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Topic: OT - Weird History

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Cincydawg

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #28 on: January 27, 2022, 12:33:19 PM »
The site in Atlanta was apparently Kennesaw Mountain, I presume.  There were other battles here that are now housed over, some historical markers are dotted about including one very near me.  Things in person have a different perspective for me versus studying even good maps.

medinabuckeye1

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #29 on: January 27, 2022, 02:21:15 PM »
The site in Atlanta was apparently Kennesaw Mountain, I presume.  There were other battles here that are now housed over, some historical markers are dotted about including one very near me.  Things in person have a different perspective for me versus studying even good maps.
Yes, it was and I agree wholeheartedly.  You don't really get a feel for how insane the charges were until you stand in that tree line and look at all of the ground the Union Soldiers were supposed to cover while climbing a mountain and being shot at.  It is the same at Gettysburg.  Reading about it or looking at pictures isn't the same as standing at The Angle and looking out across the vast field that the Confederates ran across while being mowed down in spectacular numbers by Union riflemen and Union cannons loaded with chains, rocks, and whatever else the Union Cannoneers could find (effectively turning a 4" smoothbore cannon into a giant shotgun.  

medinabuckeye1

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #30 on: January 27, 2022, 02:54:26 PM »
Shoot me a PM if it's in book form and could get thru the local library from search Ohio
It looks like the Columbus Library has one but it is "in use":

https://cml.bibliocommons.com/v2/record/S105C981814

Here is one for sale:

https://www.garrisonhousebooks.com/product/18804/Joshua-DeWees-His-Civil-War-Diary-Army-of-the-Cumberland-DeWees--Joseph-editor

I have his service record of his hanging in my office (will try to attach a picture).  

More on my 2-great grandfather Joshua DeWees:
Joshua was born in Ohio in 1843.  His father William died when he was a child.  He was raised Quaker.  The Quakers opposed slavery but they were also pacifists.  When the Civil War started he felt that sitting around a Meeting House (Quaker version of church) talking about ending slavery was somewhat less effective than joining the Union Army and going down South to free the slaves so he joined up.  

The Quaker Church excommunicated him for joining the Army.  That isn't really true, their term isn't "excommunicated", that is Catholic.  I actually don't know what their term is but Quakers are called "Friends" so I always say that they unfriended him, LoL.  

Joshua's brother Caleb was killed at Gettysburg.  I learned this from reading in Joshua's diary entry for July 5, 1863 that he "received a telegram that brother Caleb had been killed at Gettysburg".  My problem was that Joshua's language made that unclear.  I didn't know if he meant "Brother Caleb" as in "brother in the faith" like "Brother Nubbz" or if he meant his biological brother.  I spent an afternoon at the Historical Society in Columbus and discovered that a Caleb DeWees had served in the 73rd OVI and been killed at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863. 

There is a monument to the 73rd OVI just South of Gettysburg off Taneytown Rd inside the Gettysburg National Cemetery where my 3-great Uncle Caleb is buried.  The 73rd OVI defended a section of the Union Line near Culps Hill just South of the small village of Gettysburg and not far from the home of Jenni Wade (the only civilian casualty at Gettysburg).  Jennie was killed while baking bread in her kitchen for the Union Soldiers and, for all I know, Caleb may have met her and/or eaten some of her bread because he was in that immediate vicinity.  

Joshua survived the war and had a son in the 1870's who was my great-grandfather.  His daughter was my grandmother (1909-2012) and her daughter (1944-present) is my mom.  In my copy of the diary I have a picture of my grandmother sitting on Joshua's knee and in the picture my grandmother appears to be about 4-5 years old so the picture was probably taken in 1913-1914ish.  

MrNubbz

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #31 on: January 27, 2022, 03:18:00 PM »
For a second I thought you wrote Joshua Tree thinking so that's where they got the name for the album and not some desert plant.That would be something if he had really eaten at Jenny Wade's house.
"The longer I live, the more convinced am I that this planet is used by other planets as a lunatic asylum." - George Bernard Shaw

medinabuckeye1

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #32 on: January 27, 2022, 03:27:40 PM »
I've been to every major Civil War battlefield except Shiloh.
This is really neat.  I will say, it is easier for you in Atlanta since obviously most of the battles were fought in the South.  

The next two I really want to get to are Antietam and Perryville.  

Antietam:
The bloodiest day in American History.  This battle is much less well known than Gettysburg mostly because it was a less comprehensive Union victory but it had a major impact on history.  For one thing, just like Gettysburg about a year later, this battle was forced by the Union as a check on a Confederate invasion of the North.  Secondly, Lincoln had already written the Emancipation Proclamation but he and his Cabinet felt that releasing it would reek of desperation unless it could be released after a Union victory.  Antietam was somewhat inconclusive but that was good enough for Lincoln and the Proclamation was released September 22, 1862 - five days after the Battle.  

