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Topic: OT - Weird History

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847badgerfan

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #686 on: May 23, 2022, 04:12:59 PM »
President Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) is the only president to be elected to two nonconsecutive terms. He was the 22nd and 24th president.
Could happen again soon....
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847badgerfan

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #687 on: May 23, 2022, 04:13:35 PM »
When i started posting on the old CFN.com board Forum there was a vote for poster of the year - for a while
We stopped that when we moved to Scout for some reason. 
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FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #688 on: May 23, 2022, 11:19:41 PM »
Could happen again soon....
I hope not
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #689 on: May 26, 2022, 10:04:15 AM »
Before Arthur MacArthur was 20 years old, he had already fought in several significant Civil War battles and survived being shot in the chest, his life likely spared by a packet of letters and a Bible placed close to his heart.

Almost two decades before his more famous son, Douglas, was born, MacArthur was a war hero and the recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle of Missionary Ridge.


Arthur MacArthur always wanted to be a soldier. When he was only 16 and living in Wisconsin, he approached several company commanders from one regiment that passed through Milwaukee in July 1861, pleading to join. He was declined by all, with one politely telling him that he should focus on being a better student than soldier. MacArthur is said to have replied, "I propose to do both, sir."

A year later, MacArthur lied about his age and, with the help of his father, a judge, was appointed the adjutant of the 24th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. A military career that lasted until 1909 started inauspiciously as MacArthur's abilities -- his youth and eagerness conspiring against him at times -- were doubted by superiors. MacArthur was determined, though, and began to prove himself, starting at the Battle of Perryville in Kentucky in October 1862 and then at the Battle of Stones River in Tennessee a few months later.


Then came Missionary Ridge on Nov. 25, 1863. Coming off being defeated soundly at Chickamauga, Union troops were surrounded as Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg's forces lay siege to Chattanooga, Tennessee. Bragg's intent was to cut off the Union's supply lines and force it to surrender.

Soldiers were starving, with rations limited to "four cakes of hard bread and a quarter pound of pork every three days."

Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant -- recently placed in command of all Union forces in the West -- acted decisively, replacing Gen. William Rosecrans with Gen. George Thomas, and opening the Cracker Line to get more food to the troops.


https://www.military.com/history/how-douglas-macarthurs-father-helped-deliver-death-knell-of-confederacy.html

Grant had another big concern. Worried about Gen. William T. Sherman's forces north of Missionary Ridge, he sought to relieve pressure on them by providing a distraction. Grant commanded Gen. Thomas Wood's men to attempt to seize the Confederate rifle pits at the base of the ridge. They weren't instructed to go any farther, but once they left themselves vulnerable to enemy artillery, staying put was not advisable.

Against orders, they charged up Missionary Ridge.

"Grant and those guys didn't want it to happen," Zobel said. "They only wanted to go to the lower part of [the ridge], but then they started taking all those potshots, and everybody was like, 'Oh, we can't even sit here. We have to go up this thing.'"

During the charge, the standard bearer of the 24th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry went down -- accounts vary about whether he was killed or not -- and dropped the unit's flag. Fueled by instinct and adrenaline, MacArthur, an 18-year-old first lieutenant recently hospitalized with typhoid fever, grabbed the flag and ran full speed at the Confederates. After one hour of intense battle, MacArthur was the first Union soldier to summit Missionary Ridge.

"Alone between the two erupting lines, [MacArthur] was wounded twice on his way to planting the regiment's flag in almost the exact midpoint of the Confederate fortifications,'' according to the nonprofit American Battlefield Trust. "The men of the 24th surged after him and 15,000 more Union troops took heart and followed, rising up and smashing the Confederate center."

Missionary Ridge was the culmination of three battles on successive days that put Chattanooga and its key rail lines in Union hands and helped lay the groundwork for Sherman's Atlanta Campaign a year later. One southern soldier referred to the setback as "the death-knell of the Confederacy."

As for MacArthur, he was brevetted as a colonel in 1864, earning the moniker "the Boy Colonel." Besides his wounds at Missionary Ridge, MacArthur was injured during the Atlanta Campaign and was shot in the shoulder and knee at Franklin, Tennessee, in 1864.

