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Topic: OT - Weird History

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medinabuckeye1

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #644 on: April 28, 2022, 10:52:08 AM »
On the morning of September 20, 1863, the men of the 42nd Indiana rushed up LaFayette Road, and filed into line on the east side of McDonald Field, across from where the Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center now stands, and faced into the woods mere moments before their line was overwhelmed by the advance of General John C. Breckinridge's Confederate division.
Fifty-three men of the 42nd were captured and soon found their way into the Confederate prison system, initially being sent to Danville, Virginia, then being transferred to Andersonville when it opened in early 1864. Seventeen members of Company A, from Vanderburg County, Indiana, among them.  However, over the next few months that number dwindled as Andersonville proved to be the deadliest acreage of the American Civil War, taking six of Company A.  With the end of the war, the three survivors found themselves in Vicksburg, Mississippi, being packed aboard the Steamboat Sultana with around 2,100 recently released POWs.
The men were cramped for space as the boat was designed to hold only 376 people. Grossly overpacked, the ship departed Vicksburg on the night of April 24. Around 2 am, on April 27, just a short distance north of Memphis, Tennessee, the overstrained boilers exploded, turning the ship into a roaring inferno. It became the worst maritime disaster in American History and second worst explosion (only the destruction of the Twin Towers on 9/11 resulted in more deaths). One thousand seven hundred men died as a result.
Of the Company A men, only Private William McFarland survived. He later recounted, "I seemed to be dreaming and could hear some one saying, 'there isn't any skin left on their bodies.'  I awoke with a start and the next moment the boat was on fire and all was as light as day.  The wildest confusion followed.  Some spring into the river at once, others were killed, and I could fear the groans of the dying above the roar of the flames...I was on the hurricane deck, clear aft.  This part of the boat was jammed with me.  I saw the pilot house and hundreds of them sink through the roof into the flames, at which juncture I sprang overboard into the river." 
The Sultana sinking was just incredibly sad.  All of those POW's finally released at the end of the war and then they drowned or burned to death in an overloaded steamboat.  I saw a show about it, the river has changed course since 1865 and the site of the sinking is now a field.  They were trying to excavate the remains of the ship.  

MrNubbz

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #645 on: April 28, 2022, 12:32:37 PM »
"I don't want to belong to any club that would have me as a member" -  Groucho Marx

medinabuckeye1

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #646 on: April 28, 2022, 04:44:39 PM »
https://douglascountygensoc.org/photos002.html
The photo of the Bonnie and Clyde car reveals that they didn't want to leave any doubts.  Based on the number of holes in the driver's door, Clyde Barrow must have looked like swiss cheese when he got to the Coroner.  

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #647 on: April 29, 2022, 07:57:45 PM »
Gettysburg was the largest battle ever fought in North America. It’s victor, General Meade, was born in Spain.
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #648 on: May 01, 2022, 10:02:46 PM »
"The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - - Socrates
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

longhorn320

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #649 on: May 01, 2022, 10:19:13 PM »
"The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - - Socrates
"and who decides which is which" - - longhorn320
They won't let me give blood anymore. The burnt orange color scares the hell out of the doctors.

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #650 on: May 02, 2022, 12:04:01 AM »
The Mystery of the Puffer Fish Helmets of Kiribati

This ceremonial headwear was a cultural touchstone before it became a colonial curiosity.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/puffer-fish-armor

[img width=774.8 height=937]https://img.atlasobscura.com/xnseg01vE-wBv5Kwn1Ud0y-4dMSlPXQAVt9s7Lzhxmk/rt:fit/w:1280/q:81/sm:1/scp:1/ar:1/aHR0cHM6Ly9hdGxh/cy1kZXYuczMuYW1h/em9uYXdzLmNvbS91/cGxvYWRzL2Fzc2V0/cy83YjJlYjU3Zi0y/NmJjLTRlNjgtYWM1/NC03MWYxYzZkNDM1/NTMwMTdlOWNlOTE3/NTIwM2Q5NDlfTXVz/ZXVtIG9mIEFyY2hh/ZW9sb2d5IGFuZCBB/bnRocm9wb2xvZ3lf/UHVmZmVyIGZpc2gg/YXJtb3IuanBn.jpg[/img]
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

