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Topic: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.

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Drew4UTk

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No, not a bisque at all.There was still a lot of corn kernels (2-1 solid vs. puree) and not all that much half and half based on the overall quantity of the other ingredients.It was still a dish with a ton of texture, but it had that silkiness from the puree. Hope that helps.





I went to a local eating joint yesterday and the cook there gave me a leg of deer meat. He couldn't keep it in the store cooler because of laws regarding non FDA rated meat. Now, all I have to do is figure out how to cook the thing.





Brazing would the way to go with that meat Gator.Rub it with olive oil, then season it generously with salt and pepper. Sear it first on high heat, in a dutch oven if you have one. Add a diced carrot, a diced celery stalk and a diced onion and cook until just turning soft (5 minutes). This would also be the time to add herbs or minced garlic, if you desire.Deglaze with 2 cups of red wine. Reduce the wine to wait until the alcohol burns off (10 minutes or so) and add beef broth or stock to cover the meat. NOTE: If you don't have the dutch oven, use a cast iron skillet (or any skillet, really) and simply transfer it into a foil pan or other deep vessel after the wine is reduced.Cover and let it cook at 325 for 3-4 hours or until fork tender.





a deer leg????I'd bone it out and grind it with some beef tallow.  Guessing deer near Atlanta don't eat much corn...





They nibble on rock and red clay





They eat peaches and listen to the Allman Brothers.





If it's too bulky for a pot, you could try to wrap it really tightly in foil and put in some beer n garlic n onion and then bake until tender.  That's my standard braising trinity, though I haven't tried it on Georgia deer leg.





You wouldn't sear it first?





I would if it fit in a pot.





847badgerfan wrote: Brazing would the way to go with that meat Gator.Rub it with olive oil, then season it generously with salt and pepper. Sear it first on high heat, in a dutch oven if you have one. Add a diced carrot, a diced celery stalk and a diced onion and cook until just turning soft (5 minutes). This would also be the time to add herbs or minced garlic, if you desire.Deglaze with 2 cups of red wine. Reduce the wine to wait until the alcohol burns off (10 minutes or so) and add beef broth or stock to cover the meat. NOTE: If you don't have the dutch oven, use a cast iron skillet (or any skillet, really) and simply transfer it into a foil pan or other deep vessel after the wine is reduced.Cover and let it cook at 325 for 3-4 hours or until fork tender.Thanks for the advice. I'll do just what you suggest and let you know the outcome.





Gatorama2 wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: Brazing would the way to go with that meat Gator.Rub it with olive oil, then season it generously with salt and pepper. Sear it first on high heat, in a dutch oven if you have one. Add a diced carrot, a diced celery stalk and a diced onion and cook until just turning soft (5 minutes). This would also be the time to add herbs or minced garlic, if you desire.Deglaze with 2 cups of red wine. Reduce the wine to wait until the alcohol burns off (10 minutes or so) and add beef broth or stock to cover the meat. NOTE: If you don't have the dutch oven, use a cast iron skillet (or any skillet, really) and simply transfer it into a foil pan or other deep vessel after the wine is reduced.Cover and let it cook at 325 for 3-4 hours or until fork tender.Thanks for the advice. I'll do just what you suggest and let you know the outcome.Well...?





hope he didn't expect too much





I don't really like deer meat, as I don't like any gamey meat, but I'm curious as to how it worked out.





I did just what Badgerfan suggested and it turned out to be delicious. Much more tender that I suspected and not too gamey either.





Here's a chicken dish I concocted last night. It was fantastic so I'm sharing.Boneless/skinless chicken breasts, pounded to about 1/4 inch thickFlour1 beaten eggMilk2 TB CapersFresh lemon juiceFresh garlic, 4 clovesOlive oil1 TB unsalted butter2 cups chicken stock/brothPound the chicken, and if very thick slice them to make things a little easier. Combine the egg with about a 1/4 cup of milk and add salt and pepper. Add salt and pepper to the flour. Coat the chicken with flour, and shake the eccess off. Dip into the egg mixture and then back into the flour mixture. Heat a skillet with the oil and butter to almost smoking and add the chicken. Cook about 3 minutes per side to brown and remove. Mince the capers and garlic and add to the pan. Cook until almost brown and add the stock. Reduce by half. Add the chicken back to the pan and cook through, basting the entire time with the sauce. At the last minute, add the fresh lemon juice over the chicken and serve.I like to serve this with roasted potato wedges, cooked in the oven with a little bit of olive oil and salt and pepper. I also like to add a little sauce to the potatoes. A little steamed and buttered broccoli on the side and you're rocking with a great meal.





BuckeyeCMO wrote: BUCKEYECMO's ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND PEPPERS2lbs hot Italian sausage2 large red peppers2 large yellow peppers1 large onion4 cloves garlic2 tablespoons tomato paste28oz can of chopped tomatoes1/2cup of marsala cooking wine1tsp. of oreganofresh basil1/2tsp. of red pepper flakessalt and pepper2 tablespoons of olive oilI cut up all of the vegetables the night before, so as to eliminate as much prep work as possible. This recipe really only is convenient if you have a large grill.I cook the sausage on the grill just like anything else, and then set it aside and cut it into bite size pieces. Take the peppers, onions and garlic which should already be cut from the night before and wrap it all in aluminum foil with the olive oil, salt and pepper. Cook the veggies on the grill until all are almost done.Add the sausage, the peppers/onions mixture and all of the remaining ingredients to a larger pot and let simmer on the grill until the sauce thickens and the flavors mix together. Serve either on hoagie buns or as a side......Bump





Thanks dood. Try my chicken dish above. Let me know.Also...You need to add to this thread. Slacker.





Made this last nightChicken and DumplingsChicken, cut up into bite size piecesVeggies of your choice, uncooked, or 2 bags of frozen veggie medley2 can Cream of Chicken soupenough water to coverPut in a crock pot on high for 5 1/2 hours.Take a can of refridgerated rolls and divide each roll into thirds.  Add to crock pot and cook for an additional 30 minutes.Couldn't have been easier.





speaking of crock pots.........I browned a hormone free beef rump roast and put it in the crock pot this morning.  Along with carrots, taters, onions, and garlic cloves.smells wonderful!





 roaddawg2 wrote: Had this at the Illini/Ohio St game, they were very very good so I would recommend trying them.  You can adjust the mixture to suit your taste, as I often do not follow the exact recipe.2/3 C(cup) finely chopped green onions1/2 C whiskey   (I used Gentelman Jack just because it was the 1st bottle in the cabinet I grabbed)1/4 C dry bread crumbs2 Tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce2 Tablespoons melted butter2 cloves minced garlic1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt OR garlic salt   (I used garlic salt)1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper1 pound ground beef     (I subbed Bison Burger)1 pound ground pork Chedder Whiskey Filling: Take 2 cups of shredded cheddar cheese, 1/3 cup finely chopped green onions, 2 tablespoons                                  Whiskey, 1 1/2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce and 2 cloves of minced garlic and mix in a                                        food processor until smooth or nearly so, it will be about like a paste.   (SAVE ALL THE FILLING)1/2 Cup BBQ sauce  (I used Sweet Baby Ray's)Lettuce, Red Onions and Tomato's sliced for garnish on Jumbo Buns (I toasted mine when I was cooking)DAY BEFORE:Mix the green onions, whiskey, bread crumbs, worcestershire sauce, butter, garlic. seasoned salt, red pepper and black pepper in a bowl.  Add in the BURGER and PORK and mix well.  Patty the mixture out to make an even amount of patties that are about 1/2 inch thick (I have a hamburger patty press, but if you are using your hands the mix should make about 12-14 patties).  Place 1 tablespoon of the whiskey filling one center of half the patties.  Keep the remaining filling in a storage container to be used when you grill the burgers.  Take the other patties and cover each patty that has filling and pinch the two together to form one nice sized burger-don't worry they will shrink some during the cooking, but you should have a hefty patty to start out with, about 3/4 inches thick.Put the burgers in a storage container with wax paper between each row/level to keep them from sticking and refrig overnite.  Transport to the tailgate site in a cooler with ice.  Remove them from the ice/cooler about 15 minutes before grilling (IF doing this in HOT weather, maybe 5-9 minutes before throwing on the grill.).Grill the burgers when ready, give a little extra time than you may used too since they are pretty thick and sometimes the tailgates grills are not as hot as home grills.  After you flip the burgers (I sear my burgers by pressing down on the top with the spatula) place 1 tablespoon of the remaining whiskey filling on top of the cooked side of the burger.  The filling will be oozing out of the burger, but don't worry, the topping will more than make up for whatever leaks out.  IF you have the grill space you can toast the burger buns as well.Swab the bottom of the burger bun with BBQ sauce, place the burger on top and garnish with your lettuce, red onions, and whatever else you what to top it with, cover with the crown of the bun and ENJOY! !! !I was able to get some nice sweet corn to grill; we also had macaroni salad, potato salad, and chips.   I know it sounds like a lot of work, but really it is not.  The pre-prep makes this very easy on game day.  The corn was not hard to cook either.  We used one coleman grill (standard equip for tailgate) and had no troubles.  Just adjust your cooking times for the burger thickness. I know it the "off season" and here in Indiana the weather is uh, ummmmm, oddd, so the mind starts to think, and mine said the other day "self, I wonder how that Whiskey Burger recipe would taste as a meatloaf?".   Come to find out it tastes pretty damn good!    I called my younger brother, who is Michigan Fan, and sister-in-law, who is a Notre Dame fan, up and invited them over for the experiment along with my wife who is Wisconsin grad.  I mixed it up, baked it for about an hour and served with the traditional "meatloaf" sides-biscuts, mashed potatoes, and corn.  We paired it with a red wine and glasses of ice water.   Everyone enjoyed it very much.The only change I made was:  I diced the red onions and tomato up and added it to the center of the loaf with about 2/3 of the whiskey cheese filling.  I added a little more bread crumbs to make sure it stayed together and spread the remaining 1/3 of the cheese mixture on top of the loaf for the last 15 minutes of baking(which I did at 350 for about an hour).   P.S.As a precaution, in the event it did not turn out well, and to assure that Buckeye Nation continues to grow strong, I served my four year old son hot dog and the sides!





nothing wrong with a good hot dog!





I fried beef hot dogs in beef fat yesterday and it was AWESOME!!!





