header pic

Perhaps the BEST B1G Forum anywhere, here at College Football Fan Site, CFB51!!!

The 'Old' CFN/Scout Crowd- Enjoy Civil discussion, game analytics, in depth player and coaching 'takes' and discussing topics surrounding the game. You can even have your own free board, all you have to do is ask!!!

Anyone is welcomed and encouraged to join our FREE site and to take part in our community- a community with you- the user, the fan, -and the person- will be protected from intrusive actions and with a clean place to interact.


Author

Topic: Memorial Day

 (Read 1516 times)

MrNubbz

  • Legend
  • ****
  • Default Avatar
  • Posts: 8855
  • Liked:
Memorial Day
« on: May 27, 2019, 09:35:26 AM »
To the men and women of our military who have as Abraham Lincoln so eloquently put it "gave the last full measure of devotion" - Thank You and Godspeed
“Did I hear God call me an idiot? ”― William P. Young

Hawkinole

  • Starter
  • *****
  • Posts: 1189
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2019, 01:49:40 AM »
I did not see this earlier. I would like to present a brief memorial for my great uncle.  I did not have the privilege to meet him.  Nazis killed him in the Battle of Hurtgen Forest while he stood against them for freedom.

I present, Marvin P. Roeder, standing here with his sister, my Great Aunt "Mitt" Millicent Roeder. My dad's sled can also be seen. 

Dad says he thinks Marvin was having the time of his life in the military. He was 37-years old, and single. He was traveling the country and then waiting in England to go into the field of battle. He was in the battle field just a few days, when the time of his life, ended. God bless him.








Hawkinole

  • Starter
  • *****
  • Posts: 1189
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2019, 02:04:06 AM »
My grandfather's parents died within 6-months of each other when he was 16 in the early 1920s. Grandpa being the oldest child was tasked with the impossible task of raising  3 of his siblings; the fourth and youngest sibling was 1-year old and was sent to live with an aunt; she did okay -- she eventually married a man who became the CEO of Hormel. Until grandpa died in 1979 he, and my grandmother would say, it seems like yesterday when they lost Marvin. I could not understand then because yesterday was a long time ago -- before I was born. Grandpa was very close to three of his siblings, since they grew up as orphans and he raised them. 

This is the announcement of doom that would floor you, and which you hope never to receive:




Hawkinole

  • Starter
  • *****
  • Posts: 1189
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2019, 02:06:45 AM »
Grandpa carried the telegram in is wallet for decades, and then a few years before he died, he gave it to me to carry forward. I am carrying it forward.

FearlessF

  • Hall of Fame
  • *****
  • Posts: 17645
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2019, 08:00:14 AM »
that is what Memorial Day is about
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

Cincydawg

  • Ombudsman for the Secret Order of the Odd Fellows
  • Global Moderator
  • Hall of Fame
  • *****
  • Default Avatar
  • Posts: 37401
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2019, 08:12:01 AM »
One of the difficult things in the movie "We were Soldiers" was the scenes about telegrams being delivered (was in the book as well of course).  The military corrected that one at least.  It can be a strain when a lot of men from one area are killed in the same event, as happened in Cincinnati in 2005 when 14 Marines were killed, 5 of them from the Cincy area.  The local Marine reserve communications I&I staff had to respond.  They had about 5 minutes of "training".  They sent two to each parent's known address, which meant they had to provide 8 separate teams.  There was nothing written, just verbal.  That Marine group was overwhelmed obviously, and Marines from New Orleans were sent up to assist, and ironically the reverse happened in a few weeks and the hurricane hit NO.

And of course there is no "good way" to deliver such news.  

I may have mentioned that my Dad was awarded a Purple Heart for WW II.  He gave it to me to keep around 2000 or so.  He had to work to get the award for some reason, records lost in the St. Louis fire was part of it, he kept writing to Congress about it, and finally got it around 1990.  I know he had a Purple Heart tag on his car and it's on his grave marker.

