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Topic: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques

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utee94

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #980 on: June 03, 2023, 12:53:16 PM »
Ribs...

I normally go 3-1.5-.5 for baby back ribs. I.e. uncovered 3 hrs, 1.5 hrs in foil, then 30 minutes uncovered to reset the bark and sauce them.

That puts them a little *too* tender for my taste, but the wife and kids love 'em falling off the bone, so I make them how they want.

I just went to Costco and saw they're now selling big rolls of pink butcher paper, so I bought some. I know a lot of Texas brisket are wrapped in butcher paper instead of foil once the bark is set. Foil can sometimes cause a bit of a "pot roast" texture, whereas there's more permeability of the paper so it doesn't kill the bark as much, so I'm led to believe.

Does anyone do this with ribs? Cooking some on Sunday and thinking butcher paper might be a better option than wrapping in foil.

I think the real issue is the difference between how you like them, and how your family likes them.  I'm not certain foil vs. butcher paper is going to help there.  During 3-2-1 (or your 3-1.5-.5 for baby backs), the difference is the third stage.  Going shorter leaves them more fall off the bone, going longer resets their firmness.  The duration of the third stage directly correlates to the firmness.

But hey, feel free to try it out and let us know.

For ribs, you're not so worried about bark as you are on brisket, so the permeability doesn't seem like it matters so much.

And for brisket, I don't crutch them at all because even a butcher paper wrap leaves the bark less firm and more mushy than I like.

utee94

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #981 on: June 03, 2023, 12:56:25 PM »
What temp do you run the cooker at for the ribs?
225 all the way for me.  Same for pork tenderloin.

For brisket I've become a "hot and fast" convert.  Meaning, 285 or so.  I can finish a 12-lb brisket in around 8 hours, with zero loss of quality.

betarhoalphadelta

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #982 on: June 03, 2023, 01:37:16 PM »
225 all the way for me.  Same for pork tenderloin.

For brisket I've become a "hot and fast" convert.  Meaning, 285 or so.  I can finish a 12-lb brisket in around 8 hours, with zero loss of quality.
Yeah, I've heard that basically all the big BBQ guys have largely moved to 275ish for brisket, getting it done with no apparent quality difference. Helps power through the stall.

I've actually gone higher than that, even, on pork butt. Get that sucker up around 350. Finishes quickly and I see no real difference, especially since it's pulled rather than sliced. 

MaximumSam

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #983 on: June 03, 2023, 04:26:06 PM »
Anyone have experience with parrilla style grills? Like the Nuke Delta? It looks like a lot of fun, though dropping 2 grand on something I've never actually seen or used isn't ideal.

847badgerfan

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #984 on: June 04, 2023, 07:15:26 AM »
Only from seeing them on TV. I don't think I'd ever get one.
U RAH RAH! WIS CON SIN!

MaximumSam

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #985 on: June 04, 2023, 09:12:35 AM »
For me, outdoor cooking is just an elaborate excuse to set fires. The tasty food is just a great perk.

betarhoalphadelta

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #986 on: June 04, 2023, 10:18:00 AM »
Never used one myself. Closest I've gotten is a Santa Maria style grill, and that was just once on a vacation. 

Seems like a simple concept, but I'd have to evaluate whether it gives me something significantly different or advantageous to add to my grilling repertoire. I'm not sure it does. 

utee94

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #987 on: June 04, 2023, 10:50:03 AM »
Yeah, I've heard that basically all the big BBQ guys have largely moved to 275ish for brisket, getting it done with no apparent quality difference. Helps power through the stall.

I've actually gone higher than that, even, on pork butt. Get that sucker up around 350. Finishes quickly and I see no real difference, especially since it's pulled rather than sliced.
Yeah some of the biggest names in  BBQ will go 325-350 and it comes out great. My stick-burner really likes to settle in at around 285 so that's what works for me.

My observation on "low and slow" is that the lower you go, the more fool-proof it is.  It insulates you against an occasional spike when the pit goes up by 30-50 degrees, due to adding a new split or just a hot flare up in the coals.  So 225 is easier to get great results than 285 which is easier to get great results than 350.  You have to REALLY watch the pit temp, the higher you go, because a 50-degree flare-up when you're already at 350, can really do some damage to the final product, while a 50-degree flare-up at 225 does no harm at all.  Know what I mean?

I actually have to work harder to keep my pit down to 225.  I have to cut my splits into 1/3 size chunks so I can control the lower temp better.  At 285 I can add a whole split and not worry about the temp as much.

betarhoalphadelta

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #988 on: June 04, 2023, 10:58:51 AM »
I say I'd love to play around with a stick-burner, but one of the things I love about the Kamado is that once you get the temps settled in with the vents, it'll hold like a rock for HOURS. 

And by "hold" I mean within 2-3 degrees, as measured with a good electronic pit thermometer. Better temp control than an oven. 

utee94

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #989 on: June 04, 2023, 12:54:05 PM »
Yup, one of my friends has the BGE and gets solid results from it. 

MarqHusker

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #990 on: June 04, 2023, 10:05:21 PM »
My kids were thrilled to see a big sign as we drove past a Steak N Shake:  'Back by Popular Demand: Chicken Tenders'  

MaximumSam

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #991 on: June 07, 2023, 09:14:51 AM »


Never used one myself. Closest I've gotten is a Santa Maria style grill, and that was just once on a vacation.

Seems like a simple concept, but I'd have to evaluate whether it gives me something significantly different or advantageous to add to my grilling repertoire. I'm not sure it does.
The most fun I've had cooking all involved live fires. Smoking stuff low and slow is fine and all, but not exactly thrilling. All gas, no brakes.

utee94

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #992 on: June 12, 2023, 12:44:00 PM »
Cooking at least one brisket for Father's Day this weekend, might end up being two if everyone we invited says yes.  


betarhoalphadelta

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Re: CFB 51 Cookbook, equipment discussion, techniques
« Reply #993 on: June 12, 2023, 02:43:02 PM »
Cooking at least one brisket for Father's Day this weekend, might end up being two if everyone we invited says yes. 
Nice! We're on for pulled pork sammiches for this one. 

We're low on bagged/frozen pulled pork, so I'll be buying about 35# pork shoulder for 4 adults and 3 kids, so we'll have a ton left over for the vacuum sealer for future meals. 

 

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