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Topic: Sporty Cars

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Cincydawg

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #84 on: April 28, 2020, 04:10:13 PM »
The old Corvettes were starting to be fairly sophisticated by 1963.  The had independent rear suspensions, something very rare on US vehicles, and by 1965 4 wheel brakes.  They got into a horsepower war at that point as passenger cars started becoming muscle cars.

The 1982 Corvette had a 0-60 time of 9.1 seconds.  Just about any passenger car today is faster than that, at least any costing over $20K.






utee94

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #85 on: April 28, 2020, 04:18:25 PM »
My favorite supercar of all time:



FearlessF

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #86 on: April 28, 2020, 04:24:13 PM »
The old Corvettes were starting to be fairly sophisticated by 1963.  The had independent rear suspensions, something very rare on US vehicles, and by 1965 4 wheel brakes.  They got into a horsepower war at that point as passenger cars started becoming muscle cars.

The 1982 Corvette had a 0-60 time of 9.1 seconds.  Just about any passenger car today is faster than that, at least any costing over $20K.






mid to late 70s and early 80's were not good years for sports cars
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Cincydawg

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #87 on: April 28, 2020, 04:32:26 PM »
From about 1974 on to 1985 were bad years for cars period.  My little Sonic does 0-60 in 8.0 seconds, faster than most Corvettes during the down period.

The 2019 ZR-1 top of the line Vette hits 60 in 3.0 seconds while the 2020 Vette with much less horsepower does it in 2.8 seconds, though the ZR1 is faster in the quarter mile as the wheels start to bite.

When we would launch the CTS, we'd hold the brake pedal HARD and then floor the accelerator.  RPMs would come up to about 1800 or so depending on temperature, then you release the brake and off you go.  Back in the day that was a way to fry your torque converter.

The new Vette has a dual clutch transmission and probably the same kind of launch, all computer controlled.


betarhoalphadelta

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #88 on: April 28, 2020, 04:33:42 PM »
even the closed track can be quite dangerous to the driver trying to push the limits of many of these "sporty cars"

Yeah, but a lot safer than on the street. No oncoming traffic. If you go off-track, there are no trees, telephone poles, big rock walls or dropoffs into oblivion... All of which are quite common and prominent on twisty mountain roads here in SoCal...

I highsided my motorcycle at ~75 mph at the Streets of Willow. It sucked. But even that is not a particularly "dangerous" crash on a racetrack, and it'd be high likelihood of major injury or death on the road. 


I am NOT a fast driver even on a track though, relatively.
I've always been relatively quick, whether it's go karts, motorcycles, or cars. 

But as I said earlier, it's lot more fun to drive a slow car fast than a fast car slow. When you're driving a vehicle with limits FAR in excess of your own skill, you run into the problem that you NEVER ask the car to do something it's not capable of... Until you do, at which time you're not capable of saving it.

The way to learn to drive at the limit is to actually drive at the limit, which you can do in less capable cars. If you manage that, you can then start moving up to cars where the limits are higher.

Some of the fastest riders I used to hang with were the old dudes who grew up riding in the 70's, on bikes with crap suspension, crap tires, so they knew where the limits were. Or those who had grown up riding dirtbikes, for whom playing at the edge of traction was second nature. They knew what it felt like to be approaching the line, and not to cross it. 

betarhoalphadelta

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #89 on: April 28, 2020, 04:39:13 PM »
When we would launch the CTS, we'd hold the brake pedal HARD and then floor the accelerator.  RPMs would come up to about 1800 or so depending on temperature, then you release the brake and off you go.  Back in the day that was a way to fry your torque converter.

The new Vette has a dual clutch transmission and probably the same kind of launch, all computer controlled.
Yeah, a drag race today isn't about who is the better driver, but whose car has the better launch control algorithm.

I used to love in college when I'd drag race my buddy with my 1989 Ford Probe GT vs his late 90's Saturn SL2. We both had manuals. I had the horsepower and torque advantage, but his car was a LOT lighter. The two cars ended up somewhat evenly matched. It really was a question of which of us could get the power down to the wheels, balancing slight wheelspin with not letting the engine bog down. 

With these modern launch control cars, why bother drag racing at all?

FearlessF

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #90 on: April 28, 2020, 04:51:24 PM »
1800 RPM doesn't sound like much, but probably reduces wheel spin
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FearlessF

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #91 on: April 28, 2020, 04:58:49 PM »
I highsided my motorcycle at ~75 mph at the Streets of Willow. It sucked. But even that is not a particularly "dangerous" crash on a racetrack, and it'd be high likelihood of major injury or death on the road.
I've always been relatively quick, whether it's go karts, motorcycles, or cars.

I highsided my 87 Honda Hurricane 1000 on Wolf Creek Pass on the way back from Durango, CO.  Very lucky I didn't slide over the cliff.
Hah, I grew up in the 70s riding dirt bikes.  First street bike was a 1973 Kaw 750 Triple 2-stroke - yup the purple one.  I called it the bug killer.

1972 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV Two-stroke Triple - YouTube
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Cincydawg

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #92 on: April 28, 2020, 05:35:10 PM »
1800 RPM doesn't sound like much, but probably reduces wheel spin
Wheel spin is computer controlled obviously, and 1800 RPM is near torque max, and higher would probably burn out the torque converter.  

At times, a skilled driver can do better than the launch program, but it isn't easy.  We had some fun just mashing the throttle with the nannies turned off, you generate a lot of smoke and ruin some expensive Michelins.  They told us they changed all four tires and the brake pads daily on those cars.




FearlessF

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #93 on: April 28, 2020, 07:19:06 PM »
burn outs are good for the soul
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

Honestbuckeye

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #94 on: April 28, 2020, 07:50:21 PM »
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
-Mark Twain

Honestbuckeye

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #95 on: April 28, 2020, 08:00:23 PM »
Ahh.  cars..my sickness....eh....I mean my thing.

Got one of these to tow the boat or the golf clubs or, if I h
Jus want to rip some 0-60s or 1/4 miles on back roads
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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Honestbuckeye

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #96 on: April 28, 2020, 08:07:15 PM »
My sporty car...latest version. Have already modified the tuning, suspension and other performance parts.  😳
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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SFBadger96

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Re: Sporty Cars
« Reply #97 on: April 28, 2020, 08:12:27 PM »
I've always liked the Mercedes sports cars, the SLs, with the 1955 Gull Wing at the top of the list. But outside of some early 90s Mustangs, I've never really driven a true sports car. I've ridden in Porsches, Corvettes, a Ferrari, BMWs and Audis--I guess I've driven some Audis, too. I've driven rental Camaros and Mustangs. Meh. And I've ridden in Teslas. Holy torque, Batman.

I grew up as a car guy, loving the mid-to-late 60s midsize muscle (Camaros, Mustangs, and Barracudas), but somewhere along the line I lost it and now couldn't really see investing in such a car. We had a 1973 Dodge Dart that was actually kind of fun when I was a teenager. As a result, I developed an appreciation for Mopar muscle. I appreciate the current Dodges, but don't love them. 

I still like looking, but at the end of my day, that's what it comes down to: what they look (and sound) like. Because I would never drive them to their capabilities, and, as you have all pointed out, many of the cars I like most aren't as sporty as a modern Honda Civic sedan.

SFIrish will almost certainly buy a Harley when the kids leave the house. She sold her Sportster the day before she went into labor with our first, figuring our kids needed their mom more than she needed a bike. She's always wanted a Dyna of some variety--of the current crop, probably a Low Rider. I'll probably have to get a Class M license so that I can tour with her on one of my own.

 

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