MacArthur was bestowed the Medal of Honor for his actions at Missionary Ridge in 1890. He died while speaking at a reunion of the 24th in 1912. He was 67.

"At the podium he began, 'Your indomitable regiment ...' before collapsing," according to one account. "Moments later, he was dead. The old men of the 24th wrapped his body in the flag hanging on the wall, the flag he had carried to the top of Missionary Ridge as a teenager."
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

MrNubbz

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #690 on: May 26, 2022, 12:51:51 PM »
ask utee about it
Why did he win then shut it down?Speaking of him where has he been?Hanging out with Bwarb? Haven't seen either post for a spell
"I don't want to belong to any club that would have me as a member" -  Groucho Marx

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #691 on: May 26, 2022, 01:00:39 PM »
not sure where they've been

the political crap here may have run them off

I did see something on Facebook a week or so ago including utee, seemed he was enjoying life

Perhaps Bwarb moved to Austin?
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

MrNubbz

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #692 on: May 26, 2022, 04:37:46 PM »
The Horror
"I don't want to belong to any club that would have me as a member" -  Groucho Marx

847badgerfan

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #693 on: May 26, 2022, 04:54:10 PM »
The Ukraine topic, I think, made them go away. Hopefully they will return. Great guys.
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betarhoalphadelta

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #694 on: May 26, 2022, 07:15:53 PM »
The Ukraine topic, I think, made them go away. Hopefully they will return. Great guys.
I've still been reading. 

The NCAAT broke my Purdue fandom. I can no longer care. I don't think I'm going to watch either football or basketball going forward. And that means I don't care about recruiting, or conference realignment, or the transfer portal and NIL, etc. 

As for CFB51 in general, well, I haven't really wanted to talk about abortion, or gun control, or Ukraine (which has fallen out of the news despite still being a sh!tshow), or any of the other bullsh!t topics that have been dominating this place lately. The level of discourse on these topics--topics we used to avoid as a rule--is coarse. Not really causing me to want to interact. 

It's a shame, too... I've done some really good cooking lately and I know Nubbz has been missing the pictures. :57:

I have not moved to Austin, and I do not know 94's whereabouts. 

WhiskeyM

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #695 on: May 26, 2022, 09:56:11 PM »
I've still been reading.

The NCAAT broke my Purdue fandom. I can no longer care. I don't think I'm going to watch either football or basketball going forward. And that means I don't care about recruiting, or conference realignment, or the transfer portal and NIL, etc.

You've got to bring yourself around to watching Purdue football again.

This is THE season for it.  Everything is falling into place for a run at the B1G West and finally playing for a CCG.

We finally have a seasoned QB and know for sure who will be the starter in week 1.  We also have a competent OL.

We are in Brohms 6th year.  He finally has the right pieces and culture in place.  This was the expected time frame to rebuild the Hazell disaster and the COVID year.

And honestly, probably a chance Brohm is gone after this year.  A successful season means others will come calling.  Ive long suspected he's waiting for an NFL job.

847badgerfan

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #696 on: May 27, 2022, 08:14:28 AM »
I've still been reading.

The NCAAT broke my Purdue fandom. I can no longer care. I don't think I'm going to watch either football or basketball going forward. And that means I don't care about recruiting, or conference realignment, or the transfer portal and NIL, etc.

As for CFB51 in general, well, I haven't really wanted to talk about abortion, or gun control, or Ukraine (which has fallen out of the news despite still being a sh!tshow), or any of the other bullsh!t topics that have been dominating this place lately. The level of discourse on these topics--topics we used to avoid as a rule--is coarse. Not really causing me to want to interact.

It's a shame, too... I've done some really good cooking lately and I know Nubbz has been missing the pictures. :57:

I have not moved to Austin, and I do not know 94's whereabouts.
Well, we miss you.
U RAH RAH! WIS CON SIN!

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #697 on: May 27, 2022, 09:14:16 AM »
One of Uranus's moons, Miranda, is not like any other object in the solar system astronomers have discovered so far. It looks like it has been turned inside out.
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #698 on: May 27, 2022, 11:42:08 AM »
No photo description available.
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #699 on: May 27, 2022, 11:49:43 AM »
Sioux City, Iowa -- 
When the U.S. Air Force F-100 Super Sabre that was on static display in Sioux City, Iowa was removed from its prominent position last fall the timing for a much needed makeover was perfect.