This is a flank steak I made, so I'm sharing.1 flank steak1 sweet onion, sliced thinn1 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped1 red bell pepper, sliced thin4 cloves of garlic, finely chopped1 cup of mushrooms, sliced thin1 TB chipotle puree (or chipotle salsa would work)1/2 up of blue cheese crumbles3 TB sugarolive oilsalt and pepperRub the steak with a little oil, and liberally salt and pepper. Set aside and let it come to room temperature. Heat the grill to high heat.In a sautee pan, add a little oil and the onions and red pepper. Season with salt and pepper. Bring to a high heat, then reduce and add the sugar to carmelize. When half way, add the jalepeno and garlic. Continue to sautee and add the mushrooms and puree with about 5 minutes left. You may need to add a little more oil or even water at this time. Reduce the heat, add the blue cheese and let cook until the mushrooms are done.Put the steak on the grill and cook to medium-rare - about 6 minutes per side. Remove the steak and let it rest for a few minutes on the cutting board covered with foil.Thinly slice the steak on the bias and add to the sautee pan. Stir to combine and heat through. Add a little more blue cheese at this time, if desired.Serve with potatoes or rice and a nice veggie like asparagus.





I was just thinking that the above recipe could be served in a flour tortilla as well. That might be really excellent.





flour tortilla and a frosted mug of Budweiser!





there are already carbs in the tortilla ya don't need rice to boot





 MaximumSam wrote: I fried beef hot dogs in beef fat yesterday and it was AWESOME!!! yum





MrNubbz wrote: there are already carbs in the tortilla ya don't need rice to bootIt's an either/or thing Mr. N.






Drew4UTk

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Potato and parsnip puree2 parsnips, peeled and diced into 1/2" cubes3 large yukon gold potatoes, peeled and diced into 2" cubes6 cloves of garlic, finely diced or pressed1/2 stick of butter1/2 cup of olive oil1/2 cup warm milksalt and pepperBring a pot of salted water to a heavy boil. Add the parsnips and boil for 10 minutes. Add the potatoes and boil for 20 minutes longer, until parsnips and potatoes are fork tender. Add the olive oil and butter to a saucepan and add the garlic. Season with salt and pepper. Cook the garlic on low/medium heat to just browning. Add the milk, stir, and remove from the heat.Drain the parsnips and potatoes and return to the pot. Pour the milk mixture over the potatoes. Season with salt and pepper. Beat the mixture to a puree and serve.Can be garnished with fresh parsley and can also be served with grated parmeson or romano cheese, but I like them plain.





Roasted red pepper and shallot sauce1 whole roasted red pepper, seeds and skin removed1 shallot, finely dicedpinch of saffron strands1/2 cup dry white wine1/4 cup white wine (champaign) vinegar1/2 stick of butter, cold and cubedsalt and pepperAdd the wine, vinegar, shallot and saffron to a small saucepan and season to taste. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to medium/low. Reduce the mixture to about a 1/4 cup. Puree the red pepper in a food processor or blender and add it to the reduced mixture. Whisk in the butter one cube at a time. The sauce will emulsify and it's ready to serve on fish or chicken.I served this over sauteed sea bass last night.ToDieFor





847badgerfan wrote: I was just thinking that the above recipe could be served in a flour tortilla as well. That might be really excellent.I'll throw just about anything into a flour tortilla and eat it.  Corn tortillas are good too, and are actually a slightly "healthier" option (until you deep-fry them, that is).





Tortillas are verstile little buggers. Like rice and potatoes.I like to grill hotdogs (big, beefy ones) and put them in tortillas along with chili, cheese, yellow mustard and onions. I've also added fritos or other chips for crunch.





847badgerfan wrote:I like to grill hotdogs (big, beefy ones) and put them in tortillas along with chili, cheese, yellow mustard and onions. I've also added fritos or other chips for crunch.Down here in Texico that's called a sausage wrap.  Most common filling is BBQ sausage, but any grilled sausage or hot dogs can be used.  And any toppings you like too, for me it's usually yellow mustard, jalapenos, and grilled onions, or sometimes BBQ sauce.(It's okay to eat BBQ sauce on a sausage wrap, just not on real BBQ  )





Anyone who has ever had a Big Mac and liked it will appreciate this sauce recipe...1 c. Miracle Whip  1/3 c. bottle creamy French dressing  1/4 c. sweet pickle relish  1 tbsp. sugar  1/4 tsp. pepper  1 tsp. dry minced onion     Combine. Mix with fork. Refrigerate in covered container for 24 hours and serve. Makes 2 cups.





I had a request for a blackened chicken recipe, and here is the basic rub I use for most things blackened. It's a modification from a recipe I got from Emeril.3 tablespoons paprika2 tablespoons cayenne pepper2 tablespoons salt2 tablespoons garlic powder1 tablespoon black pepper1 tablespoon onion powder1 tablespoon dried oregano1 tablespoon dried thymePut all ingredients into a spice grinder and combine. Use to rub on chicken, fish or pork, to taste.Remember to put some oil or spray the meat before rubbing so it sticks.





To make a chicken or fish sandwich, use the rub from above. Use a nice, fresh roll of your choice along with some lettuce, red onion slices and tomato slices.Toast and coat each slice of roll with some of this:1 Cup Mayo3 TB chopped fresh taragon leaves or cilantro leaves (depending on taste)Juice of one lemon (for taragon) OR juice of one lime (for cilantro)salt and fresh black pepperCombine and place in the refridgerator for 24 hours in a covered container.





 847badgerfan wrote: I had a request for a blackened chicken recipe, and here is the basic rub I use for most things blackened. It's a modification from a recipe I got from Emeril. Put all ingredients into a spice grinder and combine. Use to rub on chicken, fish or pork, to taste.  do you have a different version for beef?





Beef can withstand alot more than the other proteins so I tend to mix it up a little more - a little more heat, a little more herb. It depends on the dish.





So I've been reading up and have decided to move away from more processed oils like vegetable and canola and towards more natural fats like olive oil, butter, lard, and beef tallow.  Mmm beef tallow.  Anyone else done that?  I'd like to make my own butter - any tips?





Compound butter? Or butter from scratch?What is tallow?What have you read about the oils?How about peanut, sesame and grapeseed? Anything on those oils?





speaking of beef tallow, I was wondering if the "Good Eats" burger was ground together with beef tallow to give it some flavor and enough fat to cause it to stick together in a patty.Here in Iowa, the land of corn-fed whitetail.  We always ground our venison with beef tallow.





847badgerfan wrote: Compound butter? Or butter from scratch?What is tallow?What have you read about the oils?How about peanut, sesame and grapeseed? Anything on those oils?Butter from scratch - it sounds pretty simple - run cream in a blender or Kitchenaid until it butter forms, then you have to wash it, which doesn't sound too complicated.  I would really like to try it though.Tallow is just beef fat typically rendered from the suet.  I've done that a couple times, and I absolutely love it.  It is perfect for frying, especially steaks.  McDonald's used to fry their fries in beef fat, but switched to all sorts of other garbage to avoid saturated fat.My concern about the oils is the idea that one of the bigger problems for health is the ratio of essential fatty acids, specifically Omega-6 to Omega-3.  Both are necessary for continued living, but Omega-3s are typically found in seafood and a few other places, while Omega 6s are found in high quantities in other foods.  The problem voiced about "healthy" oils like vegetable oil is that they have very quantities of Omega 6 and low of Omega 3.  Now, I am hardly an expert on this type of stuff, but I've read some lately and it seems believable.  The same camp of people tend to think fats with high quantities of saturated fat are perfectly fine.  They make good arguments and I tend to find myself convinced.  The most accessible of these people is probably from www.marksdailyapple.com, although really the whole "primal" and "paleo" diet movements are based on a lot of the same principles.  There is a post about those oils and a bunch of other ones at Mark's Daily Apple.  Fascinating stuff, really, but I am always curious as to other's people experiences and opinions.  I don't want to eat a bunch of butter and die from a heart attack.  I also don't want to skimp out on all that great stuff and then die of a heart attack anyway because I avoided the wrong things.





Oh, OK. I know what that is.I think, like anything, you can eat whatever you want in moderation.I have a funny story. I've been prone to gout flares my entire life and I just had the worst one I've ever had. I don't drink beer. I've cut WAY back on all alcohol consumption. I've cut back on red meat.This last flare was caused by eating too much seafood, and, get this...TOO MANY WHOLE GRAINS.Whole grains are high in purine, which causes uric acid production, which causes gout.I ate too many. Holy crap, right?!?!?





847badgerfan wrote: Oh, OK. I know what that is.I think, like anything, you can eat whatever you want in moderation.I have a funny story. I've been prone to gout flares my entire life and I just had the worst one I've ever had. I don't drink beer. I've cut WAY back on all alcohol consumption. I've cut back on red meat.This last flare was caused by eating too much seafood, and, get this...TOO MANY WHOLE GRAINS.Whole grains are high in purine, which causes uric acid production, which causes gout.I ate too many. Holy crap, right?!?!?I don't know anything about gout.  So I investigated.  And I'm curious - purines are apparently the evildoer here, but purines in plants are apparently ok, and purines in animals are apparently not ok.  And beer isn't ok.  And now whole wheat isn't ok.  And I'm thinking - maybe purines aren't really what the problem is.  I found one website - GoutPal, which seemed to agree, but his page was pretty hard to read and didn't provide much reasoning.  After more perusal I found an alternate theory that fructose may be the bad guy, meaning sugar/corn syrup, soda, etc.  Then I found this link to a missing chapter of a book called "Good Calories, Bad Calories," by Gary Taubes, which focused on gout. Thoughts?





Who knows?I get bad flares when I have to much spinach or too many mushrooms.One of my favorite dishes I make is based on spinach and mushrooms.It sucks.I've also had bad flares from too much chicken.I'm blood type O.





So to update a previous post - I saw Snowville Creamery Cream at Krogers of all places - (usually you can only get it at Whole Foods - it's not ultra-pasteurized, very fresh, and mostly grassfed).  So I bought a half gallon and went to making some butter.  It was surprisingly easy and took just minutes.  The first step was putting in the Kitchen Aid with the Whisk and running it until the fat separated from the liquid.  Then you put it in collender and rinse it while you squeeze it until you get all the liquid out.  And that's it.  Fresh butter on the table.





