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Topic: Weather, Climate, and Environment

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Cincydawg

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #812 on: March 24, 2019, 10:04:58 AM »
How you pour your beer is a personal choice depending on how much carbonation you like.  

Champagne should be opened to preserve as much as possible, the cork should make a slight whoosh, not a boom, and nothing should come out of the bottle.  This takes some practice.  Pouring Champagne is more varied.  I use a glass designed for chardonnay for obviously reasons, not a flute.  I pour a small amount in each glass and then pour to bring up to a third of the volume and serve.  This limits decarbonation.  

The Champagne district makes a small amount of still wine, I've never had one.  It probably tastes somewhat like Chablis.  The carbonation is basically because the still wines from that area are not very good (it's to the north of nearly all wine grape growing regions).

Chablis is interesting to visit, not far from Paris.  There is a discrete line you can see where the region starts and ends, across the line is pasture, mostly, and inside is grape vines (some of which is Petite Chablis).  There is an outcropping of limestone that makes the region prized.

The growers worry that climate change may change their terroir and they can't move north to compensate.

Anonymous Coward

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #813 on: March 24, 2019, 10:06:02 AM »
@MrNubbz - I know that. But I don't like beer for the reasons other people do. We've talked about this. People typically want beer to be balanced and mild. I want to be kicked in the mouth. So I want the hoppiest IPA imaginable. And straight from the bottle. Anything that reduces the kick reduces my enjoyment.

MarqHusker

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #814 on: March 24, 2019, 10:42:50 AM »
So you must love HopSlam, which is a Michigan brewery.    Did you pick some up this winter?

Cincydawg

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #815 on: March 24, 2019, 11:00:55 AM »
I like balance in beer, and wine.  When I was teaching wine classes, that was one of my main points (another was to enjoy what YOU like, not what someone says is good).

The best wines I've had were hard to describe, they weren't this or that, unless I make up stuff to sound good, they were balanced, and good.  American wine makers got on a kick of making overly alcoholic wine, or tannic wine, or woody wine, or buttery wine, or fruity wine, or whatever, instead of balance.  It's good for marketing.

It may be harder to "enjoy" and reflect on a wine that has balance instead of some in your face attribute, like "blueberries" or "chocolate" or a "soupcon of asparagus".

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FearlessF

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #816 on: March 24, 2019, 11:04:02 AM »
I'd far rather drink straight from the bottle than pour it into a separate glass. I chase every bit of bite I can get, and pouring beer into a glass seeds too much CO2 gas. My goal is to keep that in solution, so emptying a beer into a glass kind of ruins its flavor for me.
well, as you know the CO2 is going to get out somehow, I don't mind a little belching and farting while drinking beer
everyone has their own taste preference.  Brewers aim for the taste gained by releasing the head.  Most of this taste is of course promoted by the odor.
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847badgerfan

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #817 on: March 24, 2019, 11:50:22 AM »
U RAH RAH! WIS CON SIN!

Anonymous Coward

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #818 on: March 24, 2019, 01:28:18 PM »
So you must love HopSlam, which is a Michigan brewery.    Did you pick some up this winter?
I love most Michigan IPAs. Hopslam counts. Ditto Humalupaliscious and Founders Centennial and All Day. But Two-Hearted is my favorite of Michigan and my favorite overall.

MrNubbz

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #819 on: March 24, 2019, 09:53:33 PM »
@MrNubbz - I know that. But I don't like beer for the reasons other people do. We've talked about this. People typically want beer to be balanced and mild. I want to be kicked in the mouth. So I want the hoppiest IPA imaginable. And straight from the bottle. Anything that reduces the kick reduces my enjoyment.
IPA's aren't on my radar,so I don't think about them,prolly why I don't recall.Don't get me wrong I'll have one if a warm Natty Lite or Milwaukee's Best isn't available 
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Cincydawg

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #820 on: March 25, 2019, 07:28:58 AM »
We're headed to Boston during what probably is the nicest weather of the year around here with dogwoods and azaleas starting to bloom (think the Masters).  The NE part of ATL is replete with very ritzy older homes with some serious landscaping that has been there for decades.  It's something to see and the wife would enjoy that.

But Boston calls (long story).  Bummer.  I may take a couple road trips to adjoining states I've never visited.

Checking boxes etc.  Boston weather forecast is "OK' at least five days out.  Weather here forecast is spectacular.  We're 14°F warmer at the moment.

CWSooner

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #821 on: March 25, 2019, 12:42:29 PM »
What do you do with the mushrooms after they are contaminated?

Superfund sites are real problems.  They often just get brownfielded, as the funds are not there to clean up any but the very worst.
Re-reading the articles, I see that I misstated the point about mushrooms.  It is mushroom compost--mushrooms grown on a chicken-litter-and-hay compost, then composted themselves--that is used to filter the contaminated water in ponds.  Each pond takes in water at the top and exits it below the compost layer into the next pond.  The ponds in total are cleaning about half a million gallons of contaminated water a day, but contaminated water is going to be coming out of the abandoned mines for a long time.  The compost is supposed to last 20 years or more.  After that, it will have to be "stored."  Where that storage will be has not yet been determined.
The area is certainly a large brownfield now, and will probably remain that way for many more decades.  Most of the state money in the cleanup has gone to relocate the former inhabitants of the area.
I didn't know this before, but it's part of a larger tri-state project that also includes SE Kansas and SW Missouri.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2019, 12:51:36 PM by CWSooner »
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Cincydawg

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #822 on: March 25, 2019, 01:03:09 PM »
Cleaning contaminated water is "easy" but can require a lot of energy depending on how it's done.

I could think of better (IMHO) filtration materials than mushroom compost in terms of volume of material you end up with.

CWSooner

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #823 on: March 25, 2019, 01:31:59 PM »
It does seem like a bulky filtration medium.  Maybe it's good because either (A) it's cheap, (B) it's effective, or (C) doesn't require much energy.

The metals they're trying to remove are lead, zinc, cadmium, nickel, and iron, and it seems like each pond or series of ponds is designed to concentrate on one metal.  I don't know if mushrooms are better than some alternatives given that design.
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Cincydawg

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #824 on: March 25, 2019, 01:59:33 PM »
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1878535210001334

Useful article on the different methods of heavy metal removal.  

"Various low-cost adsorbents, derived from agricultural waste, industrial by-product, natural material, or modified biopolymers, have been recently developed and applied for the removal of heavy metals from metal-contaminated wastewater. In general, there are three main steps involved in pollutant sorption onto solid sorbent: (i) the transport of the pollutant from the bulk solution to the sorbent surface; (ii) adsorption on the particle surface; and (iii) transport within the sorbent particle. Technical applicability and cost-effectiveness are the key factors that play major roles in the selection of the most suitable adsorbent to treat inorganic effluent."


CWSooner

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #825 on: March 25, 2019, 02:22:17 PM »
The purple area along the Missouri River extends into NW Missouri and NE Kansas.  That includes my last Army post, Fort Leavenworth.  I've been getting some pictures from a couple of former colleagues there.
Here are a few.

Here the Platte River is above the bottom of the BNSF railroad bridge.  So far not too much flotsam has piled up against the bridge.

These are RR tracks descending into the flood waters, vicinity of Waldron, MO.  Waldron is just to the north of where I-435 crosses the Missouri River from Kansas into Missouri.  The BNSF tracks go below the Interstate bridge.

There are RR tracks down there somewhere.  Under the closest stretch of water, I think.
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