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Author Topic: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.  (Read 9348 times)

Online Drew4UTk

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MarqHusker wrote: I was pleasantly surprised with my rookie effort on the BGE yesterday with two racks of baby back ribs.  Again, what a great device, especially for indirect purposes. What was most surprising was my wife's appetite with them.  Normally she pick at a few ribs and that's all.  She was startled to be caught eating them right off the bone.  I think that's the most I've ever seen her eat (ribs).  Generally she's big into 'smoked' anything.Hope it works well for you!  We should compare notes sometime.





BGE is a great and versatile cooker.





Whole  packers went on sale this week for $1.97/lb, so I picked up a couple.  One went in the deep freeze for later, and one is going on the smoker for Mother's Day.  Also got a few racks of St. Louis cut pork spare ribs.Makes me wonder how low beef prices will go this summer?  Usually the best sales are the week before Memorial Day, 4th of July, and Labor Day, when back in the old days before beef prices spiked, they'd go on sale for $.99/lb.Anyway, maybe one of these days I'll sign up for a web photo hosting site and post up some pictures of the goods.





your facebook page will host pics





I ain't linking my FB page to this joint.  





medinabuckeye1 wrote: Ahh, the Akorn. Yes, I actually do hear folks say that these are even better insulated than a clay kamado. And all that with two shells of steel with some foam insulation in between.Good cooker. If you're not already on it, check out Kamado Guru. Great place to learn about how to make the most of these wonderful contraptions.





bwarbiany wrote: Ahh, the Akorn. Yes, I actually do hear folks say that these are even better insulated than a clay kamado. And all that with two shells of steel with some foam insulation in between.Good cooker. If you're not already on it, check out Kamado Guru. Great place to learn about how to make the most of these wonderful contraptions.I've been very happy with the insulation so far, but I haven't tried cooking in winter yet.  A friend has a cheap, uninuslated one and he says it is completely useless in winter because the heat zones are so bad.  Thanks for the Kamado Guru link.  I looked around a bit and I'll get back there at home when I have more time.





I'm thinking when my Weber pukes, I'm getting one of those. Of course, when my Weber pukes, I might be in diapers. So probably not.





Topolobampo Mezcal Maragaritas(from Rick Bayless via the Washington Post) Ingredients   Coarse kosher salt, for garnish   6 to 10 ice cubes   1 1/2 ounces Wahaka Joven Espadín Mezcal (see headnote)   1/2 ounce Torres 10 Imperial Brandy Gran Reserva (see headnote)   2 1/2 ounces limonada (see NOTE)   3 dashes Peychaud's bitters   Lime wedge or wheel, for garnish    Directions  Wet the rim of a cocktail (martini) glass. Invert it onto a dish of coarse salt to coat the rim. Fill a cocktail shaker with the ice. Add the mezcal, brandy, limonada and bitters; seal and shake vigorously until frothy and cold; tiny ice crystals will appear in the drink after about 15 seconds of shaking. Strain into the glass. Garnish with the lime; serve right away. NOTE: To make the limonada, combine 1 cup of fresh lime juice, 1/2 cup of sugar and 1 1/2 cups of water in a pitcher or glass container. Stir until the sugar has dissolved. Cover and refrigerate until well chilled. The yield is about 2 3/4 cups.   * 847 NOTE: Fresh limes are key int this thing. I know it's a pain in the ass, but man, ya gotta do it.





takes a few limes to produce a cup of juice, but it's not that toughpatience





847badgerfan wrote: Topolobampo Mezcal Maragaritas(from Rick Bayless via the Washington Post)IngredientsCoarse kosher salt, for garnish6 to 10 ice cubes1 1/2 ounces Wahaka Joven Espadín Mezcal (see headnote)1/2 ounce Torres 10 Imperial Brandy Gran Reserva (see headnote)2 1/2 ounces limonada (see NOTE)3 dashes Peychaud's bittersLime wedge or wheel, for garnishDirectionsWet the rim of a cocktail (martini) glass. Invert it onto a dish of coarse salt to coat the rim.Fill a cocktail shaker with the ice. Add the mezcal, brandy, limonada and bitters; seal and shake vigorously until frothy and cold; tiny ice crystals will appear in the drink after about 15 seconds of shaking. Strain into the glass.Garnish with the lime; serve right away.NOTE: To make the limonada, combine 1 cup of fresh lime juice, 1/2 cup of sugar and 1 1/2 cups of water in a pitcher or glass container. Stir until the sugar has dissolved. Cover and refrigerate until well chilled. The yield is about 2 3/4 cups.* 847 NOTE: Fresh limes are key int this thing. I know it's a pain in the ass, but man, ya gotta do it.Lots of sugar, looks pretty girly to me. 





I made a batch on Sunday and cut the sugar in half. It worked fine, but I like tartness (as does my wife).





Tart is fine.  Originally margaritas were made with the juice of (key) limes only, no additional sugar added.   I like them that way, or with some sugar, but I definitely don't like them when they get too syrupy sweet.





I like upside down margaritas





What's not to like?  





I believe that pic is from a place in beloved Lubbock 





I did more than my fair share of that in South Padre, and Matamoros, Mexico.  Good times.





Good timesso many that I finally had to shut it downI still have 4 pour spouts in the cupboard if neededI assume it might be even better today with the advances of better tequila





My wife got me a KettlePizza topper for my grill to turn it into a pizza over.  Anyone used those before?





