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Topic: Beer

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CWSooner

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Re: Beer
« Reply #210 on: November 09, 2019, 11:29:32 AM »
Sounds like there's a swallowed vowel between the "l" and the "v" in "Calvados."
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utee94

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Re: Beer
« Reply #211 on: November 09, 2019, 11:51:01 AM »
A consonant at the end is only pronounced if the next word in sentence starts with a vowel.

Boulevard is pronounced roughly "boo-luh-var", no "d" sound at the end.

"Marc" is pronounced "Mar".  Calvados oddly enough is pronounced as it sounds, maybe because Normans aren't quite French enough.  Sometimes they call it simply "calva".


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxpLQZdyYkk

We know two folks named Bernard and another Gerrard, and the d is not pronounced.



Yup, my best buddy in Nantes-- our local field service engineer-- was named Bernard Jean.  No d at the end of Bernard, or rather, it was just totally swallowed.  it was "kind of there" but not really, if that makes sense?  I couldn't really pronounce it correctly so my best approximation was just "Bear - Nar."

He'd laugh and say "that's not my name" but he never understood that when he called me "Mar-KOOS-a" that it wasn't my name either, which is Marcus, pronounced as you'd expect it in English.  But the French are weird that way... :)

utee94

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Re: Beer
« Reply #212 on: November 09, 2019, 11:53:14 AM »
Another strange phenomenon of pronunciation, this time in English, is-- why do many Brits, and even some New Englanders, add an "r" to the end of words that end in "a?"

For example: "Hey, I have an idear!"


Cincydawg

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Re: Beer
« Reply #213 on: November 09, 2019, 02:15:16 PM »
I have no idear ...

CWSooner

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Re: Beer
« Reply #214 on: November 09, 2019, 05:39:51 PM »
Another strange phenomenon of pronunciation, this time in English, is-- why do many Brits, and even some New Englanders, add an "r" to the end of words that end in "a?"

For example: "Hey, I have an idear!"
Maybe for the opposite reason that some Americans--Southerners, usually, drop the final "r" in words like "runner."  And sometimes also do the same thing you mentioned.  My 9th-grade Alabama history teacher said both "runnah" and "winder" (for "window").
Brits who speak Received Pronunciation wouldn't be adding an "r" to the end of words.  It would have to be someone with some non-standard accent.  People from Yorkshire or Cornwall, maybe.
The word to describe use of the "r" is "rhotic."  British Received Pronunciation is non-rhotic.  "Motha and fatha went fuhthah down the road."
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utee94

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Re: Beer
« Reply #215 on: November 09, 2019, 11:00:51 PM »
Yeah, dropping the R is different than adding an R.

I have no idea why they do it, but one of my best friends of all time was a Brit who was one of my TAs when I was an engineering student at UT.  His undergrad was at Oxford but I don't remember where he was born.  He didn't do the "add an r" thing but he definitely noticed it and was as confounded as I.


Cincydawg

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Re: Beer
« Reply #216 on: November 10, 2019, 07:45:47 AM »
I read somewhere (and doubted it) that the British accent of our revolutionary period was very much like today's American accent, and their current accent came later.

Of course, one encounters all sorts of accents in Britain, but I mean the more typical "TV accent".  I've met a few Germans who I thought were Brits because their English was so good.  My step son speaks accentless American English and French which is impressive to me, both like a native.  The wife has a nice French accent.  It's interesting how good her English is until something gets technical, or financial, or medical, etc.  That makes sense, you wouldn't learn what "death benefit" means in French class, or Required Minimum Distribution.

I may be busy next week as the wife goes in for a "hip revision".  Interesting term, I've had to translate a lot of medical jargon for her of late.

CWSooner

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Re: Beer
« Reply #217 on: November 10, 2019, 07:43:46 PM »
I read somewhere (and doubted it) that the British accent of our revolutionary period was very much like today's American accent, and their current accent came later.

Of course, one encounters all sorts of accents in Britain, but I mean the more typical "TV accent".  I've met a few Germans who I thought were Brits because their English was so good.  My step son speaks accentless American English and French which is impressive to me, both like a native.  The wife has a nice French accent.  It's interesting how good her English is until something gets technical, or financial, or medical, etc.  That makes sense, you wouldn't learn what "death benefit" means in French class, or Required Minimum Distribution.

