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Topic: Weather, Climate, Environment, and Energy

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MarqHusker

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5950 on: April 23, 2022, 08:18:40 PM »
Psssh.   That's a 'Tuesday' in the plains states in the spring.   

FearlessF

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5951 on: April 25, 2022, 12:20:46 PM »
So what is natural hydrogen
While there remains some debate natural hydrogen, which has until now rarely been a focal point, there is consensus around the two main ways underground accumulations of the molecule develop.

The first, called ‘serpentinisation,’ is an underground reaction between iron and water. As McIntyre, who spent 13 years at Shell as an exploration geologist explains, the reaction occurs when water comes into contact with iron rich rocks in the subsurface, deep enough to be unaffected atmospheric oxygen. “Then those iron-rich rocks, they effectively want to rust, they want to turn into iron oxides… so they will strip the oxygen atom off the H2O and that releases the hydrogen,” McIntyre tells pv magazine Australia.

“This is a well understood process and people have known about it for many, many years. It’s just that nobody’s really considered if this could be an economically viable process.”

The second mechanism is radiolysis of water, in which radioactive rocks split the H20 molecules into its component atoms. The hydrogen then migrates away from the radioactive rocks to accumulate or possibly get stuck in a fracture flux system underground.


https://www.pv-magazine-australia.com/2022/04/20/natural-hydrogen-how-the-potential-wellspring-works-and-why-companies-are-pouncing/
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longhorn320

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5952 on: April 25, 2022, 01:16:36 PM »
So what is natural hydrogen
While there remains some debate natural hydrogen, which has until now rarely been a focal point, there is consensus around the two main ways underground accumulations of the molecule develop.

The first, called ‘serpentinisation,’ is an underground reaction between iron and water. As McIntyre, who spent 13 years at Shell as an exploration geologist explains, the reaction occurs when water comes into contact with iron rich rocks in the subsurface, deep enough to be unaffected atmospheric oxygen. “Then those iron-rich rocks, they effectively want to rust, they want to turn into iron oxides… so they will strip the oxygen atom off the H2O and that releases the hydrogen,” McIntyre tells pv magazine Australia.

“This is a well understood process and people have known about it for many, many years. It’s just that nobody’s really considered if this could be an economically viable process.”

The second mechanism is radiolysis of water, in which radioactive rocks split the H20 molecules into its component atoms. The hydrogen then migrates away from the radioactive rocks to accumulate or possibly get stuck in a fracture flux system underground.


https://www.pv-magazine-australia.com/2022/04/20/natural-hydrogen-how-the-potential-wellspring-works-and-why-companies-are-pouncing/
You have clearly been around CD too damn much
They won't let me give blood anymore. The burnt orange color scares the hell out of the doctors.

Cincydawg

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5953 on: April 26, 2022, 06:07:32 AM »
Zero, then negative: Why getting to net-zero isn’t enough | The Hill

Yet another fairy tale with no substantive arguments.  But it does highlight the clear fact "we" are going to continue pumping CO2 into the atmosphere for years to come, in large quantities, and the "commitments" are just political statements.

847badgerfan

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5954 on: April 26, 2022, 07:20:40 AM »
Let's remove all of the levees.
U RAH RAH! WIS CON SIN!

Cincydawg

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MrNubbz

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5956 on: April 26, 2022, 07:30:07 AM »
A week ago Mon/Tue we had 2 days of snow/ice then sat/sun/ it was 83/86 yesterday 40s-50 rain tonite supposedly snow/ice - da Fuq
"I don't want to belong to any club that would have me as a member" -  Groucho Marx

MrNubbz

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5957 on: April 26, 2022, 07:35:14 AM »
"I don't want to belong to any club that would have me as a member" -  Groucho Marx

Cincydawg

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5958 on: April 26, 2022, 09:43:46 AM »
Green jet fuel is here -- so why are airlines not using it? | CNN Travel

I'm not sure scaling up is going to make this stuff affordable.