Was it good? Better than a stick from the store?





847badgerfan wrote: Was it good? Better than a stick from the store?Definitely very clean and sweet tasting.  If you like making compound butter, it would be an excellent time to make it, since it's already pretty malleable.  Also, since you like having guests, there is something pretty cool about making butter while dinner is cooking.





Sounds pretty simple and worth the effort. Thanks.Is there anything you can do with the leftover liquid?





 847badgerfan wrote: Sounds pretty simple and worth the effort. Thanks.Is there anything you can do with the leftover liquid? Probably - it's traditional buttermilk (which is not the same as the buttermilk at the store).  Store bought buttermilk is regular milk that has been cultured with bacteria, so it is much thicker.





Interesting. I'd like to try that to treat chicken and calamari. I almost always use buttermilk to tenderize either of those meats.Also... I noted that you mentioned putting citrus in regular milk instead of using buttermilk. I don't think that would work.I'm going to try the milk thing with lemon on some calamri this weekend to test it. I'll let you know.





847badgerfan wrote: Oh, OK. I know what that is.I think, like anything, you can eat whatever you want in moderation.I have a funny story. I've been prone to gout flares my entire life and I just had the worst one I've ever had. I don't drink beer. I've cut WAY back on all alcohol consumption. I've cut back on red meat.This last flare was caused by eating too much seafood, and, get this...TOO MANY WHOLE GRAINS.Whole grains are high in purine, which causes uric acid production, which causes gout.I ate too many. Holy crap, right?!?!?Um I'm a big violater,better go back to coffee,bacon & eggs sorta screwed either way





Today is gonna be Italian day.I've got some veal cutlets, ground pork, ground beef, potatoes, pasta, fresh veggies and a stocked pantry.I'll let you know how things turn out and if they do, the recipes will be posted.





up and at 'em early to start preparing the Saturday feastmotivated by food!





Marinara is on. Meatballs are baked and now braising.Gonna pound the veal and flour it next, for ease of prep later.





well???  results??





Much success.Carbonara was awesome. Veal was the best I ever ate. Meatballs were fantastic.I'll get the recipes up when I figure them out, except the carbonara. I used a recipe from Giada for that and it worked.http://www.foodnetwork.com/rec...cipe/index.htmlI used half and half in place of cream, and I drained the bacon fat in favor of olive oil.





I suspected success






Drew4UTk

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Meatballs1 LB ground beef (85%)1 LB ground pork (80%)1 cup bread crumbs1 cup grated parmesan cheese1 egg1 TB oregano1 TB basil1 TB onion powder1 TB garlic powber1 TB parsley flakes1/2 cup milksalt and pepperPreheat the oven to 450F.Beat the egg and milk, then add the spices and the cheese and bread crumbs and combine so it is consistent. Add the meat and hand mix to fully combine.Form the mixture into 1.5" balls and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Leave a little room in between the balls so that air can flow. Bake for 15 minutes and turn. Bake for 15 minutes more and remove from the oven to rest.Braise the meatballs in 1/2 marinara and 1/2 beef broth for 3 hours in a sauce pan on low heat.Marinara recipe to follow...





I made a crabmeat croissant for dinner today, with vinegar potatoes. I'll get those recipes up tomorrow, along with the veal from last night.AMAZING.





wish I lived 8 hours closer





Hey any of you guys have marinade suggestions that you've tried for Pork Loin.Got a good price on a couple of 'em and like to try this week





I like to use sage with pork. It's a great pairing.How are you going to cook it?





grilling,previously Ive had the loins vacuum sealed in a marinade and they turned out great.I have marinade recipes just thought I'd ask for one already sampled.The loin is a little over 21/2lbs





Is it the loin, or the tenderloin?





Been off with elbow surgery if I went into work I'd have less to do,Anyhoo TENDERLOIN.Thanx





Try the one I posted a while back, marinating in the chipotle and adobo puree along with some apple cider vinegar and canola oil.Go with a can of the chipotles and puree them. Add 1/2 cup each of the vinegar and the oil, as well as salt and pepper. Let it go overnight if possible.If you want, finish it with the apple juice reduction I posted, or just some apple sauce mixed with some roasted diced jalepeno and shallot to warm.Pair with roasted or grilled sweet potato planks.





Will do,ever try this a friend sent me this said he got it off the web.Said it was lip smackin'Brine the tenderloins In a medium bowl, mix 1/4 C Kosher salt and 1/4C sugar with 1 pint cool water until dissolved(for every tenderloin). Trim the tenderloins of excess fat and silverskin and submerge them in the brine; let stand about 45 minutes. Remove the pork from the brine, rinse thoroughly, and pat dry.





I've done brining quite a bit, but I let that go overnight as well.I also like to add toasted spices, like allspice berries, juniper berries, cloves, etc. They add a nice dimension to the brine. Brown sugar instead of regular and some cidar vinegar (a TB or 2) also works nicely.Cut back the salt a bit and you can easily go overnight on brining - especially with whole roasts and such.





Badge you said marinade overnite if possible.I'll makeit in the morning and let sit til around 5 PM-should do it.Is that chipolte puree recipe in this thread?





Veal Picatta1 LB veal cutlets, pounded to about 1/8" thickFloursalt and pepper2 eggs, beaten with a little milkOlive oil2 TB unsalted butter1.5 TB capersJuice of 2 lemons1 cup dry white wineSeason the floour and dredge the veal in the flour, covering uniformly and shaking off the excess. Preheat a sautee pan to medium heat and lightly coat the bottom with olive oil, adding more oil throughout the process as needed to cook all the veal. Pass the veal through the egg wash and then straight into the pan. Sautee for roughly 2 minutes per side, so the veal browns and cooks through. place on a plate with paper towel to drain and keep warm. Deglaze the pan with the wine and reduce by half. Add the butter, the lemon juice and the caper and whisk to thicken. Return the veal to the pan and coat with the sauce. Serve over mashed potatoes and add a little more sauce and fresh parsley to the place, alongside some roasted carrots and/or asparagus.





Well Badge pureed' the chipolte's.Used Apple cider & white vinegar with the oil and sprinkled some sage in there.Prolly pull it out of the marinade & grill around 6 PM





Good. don't forget the sauce though. Very important.





 847badgerfan wrote: Veal Picatta1 LB veal cutlets, pounded to about 1/8" thickFloursalt and pepper2 eggs, beaten with a little milkOlive oil2 TB unsalted butter1.5 TB capersJuice of 2 lemons1 cup dry white wineSeason the floour and dredge the veal in the flour, covering uniformly and shaking off the excess. Preheat a sautee pan to medium heat and lightly coat the bottom with olive oil, adding more oil throughout the process as needed to cook all the veal. Pass the veal through the egg wash and then straight into the pan. Sautee for roughly 2 minutes per side, so the veal browns and cooks through. place on a plate with paper towel to drain and keep warm. Deglaze the pan with the wine and reduce by half. Add the butter, the lemon juice and the caper and whisk to thicken. Return the veal to the pan and coat with the sauce. Serve over mashed potatoes and add a little more sauce and fresh parsley to the place, alongside some roasted carrots and/or asparagus. I make this as well, I enjoy it very much, my wife, not so much.  He has this phobia about Veal.





Any good Tuna Steak recipes from the CFN Kitchenmates?





Ahi?If it's fresh enough you need not do much. Slice it thinly and serve it with some traditional Japanese condiments in its raw state.If it was frozen, make sure it's thawed and lightly spray it with cooking spray. Then sprinkle it with black and white sesame seeds to cover it. Sear it on high heat in a cast iron skillet or other heavy pan, about a minute per side maximum. You want it to be warm, but raw inside still.Slice it thin, arrange it on a plate nicely, and place some pickled ginger, wasabe and soy sauce on the side.





 847badgerfan wrote: Ahi?If it's fresh enough you need not do much. Slice it thinly and serve it with some traditional Japanese condiments in its raw state.If it was frozen, make sure it's thawed and lightly spray it with cooking spray. Then sprinkle it with black and white sesame seeds to cover it. Sear it on high heat in a cast iron skillet or other heavy pan, about a minute per side maximum. You want it to be warm, but raw inside still.Slice it thin, arrange it on a plate nicely, and place some pickled ginger, wasabe and soy sauce on the side. I lightly coated it with olive oil, salt, and pepper, and broiled it about 6 min on one side and about 3 on the other.  May have been a tad over done for some, but I do not like it rare, more medium rare.  I made a cucumber sauce with finely diced cucs, lemon juice, dill weed, pepper/salt and sour cream.  Not too bad, rather plain, but enjoyable.





Broke down and bought a little smoker - I had been smoking things using a combo of starting on the grill and finishing in the oven, but that requires a lot of work and I just want to watch basketball and drink beer.  Any tips, smoker people?





I just bought some ahi that was caught 3 hours ago.Hanalei is a good place to be for that. I'm gonna lightly grill it and serve with the ginger, wasabe and soy trilogy.Mmmm.Smokey or UTee would be your best bets on the smoking Max. I'm going to defer.





My main question now is whether there is a good way to convert a wet smoker, which is what I have, to a dry smoker, and back again.





847badgerfan wrote: I just bought some ahi that was caught 3 hours ago.How did they get it to Chi-town in 3rs?F-18 Hornet?





I was lucky enough to pick up some just-caught mahi mahi last night at the beach, so that is what I will be making today.I'm going to mix a little butter, teriyaki and salt and pepper and glaze as I cook it gently on the grill.Then it's home tomorrow.Bummer, but it sounds like the weather at home has been just as nice as it is here.





Golfing Weather





Hmm....learn something new every dayKobe beef (the real deal) can't and isn't sold in the US. People who claim they are selling you Kobe beef anything are taking you for a ride.





won't bother meI wouldn't spend have of that on the real thingthe steaks and beef I get locally are some of the best in the world and plenty good enough for medon't need no stinking Japanese beef and don't need no stinking Russian fish eggs





FearlessF wrote: won't bother meI wouldn't spend have of that on the real thingthe steaks and beef I get locally are some of the best in the world and plenty good enough for medon't need no stinking Japanese beef and don't need no stinking Russian fish eggsRussian Vodka is alright and you drink Rice Beer like the Japanese





Stolichnaya vodka is my favoriteOtherwise I go with Ketel One





Luksusowa - Polish Potato Vodka,rated a Best Buy - Beverage Tasting Institute or Tito's are my Favs.Prolly toss Sky in there too






Drew4UTk

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I am obviously a huge fan of Tito'sworthy of a best buy awardWish I could get the big bottles of Tito's here





FearlessF wrote: I am obviously a huge fan of Tito'sworthy of a best buy awardWish I could get the big bottles of Tito's hereLet me know how many you want.10 cases? 20? That should get you by for a month or so.





