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Topic: Weather, Climate, and Environment

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Brutus Buckeye

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4606 on: April 04, 2021, 10:53:29 PM »
« Last Edit: April 04, 2021, 11:01:21 PM by Brutus Buckeye »
1919, 20, 21, 28, 29, 31, 34, 35, 36, 37, 42, 44
WWH: 1952, 54, 55, 57, 58, 60, 61, 62, 63, 65, 67, 68, 70, 72, 74, 75
1979, 81, 82, 84, 87, 94, 98
2001, 02, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19

FearlessF

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4607 on: April 07, 2021, 01:01:54 PM »
Barakah unit 1 entered commercial operation today, the Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation (ENEC) has announced. The unit, which is operated by Nawah Energy Company, has been the single largest electricity generator in the UAE since reaching 100% power in early December. ENEC said the 1400-megawatt unit, which is in the Al Dhafra region of Abu Dhabi, is now providing "constant, reliable and sustainable electricity around the clock". As a result, ENEC says it is "now leading the largest decarbonisation effort of any industry in the UAE to date".

https://www.world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/UAE-s-first-nuclear-unit-starts-commercial-operati
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FearlessF

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4608 on: April 07, 2021, 01:03:13 PM »
Diamond battery powered by nuclear waste runs for 28,000 years
Would you use one in your phone though?

A U.S. startup combined radioactive isotopes from nuclear waste with ultra-slim layers of nanodiamonds to assemble a ridiculous battery that allegedly can last 28,000 years.

According to the California startup in question, called NDB (Nano Diamond Battery), their product is a “high-power diamond-based alpha, beta, and neutron voltaic battery.”


https://www.zmescience.com/science/diamond-battery-powered-by-nuclear-waste-runs-for-28000-years/amp/
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FearlessF

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4609 on: April 08, 2021, 01:08:39 PM »
Almost every major city in the Czech Republic has a system of combined heat and power stations that are mainly fueled by coal. However, as the European Union gradually moves away from coal as an energy source, those cities are urgently looking for alternatives. While it is technologically possible to make the transition from coal to natural gas, the heat is likely to be much more expensive as a result.

Researchers at the Czech Technical University in Prague and the University of West Bohemia in Pilsen have come up with an innovative solution: the Teplator, a system which uses the radioactive decay heat produced by spent fuel rods from nuclear reactors to heat water. The team, led by Radek Skoda, has already been granted a patent for the concept and design of what it says is a very cost-effective alternative to coal and gas-powered plants.

Skoda, of the Czech Technical University, told DW that the project was particularly noteworthy because it allows power stations to generate heat from spent fuel elements that otherwise would have to be stored and cooled at great expense for many years.


https://www.dw.com/en/czech-researchers-develop-revolutionary-nuclear-heating-plant/a-57072924
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FearlessF

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4610 on: April 08, 2021, 03:09:26 PM »
San Diego-based Aptera has just unveiled a new solar-based three-wheeler it claims doesn’t require charging—but just happens to have 1,000-mile battery-electric range for good measure.

The futuristic trike, which has an almost Jetsons flying car-like aesthetic, features more than 32 square feet of solar panels that are integrated into the body. This setup allows the two-seater to travel up to 45 miles a day and up to 11,000 miles per year on energy harnessed from the sun, according to the company.


https://robbreport.com/motors/cars/aptera-new-solar-ev-can-cover-1000-miles-no-charging-1234585242/?fbclid=IwAR3Bxz_g4wLlKlH6EcjFvkan9xG2qjd8xuH_LnyM_9oA5O9BMO5FU58y_bk


https://youtu.be/HNjUdTJjiNk
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betarhoalphadelta

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4611 on: April 08, 2021, 03:40:39 PM »
San Diego-based Aptera has just unveiled a new solar-based three-wheeler it claims doesn’t require charging—but just happens to have 1,000-mile battery-electric range for good measure.

The futuristic trike, which has an almost Jetsons flying car-like aesthetic, features more than 32 square feet of solar panels that are integrated into the body. This setup allows the two-seater to travel up to 45 miles a day and up to 11,000 miles per year on energy harnessed from the sun, according to the company.


https://robbreport.com/motors/cars/aptera-new-solar-ev-can-cover-1000-miles-no-charging-1234585242/?fbclid=IwAR3Bxz_g4wLlKlH6EcjFvkan9xG2qjd8xuH_LnyM_9oA5O9BMO5FU58y_bk


https://youtu.be/HNjUdTJjiNk
How badly does the range diminish with my 265# ass in the driver's seat? :57:

Cincydawg

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4612 on: April 08, 2021, 03:51:07 PM »
I don't see 32 sq ft of solar panel on that model.

For a 300-watt solar panel with dimensions 64 inches x 39 inches (1.61 meters squared or 17.31 square feet), the peak instantaneous electricity production per square foot at STC is 14.58 watts per square foot. This is typical for residential solar panels being sold in the US in 2020.