Nope.But I did BBQ a brisket and 3 racks of pork spare ribs over the 4th of July weekend.  Had just enough leftover to cube up and save for some brisket enchiladas this weekend.





I'm still fooling with it.  I'm trying to get temps in the 1000-1200 range but haven't gotten close to that yet.





How would you get the temps that high? Is that really even possible?





coal might get you to 1,000 degrees 





847badgerfan wrote: How would you get the temps that high? Is that really even possible?I've read things from people I trust that it is doable, but I can't confirm it yet.  But I still have a few tricks to play.





Wood fires can get up to 1600 degrees.  Oak can burn 900-1200 degrees.  Even in my offset,  I've had the furthest point of my main cooking chamber up to 600-700 degrees without really overloading the firebox.  That was with mesquite, I was intentionally burning it down to coals before cooking.





Smoking a few racks  of baby back ribs and some chicken today on the green egg,  its a hot one today, fortunately I get patio shade by 2 pm est.   Actually fighting to keep the temp down today beneath 275 for a little while.    I've tinkered and done 235, 275, 250,  I think there's a decent range in there where you can't mess things up, though in a perfect world, I'd keep it closer to 235.  Yes, I do a variation of the 2-2-1 on these racks.  Pretty doggone consistent work product.Best thing, is when the people get here, the work is all done, save warming up the cornbread.





you got gravy for that cornbread?





FearlessF wrote: you got gravy for that cornbread?Hmm, I'm intrigued, may I subscribe to your newsletter?No,  our friends brought the tasty cornbread.   The ribs were crushed, even by one of the kids.   Four kids all 7 and under and only one of them has the wits so far to take down some ribs.   We've got work to do with this generation.  I threaten to send my girls to Food Camp.  I've even got their cousins worried about trying exotic foods like cole slaw, summer sausage and grilled cheese sandwiches.   I may actually start this damn Food Camp myself.





hah, reminds me when my brother was about 7 years old, thought gravy was too greasy and put butter on our Grandma's cornbreadI was never like that.  Interestingly, my daughters enjoy all types of food and not afraid to try things.  It's more an attitude than anything





My kids love ribs.  And brisket.  And smoked chicken, turkey, and sausage.They're not too big on cornbread, not sure why.






Online Drew4UTk

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I get being a bit picky, and loving your staples as a kid, but its getting to be a standstill with the 7 yr old.  She could/would eat peanut butter sandwiches, pancakes, bread, tacos and cheese pizza for a year straight and be happy with it.I think the only food I tend to avoid is tuna, and olives, but even then I'll eat certain presentations of it (rolls, generally raw only, I would never turn down a piece of Toro).  Never tuna salad.  I don't understand why I don't like olives, I love briny flavors and mediterranean food (plus sea urchin, oysters, olive oils).  No olives though.





I don't like olives either, not by themselves anyway.  I can take them in prepared methods, like tapenade served on sandwiches and the like, but never by themselves.I also loathe pickles.  I like pickled jalapeno, pickled carrots, pickled cabbage, but not pickled cucumbers.  I'm not a big fan of fresh cucumbers either, though.Other than that, I'll eat pretty much anything.But yeah, my kids are pretty picky too, at age 6 and 8, especially concerning vegetables.  The boy loves green beans, and the girl loves broccoli, but neither likes the other green vegetable.





I can't eat liver as just liver. But I like things like rumaki (bacon) and such. I like foie gras too, when prepared right.





Yeah, preparation makes all the difference in the world.   Liver and onions sounds like a perfect combination, what could go wrong?  Liver, and offal in general are particularly challenging, as if it doesn't fit just right for your palette it can kill the meal.   Of course the best way to do (or introduce)  liver is in Braunschweiger, or just liverwurst.





Yeah, liver pate is interesting I guess, but I need a good cracker, mustard and raw onion to make it good for my palette.  I need to get back to posting some recipes here. We all do, actually. I've got a few new ones I made this summer that I'll get posted soon.





I live olives in my beer





FearlessF wrote: I live olives in my beerWeirdo dirt farmer. 





MarqHusker wrote: Yeah, preparation makes all the difference in the world.   Liver and onions sounds like a perfect combination, what could go wrong?  Liver, and offal in general are particularly challenging, as if it doesn't fit just right for your palette it can kill the meal.   Of course the best way to do (or introduce)  liver is in Braunschweiger, or just liverwurst.What's the difference





847badgerfan wrote: Yeah, liver pate is interesting I guess, but I need a good cracker, mustard and raw onion to make it good for my palette.  Cindy got me liverwurst back in May.Toasted Pumpernickel or Rye w/brown mustard and raw onion is exactly how I had it.It was pretty damn good for a change of pace.Somewhere the old folks are salivating





utee94 wrote: FearlessF wrote: I live olives in my beerWeirdo dirt farmer. Bug eater - get it right





------------------------------------------------ MrNubbz wrote:MarqHusker wrote: Yeah, preparation makes all the difference in the world.   Liver and onions sounds like a perfect combination, what could go wrong?  Liver, and offal in general are particularly challenging, as if it doesn't fit just right for your palette it can kill the meal.   Of course the best way to do (or introduce)  liver is in Braunschweiger, or just liverwurst.What's the difference---------------------------------------------Braunschweiger is always smoked. Often spreadable and frequently has pork in it along w liver. Some ttimes I think bacon too.Liverwurst is in a casing typically sliceable.