I don't know of a best way to treat Memorial Day other than spending time with those who mean something to you and letting them know they do.  Days of reflection can be a reminder to say stuff we probably should say more often while we still can.  Vita brevis.

CWSooner

  • All Star
  • ******
  • Posts: 4303
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2019, 05:59:58 PM »
From the Font of All Wisdom and Knowledge:

Thirty-four Virginia National Guard soldiers from the town of Bedford were part of D-Day. Nineteen of them were killed during the first day of the invasion, and four more died during the rest of the Normandy campaign. The town and the "Bedford Boys" had proportionately suffered the greatest losses of the campaign, thus inspiring the United States Congress to establish the D-Day memorial in Bedford.

The Bedford Boys included three sets of brothers: twins Roy and Ray Stevens, with Ray killed during the landing while Roy survived, Clyde and Jack Powers, with Jack killed and Clyde wounded but surviving, and Bedford and Raymond Hoback, both killed. The losses by the soldiers from Bedford were chronicled in the best-selling book The Bedford Boys by Alex Kershaw, and helped inspire the movie Saving Private Ryan. The movie's director, Steven Spielberg, helped fund the memorial, including funding for the creation of the Arnold M. Spielberg Theater, in honor of his father, a World War II veteran.

That level of loss from one small town is almost inconceivable.
Play Like a Champion Today

MrNubbz

  • Legend
  • ****
  • Default Avatar
  • Posts: 8855
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2019, 09:45:57 PM »
The Bedford Boys included three sets of brothers: twins Roy and Ray Stevens, with Ray killed during the landing while Roy survived, Clyde and Jack Powers, with Jack killed and Clyde wounded but surviving, and Bedford and Raymond Hoback, both killed. The losses by the soldiers from Bedford were chronicled in the best-selling book The Bedford Boys by Alex Kershaw, and helped inspire the movie Saving Private Ryan. The movie's director, Steven Spielberg, helped fund the memorial, including funding for the creation of the Arnold M. Spielberg Theater, in honor of his father, a World War II veteran.

That level of loss from one small town is almost inconceivable.
I thought they did away with keeping units together from the same area in the Civil War.A hot day in the field and there's no young men to come home to.I'm aware of the Bedford Boys.But I had read Saving Private Ryan was based on the Neilands who were friends of Skip Mucks who was a friend of Don Malarkeys in Band of Brothers from Steven Ambose/Speilberg
“Did I hear God call me an idiot? ”― William P. Young

Hawkinole

  • Starter
  • *****
  • Posts: 1189
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2019, 02:36:29 AM »
I thought they did away with keeping units together from the same area in the Civil War.A hot day in the field and there's no young men to come home to.I'm aware of the Bedford Boys.But I had read Saving Private Ryan was based on the Neilands who were friends of Skip Mucks who was a friend of Don Malarkeys in Band of Brothers from Steven Ambose/Speilberg
Not exactly. We have a museum in Waterloo, Iowa to this effect, since the policy was either not enforced, or loosely enforced, and five brothers perished together in WW II: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sullivan_brothers (five Sullivan brothers).

Cincydawg

  • Ombudsman for the Secret Order of the Odd Fellows
  • Global Moderator
  • Hall of Fame
  • *****
  • Default Avatar
  • Posts: 37401
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2019, 06:40:00 AM »
Reserve units are naturally going to be manned by folks from the same general area, which can be 2-3 stateswide.

MrNubbz

  • Legend
  • ****
  • Default Avatar
  • Posts: 8855
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2019, 07:19:34 AM »
I remember in August 2005 the Brook Park unit got hit hard also like the Lucky Lima.I know BP Unit had soldiers from across the state.