Solar Panel Car Roofs: Are they a good idea? (solarreviews.com)


A few years ago, we did the math on how many solar panels you need to charge an electric car. Looking at the Nissan Leaf, at 50 miles per day, we came up with a total of 3.44 kilowatts of solar panels. Some of the best home solar panels on the market make around 345 watts under full sun. You’d need 10 of them to make enough solar energy to power the Nissan Leaf, a small sedan, on its daily journey from work to home, if you drive 25 miles each way.
That’s 250 square feet of solar panels on IDEAL roof space in order to make that much energy.

That’s why solar powered cars aren’t practical. There simply isn’t enough surface area on a car to allow the solar cells to generate enough electricity for the average driver, especially considering the surfaces of a car aren’t always pointed in the right direction or not under shade.
That impracticality isn’t stopping automakers, though. At least a few of them have added photovoltaic cells under special glass on their cars. Some manufacturers add a solar roof or hood, and at least one also puts cells into the door and quarter panels.




betarhoalphadelta

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4613 on: April 08, 2021, 04:22:18 PM »
Solar Panel Car Roofs: Are they a good idea? (solarreviews.com)
The better question is whether they're useful enough to be worth it. 

Yes, for the obvious points that article makes, a fully solar-powered car isn't practical. 

However, for a car that is powered by electricity, the sun is free. The question becomes whether the amount of electricity provided by the sun realistically makes the cost of the solar panels and associated charging electronics worth it. Every kWh that comes from the sun offsets one that comes from your power company, so the question is how long it takes to amortize the cost of the panels?

If for a typical consumer the solar panels in a car "pay for themselves" in 6 months, I'd say keep putting them on. If it's going to take 25 years, well, then it's pretty much pointless for a consumer to pay extra for them.

Cincydawg

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4614 on: April 08, 2021, 04:32:28 PM »
Looks like a gimmick to me, something that sounds good but is expensive and contributes little to a car's range, like practicably speaking maybe 5 miles.

Your better off with a home PV system optimized for angle to the sun to charge your EV.  And if you have accident damage, you won't have PV damage.


betarhoalphadelta

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4615 on: April 08, 2021, 04:40:58 PM »
Looks like a gimmick to me, something that sounds good but is expensive and contributes little to a car's range, like practicably speaking maybe 5 miles.
Over what time horizon? Per day? 

If you keep an EV, say, 5 years, that's 1826.25 days. Which means that you'll have generated over 9,000 miles worth of range. 

This Car and Driver article says the average cost per mile of electricity is 5.5c. Which would put the cost of that electricity at about $500.

So if the additional cost of the panels and charging electronics in the car's design is <$500, you're coming out ahead. 


Quote
Your better off with a home PV system optimized for angle to the sun to charge your EV.  And if you have accident damage, you won't have PV damage.

True, but home PV systems have a MUCH higher acquisition cost. 

If I'm buying an EV and I have a choice between a $500 option on the EV to add solar charging, or I need to spend $10,000+ to put a solar system onto my roof, it's not an apples-to-apples comparison. 

Cincydawg

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4616 on: April 08, 2021, 04:48:14 PM »
Electricity here is 6 cents per kwhr, which is low of course.  A Chevy Bolt has a 66 kwhr battery and 256 mile range (numbers from memory, might be wrong).

So, I could charge that sucker for under $4?  And drive 256 miles.  That C&D figure may have been for California costs or something.

How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Chevy Bolt EV? In short, the Bolt EV costs around $7-8 to charge its 60kWh battery pack at home. Electricity rates vary across the U.S. of course, but the average price is 13.27 cents per kWh according to U.S. Energy and Information Administration (EIA) figures for July 2019.Sep 30, 2019






betarhoalphadelta

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4617 on: April 08, 2021, 05:20:07 PM »
Yeah, the C&D article used the national average. 

I agree with you in principle that solar charging on vehicles is mostly more about looking green and high-tech than it is about a good economic decision--if it was good economically you'd see it on all the new EVs coming out. It's probably a gimmick.

That said, like anything it all eventually comes down to an economic decision. If PV cell efficiency or cost improve, it will probably start to make some sense to integrate it into the vehicle. It may never be a significant amount of charge per day, but could pay for itself quickly enough with free energy from the sun to be worth it.

Cincydawg

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4618 on: April 08, 2021, 05:34:18 PM »
So, $7.50 for enough to drive 256 miles.  That would take about ten gallons with an equivalent ICE vehicle, close to $25.  An extra 5 miles doesn't cost very much at all.

My GTI got over 40 mpg on the trip up to DC, only 35 coming back, I guess it's uphill.  (We hit traffic and that includes some city driving.)  I'm pretty happy with a car with decent space inside and good acceleration that can exceed 35 mpg.  It gets 25-27 around town.

The wife had wanted a convertible and I am recently "cashed up" and had been looking and she said she just wants to stay with the GTI.




betarhoalphadelta

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #4619 on: April 08, 2021, 05:48:50 PM »
As I've mentioned, I'm somewhat car-committed for at least another 5+ years or so due to the kids [and dog]. The Flex guzzles gas like a pig and is the size of a rhino, but I swear the driver's seat is a La-Z-Boy... Surprisingly it handles pretty well for its heft, as it's low and wide compared to a typical SUV. 

By that point, I might be considering EV.

 

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