MrNubbz wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: Yeah, liver pate is interesting I guess, but I need a good cracker, mustard and raw onion to make it good for my palette.  Cindy got me liverwurst back in May.Toasted Pumpernickel or Rye w/brown mustard and raw onion is exactly how I had it.It was pretty damn good for a change of pace.Somewhere the old folks are salivatingonce again, very good pared with BEERlike olives





Olives are gross.But beer is delicious.





I broke down and bought a pressure cooker on Amazon Prime day.  I don't use it much now, but as the weather cools down I anticipate making all my chili and many other stews and soups.  Anyone with good pressure cooker recipes?





pressure cookers are good for Longhorn beef from Texas...it's a joke, utee





But probably true.  Longhorn cattle are a tough and stringy breed.  I know several people that ranch them, but I don't know anyone that actually eats them!  I'm curious how/why you use a pressure cooker for chili?  The long cook time isn't just to break down the meat, but also to meld the flavors.  I can't comment from personal experience, but I'd worry that pressure cooking chili would skip some valuable melding time.Like other similar dishes, actually refrigerating overnight and consuming the next day tends to enhance chili's flavor.





For not so tender cuts of beef, this can be great.....http://pressurecookerconvert.com/pressure-cooker-smoky-swiss-steak/





utee94 wrote:But probably true.  Longhorn cattle are a tough and stringy breed.  I know several people that ranch them, but I don't know anyone that actually eats them!  I'm curious how/why you use a pressure cooker for chili?  The long cook time isn't just to break down the meat, but also to meld the flavors.  I can't comment from personal experience, but I'd worry that pressure cooking chili would skip some valuable melding time.Like other similar dishes, actually refrigerating overnight and consuming the next day tends to enhance chili's flavor.Cause I ain't all day. I like a five hour cook, but I doubt the differences are very obvious and I can get it out on a weeknight.  Also, pressure cookers do have a reputation for getting a little more flavor out of meat compared to slower cooks.





I've never used one of those things. For chili I use a cast iron skillet to brown the meats and then a crock pot to slow-cook the mixture, usually for 12-15 hours, on low. Most of the cooking happens while I'm sleeping.





KFC Original Recipe, from the Chicago Tribune.





ground ginger is probably the only spice that throws me off.I wonder if  'oregino'  is simply a misspelling or something else?





The Trib chalked that up to spelling error.





847badgerfan wrote: I've never used one of those things. For chili I use a cast iron skillet to brown the meats and then a crock pot to slow-cook the mixture, usually for 12-15 hours, on low. Most of the cooking happens while I'm sleeping.You should get one.  I'm finding it pretty awesome for breaking down chuck roast quickly into a variety of things, taco fillings, pot roast, that sort of thing.  I've heard they are awesome for getting flavor out of bones, too, but I haven't gone that route yet.





Sounds interesting, but are they really as effective as a long cook in extracting/building flavors? That would be the key to me.Had a great Osso Buco they other day that I'm going to try and replicate. Seems like that might be a way to do it, as opposed to a long cook?





847badgerfan wrote: Sounds interesting, but are they really as effective as a long cook in extracting/building flavors? That would be the key to me.Had a great Osso Buco they other day that I'm going to try and replicate. Seems like that might be a way to do it, as opposed to a long cook?http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/01/ask-the-food-lab-can-i-make-stock-in-a-pressure-cooker-slow-cooker.html





847badgerfan wrote: I've never used one of those things. For chili I use a cast iron skillet to brown the meats and then a crock pot to slow-cook the mixture, usually for 12-15 hours, on low. Most of the cooking happens while I'm sleeping.15 hours?mine takes 3 hours





I use some ground beef, chorizo, fresh onion, fresh garlic and fresh peppers in my chili. After the 12-15 hour cook, all those things are completely broken down and invisible. All that's left is the cubed steak meat variety. The rest is a nice, thick and flavorful gravy.It's how it's done.





utee94 wrote: I don't like olives either, not by themselves anyway. They go great in chili w/beans





847badgerfan wrote: I use some ground beef, chorizo, fresh onion, fresh garlic and fresh peppers in my chili. After the 12-15 hour cook, all those things are completely broken down and invisible. All that's left is the cubed steak meat variety. The rest is a nice, thick and flavorful gravy.It's how it's done.I'm sure this tastes great but how much nutrients are left in the vegetable content after the meat has been cooked to perfection?Taking care of this Adonis like earthly vessel is a priority of mine





847badgerfan wrote: I use some ground beef, chorizo, fresh onion, fresh garlic and fresh peppers in my chili. After the 12-15 hour cook, all those things are completely broken down and invisible. All that's left is the cubed steak meat variety. The rest is a nice, thick and flavorful gravy.It's how it's done.you got that right - meat with good spicy gravymy cubed Tri-tip is cooked and tender after 3 hours and the chopped onion, garlic, & peppers are gravycrock pot on high - a nice 7 bubble simmerI could see 5 or 6 hours, 15 just seems too long, but it must work very well, because I know how the food you cook tastes 






Online Drew4UTk

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I grilled quesadillas in the pizza oven for Labor day.  They turned out ok.  Not as good as ones in the skillet, but all right.





I think the tortillas in a quesadilla require the skillet to achieve proper texture and crispiness. Oh, and my chili usually goes for 8 hours or so.