*https://www.nytimes.com/2005/08/04/us/iraq-casualties-hit-hard-in-a-suburb-of-cleveland.html*
“Did I hear God call me an idiot? ”― William P. Young

Cincydawg

  • Ombudsman for the Secret Order of the Odd Fellows
  • Global Moderator
  • Hall of Fame
  • *****
  • Default Avatar
  • Posts: 37401
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2019, 08:03:05 AM »
That was the same event.  A "track" was destroyed by a large IED and 14 Marines were KIA, all but 2 from Lima 3/25.  The two were part of the track crew.  One was apparently blown clear somehow.  Lima Company is actually based near Columbus at Rickenbacker.  The larger regiment is in Brook Park and comprises three companies plus staff, Kilo, India, and Lima companies.  Kilo and India for whatever reason were not "in the field" nearly as much as Lima.

Lima had 23 KIA and 59 Purple Hearts out of 186 deployed.  This is their story.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRMCjzTYbY0




CWSooner

  • All Star
  • ******
  • Posts: 4303
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #12 on: June 05, 2019, 10:04:28 AM »
Not exactly. We have a museum in Waterloo, Iowa to this effect, since the policy was either not enforced, or loosely enforced, and five brothers perished together in WW II: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sullivan_brothers (five Sullivan brothers).
The armed forces implemented the policy after the loss of the Sullivan brothers, who had all enlisted explicitly to serve with each other.  There have been two U.S. Navy destroyers named USS The Sullivans. One is a museum ship in Buffalo and the other is still in service.
I don't know of any such policy from the Civil War.  In fact, the volunteer regiments that made up most of the Civil War armies, were built on local enlistments.
It's why most Civil War memorials are about states and state units.
And the fact that WWII was so different is why the WWII memorial in Washington, DC, makes no sense.  We didn't fight WWII as states.  Even the National Guard units got replacements from everywhere once they were federalized.

The Bedford Boys were in the 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry ("Blue and Gray") Division.  That division was made up of two Maryland NG regiments (the 115th and 175th) and the one Virginia NG regiment.  6 June 1944 was its first day in combat in World War II, which is why its components were still largely manned by guys from the same states.  The 116th was actually attached to the 1st Infantry Division ("the Big Red One") for the initial assault.
Play Like a Champion Today

Cincydawg

  • Ombudsman for the Secret Order of the Odd Fellows
  • Global Moderator
  • Hall of Fame
  • *****
  • Default Avatar
  • Posts: 37401
  • Liked:
Re: Memorial Day
« Reply #13 on: June 05, 2019, 10:12:08 AM »
I believe we're coming up on 75 tomorrow.  It is amazing that many of them are still living 75 years after, I suppose they were around 20 at the time.

I have visited Omaha twice in my life, and hope to go back again.  The cemetery is extremely moving.  The beaches are very quiet now, some vacation houses here and there, and some remaining German fortifications.  

Obama of course was assaulted by the !st Division which had experience from North Africa and the 29th Division which was "green".  The 29th acquitted itself quite well as I recall.  The movie "The Big Red One" was interesting I think, included Luke Skywalker.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_A0ZvUIDfE

Lee Marvin left school at 18 to enlist in the United States Marine Corps Reserve on August 12, 1942. He served with the 4th Marine Division in the Pacific Theater during World War II.[6] While serving as a member of "I" Company, 3rd Battalion24th Marines4th Marine Division, he was wounded in action on June 18, 1944, during the assault on Mount Tapochau in the Battle of Saipan, during which most of his company were casualties.[7] He was hit by machine gun fire, which severed his sciatic nerve,[8] and then was hit again in the foot by a sniper.[9] After over a year of medical treatment in naval hospitals, Marvin was given a medical discharge with the rank of private first class (he had been a corporal years earlier but had been demoted after causing trouble)[9] in 1945 at Philadelphia.[10]

Marvin's military awards include: the Purple Heart Medal, the Presidential Unit Citation, the American Campaign Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, and the World War II Victory MedalCombat Action Ribbon.



 

Support the Site!