Anyone have some good ideas for about 3-4 pounds of country style pork ribs?I tried something last weekend, and didn't like it.  Slow cooked them in the oven for about 4 hours at 200 covered in garlic and lemon, then covered in sauce and cooked for another hour at 225, bleh.Should I just use my regular rib recipe on them, even though they aren't actually ribs?





EastLansingAdam wrote: Anyone have some good ideas for about 3-4 pounds of country style pork ribs?I tried something last weekend, and didn't like it.  Slow cooked them in the oven for about 4 hours at 200 covered in garlic and lemon, then covered in sauce and cooked for another hour at 225, bleh.Should I just use my regular rib recipe on them, even though they aren't actually ribs?That's what I typically do.  Country ribs are a little tricky because they aren't exactly a universal piece of meat - they tend to cut up all sorts of things and call them country ribs.  But generally, take a look at the fat content in the rib - the higher it is, the longer you can cook them on indirect heat and the better they will taste.  I am usually too lazy and just cook them all the same time, which always leads to a couple being dry.





I agree with Max.You can also braise them in seasoned pork or beef stock after grilling them.





Didn't even bother throwing them on the grill, partially because it was about 40 and raining.  Slow cooked them with apple cidar, cidar vinegar, brown sugar, onions and BBQ sauce.  Worked well.





847badgerfan wrote: FearlessF wrote: I am obviously a huge fan of Tito'sworthy of a best buy awardWish I could get the big bottles of Tito's hereLet me know how many you want.10 cases? 20? That should get you by for a month or so.That reminds me, I have a case of Tito's handles leftover from football season just waiting in my cabinet.  Big baseball weekend series against the departing Aggies, I should drag that sucker out and kill it.





don't waste it on the Aggies!





FearlessF wrote: Stolichnaya vodka is my favoriteOtherwise I go with Ketel OneI like Stolichnaya too. On my trips to Russia I drank the real stuff over there. Cost was 60 cents for a full liter and the proof over there is 125.





847badgerfan wrote: FearlessF wrote: I am obviously a huge fan of Tito'sworthy of a best buy awardWish I could get the big bottles of Tito's hereLet me know how many you want.10 cases? 20? That should get you by for a month or so.I think you are right on with that estimate.





Ya well it is the off season you know





20 cases during SHARKWATER season





Change O' plans today, unfortunately. 39 degrees, rain and 8 foot waves put a damper on fishing. Oh well.So...I'm making short ribs, mashed potatoes and parsnips, grilled sweet corn, tomato salad and grilled broccoli.Just poured a 2009 Edmeades Zinfindel, an axiously awaiting a pour of JW Gold that the wife got me for our 15th.It could be worse. Life is pretty good.





This is something I love, and I started getting creative over the weekend to come up with this recipe. There are several variations around, but this one is mine and I think it's the best. Finally - a creamy garlic dressing that doesn't have Big Mac calories....Low fat creamy garlic dressing 1 cup fat-free mayo½ cup half and half½ cup skim milk5 cloves of garlic, minced2 TB soy sauce2 TB lemon juiceSalt and cracked black pepper to taste Combine all ingredients in a blender or food processor, and process until smooth. Let it sit for a day in the fridge to thicken.





847badgerfan wrote: This is something I love, and I started getting creative over the weekend to come up with this recipe. There are several variations around, but this one is mine and I think it's the best. Finally - a creamy garlic dressing that doesn't have Big Mac calories....Low fat creamy garlic dressing 1 cup fat-free mayo½ cup half and half½ cup skim milk5 cloves of garlic, minced2 TB soy sauce2 TB lemon juiceSalt and cracked black pepper to taste Combine all ingredients in a blender or food processor, and process until smooth. Let it sit for a day in the fridge to thicken.WTF is in fat free mayo?





I probably don't want to know - and next time I will use the real stuff or just the reduced fat variety, and skip the 1/2 and 1/2 in favor of all skim milk or maybe lowfat buttermilk.My guess is there are no egg yolks in fat free mayo, for starters.





I love mayo, but make your own.  The essential ingredients are an egg yolk and oil.  I would only use olive oil due to its low polyunsaturated fat content. Lemon juice, salt, vinegar, mustard, and sugar are all good ingredients, and there are many more.  Mmmm mayo.Also a good slaw recipe would be a half a shredded cabbage, a quarter of a chopped onion, a few spoonfuls of mayo, a splash of rice vinegar, and salt and pepper.





I do love homemade mayo, but that day I just used stuff that was in the fridge. I didn't even know we had it, to be honest. The dressing still came out good - and I will use the real stuff next time. Thanks.





It's been a while, but I've been a little busy lately.This is a recipe for a marinade that works well with tougher cuts of beef (flank, skirt) and chicken. Let the beef go for 24 hours, and chicken about 8 or so.4 sprigs of fresh rosemary, stems removed4 cloves of garlic2 tbl capers1 tbl sea salt1 tbl fresh cracked pepper1 tbl brown mustardJuice of 1 lemon1/2 cup canola oil or grapeseed oilCombine all these ingredients in a food processor or blender and work until somewhat smooth.Hint:If you use this marinade for beef, you can re-use it for chicken afterward. Keep in mind though - you cannot do this backward. You will die. Beef is always first.





Tomorrow I'm making fried chicken using some of the suggestions from you all.1. Soak chicken for 4 hours in milk2. Egg wash3. Dip in bowl of flour4. Dip in bowl of bread crumbs and seasonings: salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, Old Bay, and Oregano5. Fry in vegetable oil.





PennState4Life wrote: Tomorrow I'm making fried chicken using some of the suggestions from you all.1. Soak chicken for 4 hours in milk2. Egg wash3. Dip in bowl of flour4. Dip in bowl of bread crumbs and seasonings: salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, Old Bay, and Oregano5. Fry in vegetable oil.Milk, or buttermilk? I prefer the latter as it has enzymes that regular milk doesn't.Also, you're going to want to go in the flour before you do the egg wash. The flour will coat the chicken, and the egg wash will hold to the flour and then the bread crumbs.Let us know how you make out.





I'm using whole milk because I couldn't find buttermilk at the store.  As for reversing the flour/egg wash order, I tried that last time and the flour washed off when I dipped the part in the egg wash bowl.  But now that I'm thinking about it, scooping up the egg by hand and placing it on the floured part would not wash the flour off.  Thanks for mentioning that.





Everything turned out pretty good: crispy on the outside and juicy on the inside.  Unfortunately, I poured a larger amount of bread crumbs into the bowl than needed and the seasonings got buried in them, preventing their flavors from shining through.  Lesson learned.





What is the purpose of soaking the chicken in Buttermilk?I am sure this sounds like a weird question, but if the purpose is to bring out some sort of flavor or provide additional moisture, would this be advisable before smoking a whole chicken?Here are a couple of my favorite Summer time go-tos: Brine a Pork Loin overnightPat Dry. Cover in your favorite rib rub. paint with a mixture of half Heinz 57 steak sauce and plain yellow mustard. Completely wrap the whole thing in the best bacon you can find. Throw in your smoker until 10 degrees from your desired temp (I like to use apple to smoke it)... take off and wrap in foil and towels and put in cooler to rest for 20 minutes. Good eating. Marinade Chicken Breast cubed into 1.5 inch cubes and large sliced fresh mushrooms in a mixture of 1/4 apple cider vinegar,  1/4 honey, 1/2 lite soy sauce. Add  a few tablespoons of veggie oil and a whole crap load of chopped green onion and garlic that has been run through a press. Do not marniate for over 3-4 hours, as the vinegar and soy sauce it so salty/acid, it will nearly cook the chicken. Wrap the chicken in bacon and skewer along with the mushrooms, pinneapple and onion. Cook over a medium hot grill, turning frequently to avoid flareups. The only take about 10-15 minutes to cook, and are nearly impossible to mess up. You will not be disappointed.





MUSTARD & HERB PORK CHOPSStir salt into water to create a brine (I do about 1 cup salt per 10 cups water - for 2 chops)Place the pork chops in the brine for about an hourCombine (per pork chop)...0.5 tbs marjoram0.5 tbs rosemary0.5 tbs thyme2 tbs dijon mustardAs you grill the chops apply the sauce generously.  Remember to adjust the sauce for however many pork chops you are making.  There should be none left when you are done grilling.I served with a grilled veggie medley and roasted redskin potatoes.





CARIBBEAN PORKI used a pound of boneless pork chops for this, but I imagine you could use a variety of pork...Combine1 cup brown sugar2 cups apple cidar1/4 cup salt1 tbs rosemary2 tbs pepper2 cloves garlicBring ingrediants to boil, then let simmer to totally dissolved.  Let pork marinade in marinade, adding enough water to cover.Refridgerate overnight, then grill.I made it with this sauce, but honestly, I think it was flavorful enough without it, that if I made it again, I would skip the sauce.1 tbs olive oil1 pear, peeled and cut into small cubes1 tbs caribbean jerk spice8 oz chicken stock0.5 cups dark rum1 tbs buttersalt and pepper to tasteSimmer until totally dissolved, you may have to whisk a bit to get the pear to totally dissolve.I served with green beans and potato wedges.





PORK SANDWICHESGrill the pork loin chops just with salt and pepper to taste.Take a baguette and divide into 1/4ths and then cut in half to prepare sandwiches.Combine...2 tbs cidar vinegar1 tbs dry mustard1 tbs dijon mustard1 tsp brown sugarWhick together into blended, then spread on top portion of sandwich as you would any topping.Place the grilled pork on the bottom piece of break and top with anythign of your choice (I did lettuce and onions).  Place the top piece of the baguette with the sauce already on it on top.I served with sweet potato fries and corn on the cob.