The Vietnam War era fighter jet at the Iowa Air National Guard looks like new again after being repaired and repainted. The restoration came just in time as the U.S. Air Force marks its 75th Anniversary this year.

https://www.185arw.ang.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/3045615/f-100-restoration-tribute-to-air-national-guard-legacy/fbclid/f-100-restoration-tribute-to-air-national-guard-legacy/


Sioux City HA F-100
A U.S. Air Force F-100 Super Sabre on the ramp at the Iowa Air National Guard’s 185th Air Refueling Wing has been repaired and repainted in preparation to be placed back on static display. The Iowa Air National Guard unit flew the F-100 for 16 years between 1961 and 1977. U.S. Air National Guard photo Senior Master Sgt. Vincent De Groot




With its signature oval nose, curved fuselage and flat bottom the 1950’s era swept wing jet resembles a Formula 1 race car of the same time period. Every inch of the North American Aviation engineered aircraft was built for speed. Known as a “century series” fighter because of the “100” designation, the 2nd generation fighter was the first production run of supersonic fighters created for the U.S. Air Force.

Like many Air National Guard units the 174th Fighter Squadron of the Iowa Air Guard was first allocated aircraft, pilots and maintainers in 1946 following the 2nd World War. Fixed-wing flying units were not part of the newly formed Air National Guard however until a year later, when in September of 1947 the Air Force officially became a separate service.

The Iowa Air Guard’s 185th Air Refueling Wing, as it is known today had originally flown single seat fighter aircraft when they received castoff P-51 Mustangs after the war. The unit was equipped with variations of F-80 fighter jets during the 1950s but when the unit receive the F-100 in 1961 they had officially made the leap into the supersonic jet age.

In the years to follow the F-100 would go on to become a significant part of U.S. Air Force and Air National Guard history. During their 16 year run with the Super Sabre, the 174th Tactical Fighter Squadron was one of only four Air National Guard Fighter units who deployed with the F-100 for a yearlong deployment to Vietnam.

The 174th was joined by Colorado’s 120th, New Mexico’s 188th and New York’s 136th Tactical Fighter Squadrons, where each unit served a full year at air bases in South Vietnam starting in 1968. A fifth group of volunteer guard members from New Jersey and Washington, D.C. made up an active duty squadron, the 355th TFS, who also flew the F-100.

After their arrival in Vietnam, Air National Guard F-100 units quickly achieved the status being among most effective close air support units in theater.  Their performance during that time permanently erased the “flying club” image of the guard. The five squadrons accumulated a combined 30,000 combat sorties during their deployment to South Vietnam.

Much of the guard success of getting bombs on target and keeping aircraft flying was attributed to the maturity and experience of ANG pilots. Another significant contributing factor to their success was the combination of stability and ownership that ANG maintainers have with their aircraft.

During the 1970s Air Guard maintainers were credited with a significant F-100 upgrade when they were granted additional autonomy that came with sole ownership of the F-100.  ANG maintainers, who F-100 “Misty” pilot Jack Doub referred to as “really smart Air National Guard guys” retrofitted the F-100 with afterburners from retired F-102 aircraft. The improvement solved long standing issues with engine performance while solidifying the unique, total force contributions of the Air National Guard.

After giving up the Super Sabre in July 1977 the F-100 held the honor of being the longest piloted airframe in the Iowa Guard unit until a few years ago when it was surpassed by their current KC-135. In November of 2023 the unit will mark its 20th year flying the KC-135 Stratotanker.

Even after sixty years the recent F-100 restoration project had new 185th Fabrication Specialists honing freshly acquired tech school skills repairing badly deteriorated wing trailing edges. Other repairs, combined with the efforts of the co-located Air National Guard paint facility, ensured a high quality finished product that will keep the old aircraft in good shape for another 20 years.

The old jet with the iconic Sioux City “HA” on its tail is now ready to go back on its pedestal where it will serve as a tribute to Air National Guard members past and present.  The aircraft will again serve as a reminder of the shared heritage and contributions of those who flew and fixed the “HUN” for years to come.
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

 

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