purpose of picking up girls.  We saw none.  It was like the streets had been rolled up.  Nothing was open.
It was a Saturday night.
Like the one in this town.
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CWSooner

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #562 on: November 14, 2020, 04:21:00 PM »
I think patty melts need to be on pumpernickel or dark rye bread with an obscene amount of fried onions to be considered a patty melt.
Right.  That's what a patty melt has meant to me.
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CWSooner

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #563 on: November 14, 2020, 04:22:22 PM »
Is a bun typically something other than bread?
Technically, no.
But when I hear "bread," I don't think of a hamburger bun.
Just like when I hear "sandwich," I don't think of a hamburger.
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CWSooner

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #564 on: November 14, 2020, 04:29:32 PM »
Prettiest airliner ever.

The Lockheed Constellation
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Cincydawg

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #565 on: November 14, 2020, 05:43:38 PM »
My buddy says it's the best three engine aircraft in history.  He was an eng officer on one for the French Air Force in the 60s.  He said they almost never completed a mission with all four running.

CWSooner

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #566 on: November 14, 2020, 07:40:29 PM »
Well, by the '60s they were old.  I'm not sure what model he would have flown.

Checking the Font of All Wisdom and Knowledge, I find that Air France and something called CATAIR (Compagnie d'Affretements et de Transports Aeriens) were the French operators of the Constellation, Super Constellation, and/or L-1649 Starliner.

Starting with the L-1049 Super-Connie, they used the very complex R-3350 turbo-compound engines.  I can imagine that those engines, with a lot of hours on them, could have had some reliability issues.

The airplane in the video is a Starliner.  They used a different wing planform than the P-38-ish design that Connies and Super-Connies did.

Connies looked very nice in Air France livery.

« Last Edit: November 14, 2020, 07:47:15 PM by CWSooner »
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OrangeAfroMan

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #567 on: November 14, 2020, 08:47:54 PM »
In the summer of 1979, my buddy at Fort Benning and I drove to Auburn with the express purpose of picking up girls.  We saw none.  It was like the streets had been rolled up.  Nothing was open.
It was a Saturday night.
Like the one in this town.
Especially before summer semesters became normalized, yeah, college towns were ghost towns in the summer.  What were you thinking?
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betarhoalphadelta

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #568 on: November 15, 2020, 12:29:50 AM »
Especially before summer semesters became normalized, yeah, college towns were ghost towns in the summer.  What were you thinking?
I'm guessing the southmost heads were doing the bulk of the "thinking" on that trip lol... 

MrNubbz

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #569 on: November 15, 2020, 01:16:15 AM »

Connies looked very nice in Air France livery.


Looks like a Dolphin sailing out of the water
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OrangeAfroMan

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #570 on: November 15, 2020, 01:19:00 AM »
I'm guessing the southmost heads were doing the bulk of the "thinking" on that trip lol...
Isn't that what Myrtle Beach was for back then?  Panama City Beach is now?
“The Swamp is where Gators live.  We feel comfortable there, but we hope our opponents feel tentative. A swamp is hot and sticky and can be dangerous." - Steve Spurrier

utee94

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #571 on: November 15, 2020, 08:50:55 AM »
Down here a patty melt doesn't need to be on dark bread, but the bread definitely needs to be toasted.

A common version of a patty melt here, is between two thick slabs of toasted white bread, called "Texas toast."

Obviously cheese is also necessary, hence the "melt" part.

Oh and all buns are bread, but not all bread are buns.  Hamburgers are served on buns, specifically, not just any ol' bread.  If you want to depart from a standard hamburger bun, then you'll need to make a distinction in the description, and call out "kaiser roll" or whatever, otherwise you're gonna confuse the customer when you serve what you called a hamburger, on something other than a hamburger bun.

847badgerfan

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #572 on: November 15, 2020, 08:52:58 AM »
Had my burger on some sort of French bread last night. But it was not a baguette.
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Cincydawg

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Re: In other news ...
« Reply #573 on: November 15, 2020, 10:13:08 AM »
Minced meat was a delicacy in medieval cuisinered meat usually being restricted to the higher classes.[16] Very little mincing was done by medieval butchers or recorded in the cookbooks of the time, perhaps because it was not part of the sausage-making process that preserves meat.
During the first half of the 19th century, most European emigrants to the New World embarked from Hamburg, and New York City was their most common destination. Restaurants in New York offered Hamburg-style American fillet,[17][18] or even beefsteak à la Hambourgeoise. Early American preparations of minced beef were therefore made to fit the tastes of European immigrants, evoking memories of the port of Hamburg and the world they left behind.[19]
Hamburg steak[edit]
In the late 19th century, the Hamburg steak became popular on the menus of many restaurants in the port of New York. This might consist of a fried patty of chopped beef, eggs, onions, and seasoning,[20] or it might be lightly salted and often smoked, and served raw in a dish along with onions and bread crumbs.[21][page needed] The oldest document that refers to the Hamburg steak is a Delmonico's Restaurant menu from 1873 which offered customers an 11-cent plate of Hamburg steak that had been developed by American chef Charles Ranhofer (1836–1899). This price was high for the time, twice the price of a simple fillet of beef steak.[18][22][page needed] However, by the end of the century the Hamburg steak was gaining popularity because of its ease of preparation decreasing cost. This is evident from its detailed description in some of the most popular cookbooks of the day.[13][page needed] Documents show that this preparation style was used by 1887 in some U.S. restaurants and was also used for feeding patients in hospitals; the Hamburg steak was served raw or lightly cooked and was accompanied by a raw egg.[23]
The menus of many American restaurants during the 19th century included a Hamburg beefsteak that was often sold for breakfast.[24] A variant of Hamburg steak is the Salisbury steak, which is usually served with a gravy similar in texture to brown sauce. Invented by Dr. James Salisbury (1823–1905), the term Salisbury steak has been used in the United States since 1897.[25] Nowadays, in the city of Hamburg as well as in parts of northern Germany, this type dish is called Frikadelle, Frikandelle, or Bulette, which is similar to the meatball. The term hamburger steak was replaced by hamburger by 1930, which has in turn been somewhat displaced by the simpler term, burger.[26] The latter term is now commonly used as a suffix to create new words for different variants of the hamburger, including cheeseburgerporkburgerbaconburger and mooseburger. There are other foods with names derived from German cities that are shortened in different ways in American English. An example is the frankfurter, often abbreviated as frank.[26]



 

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