ASIAN CHICKEN3 lbs chicken breastsCombine1/3 cup soy sauce2 tbs sugar1 tbs white wine1/2 onion (grated)2 cloves garlic1 tsp gingerPlace the breasts in the marinade and refidgerate for 1 hourRemove chicken, but reserve marinadeTake reserve marinade and add...1 tsp dry mustard1/4 tsp pepperGrill the chicken, brushing with the marinade.To create glaze, combine...1/4 cup soy sauce1 tbs sesame oil1 tbs butterCombine over heat until melted.Remove the chicken from the grill, put glaze over top.I served with rice and sugar snap peas.





BALSAMIC GARLIC CHICKENSeason chicken with salt and pepper and grill as desired.Sauce2 tbs olive oil1 tbs butter5 cloves garlic1 onion, chopped1/3 cup balsamic vinegar1 cup chicken broth2 tbs flourHeat the olive oil in a panAdd the garlic and onion and fryAdd the vinegar and broth and bring to boilReduce heat and add the flour, stirring constantly until desired consistancyServe the chicken with the sauce drizzled over.





Shortcut "homemade" potato chipsSure you can make homemade chips, but when time does not permit, try these.First, you want to buy a nice bag of all-natural kettle chips, lightly salted.Heat them in a foil pan on the grill while your meat is resting.When the oils start releasing from the chips, lightly coat them with a blue cheese/rosemary dipping sauce*, toss and serve.*For the sauce, sautee 1 finely diced shallot and 3 finely diced cloves of garlic. Add 1 cup of dry white wine and reduce to 1/4 volume. Add one up of heavy cream and 1 small container of blue cheese or 1 cup of fresh crumbles. Stir until the cheese is melted and add 2 sprigs of very finely diced rosemary. Remove from heat.






Drew4UTk

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TEQUILA LIME CHICKEN1 lbs chicken breast2 cloves garlic1/4 cup lime juice1/4 cup gold tequila1/2 tsp saltdash of pepper3/4 tsp chili powder1/2 tbs olive oilCombine all ingredients and marinade the chicken for 30 minutes.Throw it on the grill.Simple





Does anyone use an electric smoker?  I am somewhat perplexed by the one I got.  I got it just for the ease of use, but it seems to take forever, and I can't quite find the range where my meat is perfectly done.  Everything comes out either too tough or too tender.





I am going to try something this weekend and wondered if anyone had experience with it.  I like sweet potatoes with ribs.  At home I make a pecan crusted sweet potato dish in the oven.  It is delicious, but I can't make it or even heat it properly at a tailgate/campsite.  I checked with google and found that sweet potatoes can be baked on a grill (wrapped in tinfoil) but it takes 45 minutes.  That is probably too long for people to wait.  Another site suggested slicing the sweet potatoes into roughly 1/4" slices and grilling them for 5-10 minutes.  Has anyone tried this or does anyone have another idea?  I was thinking that I could mix up some cinnamon or brownsugar (or both) with butter in advance and offer that as a spread for the grilled sweet potato wedges.  Thoughts?  Please note that this needs to be a tailgate recipe.  If I can't do it with a stove, grill, a few pots and pans, and a limited number of ingredients then it will not work for this application.





BurntEyes wrote:Easy dessert... Easy to pre prep Take an apple for every one you want Core out the apple and wash it well. Take aluminum foil and wrap around the bottom In the top of the apple poor in sugar/cinnamon mixed like cinnamon toast (2/3 sugar 1/2 cinnamon) into the open core of the appel. Drop in a small piece of butter (Totally optional) Wrap foil tight As you are finishing your meat off drop in the premade apples After your meal and a few brews, (the apples should be soft to the touch through the foil) open and serve.I'm really curious about this.  Our thread only has three desserts.  The other two are my chocolate/PB Buckeyes which are obviously pre-prep and cold serve and UTErin's cupcakes which require an oven and therefore can't be prepared at most tailgates.  Thus, this is the only hot dessert in this entire thread that I could actually make at my tailgate/campsite.  I plan to try it this weekend.  When you say to "core out the apple", do you mean to just cut out the core and leave the rest completely intact?  I have an apple-corer, but it cuts the rest into wedges and I don't think that would work for this recipe.  Am I reading that correctly, and do you do it with a knife or do you have a tool for it?





Sweet Potato Planks – Serves 8 4 sweet potatoes, sliced lengthwise into ¼ inch think planksCanola oilCourse sea saltFreshly ground black pepper Brush the sweet potato planks with canola oil and liberally season both sides with the salt and pepper. Place on the grill on medium heat and grill until cooked through, about 5-7 minutes per side. Serve immediately. TIP: Move to indirect heat in order to prevent burning.





Thanks badge, that sounds good.  I am not sure that everyone in my group will want them with salt and pepper so I think I'll go half and half.  I'll do half with canola, salt, and pepper and the other half with just a little canola and have cinnamon-sugar (like you use for cinnamon toast and also for Burnt's apples) and butter for the other half. I'm glad to get it confirmed that grilling them as planks works.





cinnamon-sugar on sweet potato planks = dessert





 medinabuckeye1 wrote:  BurntEyes wrote: Easy dessert...   Easy to pre prep   Take an apple for every one you want   Core out the apple and wash it well.   Take aluminum foil and wrap around the bottom   In the top of the apple poor in sugar/cinnamon mixed like cinnamon toast (2/3 sugar 1/2 cinnamon) into the open core of the appel.   Drop in a small piece of butter (Totally optional)   Wrap foil tight   As you are finishing your meat off drop in the premade apples   After your meal and a few brews, (the apples should be soft to the touch through the foil) open and serve.  I'm really curious about this.  Our thread only has three desserts.  The other two are my chocolate/PB Buckeyes which are obviously pre-prep and cold serve and UTErin's cupcakes which require an oven and therefore can't be prepared at most tailgates.  Thus, this is the only hot dessert in this entire thread that I could actually make at my tailgate/campsite.  I plan to try it this weekend.  When you say to "core out the apple", do you mean to just cut out the core and leave the rest completely intact?  I have an apple-corer, but it cuts the rest into wedges and I don't think that would work for this recipe.  Am I reading that correctly, and do you do it with a knife or do you have a tool for it? Keep it intact. Simply using a paring or heck any knife to cut out the core. So basically you have a apple donut, if you will. Then pour the sugar and cinnamon inside the core using the foil as the bottom. When it's soft to the touch, it's ready. Nice thing for camping and tailgating is, when premaid, if you don't use butter, you don't even have to refrigerate them. With butter, be sure to put them in a cooler. I occasional throw one these in the pack when trekking, and you should see the looks of envy from others. (I usually share)





Fearless:You are probably right, I guess I just have a sweet tooth! Burnt:Thanks for the clarification, now I have my menu for this weekend's major meal complete:Ribs - I will cook them in the Crockpot on Friday with Apple Cider vinegar, Bourbon, onions, peppers, garlic, and apple slices then put some sauce on them and grill them on location.  I have a homemade BBQ sauce, but it isn't perfect, I'm still experimenting. Chicken - I am just going to use a simple marinade for this.  I will cut bonelss-skinless chicken breasts in two and place them in Italian Dressing in a container in the cooler then grill them on location. Sweet Potato Planks - Half badge's way with salt and pepper, half with butter and cinnamon-sugar available. Rice - This is the most unimpressive thing, just boil-in-a-bag rice.  I know it isn't the greatest, but really easy to cook at a tailgate. Veggies - just veggiesCrescent Rolls - I'll make those up Friday during the MSU-Boise game so I have them ready to take along. Burnt's cinnamon apples for dessert. Oh, I'll also take my two 2 1/2 Gallon water containers.  One full of water for cooking/cleaning and the other full of lemonade with lemon slices (for when we aren't drinking other things).





One of my favorite football foods and it's very simple.Armadillo EggsGet about a pound of medium size fresh jalapenos - Halve them lengthwise and deseed. If you want to take a bit of the bite out of them it's best to do this a couple days before you plan to eat them (Gameday!) and then let them soak in water. But who really wants to take the bite out of them?Fill the jalapeno halves with cream cheese and then roll slices of bacon around them. Secure the bacon with a toothpick. You should then freeze the whole assembly. This keeps the cream cheese from oozing out when you bake them. To finish it off, bake for a half hour and eat up the awesomeness.I've been toying with an idea to bread and deep fry the assembled "eggs" but haven't been brave enough to try it yet.





LetsGoPeay wrote: One of my favorite football foods and it's very simple.Armadillo EggsGet about a pound of medium size fresh jalapenos - Halve them lengthwise and deseed. If you want to take a bit of the bite out of them it's best to do this a couple days before you plan to eat them (Gameday!) and then let them soak in water. But who really wants to take the bite out of them?Fill the jalapeno halves with cream cheese and then roll slices of bacon around them. Secure the bacon with a toothpick. You should then freeze the whole assembly. This keeps the cream cheese from oozing out when you bake them. To finish it off, bake for a half hour and eat up the awesomeness.I've been toying with an idea to bread and deep fry the assembled "eggs" but haven't been brave enough to try it yet.Breading and frying them is the most common way they're eaten down here in Texico.  Don't have to be deep-fried though, you can pan fry them if you like.Oh, and typically down here they're not halved, just opened up enough to put the filler inside.





Fearless Phil authentic Chili: 1 1/2 cups finely minced white onion 8 garlic cloves, finely minced  2 (15 1/2-ounce) cans chicken broth, with fat removed 4 ounces tomato sauce  3/4 teaspoon garlic powder  3 tablespoons ground cumin  2 1/2 tablespoons Gebhardt chili powder3 tablespoons   Fort Worth   Light chili powder3 tablespoons California chile powder (mild)  2 tablespoons Flagstaff chile powder (medium)  1 tablespoon  New Mexico  chile powder (hot)  2 teaspoons Seasoning salt  3 pounds tri-tip beef, cut into 3/4-inch cubes  1 tablespoon virgin olive oil  1/2 teaspoon meat tenderizer  1/2 teaspoon light brown sugar  1 teaspoon   Tabasco   brand pepper sauce In a large pot simmer onion and minced garlic in 2 cups of chicken broth for 10 minutes. Add tomato sauce and all dry spices, except the tenderizer and sugar. Mix well. Brown the meat in oil using a separate pan and drain well. Sprinkle the meat with the tenderizer. Add the meat to the onion/spice mixture. Add remaining broth and simmer for 2 1/2 hours. Mix in brown sugar and pepper sauce just before serving.