Speaking of using Skillets.   My favorite breakfast for dinner dish (or anytime for that matter).This is often a great empty the refrigerator dish, and works for all kinds of substitute ingredients, so don't take this as the only way to make it.Frittata (w/ bacon)10-12 eggs8 slices bacon2 shallotsa large bunch of 'greens'1 cup of cheese (parm or asiago)1 container of ricotta (full fat, maybe 12-16 oz)preheat oven , I do 350 degrees.Cook/fry some bacon (about 6-8 strips), save a few tablespoons of the bacon fat.   Let bacon dry on towels, eventually break it into 1/2 inch or so pieces.Slice a bunch of shallots really thin (about a cup maybe) and saute them using about a tablespoon of bacon fat in a big skillet (something that can go into the oven, such as All-Clad, or an iron skillet.  Saute on medium for about 4-5 min.A whole bunch of greens, really any kind (spinach, mustard greens, kale if you are so inclined, chard, whatever)  rough chop those, after you clean them of course.Take 1/2 of the greens and add them to your sautéed shallots until they wilt after a minute or so, add the rest of the greens and add them to this skillet and stir (toss in pinch of kosher salt now), and let them wilt and basically dry out, this takes about 10 minutes.    Put them onto a plate and they will cool a bit.   Wipe you your skillet, doesn't need to be totally cleaned out.Whisk a lot of eggs (10-12 is norm) in a big bowl.  Add 2/3 or 3/4 cup of parmesan or asiago, cheese, the wilted greens/shallots and 1/2 the bacon pieces.   I might pinch kosher salt here too.   Stir in some ricotta cheese (I use about 3/4 of a 16 ounce container.  It need not be perfectly blended in, Put another tablespoon of that reserved bacon fat back into your skillet, heat it at medium again.  Pour your egg mixture in the skillet.  Sprinkle the rest of bacon and your remaining greens on top.  Cook for about 5-10 minutes, or until the eggs begin to set in the skillet on the edges.Into the oven for about 15-20 minutes, until the whole thing has set.   Remove from oven.  Use silicon or soft spatula to loosen frittata on the edges and slide it out onto a platter.  I let it rest for a solid 10 minutes, before cutting into pizza slices.Tasty for dinner or breakfast, left overs good too.  Add Crystal hot sauce for fun, I do.





That looks good.We do some of that here at the harbor on Sundays, except we use a grill. 18 eggs and a whole bunch of leftover meats and veggies. Works out really good in a foil pan too.





utee94 wrote: Oh, and my chili usually goes for 8 hours or so.sure, but you use that tough longhorn beef that needs time to soften 





NOBODY eats that stuff, man. We do, however, keep Longhorns as pets.  





Well, I knew that Hooky Hornstein had a few of them as pets in the yardI figured as a tax break





FearlessF wrote: Well, I knew that Hooky Hornstein had a few of them as pets in the yardI figured as a tax breakYup, you can get an agricultural exemption depending on various circumstances.  Lots of people have "ranches" that are actually deer/dove leases.  





deer in Iowa taste good





I like venison chili.





I love venison chops, cut from the loin, on the grill





Great day to use the pressure cooker.  Made some black bean soup that turned out well.  All measurements are estimates as I used no measuring devices.3 cans black beans with liquid3 links garlic smoked sausage (I bought CostCo's version)1 onion, chopped3 cloves garlic, minced1 cup chicken stock (I used CostCo's organic)1 Tbsp chili powder1 Tbsp ground cumin2 teaspoons oregano1/8 cup apple cider vinegar2 teaspoons salt1 teaspoon ground pepper1 teaspoon fish sauceI put it on 30 minutes, and it came out wonderful.





Man, that sounds right up my alley.fish sauce.  very intriguing.   Do you do any searing or char on the sausage?





MarqHusker wrote: Man, that sounds right up my alley.fish sauce.  very intriguing.   Do you do any searing or char on the sausage?I did not, though certainly that could add something good. Cooking has been a challenge since I'm usually also watching three girls, so I tend to try things really easy lately.





I'm going to try that one.





yep, almost soup season





Did someone say soup weather?Although, it was about 90 degrees here in SoCal, but I decided to simmer beef broth for 6 hours and make pho.Used this recipe from Serious Eats, although I used filet rather than flank as the tender meat, along with sliced brisket from the simmer steps on the stock.





Looks good, I'd eat it.  I've made it a few times myself, using that recipe and and couple of others.  But I still can't get it to be anywhere near as good as my favorite place in town-- their broth is simply off the charts unbelievable.





man, it's lunch time here too 





I like to make pho. Very time consuming, but the end game is worth it.





bwarbiany wrote: Did someone say soup weather?Although, it was about 90 degrees here in SoCal, but I decided to simmer beef broth for 6 hours and make pho.Used this recipe from Serious Eats, although I used filet rather than flank as the tender meat, along with sliced brisket from the simmer steps on the stock.Where do you get beef shin?





MaximumSam wrote: bwarbiany wrote: Did someone say soup weather?Although, it was about 90 degrees here in SoCal, but I decided to simmer beef broth for 6 hours and make pho.Used this recipe from Serious Eats, although I used filet rather than flank as the tender meat, along with sliced brisket from the simmer steps on the stock.Where do you get beef shin?I changed the recipe a bit... I doubled the oxtail to replace the beef shin, and used 2# brisket instead of 1# chuck and 1# brisket. Here in SoCal, we have excellent Asian markets... But even so, I couldn't find beef shin.





Regular supermarkets here carry beef shank (shin is part of the shank), but beyond that, Mexican carnicerias should have it pretty much everywhere?  I'm surprised you couldn't find it in SoCal.





utee94 wrote: Regular supermarkets here carry beef shank (shin is part of the shank), but beyond that, Mexican carnicerias should have it pretty much everywhere?  I'm surprised you couldn't find it in SoCal.Admittedly, I didn't search that hard... It's beef broth. Substitutions aren't *that* meaningful.But I was at the Asian market, and didn't find it there. I didn't think of the Mexican market... Or the Persian market... I'll probably do more research when the time comes that I do a 5 gallon stock batch for freezing though.