MrNubbz

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5959 on: April 27, 2022, 06:23:49 PM »
Damn cold & damp 35 now 27 along the lake with the WC .Below freezing tonite,good thing I held out on planting the annuals
"I don't want to belong to any club that would have me as a member" -  Groucho Marx

Brutus Buckeye

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5960 on: May 02, 2022, 07:15:04 PM »
1919, 20, 21, 28, 29, 31, 34, 35, 36, 37, 42, 44
WWH: 1952, 54, 55, 57, 58, 60, 61, 62, 63, 65, 67, 68, 70, 72, 74, 75
1979, 81, 82, 84, 87, 94, 98
2001, 02, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19

FearlessF

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5961 on: May 05, 2022, 04:47:05 PM »
An Associated Press analysis tallied more than 2,200 high-hazard dams in poor or unsatisfactory condition across the U.S. — up substantially from a similar AP review conducted three years ago. The actual number is likely even higher, although it’s unclear because some states don’t track such data and many federal agencies refuse to release details about their dams’ conditions.

https://apnews.com/article/technology-business-environment-san-diego-dams-d0836a1fdfc46a5f1ea6c6a4a8b8df96

The nation’s dams are on average over a half-century old and often present more of a hazard than envisioned when designed because homes, businesses or highways have cropped up below them. Meanwhile, a warming atmosphere can bring stronger storms with heavier rainfall that could overwhelm aging dams.

“All of a sudden, you’ve got older dams with a lower design criteria that now can potentially cause loss of life if they fail,” said Del Shannon, an engineer who is president of the U.S. Society on Dams.

“The number of deficient, high-hazard dams is increasing,” he said, adding that without investment in upgrades, that number will continue to rise.

Decades of deferred maintenance has worsened the problem. But a changing climate and extreme floods — such as the one that caused the failure of two Michigan dams and the evacuation of 10,000 people in 2020 — have brought a renewed focus to an often overlooked aspect of America’s critical infrastructure.

The $1 trillion infrastructure bill signed last year by President Joe Biden will pump about $3 billion into dam-related projects, including hundreds of millions for state dam safety programs and repairs.


The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers lists about 92,000 dams in its nationwide database, most of which are privately owned and regulated by states. Dams are classified according to the risk posed by failure, ranging from low to significant to high. A high hazard means lives could be lost if the dam fails.
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

Brutus Buckeye

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5962 on: May 07, 2022, 09:03:31 AM »
Wouldn't it behoove us to warm up the climate, since the continents are all going to eventually meet together in order to form another super continent centered around the North Pole? 


1919, 20, 21, 28, 29, 31, 34, 35, 36, 37, 42, 44
WWH: 1952, 54, 55, 57, 58, 60, 61, 62, 63, 65, 67, 68, 70, 72, 74, 75
1979, 81, 82, 84, 87, 94, 98
2001, 02, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19

847badgerfan

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Re: Weather, Climate, and Environment
« Reply #5963 on: May 07, 2022, 09:59:45 AM »
An Associated Press analysis tallied more than 2,200 high-hazard dams in poor or unsatisfactory condition across the U.S. — up substantially from a similar AP review conducted three years ago. The actual number is likely even higher, although it’s unclear because some states don’t track such data and many federal agencies refuse to release details about their dams’ conditions.

https://apnews.com/article/technology-business-environment-san-diego-dams-d0836a1fdfc46a5f1ea6c6a4a8b8df96

The nation’s dams are on average over a half-century old and often present more of a hazard than envisioned when designed because homes, businesses or highways have cropped up below them. Meanwhile, a warming atmosphere can bring stronger storms with heavier rainfall that could overwhelm aging dams.

“All of a sudden, you’ve got older dams with a lower design criteria that now can potentially cause loss of life if they fail,” said Del Shannon, an engineer who is president of the U.S. Society on Dams.

“The number of deficient, high-hazard dams is increasing,” he said, adding that without investment in upgrades, that number will continue to rise.

Decades of deferred maintenance has worsened the problem. But a changing climate and extreme floods — such as the one that caused the failure of two Michigan dams and the evacuation of 10,000 people in 2020 — have brought a renewed focus to an often overlooked aspect of America’s critical infrastructure.

The $1 trillion infrastructure bill signed last year by President Joe Biden will pump about $3 billion into dam-related projects, including hundreds of millions for state dam safety programs and repairs.


The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers lists about 92,000 dams in its nationwide database, most of which are privately owned and regulated by states. Dams are classified according to the risk posed by failure, ranging from low to significant to high. A high hazard means lives could be lost if the dam fails.
When I was in school I did some part-time hydraulics work for the Wisconsin DNR as a part of my senior thesis. I used a program called DAMBRK to simulate dam failures and what they would do downstream. Of particular interest to me was multiple dams along the same river. One goes, they all go. And everything in between.

Very spooky shit.
U RAH RAH! WIS CON SIN!

 

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