Where are the beans?





medinabuckeye1 wrote: Where are the beans?It's a recipe for chili, not bean soup.





BurntEyes wrote: medinabuckeye1 wrote: BurntEyes wrote:Easy dessert... Easy to pre prep Take an apple for every one you want Core out the apple and wash it well. Take aluminum foil and wrap around the bottom In the top of the apple poor in sugar/cinnamon mixed like cinnamon toast (2/3 sugar 1/2 cinnamon) into the open core of the appel. Drop in a small piece of butter (Totally optional) Wrap foil tight As you are finishing your meat off drop in the premade apples After your meal and a few brews, (the apples should be soft to the touch through the foil) open and serve.I'm really curious about this.  Our thread only has three desserts.  The other two are my chocolate/PB Buckeyes which are obviously pre-prep and cold serve and UTErin's cupcakes which require an oven and therefore can't be prepared at most tailgates.  Thus, this is the only hot dessert in this entire thread that I could actually make at my tailgate/campsite.  I plan to try it this weekend.  When you say to "core out the apple", do you mean to just cut out the core and leave the rest completely intact?  I have an apple-corer, but it cuts the rest into wedges and I don't think that would work for this recipe.  Am I reading that correctly, and do you do it with a knife or do you have a tool for it?Keep it intact. Simply using a paring or heck any knife to cut out the core. So basically you have a apple donut, if you will. Then pour the sugar and cinnamon inside the core using the foil as the bottom. When it's soft to the touch, it's ready. Nice thing for camping and tailgating is, when premaid, if you don't use butter, you don't even have to refrigerate them. With butter, be sure to put them in a cooler. I occasional throw one these in the pack when trekking, and you should see the looks of envy from others. (I usually share)My sister-in-law is trained a as a pastry chef, she makes what she calls "inside-out apple pie" like this, but adds some strudel mix to the filling to form a bit of a crust.  Delicious.





medinabuckeye1 wrote: Where are the beans?Not sure why you'd ask that, but there are probably 17 pages of this thread with the answer to your silly question.





847badgerfan wrote: medinabuckeye1 wrote: Where are the beans?Not sure why you'd ask that, but there are probably 17 pages of this thread with the answer to your silly question.How do you live up there, amongst all those idgit yankees??





Goldernd Bevo-lovin' 3rd party smack hacker.And fearless recipe looks fine you expect us to find and purchase 5 different chili powders.Screw it just throw in a jar of medium/hot salsa.





MrNubbz wrote: .Screw it just throw in a jar of medium/hot salsa.Ugh.





Hey Texican I slice & dice quite a few components into my Chili.Not everything pre-packaged sucks.America's test Kitchen recommended Pace Salsa I tossed some into my last batch in march and got thumbs up.We have quite a few farm stands uphere and had my sister can some produce.So it's alright by me.Might wanna try some black or kidney beans in there.You already know that though





the different chili powders with different heats and flavors affect different areas of the tongue.someday perhaps you'll be lucky enough to try my recipe at a board meetingI mix a complex bloody mary as well





Oh boy,chili....bloody mary's.....sharkwater now I know why Gator sstopped barnstorming





Gator been living in the south long enoughdon't think it hurt him muchwell, maybe the sharkwater





MrNubbz wrote: Hey Texican I slice & dice quite a few components into my Chili.Not everything pre-packaged sucks.America's test Kitchen recommended Pace Salsa I tossed some into my last batch in march and got thumbs up.We have quite a few farm stands uphere and had my sister can some produce.So it's alright by me.Might wanna try some black or kidney beans in there.You already know that thoughI use salsa in my taco meat, but only chile in my chili. 





Here's a fairly simple, but very tasty, breakfast dish that seems to be a hit whenever I make it. This is an omlette.3 eggs, beatenAssorted field greens, spinach, etcGoat cheeseGood Balsamic vinegarFreshly ground salt and pepperOlive OilBeat the eggs in a dish, add the seasoning and combine well. Set aside and let come to room temperature. Place a sautee pan on medium heat, and add a little olive oil. When the pan is hot, add the egg mixture and make sure it spreads throughout the pan. Using a rubber spatula, keep rimming the eggs around the pan and keep an eye on the doneness. Just before the eggs turn golden brown on the underside, add the goat cheese in the middle. Gently fold the eggs from two directions, in thirds, wrapping the goat cheese.Place some of the greens on a plate and top with the egg. Drissle the balsamic over the eggs to taste, and add a little more salt and pepper, to taste.If you want, you can add some fresh rasberries over the top. That's a nice finish. Also a little parsley is nice.





a chili recipe from Pittsburgh........... I advise leaving out the beans GRETCHEN MCKAY Pittsburgh Post-Gazette(0) Comments  It's not necessarily cold enough to turn on the heat, but the nights are definitely getting cooler. That means pulling out the sweaters and warming our bellies with a good bowl of chili. This recipe from the editors of Cooking Light is only moderately spicy but still quite delicious. I substituted pumpkin beer because that's what I drink this time of year, and used only one can of beans so there would be less for my daughters to pick out. For extra crunch, top with thinly sliced radishes. Serve with hot buttered corn bread.POBLANO-JALAPENO CHILICooking spray1 1/2 pounds ground sirloin2 jalapeno peppers1 tablespoon canola oil3 cups chopped onion1 cup chopped seeded poblano chiles8 garlic cloves, minced12-ounce bottle Mexican beer1 tablespoon chili powder1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin3/4 teaspoon kosher salt2 1/2 cups marinara sauce1 cup fat-free lower-sodium chicken broth2 15-ounce cans no-salt added kidney beans, rinsed and drained14.5-ounce can diced fire-roasted tomatoes, undrained3/4 cup (3 ounces) shredded sharp cheddar cheese1/2 cup light sour cream1/4 cup fresh cilantro leavesHeat a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. (I used 1/2 tablespoon olive oil.) Add beef; cook 10 minutes or until browned, stirring to crumble. Remove beef from pan; drain. Wipe pan clean with paper towels.Remove and discard seeds and membranes from one jalapeno; finely chop both jalapenos. Heat pan over medium-high heat. Add oil; swirl to coat. Add jalapenos, onion, poblanos and garlic; saute 10 minutes or until onion is tender. Add beer, scraping pan to loosen browned bits; cook 12 minutes or until about half of the liquid evaporates. Add chili powder, cumin and salt; cook 1 minute, stirring frequently. Stir in beef, marinara, broth, beans and tomatoes; bring to a boil.Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, 30 minutes or until slightly thick. Ladle about 1 1/2 cups chili into each of eight bowls; top each with 1 1/2 tablespoons cheese, 1 tablespoon sour cream and 1 1/2 teaspoons cilantro.Serves 8.





MrNubbz wrote: Oh boy,chili....bloody mary's.....sharkwater now I know why Gator sstopped barnstormingIt wasn't the food or drink, I simply got "OLD."





FearlessF wrote: Gator been living in the south long enoughdon't think it hurt him muchwell, maybe the sharkwaterNah, the sharkwater didn't hurt much. I was long ago warned about the stuff and drank cautiously as must be the case. I do miss having a belt though now and again.





I had a few belts last night during the Michigan game





I'm going on an expedition to be an expert bread baker.  Any tips?  My first loaves have been a little dense.






Drew4UTk

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MaximumSam wrote: I'm going on an expedition to be an expert bread baker. Any tips? My first loaves have been a little dense.I gave up on that. If you'd like to buy a seldom-used Kitchenaid stand mixer, let me know.





847badgerfan wrote: MaximumSam wrote: I'm going on an expedition to be an expert bread baker. Any tips? My first loaves have been a little dense.I gave up on that. If you'd like to buy a seldom-used Kitchenaid stand mixer, let me know.Yeah? I have a KitchenAid or else I might take you up on it.  I don't even eat much bread, but I have it in my mind that to be a good cook I should be able to put together a really good loaf of bread.  Something really chewy with a good crust that goes well with olive oil or butter.  I have a book called "Ratio" by Michael Ruhlman that I've had sitting around forever, but just now decided to really get into.  He lists basically all sorts of types of doughs, sauces, and other goodies by ratio - for example the baker's ratio for bread is 5 parts flour to 3 parts water, with salt and yeast.  As you learn the basics, you can easily add and subtract ingredients and make your own recipes.  So it is that I am trying to increase my cooking skills, and bread is the first thing I need to conquer.





I guess that's one way to look at it. I like to cook and I very much dislike baking. There are some very fine bakeries in my neighborhood and that also has an effect on my thinking, I guess.





847badgerfan wrote:I guess that's one way to look at it. I like to cook and I very much dislike baking. There are some very fine bakeries in my neighborhood and that also has an effect on my thinking, I guess.Same here.  I love to cook, but don't enjoy baking.  Access to good bakeries is definitely part of it.





I guess my thought is when they have those cooking shows on tv and someone is asked to make a pie and they all look at each other like, wtf how do you make a pie?  I feel I should be able to make a pie.  Also, the smell of baking bread is a wonderful thing.  My second kid is about to be born and I have this feeling that it would be nice if I could bake fresh things in the morning.





FearlessF wrote: I had a few belts last night during the Michigan gameHey your boys took us to the woodshed. Glad you had a good time, even though at our (Michigan) expense.





MaximumSam wrote: I guess my thought is when they have those cooking shows on tv and someone is asked to make a pie and they all look at each other like, wtf how do you make a pie? I feel I should be able to make a pie. Also, the smell of baking bread is a wonderful thing. My second kid is about to be born and I have this feeling that it would be nice if I could bake fresh things in the morning.Fresh baked (or baking) bread definitely smells delicious, no doubt about it.





I have one Max... mine is a digital Bradley smoker.  I like it because I don't have to pay attention to it that much.  It rotates smoking pucks every 20 minutes and maintains a constant temperature.  I have used it for ribs, pork shoulder, chicken, and fish.  For pork I have found that I get better results when I finish it off in the oven wrapped in foil.  Chicken and fish have both turned out wonderful just using the smoker.





utee94 wrote: 847badgerfan wrote:I guess that's one way to look at it. I like to cook and I very much dislike baking. There are some very fine bakeries in my neighborhood and that also has an effect on my thinking, I guess.Same here.  I love to cook, but don't enjoy baking.  Access to good bakeries is definitely part of it.+1Doesn't hurt that my wife loves to bake and hates to cook.