Yeah, oxtail is plenty good enough.  But like anything, the more variety you have, the more complexity you can introduce.Like I said before, I've made pho several times, and it turned out tasty, but just not anywhere close to my favorite local place, which has by far the best broth I've ever had anywhere-- and that includes Vietnamese places in the Bay Area, the LA area, Houston (which has a very large Vietnamese population), and above all of those, in France, where Vietnamese food is simply unbelievable.   Except, not as good as this one place in Austin.  And since that place is so good, I finally stopped trying to make it myself, and just go there.  You know, I never thought of it, but I bet they could just sell me their broth by the gallon or something...





Live oak will prolly roll out a Oxtail Saison or sumsuch





MrNubbz wrote: Live oak will prolly roll out a Oxtail Saison or sumsuchOne can only hope!Had plenty of their Oktoberfest this week, which is delicious.





I'm smoking a turkey tonight for my family's early Thanksgiving on Thursday.  I'll see how it goes!





I've got some prime rib hanging out in the fridge.  Just having my wife's dad over for Thanksgiving so I shelled out for something good





I'm doing Alton Brown's Good Eats Roast Turkey for Thursday.






Online Drew4UTk

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I intended to use that recipe this year as you had suggested, but the future son-in-law is deep frying a turkey in peanut oilnot about to tell him he can't cook for mehe's a lifelong Husker fan!





We BBQ a turkey, and deep-fry one, every year.  I typically do the BBQ and my dad and brother take care of the deep frying.  So good!





847badgerfan wrote: I'm doing Alton Brown's Good Eats Roast Turkey for Thursday.Same, well kinda. We'll be using the cooking method and aromatics from Alton Brown's Good Eats Roast Turkey, but using a dry brine instead of a wet one. This one here specifically: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/dry-brined-turkey-with-classic-herb-butter-recipe.html





I pressure cooked some ribs.  I put them in for 30 minutes and I think they were too tender.  Would probably do 20 minutes next time.  I didn't really season them - some salt and Baby Rays and some chicken stock.





Took a stab at making cajeta - a caramel sauce made with goat's milk.  I took the easiest possible path - a quart of goat's milk, a cup of sugar, a 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and an 1/8 teaspoon of kosher salt.  Put in pot over medium heat and occasionally stir until brown, thick, and delicious.  When you stir and can see the bottom of the pan, it is about done.  Rick Bayless recommends putting a cinnamon stick in there.  I had no cinnamon stick, so that was a no go.  I've also seen recipes with a vanilla bean.  In any event, it came out pretty delicious.  The goats milk certainly adds a dimension that regular caramel sauce doesn't quite have.





So some yahoo left a can of beautiful oysters in my fridge last Friday night ,  I need to find something good to do with these suckers.  Any ideas?





MaximumSam wrote: Took a stab at making cajeta - a caramel sauce made with goat's milk. I took the easiest possible path - a quart of goat's milk, a cup of sugar, a 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and an 1/8 teaspoon of kosher salt. Put in pot over medium heat and occasionally stir until brown, thick, and delicious. When you stir and can see the bottom of the pan, it is about done. Rick Bayless recommends putting a cinnamon stick in there. I had no cinnamon stick, so that was a no go. I've also seen recipes with a vanilla bean. In any event, it came out pretty delicious. The goats milk certainly adds a dimension that regular caramel sauce doesn't quite have.Sounds awesome, I'd try that.  And I'd skip the cinnamon anyway, but the vanilla bean sounds like a good addition.





utee94 wrote: MaximumSam wrote: Took a stab at making cajeta - a caramel sauce made with goat's milk. I took the easiest possible path - a quart of goat's milk, a cup of sugar, a 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and an 1/8 teaspoon of kosher salt. Put in pot over medium heat and occasionally stir until brown, thick, and delicious. When you stir and can see the bottom of the pan, it is about done. Rick Bayless recommends putting a cinnamon stick in there. I had no cinnamon stick, so that was a no go. I've also seen recipes with a vanilla bean. In any event, it came out pretty delicious. The goats milk certainly adds a dimension that regular caramel sauce doesn't quite have.Sounds awesome, I'd try that.  And I'd skip the cinnamon anyway, but the vanilla bean sounds like a good addition.I recommend it - ridiculously easy.  The local grocery sold the goat's milk - I've read using the ultra-pasteurized version is better as it is less clumpy.





 MarqHusker wrote: So some yahoo left a can of beautiful oysters in my fridge last Friday night ,  I need to find something good to do with these suckers.  Any ideas? Eat 'em!





847badgerfan wrote: MarqHusker wrote: So some yahoo left a can of beautiful oysters in my fridge last Friday night ,  I need to find something good to do with these suckers.  Any ideas?Eat 'em!





MaximumSam wrote: Took a stab at making cajeta - a caramel sauce made with goat's milk. I took the easiest possible path - a quart of goat's milk, a cup of sugar, a 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and an 1/8 teaspoon of kosher salt. Put in pot over medium heat and occasionally stir until brown, thick, and delicious. When you stir and can see the bottom of the pan, it is about done. Rick Bayless recommends putting a cinnamon stick in there. I had no cinnamon stick, so that was a no go. I've also seen recipes with a vanilla bean. In any event, it came out pretty delicious. The goats milk certainly adds a dimension that regular caramel sauce doesn't quite have.I love cajeta. In Mexico the Starbucks' even offer cajeta frappicinos which IMO are far superior to their caramel counterpart.