I may be busy next week as the wife goes in for a "hip revision".  Interesting term, I've had to translate a lot of medical jargon for her of late.
British Received Pronunciation (traditional "BBC English") is a result of the Great Vowel Shift in the English language that began in the mid-14th century and ended in the early 18th century.  The earliest English settlers came to America in the middle of that, about the time of the death of Shakespeare.  And, generally, their speech did not continue shifting, so that by the time of the American Revolution, Americans spoke more like Shakespeare had than the average Englishman did.
Alvin York of WWI fame came from an isolated mountain community in Tennessee, and supposedly spoke something like Shakespearean English.
Here are a some videos on how Shakespearean English sounded: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeW1eV7Oc5A&t=1s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2QYGEwM1Sk, and this long piece: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqmgeth4tFY.
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FearlessF

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Re: Beer
« Reply #218 on: January 19, 2020, 10:18:02 AM »
In a recent report shared by the IWSR, figures reveal that Tito’s Handmade Vodka has overtaken Smirnoff as the best selling vodka brand in the U.S. Following volume growth of more than 20 percent in 2019, Tito’s is now also the best selling distilled spirit in the country.

Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey was the third best-selling spirit brand last year, followed by Fireball Whisky and Crown Royal. Vodka remains the largest spirit category by volume in the U.S., despite surging sales of hard seltzers.


Launched by Bert “Tito” Beveridge in 1995, the brand’s rise to the top of the spirits category has been remarkable — particularly within the last decade. According to Statista, Tito’s sold 1.2 million 9-liter cases in 2013. By 2018, that figure had risen to 7.4 million cases, or 66.6 million bottles. That’s more than one million per week.

Tito’s sales surge likely comes from its dual popularity among trade and consumers. In a recent Punch article, which polled American bartenders on their go-to well liquor brands, Tito’s emerged as the favorite in the vodka category. Bartenders pointed to “brand recognition” and “reliability of the liquid” as their main reasons for favoring the brand.
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utee94

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Re: Beer
« Reply #219 on: January 19, 2020, 07:57:15 PM »
Yup, good on Tito.  A really good guy who has earned his success.

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Re: Beer
« Reply #220 on: January 20, 2020, 02:35:10 PM »
I was down in Florida where we had "free beer" at nightly events.  The usual choices included Mic Ultra and Bud Light.  I had been playing baseball all day, so this wasn't as awful as it might have been.  At one event later there was Modelo as an option and I ordered one, which to me is barely different from the former two options.

One event had another option and it was just as "bad".  They also had some wine and the last night when we had a banquet I resorted to their "house wine" at this country club, and it was quaffable (though not transcendent).  I have concluded that Americans in the main don't like beer, so they drink stuff labeled beer to "be cool" or something.

I brought on my own to the room some Sam Adams lager and the difference of course is astounding.  I guess it tastes too much like real beer???????

I also picked up some Sierra Nevada as I thought the wife would like it OK, but I much prefer Sam's.

The local Sweetwater 420 Pale Ale here is actually very decent for a lighter kind of beer, it actually has some flavor beyond carbonation.

CWSooner

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Re: Beer
« Reply #221 on: January 20, 2020, 03:06:20 PM »
Sam Adams' Boston Lager is too hoppy for my taste.  I like the Boston Ale better.
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utee94

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Re: Beer
« Reply #222 on: January 20, 2020, 03:10:17 PM »
Agree but I haven't even seen the Boston Ale around here in several years.

I drink local breweries almost exclusively, no matter where I am.  Fortunately we have some excellent ones here in Central Texas, but these days I find that no matter where I travel, there's some local beer that's worthy of sampling.

Of course, I'm in the midst of my annual "Sober January" right now, so no beers to be quaffed for me, for a couple more weeks at least.

utee94

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Re: Beer
« Reply #223 on: January 20, 2020, 03:11:18 PM »
As far as Mexican beers, Modelo isn't very good, but Negra Modelo is.

And Bohemia is actually a VERY good rendition of a typical European pilsner.




 

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