EastLansingAdam wrote: utee94 wrote: 847badgerfan wrote:I guess that's one way to look at it. I like to cook and I very much dislike baking. There are some very fine bakeries in my neighborhood and that also has an effect on my thinking, I guess.Same here.  I love to cook, but don't enjoy baking.  Access to good bakeries is definitely part of it.+1Doesn't hurt that my wife loves to bake and hates to cook.Ditto. Mine made homemade bread yesterday. Smelled good and she said it was good. I didn't have any.





Maggiano's house dressing (and salad)I serve this on a salad similar to what they make. I include romaine lettuce, gorgonzola cheese, diced tomatoes, red onions and toasted walnuts. I don’t think they use the nuts, and you don’t have to, but I think it’s really good that way. I found several variations on the internet over the years, and this is my attempt after using many of the ones I found as a guide… Here goes: ¾ cup canola oil2 TBL red wine vinegar¼ cup white wine vinegar¼ cup water1 TSP dry yellow mustard*1 TSP flour*1 TBL sugar2 cloves garlic, finely choppedfine sea salt to taste½ teaspoon crushed red pepper½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper¼ teaspoon dried oregano Add all the ingredients but the oil to a blender (or food processor) and blend until smooth. With the blender running, slowly add the oil and blend until emulsified. Refrigerate in a sealed container overnight so it sets up nicely.* A better way, if you can find it, is to use 2 TSP of Colman's mustard instead of what I listed. It's a dry mustard flour, and it really does make it better. Not all stores have it, but it's becoming more available as alot of recipes out there call for it these days.





Fooling around with a picnic roast.  Any suggestions?  Went with the very, very basic method of scoring the skin and roasting with salt and pepper.  Have the day off and am enjoying XCOM and a house that smells like cooked pig.





Probably need a solid 8 to 12 hours to do it, no?





847badgerfan wrote: Probably need a solid 8 to 12 hours to do it, no?Maybe - it's about 7 pounds.  I'm going with a Jamie Oliver recipe I found on the internet which calls for 6 hours, but I'm skeptical about it.  But it sure smells nice.  Here in a sec I'm going to take it out and put in a bunch of carrots, celery, onions, and garlic, and then roast it another hour.  Then it will really smell nice.  That with some mashers?





Can't go wrong with mashers. Throw one sweet potato in with all the white ones. Adds a new element and sweet pots are a natural with pork.





847badgerfan wrote: Maggiano's house dressing (and salad)I serve this on a salad similar to what they make. I include romaine lettuce, gorgonzola cheese, diced tomatoes, red onions and toasted walnuts. I don’t think they use the nuts, and you don’t have to, but I think it’s really good that way. I found several variations on the internet over the years, and this is my attempt after using many of the ones I found as a guide… Here goes: ¾ cup canola oil2 TBL red wine vinegar¼ cup white wine vinegar¼ cup water1 TSP dry yellow mustard*1 TSP flour*1 TBL sugar2 cloves garlic, finely choppedfine sea salt to taste½ teaspoon crushed red pepper½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper¼ teaspoon dried oregano Add all the ingredients but the oil to a blender (or food processor) and blend until smooth. With the blender running, slowly add the oil and blend until emulsified. Refrigerate in a sealed container overnight so it sets up nicely.* A better way, if you can find it, is to use 2 TSP of Colman's mustard instead of what I listed. It's a dry mustard flour, and it really does make it better. Not all stores have it, but it's becoming more available as alot of recipes out there call for it these days.This is money Badge.  I use a hand stick mixer to blend my dressings and it is a little less cleanup.  Also support the Coleman's mustard, in the metal yellow tin.  I use that quite a bit actually.Do you prefer canola, or only use canola for this?  We have too many oils in our pantry, trying to create other ways to use some of the more specialized oils..





I used canola because it does not add flavor. You can also add a little more (double) sugar if needed on this one. I know I do, but some people like to use less of it.This dressing calls for the big blender. It takes a while to emulsify.





Medina/Badgerfan... thanks SO MUCH for the index on the first post of this thread.  I came back in here to look for a specific recipe not knowing when the heck it was originally posted, and the index pointed me to the right place in seconds.   That was brilliant and I appreciate the efforts to keep this organized.





Have I ever posted my wife's recipe for her Great Uncle George's Famous Eggnog?  Seems like a good time to do it.  In fact, Burny made it just last week and brought it to the T-Day tailgate party, it turned out mighty tasty.This makes a "medium" match, not sure how much that is though, my wife always make the nogg.24 eggs2 3/4 cup sugar1.5 pints heavy cream2 quarts light cream1 fifth bourbon (~750ml)1 cup dark rum or to taste1) Using stand mixer, cream egg yolks with sugar. Add whiskey. Pour into large container.2) Whip cream, pour into same container and stir.3) Whip egg whites, pour into same container, blend with other liquids already in there.4) Stir in rum to taste5) Keep chilled while serving, we usually place our punch bowl in a wide glass serving dish with ice in it.When my wife makes this, she generally has to do a couple of batches each in the stand mixer for the cream and the egg whites. She also uses a (well-cleaned and sterilized) medium-sized kitchen trash can for all the ingredients, and then pours into gallon containers and keeps refrigerated for a day before our party. She usually at least doubles the above recipe though, so YMMV on size of batches and size of containers.If you're nervous about raw eggs, you can buy already-heat-pasteurized eggs at most markets, or you can actually do it yourself at home and save some bucks. We've done both and have never noticed any difference in texture or flavor.There you have it. This stuff absolutely destroys storebought nog, you'll never want to go back. But I'll warn you, it's a bit tedious and time-consuming because you have to separate all the eggs first, and then it takes a while to blend and mix all the ingredients.





I have a couple martini recipes that are good for the Holiday season......see if I can find themnever been a big eggnog drinker





FearlessF wrote: I have a couple martini recipes that are good for the Holiday season......see if I can find themnever been a big eggnog drinkerHave you ever had homemade eggnog?  I grew up hating eggnog, because all I'd ever had was commercial storebought stuff.Homemade eggnog tastes pretty much nothing like storebought.  Even without the booze, but of course the booze is what makes it great.





Not a big fan. Not at all, actually, but thanks for sharing. I'm sure plenty of people will enjoy that recipe.





I'll ask the same question-- have you ever had real, homemade eggnog, like in the recipe above?If not, you should try it.  If so and you still didn't like it, fair enough.I loathed eggnog my entire life, until I was almost 30 years old.  That's when my i s c &  aggie wife made the above recipe for me, and I couldn't believe how great it tasted. It's definitely something I can only handle in small doses, it's way too rich to drink multiple cups of it, but that's why it's perfect for parties.  Everybody gets a taste, without having to overload on it.Anyway, not trying to be an eggnog pimp, just sharing my personal experiences.  I always found commercial nog to be disgusting and was highly skeptical when I first tried this recipe, but it made a convert out of me.





yes, I've had homemade eggnogdoesn't mean it was well madeI'll reserve final judgement until I have a splash from your recipe.





Peppermint Martini2 ounces Absolut Peppar Vodka1 ounce White Crème de Menthe1 ½ ounces Godiva White Chocolate Liqueur1 ounce Rumple Minze Peppermint Liqueur2 small peppermint patty candies or can garnish with fresh mint leaves





I've had egg nogs of all kinds. No thank you, unless it could be deep fried somehow.





Anything can be deep fried.  One trip to the Texas State Fair will prove it to you.





deep fried Badger nutz?





I will pay you $1 to try and harvest some Badger testies. I know you're Fearless and all, but yer not stoopid.





I'd rather deep fry girl scout cookies:  These were new this year, and very good.






Drew4UTk

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847badgerfan wrote: I will pay you $1 to try and harvest some Badger testies. I know you're Fearless and all, but yer not stoopid.hah, don't bring claws and teeth to a gun fight





FearlessF wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: I will pay you $1 to try and harvest some Badger testies. I know you're Fearless and all, but yer not stoopid.hah, don't bring claws and teeth to a gun fightThat's right, you better look out for Inbred Jed, he's nasty!





Jed is his southern cousindude's name is Herby





Autumn Martini2 ounces Ketal One Vodka1 ounce Stoli Vanilla Vodka1 ounce Bols Pumpkin Smash Liqueur½ ounce Goldschlager½ tsp. Cardamom½ tsp. NutmegCinnamon sticks to garnish





Slower Cooker Taco SoupBrown 1 pound ground beef, drain and transfer to slow cooker.Add:1 chopped onion1 can (15 ounces) kidney beans with liquid1 can (15 ounces) whole kernel corn with liquid1 can (8 ounces) tomato sauce2 cans (14.5 ounces) diced tomatoes1 can (4 ounces) diced green chilies2 cups water2 tablespoons chili powderStir together. Cook on low setting 8 hours. Serve with tortilla chips or corn bread and garnish with a dollop of sour cream. 





Someone is gonna add beans to that and call it chili.Idgits.





It's soup.It's OK.





Anyone interested in some new chicken dishes?Francaise? Morrocan? I made them both this weekend. Very good stuff.I did some flash-fried Chinese green leaves too.Also made butter-poached lobster and a nice beef stew, but that's just basic stuff.





Gonna make some indoor pulled pork for the playoffs.  Any suggestions.  I made a little brine of salt, sugar, and liquid smoke that is sitting out in the garage now.  I haven't quite figured out how to consistently get a really good crust on the meat.  Sometimes it happens and sometimes it doesn't.





MaximumSam wrote: Gonna make some indoor pulled pork for the playoffs. Any suggestions. I made a little brine of salt, sugar, and liquid smoke that is sitting out in the garage now. I haven't quite figured out how to consistently get a really good crust on the meat. Sometimes it happens and sometimes it doesn't.It turned out pretty well - brined it for a few hours, then roasted it covered for three hours, then uncovered it, split it in half, and roasted it for a bit longer to firm up the crust.  It still wasn't exactly what I wanted on the crust, though the meat itself was very good.





I think next time you should try a little broiler heat or even a finish on the (charcoal) grill. It's a dryer heat then the oven, but you have to be careful to not dry out the meat. It's a tough balance.One thing I've done with briskets, turkey and larger meats is to start off at a crazy-high heat in the oven, uncovered.Set the thing as high as possible and wait for it to preheat. Put the meat in and cook for about a 1/2 hour or so. Remove the meat, cover and set to desired temp.Take about an hour off the total cooking time for this method.It works.