Taiwanese Beef Noodle Soup - Recipe





2 pounds of beef?  perfect!





Decided to eschew the green egg today for my Boston Butt (pork shoulder) and do an oldie but goodie, slow roast.  This gives you the chance to make some cracklins.  Take the 4 lb butt and score the fat cap, rub it with kosher salt, roast it at a high heat for a short while, foil it, bring the heat down and roast it for about four hours.   Add some aromatics to the roasting pan, return the roast to the pan to finish, and then make a gravy out of the jus.Pull the pork, mmm, mmm.  I'm sure my kids will sauce it up tonight, but it won't need it with the gravy.   The cracklins are just sublime.





I'm going to be using one of those to make Carnitas this weekend. I'm doing a slightly different approach to them in that I'm not going to braise them in fat, but rather put some smoke on them, then slow roast, then deep fry to crisp.I'm going to use a garlic sauce to finish them.





Yeah, that won't be any good.  slow roasts give you the best base for sauces you could ever ask for.  A lot less burnt bits, versus the brown bits, much easier to deglaze.





I'm winging in the green egg today w a 3.5lb chuck roast.  I think I'll finish inside in the oven w the veggies potatoes , stock and red wine, herbage. 100% improv.





Damn nice payoff today, even if the potatoes and carrots were way past doneness. Got egg fired to 400ish, seared the 3.5 lb english style chuck roast, dry rubbed, I use yellow mustard as base, and then my english roast rub for about 6minutes a side, inserted the ceramic plate for indirect, pulled back throttle on egg to barely 300 and left the roast for a few hours while I went for a hike w the kids. Pulled the roast at 160 degrees internal, oiled the la creuset dutch oven and put the roast inside on medium heat to sizzle and leave the browned bits in bottom for a few minutes,  remove roast,  sweated a whole diced onion and an entire garlic clove, deglazed with 1/2 a bottle of red wine and about 3 1/2 cups of beef stock, added rosemary/thyme sprigs and returned roast to the dutch oven and into the oven at 350 degrees.   Once roast was at 180 ish I added the carrots, red potatoes (quartered) and a cup of celery.  The only rule I had on this was as always to take the roast to about 202-204, the best temp to get it to where you can pull it apart with little fuss.   It took longer than an hour to get those final 20 degrees or so, thus the carrots and potatoes were way too soft.   Oh well.   Pull the dutch oven out, transfer roast to a aluminum sheet  tray (the kind Badge and i love) and separate the veggies into its own serving pan (covered in foil).  Strain the liquid into a large vessel (you're gonna get 3 cups or so).  While the fat separates, clean up your work station, while the meat rests, then either have somebody pull your beef apart, or have them make the gravy, or just make the gravy and pull the beef later yourself.   Make a roux, 2tbl butter, 4 tbl flour, melt butter add flour and whisk continuously until you have your nutty roux, then, I add my liquid gradually over medium heat, whisking constantly,  and salt/pepper to taste.  This stuff is luxurious gravy, one of the best gravies I've ever made.   Pretty good bark on the meat, and chuck roast has very little fat within the meat, so yeah, it isn't going to be as juicy and succulent as a good brisket, but it really retained moisture pretty well and takes a gravy better than any meat IMO.   Since my kids suck at eating  stuff like this, I'll have some good leftovers all week, so long as I have the gravy.  





nice workI ate a bit too well on the trip to Texas last weekneed to refrain from large meals for a week






Online bwarbiany

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Just made this on Sunday

Garlic Beef and Veggie Ramen

I first noticed when I read the instructions something strange... "That don't look like no soup!"

And it's true. We think of ramen, we think of soup. This is more of a stir-fried noodle dish using ramen noodles.

But it's freakin' delicious, and actually very, very easy.

Online 847badgerfan

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I added the index from the old site. At least that way we can know what is in here.
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Online utee94

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You are el hombre. :)

Online 847badgerfan

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This was a recipe from BuckeyeCMO.


BUCKEYECMO's ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND PEPPERS


2lbs hot Italian sausage
2 large red peppers
2 large yellow peppers
1 large onion
4 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons tomato paste
28oz can of chopped tomatoes
1/2cup of marsala cooking wine
1tsp. of oregano
fresh basil
1/2tsp. of red pepper flakes
salt and pepper
2 tablespoons of olive oil


I cut up all of the vegetables the night before, so as to eliminate as much prep work as possible. This recipe really only is convenient if you have a large grill. I cook the sausage on the grill just like anything else, and then set it aside and cut it into bite size pieces. Take the peppers, onions and garlic which should already be cut from the night before and wrap it all in aluminum foil with the olive oil, salt and pepper. Cook the veggies on the grill until all are almost done. Add the sausage, the peppers/onions mixture and all of the remaining ingredients to a larger pot and let simmer on the grill until the sauce thickens and the flavors mix together. Serve either on hoagie buns or as a side.
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Online fezzador

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My wife makes some pretty tasty pizza sticks.  I never tried making them myself, but I think all that's needed to make them is a can of Pillsbury pizza crust, a jar of marinara sauce, mozzarella cheese sticks, and (optional) garlic butter and pepperoni.  She would wrap up the cheese sticks and pepperoni slices in dough rectangles (roughly 5" x 3"), put some garlic butter on them, and put them in the oven at 450 for about 10 minutes.

