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Topic: OT - Weird History

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OrangeAfroMan

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #672 on: May 12, 2022, 06:54:04 PM »
Kentucky was originally part of Virginia, but on June 1, 1792, Virginia gave Kentucky permission to break off and become the 15th state of the United States.
You sure you wanna do that?
Sure, why not?
Ha, there's all that coal there!
What's coal?
.....
....well, uh....not a fan of fried chicken?
What's that?
.....drink bourbon? 
Huh?
.
Never mind, just let 'em go!
“The Swamp is where Gators live.  We feel comfortable there, but we hope our opponents feel tentative. A swamp is hot and sticky and can be dangerous." - Steve Spurrier

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #673 on: May 12, 2022, 10:53:55 PM »
Ludolph van Ceulen (1540-1610) spent most of his life calculating the first 36 digits of pi (which were named the Ludolphine Number). According to legend, these numbers were engraved on his now lost tombstone.
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

Cincydawg

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #674 on: May 13, 2022, 01:00:18 PM »
The story of bourbon is pretty interesting, I think, and a bit weird.  It's a French surname of course applied to a very typically American liquor.

And there are no distilleries in Bourbon County, KY today, the seat of which is a town called Paris.

Cincydawg

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #675 on: May 13, 2022, 04:27:25 PM »
Soviet troops totaling about one million men attacked Finland on several fronts. The heavily outnumbered Finns put up a skillful and effective defense that winter, and the Red Army made little progress. In February 1940, however, the Soviets used massive artillery bombardments to breach the Mannerheim Line (the Finns’ southern defensive barrier stretching across the Karelian Isthmus), after which they streamed northward across the isthmus to the Finnish city of Viipuri (Vyborg). Unable to secure help from Britain and France, the exhausted Finns made peace (the Treaty of Moscow) on Soviet terms on March 12, 1940, agreeing to the cession of western Karelia and to the construction of a Soviet naval base on the Hanko Peninsula.

Having approached Germany without reaching a formal alliance, Finland allowed German troops transit through the country after the outbreak of war between Germany and the Soviet Union in June 1941. The Finns then joined the fight against the Soviets, undertaking the “War of Continuation.” An armistice signed on September 19, 1944, effectively concluded that conflict between the Soviet Union and Finland, contingent on Finnish recognition of the Treaty of Moscow and the evacuation of German troops (who refused to leave). The formal end of the Soviet-Finnish conflict came with the signing of a peace treaty in Paris on February 10, 1947.


Cincydawg

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #676 on: May 13, 2022, 07:17:21 PM »
Nowadays he is not well remembered, but in his time Alexander Humboldt was perhaps the most famous and widely-admired man in the world. A man of extraordinary genius who made ground-breaking discoveries in a wide range of scientific fields, Humboldt was best known as a naturalist, explorer, and world traveler. Prussian by birth, Humboldt spoke and wrote in several languages and lived for decades in Paris. Equally at ease lecturing in a prestigious European university, or trekking through a South American jungle, across the world Humboldt was regarded as the ideal modern man—a cosmopolitan polymath.

Humboldt had a special affinity for America and the ideals of the young republic (he once said that he considered himself “half American”), and Americans returned it in their admiration of him. Dozens of towns, counties and geographic features across America and named for Humboldt and the territory that came to be called Nevada was nearly named “Humboldt” instead.
Humboldt and Thomas Jefferson were mutual admirers. In 1804 Humboldt traveled to Washington to meet Jefferson, much to their mutual delight, with President Jefferson taking the opportunity to consult with Humboldt regarding America’s natural borders and to solicit his advice on the Louisiana territory.
There are more species of animals and plants named for Humboldt than for any other person. Among them are the Humboldt squid, the Humboldt penguin, the Humboldt hummingbird, the Humboldt skunk, the Humboldt orchid—the list goes on and on.
When Humboldt died at age 89, his loss was grieved across the world. In the United States, hundreds of thousands of people turned out for memorial services in his honor.
Alexander Von Humboldt died in Berlin on May 6, 1859, one hundred sixty-three years ago today.
The portrait is by Charles Willson Peale from 1805, when Humboldt was 35 years old. He sat for the portrait in 1804, during his visit to meet Thomas Jefferson. Humboldt helped revived Peale’s flagging career, and he was one of many American artists and writers inspired and encouraged by Humboldt (including, among many others, Thoreau, Poe, and the landscape painter Frederick Edwin Church).


FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #677 on: May 14, 2022, 08:54:12 AM »
Explorer Roy Chapman Andrews found the first dinosaur nest known to science in 1923 in the Gobi Desert of Mongolia. Before he found the nest, scientists were unsure how dinosaur babies were born.
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FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #678 on: May 15, 2022, 07:34:11 PM »
The Top 10 Largest Nuclear Explosions, Visualized

infographic comparing the top 10 largest nuclear explosions
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #679 on: May 15, 2022, 07:36:37 PM »
The U.S.’ Trinity test in 1945, the first-ever nuclear detonation, released around 19 kilotons of explosive energy. The explosion instantly vaporized the tower it stood on and turned the surrounding sand into green glass, before sending a powerful heatwave across the desert.

As the Cold War escalated in the years after WWII, the U.S. and the Soviet Union tested bombs that were at least 500 times greater in explosive power. This infographic visually compares the 10 largest nuclear explosions in history.


https://www.visualcapitalist.com/largest-nuclear-explosions/

anatomy of a nuclear explosion's mushroom cloud
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #680 on: May 19, 2022, 10:52:30 AM »
All dogs can be traced back 40 million years ago to a weasel-like animal called the Miacis which dwelled in trees and dens. The Miacis later evolved into the Tomarctus, a direct forbear of the genus Canis, which includes the wolf and jackal as well as the dog.
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FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #681 on: May 19, 2022, 03:15:09 PM »
Known as the Kyshtym disaster or the Mayak disaster, at the time it was the worst nuclear disaster that the world had ever experienced. But neither the world nor the residents at the epicenter of the disaster really knew what was happening at the time. It would take at least 20 years for news of the disaster to reach the international community. And even then, many officials outside and within the Soviet Union continued to deny that a disaster ever took place.

Even in the 21st century, information about the Kyshtym disaster is hard to come by because there were so few reports made about it at the time in an attempt to keep the disaster a secret. Meanwhile, the full extent of the disaster remains unknown to this day, since it's difficult to determine whether illnesses are caused by radiation poisoning or not. But with the staggeringly high rates of illnesses in the area, it's hard to pretend nothing happened. These are some chilling details about the Russian nuclear disaster you've never heard of.

Chelyabinsk-40


The Soviet Union started building the closed town of Chelyabinsk-40 in 1946, later renaming it to Chelyabinsk-65, though it was located over 50 miles from the actual city of Chelyabinsk. The Guardian writes that the town was constructed secretly around a nuclear power plant and housed workers from all across the Soviet Union who were tasked with building an atomic bomb. After two years of construction by almost 35,000 soldiers, POWs, and Gulag prisoners, the town's plutonium power plant, known as the Mayak Production Association, was activated in 1948.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/chilling-details-about-the-russian-nuclear-disaster-you-ve-never-heard-of/ar-AAXrPOP?ocid=entnewsntp&pc=U531&cvid=8f4dd23194d9483eb70ae86fd9cf94b8
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FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #682 on: May 22, 2022, 07:36:21 AM »
Washington, DC, is home to two endangered species, the dwarf wedgemussel and the Hay's Spring amphipod.
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #683 on: May 23, 2022, 09:08:52 AM »
President Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) is the only president to be elected to two nonconsecutive terms. He was the 22nd and 24th president.
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MrNubbz

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #684 on: May 23, 2022, 09:34:54 AM »
When i started posting on the old CFN.com board Forum there was a vote for poster of the year - for a while
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FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #685 on: May 23, 2022, 09:48:15 AM »
ask utee about it
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