Cincydawg

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #651 on: May 02, 2022, 08:56:36 AM »
159 YEARS AGO
Night of May 1, 1863
Battle of Chancellorsville
On the evening of May 1, Robert E. Lee and "Stonewall" Jackson hatched one of the boldest schemes in military history. Hunched over maps beside a small fire, the two generals plotted how to destroy the Union army, now entrenched around Chancellorsville. The solution came when Confederate cavalryman General J.E.B. Stuart reported that the Union right flank lay unprotected.
During the night, with the help of local residents, Lee and Jackson mapped a secure route across the front of the Union army to the Federal right flank. Jackson proposed taking 30,000 men to assail the Union army from the west. That would leave Lee with just 15,000 men to distract and hold in place the 75,000-man Union army in front of Chancellorsville. Dividing his outnumbered army invited destruction, but success promised dramatic victory. Lee gave his assent.
To reach the Union army's right flank, Jackson would have to march his corps twelve miles over narrow, unpaved roads. The general hoped to have his men moving by dawn on May 2, but he got an unusually late start. It was past 7 a.m. before his troops left their camps on the Orange Plank Road and passed this point on the first leg of their journey.
Jackson rode near the head of the marching column. His face appeared flushed, and his eyes flashed in anticipation of the coming conflict. When he reached the intersection, he dismounted and spoke with Generals Lee, A.P. Hill, and J.E.B. Stuart. The informal council lasted but a few minutes. Jackson then pointed toward the head of his moving column and galloped off. It was the last time that he and Lee would ever meet.


Cincydawg

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #652 on: May 02, 2022, 08:58:33 AM »
Lee divided his army twice into three portions while facing an opponent much superior in numbers, but the terrain favored Lee, the area is called "The Wilderness".

Hooker in command of the Union Army was mostly confused and befuddled and thought reports of Jackson's flanking move was Lee retreating, he thought he had won without much fighting, so he stayed in place.

Cincydawg

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #653 on: May 02, 2022, 11:59:35 AM »
Why did the SR-71 Have to Refuel Right After Take-off?

“Many people believe we refueled after takeoff because the aircraft leaked fuel so profusely that we needed to fuel up quickly,” says Col. Richard H. Graham. “We had to refuel right after takeoff for only one reason, and it wasn’t because we leaked JP-7 fuel on the ground. Yes, the plane does leak fuel, but not enough to require refueling after takeoff.
“The JP-7 fuel reaches temperatures well over 300 degrees F. during Mach 3 cruise. , making the fumes in each of the six fuel tanks very volatile and potentially explosive. The metal skin of the aircraft approaches 400 degrees F., adding to the volatility of the fuel inside the tanks. One of our aircraft limitations was a maximum speed of Mach 2.6 without an inert atmosphere inside the fuel tanks.
“The aircraft had three liquid nitrogen Dewar flasks containing 260 liters of liquid nitrogen, located in the nose wheel well. The only way to ensure a 100 percent inert atmosphere in each fuel tank was to refuel the plane inflight completely full of JP-7, allowing ambient air in each fuel tank to vent overboard. Once full of fuel, gaseous nitrogen would now dominate each fuel tank’s empty space above as it burned off JP-7. The nitrogen gas pressurized each fuel tank to 1.5 psi above ambient pressure and inerts the space above the heated fuel to prevent autogenous ignition. This is why we refueled after takeoff."
"Then we could safely accelerate beyond Mach 2.6.” “There was one other way of achieving tank inerting, called a Yo-Yo.  but this was a maintenance nightmare. A few of our missions required the SR-71 to accelerate to Mach 3+ right after takeoff with a 65,000-pound fuel load. The Yo-Yo procedure had the crew chief completely refuel the plane to full tanks of 80,000 pounds of fuel. Then, with the nitrogen pressurization system working, they de-fueled 15,000 pounds of JP-7, ending up with a 65,000-pound fuel load and a plane that was capable of going immediately to Mach 3+. Refueling the SR 71 took about 15 minutes or more but sometimes it seems like an eternity. Being assigned to the KC 135Q you did not have to be on alert all the time like other SAC tankers. The crew of the SR 71 fondly remembers the crew members of the KC 135Q for being vigilant about keeping them safe. Thank you. Information was found on the website the