The marinara can be used as a dipping sauce, or placed in the wrap.

Online ELA

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French Onion Soup
2 1/2 lbs yellow onion
3 tbs butter
1 tbs canola oil
little bit of sugar, salt and pepper
2 cups red wine
8 cups beef stockbay leaf
6 slices of course bread
3 cups gruyere cheese

Melt the butter in a pot and add sliced onions, sugar, salt and pepper over mid-low heat til carmelized.

Add the wine and incread heat to mid-high til half the wine is cooked off

Add the bay leaf and beef stock, lower heat and simmer for 35-45 minutes

Toast the bread in the over for 8-10 minutes and 400 degrees, turning halfway through

Add the soup to bowls, removing the bay leaf.Put one piece of the bread in each bowl and cover with about a half cup of the cheese

Bake for about 12 minutes, but keep an eye on it, you want the cheese fully melted but not burned and the toast becomes lightly browned, again not burned.






Great recipes!





Looks good Adam. Let me know how it turns out with the red wine. I always use Cognac. I also put garlic in with the onions in step one.My guests loved it last night. What a coincidence you went to a farmer's market like me yesterday, 1000 miles apart!
So I've been hankering for french onion soup, and I'm going with this one I made a couple years ago.  Perhaps with badges suggestion though.  Any others with thoughts

Online 847badgerfan

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4 Vidalia and 4 Red. Two cloves of garlic. Chopped thyme. Cognac. Beef stock. Toasted French bread. Gruyere. Broiler.

Save some Cognac for drinking.
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Online ELA

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64 as a high and rain all day tomorrow too, easier to get into to soup on a day like that than your typical opening weekend.

Love it.  I think every fall Saturday should have a low of 35 a high of 55, with rain maybe about 1/3 of the time.

Offline WhiskeyM

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64 as a high and rain all day tomorrow too, easier to get into to soup on a day like that than your typical opening weekend.

Love it.  I think every fall Saturday should have a low of 35 a high of 55, with rain maybe about 1/3 of the time.
This is the only time of year I miss Pittsburgh.  I love the fall.  There's a certain smell in the air.  Hooded sweatshirts become perfect cover.  The entire metro area is ready for football.

Online utee94

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HOMEMADE EGG NOG

I'm not sure if I've ever posted this before?  We're about to do our big family Christmas party this Saturday, and that means HOMEMADE EGG NOG.  From the time she was a little girl, my i s c & a aggie wife's big German family always gathered at her Great Uncle George's house on Christmas afternoon for cookies and eggnog, after opening presents and having Christmas dinner (lunch) at their own various houses.   Even the kids were allowed some small cups, although it's quite boozy.

I should preface by saying that I always hated-- and I mean absolutely despised-- egg nog as a kid.  So when my wife told me she had a great family nog recipe, I just sort of nodded and smiled and humored her by trying it.  And I was completely blown away.  There's just no comparison between fresh homemade egg nog and the storebought stuff.  So now I love egg nog, but only homemade.  And our annual Christmas party is officially known as "A Toast To George" in memory of her Great Uncle George, his egg nog recipe, and the family and fellowship that my wife's family grew up with.  Anyway, here's the recipe:



24 eggs
2 3/4 cup sugar
1.5 pints heavy cream
2 quarts light cream
1 fifth bourbon (~750ml)
1 cup dark rum or to taste


1) Using stand mixer, cream egg yolks with sugar. Add whiskey. Pour into large container.
2) Whip cream, pour into same container and stir.
3) Whip egg whites, pour into same container, blend with other liquids already in there.
4) Stir in rum to taste
5) Keep chilled while serving, we usually place our punch bowl in a wide glass serving dish with ice in it.

When my wife makes this, she generally has to do a couple of batches each in the stand mixer for the cream and the egg whites. She also uses a (well-cleaned and sterilized) medium-sized kitchen trash can for all the ingredients, and then pours into gallon containers and keeps refrigerated for a day before our party. She usually at least doubles the above recipe though, so YMMV on size of batches and size of containers.

If you're nervous about raw eggs, you can buy already-heat-pasteurized eggs at most markets, or you can actually do it yourself at home and save some bucks. We've done both and have never noticed any difference in texture or flavor.

Online Drew4UTk

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thank you @utee94 ... my wife, without my consent, scheduled her firm's Christmas party at our place... they're renting a party bus to pick up and drop off, so i imagine there will be quite a bit of drinking- and i am SO making this!

Online utee94

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thank you @utee94 ... my wife, without my consent, scheduled her firm's Christmas party at our place... they're renting a party bus to pick up and drop off, so i imagine there will be quite a bit of drinking- and i am SO making this!
Oh I love hosting company Christmas parties!  If I must attend something awkward and potentially embarrassing, I'd much rather do it in the comfort of my own home, where everything's under my control! :)



We always make ours the night before, it mellows out and tastes even better the next day.  And we invite "special guests" to the nog-making "pre-party" which is usually more fun than the part itself, simply because it's fewer people and it's our tighter group  of "the kids" which is my brother and his wife, my BIL and his wife when they're in town, and a couple of close friends and their kids who are best friends with our kids.  We have a tradition of drinking nog directly from the trash can where it's stirred up, and also doing shots of the whiskey as it goes into the nog.  That will be this Friday night and I'm totally looking forward to it.




Anyway, hope you enjoy the recipe!