Perryville:
This battle has much less of a macro-strategic interest but it has a personal connection.  My 2-Great Grandfather Joshua fought there.  It was his first action.  The 97th OVI had mustered in on September 1, 1862 at Zanesville and was then sent to a camp outside Columbus for training.  About a month later Confederate Troops under Braxton Bragg invaded Kentucky hoping to trigger a secessionist takeover of that state.  Union commanders in the area were short on troops so Joshua's and his unit's training was cut short and they were put on a train bound for Cincinnati.  Then crossed the Ohio River to Covington on a steamboat then marched South.   - side note - 

If you've ever driven South out of Cincy on I71/I75 you know how ENORMOUS that hill is.  Every time I do that it amazes me that these guys did it in wool uniforms while carrying weapons, ammunition, food, etc.  I think I'd have gotten about half way up that hill and said "Why don't we just let them secede".  

Anyway, October 8, 1862 at the Battle of Perryville is listed on Joshua's service record as the first of his "156 days under fire".  

From what I've heard the annual reenactment at Perryville is one of the most well attended in the whole country largely due to the fact that it is one of the few northern battlefields so it is closer to all of the northern reenactors.  Since Joshua was actually there and he was a common soldier I also think that I could get a run of his diary printed up and probably sell them pretty easily at the reenactment.  

Cincydawg

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #33 on: January 27, 2022, 03:29:16 PM »
Berry Oakley was killed in a motorcycle accident just three blocks from where Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle accident.  They are buried next to each other.

Buried Here - Gregg Allman, Duane Allman And Berry Oakley (rockandrollroadmap.com)

medinabuckeye1

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #34 on: January 27, 2022, 03:30:19 PM »
For a second I thought you wrote Joshua Tree thinking so that's where they got the name for the album and not some desert plant.That would be something if he had really eaten at Jenny Wade's house.
He may have but obviously it would be impossible to find out since neither he nor Ms. Wade survived the Battle and even if they had they wouldn't be around today since that was 150+ years ago.  I was actually at Gettysburg for the 150th anniversary on July 3, 2013 and there were more of us tourists there then than there were soldiers there in 1863.  

Cincydawg

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #35 on: January 27, 2022, 03:35:51 PM »
My third book recounts what would have happened, maybe, at Gettysburg had Jackson lived.  In Book Two, he was saved by a slave from being shot.  I like irony.

longhorn320

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #36 on: January 27, 2022, 04:08:29 PM »
My third book recounts what would have happened, maybe, at Gettysburg had Jackson lived.  In Book Two, he was saved by a slave from being shot.  I like irony.
would they have gone to the right like Hood wanted
They won't let me give blood anymore. The burnt orange color scares the hell out of the doctors.

Cincydawg

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #37 on: January 27, 2022, 04:12:33 PM »
In my recreation of history, the action was all on Day One, there was no Day Two, the Union forces fell back on Pipe Creek and did not hold the ridge line against Jackson's piecemeal late attack that afternoon.  The Pipe Creek line turned out to be impregnable to direct assault.

Cincydawg

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #38 on: January 27, 2022, 04:19:42 PM »
On This Day in History > January 27, 1785:
The Georgia General Assembly incorporated the University of Georgia. It was the first state-funded institution of higher learning in the new republic.

"When the University of Georgia was incorporated by an act of the General Assembly on January 27, 1785, Georgia became the first state to charter a state-supported university. In 1784 the General Assembly had set aside 40,000 acres of land to endow a college or seminary of learning.
At the first meeting of the board of trustees, held in Augusta on February 13, 1786, Abraham Baldwin was selected president of the University. Baldwin, a native of Connecticut and a graduate of Yale University who had come to Georgia in 1784, drafted the charter adopted by the General Assembly.
The University was actually established in 1801 when a committee of the board of trustees selected a land site. John Milledge, later a governor of the state, purchased and gave to the board of trustees the chosen tract of 633 acres on the banks of the Oconee River in northeast Georgia.
Josiah Meigs was named president of the University and work was begun on the first building, originally called Franklin College in honor of Benjamin Franklin and now known as Old College. The University graduated its first class in 1804.
The curriculum of traditional classical studies was broadened in 1843 to include courses in law, and again in 1872 when the University received federal funds for instruction in agriculture and mechanical arts."




OrangeAfroMan

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #39 on: January 27, 2022, 05:13:00 PM »
Florida's role in the Civil War was basically producing food for the South.  No real big battles.  The North kept Key West and Ft Jefferson (the one you can take a seaplane to now) the whole time.

The governor offed himself after the war. 
“The Swamp is where Gators live.  We feel comfortable there, but we hope our opponents feel tentative. A swamp is hot and sticky and can be dangerous." - Steve Spurrier

bayareabadger

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #40 on: January 27, 2022, 06:22:52 PM »
I used to live in a town with a lot of 1870s architecture. For ... a reason. 

OrangeAfroMan

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Re: OT - Weird History
« Reply #41 on: January 27, 2022, 06:29:11 PM »
You guys might know this:  did Hitler have any inkling about the Japanese planning to bomb Pearl Harbor or any direct attack on the US?  
Did he even share his wishes of what their actions would be?  Did they give the Germans any 'heads up' on their actions or plans?
“The Swamp is where Gators live.  We feel comfortable there, but we hope our opponents feel tentative. A swamp is hot and sticky and can be dangerous." - Steve Spurrier

 

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