MrNubbz

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #654 on: May 02, 2022, 12:13:00 PM »
Jackson rode near the head of the marching column. His face appeared flushed, and his eyes flashed in anticipation of the coming conflict. When he reached the intersection, he dismounted and spoke with Generals Lee, A.P. Hill, and J.E.B. Stuart. The informal council lasted but a few minutes. Jackson then pointed toward the head of his moving column and galloped off. It was the last time that he and Lee would ever meet.
Lee stated - "he has lost his left arm but i have lost my right"
"I don't want to belong to any club that would have me as a member" -  Groucho Marx

FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #655 on: May 03, 2022, 08:50:39 AM »
Traditional Bedouin tents are made out of black goat hair. The Bedouin term for tent is buryuut hajar, which literally means "house of hair."

Dee Snider
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

Cincydawg

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #656 on: May 06, 2022, 07:51:53 PM »
158 years ago today in 1864, Robert E Lee in his first encounter with Ulysses S Grant personally rallies his men in the Battle of the Wilderness, holding off the Federal army and forcing them to disengage the next morning.
Grant would be the 6th commanding general to face Lee. The numbers and supplies would be in Grant’s favor, however Lee had a determined veteran army holding defensive positions in terrain they were familiar with. The battlefield would be a dense woods with tiny roads and a few pockets of clearings for farms. On the first day of the battle, the rebels managed to hold off the Federals and hope for much needed reinforcements to arrive the next morning. The woods caught fire and burned throughout the night, consuming many wounded men on both sides who could not escape the flames. Grant is reported in some of his staff’s memoirs to have wept the night after the battle, however he would wake up the next day determined to renew the attack.
On the 2nd day of the battle, the Federals were about to break through the center of the rebel position when Robert E Lee personally led a Texan brigade to hold the position in a famously recorded incident:
“Scarce had we moved a step, when Gen. Lee, in front of the whole command, raised himself in his stirrups, uncovered his grey hairs, and with an earnest, yet anxious voice, exclaimed above the din and confusion of the hour, "TEXANS ALWAYS MOVE THEM!”...never before in my lifetime or since, did I ever witness such a scene as was enacted when Lee pronounced these words, with the appealing look that he gave. A yell rent the air that must have been heard for miles around…”
Lee led 800 men across Widow Tapp’s field into a clearing that the Federal troops were marching on. Lee was spurring on his horse and encouraging the men to engage when the Texans noticed their general's foolhardy intention to remain with them as bullets whizzed by.  Alarmed for his safety the men began to repeatedly shout at the top of their lungs "LEE TO THE REAR!” One man ran up and grabbed his horse's reins as others personally pleaded “Go back, General Lee, go back!" The Texan general then approached Lee and helped him regain his senses to not risk his life. The men made way for Lee as he rode back through the cheering rebel troops.
Of the 800 soldiers who charged with Lee, all but 250 of them would be killed or wounded. But their sacrifice would delay the Federals long enough for additional reinforcements to stabilize their position.
By time nightfall came, the Federal army failed to gain any significant positions. Like many of their previous encounters with Lee, the Army of the Potomac woke up the next morning on May 8th expecting to retreat towards Washington D.C.  However, unlike his predecessors, Grant was not going to disengage after one bloody nose with Lee. To his cheering troops, Grant continued to march his army South and would fight continually over the next 5 weeks in what would become known as the Overland Campaign.


FearlessF

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #657 on: May 07, 2022, 07:55:29 AM »
The first drive-in movie theater opened in 1933 in Camden, New Jersey, the hometown of the young man who first came up with the idea.
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

 

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