Online FearlessF

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HOMEMADE EGG NOG


If you're nervous about raw eggs, you can buy already-heat-pasteurized eggs at most markets, or you can actually do it yourself at home and save some bucks. We've done both and have never noticed any difference in texture or flavor.
so, if I'm not nervous about raw eggs, just mix them as is?
Thanks
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Online utee94

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so, if I'm not nervous about raw eggs, just mix them as is?
Thanks
Yup.  Honestly in the 13 years or so we've done this party, we've pasteurized our own eggs once, bought pre-pasteurized eggs 3 or 4 times, and "risked" it with raw unpasteurized eggs the balance of 8 or 9 times.  So far, no illness or death.  Plenty of hangovers of course, but no illnesses attributed to the eggs.

Online FearlessF

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I will risk it.

Thanks
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Online utee94

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Pre-party is tonight.  I'm about to hit the store and pick up 5 dozen eggs, 3 quarts of heavy whipping cream, 6 quarts of half and half, and a big bag of sugar.

Whiskey and rum are already stocked in the liquor cabinet, but just for reference it'll be an entire handle of bourbon, and about half that of rum.  Oh boy...


Online Drew4UTk

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so... the party is tonight- and i just finished making this eggnog... and... i gotta go back to the store (or send the kid) as i'll be needing at least a dozen more eggs, another pint or so of heavy cream... and couple pints of light cream... why asks you?  because that stuff is GOOD... (and i need to drink a LOT of coffee... i'm going to be out cold before anyone even shows up). 

though i don't recommend it for any reason other than this, but... vanilla jim beam really filled in well along with a half fifth of Captain spiced (regular).  i could see me making this year 'round if you want to know the truth.  next time i'll make it with rumchata instead of captain... 

oh- and i added a couple tablespoons of both ground nutmeg and cinnamon.  

@utee94 - thank you... this is really good stuff. 

Online FearlessF

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raw eggs?

I just printed the recipe here at work

got my shopping list - a friend of mine has free range laying hens and usually needs to unload eggs
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Online utee94

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Glad you liked it, drew.  We always have fresh whole nutmeg and a grater, we don't put it into the nog because believe it or not some folks don't seem to like it, but I grate on quite a bit when I pour myself a cup of it.

Fearless, I'd imagine fresh eggs would only make it that much more delicious.

Online FearlessF

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Badge,

I don't remember tasting Stella's spicy cheese bread when in Madison???

featured on BTN Campus Eats

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Online FearlessF

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"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

Online MarqHusker

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I like and will try the technique they use with respect to the laying of the wood.  Sometimes I feel I'm a little skimpy on the wood.    I'm simply not committed to the rest of that routine.  I've only smoked brisket on my BGE, and it seems 3/4 turn out more or less 'very good'.   By no means are the 'competition' quality briskets, but they sure taste great.

I try and follow a pretty battle tested routine on it, and the only trouble I have is one of two things.   1. when the brisket seizes (uh oh) I'm not convinced there's anything you can do (I've tried to go to school on this with folks, lot of mixed ideas), or 2. and this is where maybe I should try the butcher paper, the bark gets soggy,  that's a big bummer when it happens.  the bark is my favorite part.  Like I said, 1/4 times I run into trouble.   This guy is obviously a pro.

Online 847badgerfan

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I have a method that I use and it always turns out very tasty and tender.

Texans would not approve, but they ain't eating it anyway. I am, and I approve.


I start on my Weber kettle, using indirect heat and a lot of wood for the smoke. I let this go for about 2-3 hours until there is no more smoke, and then finish it in the oven. No, you don't get the same bark, but the bite is really good. Every one of them.
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Online Drew4UTk

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that ecoque gen 2 i landed does a great job and takes much of the mystery out of smoking (this far). 

i smoked a 18# rib eye roast last weekend.  took it to 120* over about 5.5~6 hours.  the heat of the smoker never broke 240, and the meat took a slow steady climb to temp.  i killed much of the smoke at a meat temperature of 100, and let her stand wrapped in foil and a towel, and in a cooler for about an hour.  

the bark was perfect and the smoke ring well defined.  i used hickory.  i couldn't be happier than i was- unless i can complain about pulling it too late.  it was a little past medium rare.  we had sandwiches, then big cuts, then quesadillas, then i just stripped several cuts and made finger bites... and of course an omelet or two... i was very pleased. 

this weekend i'm going to try ribs in that thing... pork ribs... 

Online 847badgerfan

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How'd the pork turn out?
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Online Drew4UTk

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i did pork ribs and a whole chicken yesterday, and Saturday night i tried out the pizza oven... 

the ribs were superb... the chicken was okay (not really a chicken fan) but the texture was.... different.. pulled it at 165* internal and tossed it on grill with full out flames on it for a few minutes to do whatever it is that does to the skin to make it edible... i was really happy with those ribs, though. 

the pizza turned out pretty good!!! i've got that griddle, and prepared some italian sausage on it, along with some andolini sliced like pepperoni, and peppers and onions... i used some Pillsbury pizza dough instead of making my own and cooked it for 5 minutes @ 475* and pulled it... dressed it with sauce (wife's recipe from garden) light layer of mozzarella, a pile of fixin's, more moz, then pepperoni and andolini..... another five minutes... those things were fantastic too... 

I got that ecoque from amazon for $2600 and i was worried it wouldn't work out, but... it has and it will.  I have yet another rib eye roast i'll smoke over the 4th, and a couple other cuts i'll be doing over the summer.  

i HIGHLY rec that thing.   

 

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