Here are the one I make, very simple, use a corck pot, and I don't like Memphis style.  tried it over and over, just don't like the vinegar...3 lbs pork roast2 onions3 cloves garlic1.5 cups water12 oz BBQ sauceSalt & pepperSlice 1 of the onions and put in the bottom of the Crock Pot.  Stud the pork with the garlic and sprinkle the top with salt and pepper.  Add the water.  Cook on low for 10 hours.Slice the other onion.  Pull the pork, add the BBQ sauce and the 2nd sliced onion.  Mix together.  Cook on high for another 2 hours.





Roast Pork Top LoinBrine:2 TBL all spice berries2 TBL juniper berries2 Cups of water2 turns fresh ground pepper2 TBL fine sea salt2 TBL brown sugar2 TBL assorted chile powders1 CUP apple cider vinegarPorkCanola Oil1 3 LB Pork Top Loin Roast1 vidalia onion, sliced6 cloves of garlic1 lemon, quartered1/2 CUP of beef or chicken stock, plus more for the sauce2 TBL pepper jelly (habaniero or jalepeno)Preheat your oven to 375 degrees.Toast the berries in a sauce pan on high heat to release the oils. Do not burn, about 2 inutes. Add the water and bring to a boil. Add the ground pepper, salt, brown sugar and the chile powders. Add the vinegar and return to a boil. Reduce heat and let simmer for 15 minutes. Allow to cool completely and pour over the pork. Refridgerate overnight.Rince the pork and pat dry. Add the oil to a dutch oven or other heavy cooking vessel and place on high heat to almost smoking. Brown the pork on all sides. Remove the pork and cover the bottom of the cooking vessel with the onions. Place the garlic cloves in the voids. Return the pork to the vessel and add the stock. Place the lemon quarters in the corners.Place vessel in the preheated 375 degree oven, covered, and bake for at least 45 minutes, until temperature of pork inside is about 145/150 degrees. Remove the pork and tent for about 10 minutes. Remove the lemons. Add a little more stock, if neccessary and bring to a boil. Stir and add the jelly and mix to combine. Let the jelly melt and turn off the heat to cool slightly. Blend the mixture in a high-speed blender to puree, and pour into a fat seperator.Once seperated, reheat the sauce to temperature. Slice the pork and spoon the sauce over the slices. Serve with baked, fried or mashed sweet potatoes and a green veggie.EDIT: Recipe adjusted after preparation and refining.





Seared and Roasted Whole ChickenYou will need 2 large cast iron skillets for this recipe. The good news is they can be had for under $15 each. Everyone should have a couple of these in their arsenal. You will also need a sharp knive. I have a boning knife that works well, and I use kitchen shears to cut the backbone.1 3-4 LB chicken, wholeSpice Rub *Canola Oil* Any of the various spice rubs will work here, according to your taste, but for this one I have used the rib rub and a variation of a Morrocan rub that I found online.Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.Remove the backbone from the chicken and open it up to lay flat. Remove the breast and rib bones. The bird will now be almost like one slab of meat.Spray or pat the bird with a light coating of canola oil. Rub the spices into the bird on both sides. Lightly coat the bottom of a cast iron skillet with a little more oil and set the bird, fat side down, into the skillet. Set the skillet on high heat. Meanwhile, set another skillet ** on high heat on a seperate burner. When both skillets are blazing hot, place the seperate skillet, bottom side down, on top of the chicken. The total stove time will be 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, remove the seperate skillet and cover the one with the bird in it. Place in a 350 degree oven for about 20-25 minutes or until cooked through. Remove the skillet from the oven and then carefully remove the bird to a cutting board and tent to rest, about 5 minutes.Your sides will depend on your rub. I've gone with French Fries as a basic, and couscous for the Mediterranian/Morroccan varieties. There are lots of choices, as in the end all it really is is a roasted chicken.** As opposed to a second skillet, you can use heated foil-wrapped bricks for this. I don't have bricks, nor do I want any, so the second skillet works great and serves far more uses than do the bricks. The key is to sear both sides without turning and to keep the bird flat.





I like Morrocan food, especially Tangine.





847badgerfan wrote: Anyone interested in some new chicken dishes?Francaise? I'm curious how you did your Francaise. Care to share??I made an awesome(yet unhealthy) chicken dish yesterday..Goes like this:Take 3-4 chix breast, bread in a flour/parmigiano reggiano flour mix. Use 2 parts flour, 1 part parmesan. Get the good stuff too. Finely grated.. I use Ambrosi. Best I've tasted and fairly reasonable price.Heat saute pan with 3-4 tablespoons of butter. Get it hot to the point where the butter is just starting to brown. Add chix breasts. Cook until gold brown and flip and do the same on the second side. Remove chix breast and put in oven at 425 for 8-10 minutes depending on size.Immediately after removing the chix, add another 1-2 tablespoons of butter. Add chopped proscuitto(1/4 lb or so). Brown just a little, then add 1/4 cup chopped garlic. Once garlic is almost browned, add 1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream(I prefer Dean's). Bring cream to a boil and add 1/2 cup parmesan, 3 tablespoons butter. Stir until butter is melted. Once butter is melted, add cubed roma(plum) tomatoes (is add about 1/2 cup) and a little chopped parsley for color.Once chix is cooked, poor sauce over the chix. Sometimes I'll put some linguine under the chix as well.I call it chicken proscuitto.. It's a homerun when cooked right.. Not super healthy though.





How about some Pad Thai?I was struggling a little bit here because I've never used dried shrimp or tamarind, but it turned out pretty tasty. From Cooks Illustrated:You need:2 tbl tamarind paste: This was gross looking stuff. I got mine at an Asian Grocery store. It looks like tar. Anyway, you have to pour about 3/4 cup boiling water over it and soak it until it is soft, then push it through a strainer (there are lots of seeds and pulp and stuff). I soaked mine for ten minutes. Then you mix this with:3 TBL fish sauce1 TBL rice vinegar3 TBL sugar3/4 ts cayenne2 TBL oilThis is the sauce.Put 8 oz rice noodles in hot water and let soak about 20 minutes, then drain and set asideYou need protein - I used shrimp, though tofu and chicken are also popular. I also used:1 can bean sprouts2 TBL dried shrimp, chopped (these were kind of weird, I got them at a mexican grocery store. I took off the shells and heads though I'm not certain that is necessary)2 eggsGreen onionsCilantro6 TBL peanuts (chopped)LimeOver medium heat, using a bit of peanut oil, cook shallot and garlic for a minute or two then add eggs and cook while stirring for about 20 seconds. Then add noodles, and dried shrimp, then add sauce and turn up heat to high and cook while stirring. Add protein, a handful of green onions, most of the peanuts, and sprouts, and cook until the liquid is gone and everything is covered in sauce, then put in serving dish and finish with cilantro and rest of peanuts and green onions. Serve w lime wedges.





Chicken Francais4 boneless/skinless chicken breasts (1.5 to 2 pounds or so)floursalt and freshly ground black pepper4 TBL cup extra-virgin olive oil3 eggs1/2 lemon, juiced1/4 lemon, sliced thin with seeds removed1/3 cup dry white wine1 cup chicken broth2 TBL butter2 TBL Italian parsleyPound the chicken breasts to about 1/4 inch thickness. Combine flour, salt and pepper to make a dredge. Dredge the chicken. Heat the oil in a non-stick pan over medium/high heat. Beat the eggs (add a little milk if too thick) and dip the chicken into the eggs. Shake off the excess and put the chicken into the oil for about 2 minutes per side, until golden brown. Remove the chicken to a platter and keep warm.Add the lemon slices to the pan and lightly brown on both sides. Remove and set aside. Add the lemon juice, wine and broth and reduce by about half. Slowly add the butter and about 1 tsp of the flour and swirl around the pan with a whisk until melted and the flour is cooked through. The sauce should thicken.Reduce the heat to low and add the chicken back to the pan to warm through and then serve. Garnish with the reserved browned lemon slices and the parsley.This is great with a side of pasta (I prefer orzo here) or mashed potatoes. Some roasted asparagus completes the dish nicely.Note that this recipe can also be used with veal cutlets, which I absolutely love.





I just made a filling for an apple pie. Yes, I'm baking.Now to the crust.The filling has apples (duh), jalepeno peppers, tangerine wedges and rind, shallots and brown sugar. I also used some apple juice and thickened it with a roux.I will report back.





hope you have some vanilla ice cream to top that with when it comes out of the oven!





847badgerfan wrote: Chicken Francais4 boneless/skinless chicken breasts (1.5 to 2 pounds or so)floursalt and freshly ground black pepper4 TBL cup extra-virgin olive oil3 eggs1/2 lemon, juiced1/4 lemon, sliced thin with seeds removed1/3 cup dry white wine1 cup chicken broth2 TBL butter2 TBL Italian parsleyPound the chicken breasts to about 1/4 inch thickness. Combine flour, salt and pepper to make a dredge. Dredge the chicken. Heat the oil in a non-stick pan over medium/high heat. Beat the eggs (add a little milk if too thick) and dip the chicken into the eggs. Shake off the excess and put the chicken into the oil for about 2 minutes per side, until golden brown. Remove the chicken to a platter and keep warm.Add the lemon slices to the pan and lightly brown on both sides. Remove and set aside. Add the lemon juice, wine and broth and reduce by about half. Slowly add the butter and about 1 tsp of the flour and swirl around the pan with a whisk until melted and the flour is cooked through. The sauce should thicken.Reduce the heat to low and add the chicken back to the pan to warm through and then serve. Garnish with the reserved browned lemon slices and the parsley.This is great with a side of pasta (I prefer orzo here) or mashed potatoes. Some roasted asparagus completes the dish nicely.Note that this recipe can also be used with veal cutlets, which I absolutely love.Just saw this, sounds great, pretty much like a chicken piccata no?  No capers, but the lemon and pan fried chicken breast are the basis.One question, did you really need to do all 3 eggs?  Usually when I do 4 breasts pounded flat, 1 or a max of 2 eggs would do the trick?





BuckeyeCMO wrote:One thing I do love and am familiar with are pierogies(sp) and cabbage and noodles. My wife is Polish, so I have been able to earn/inherit a lot of those recipes. Noodles and cabbage is one of my favorites though.Just saw this CMO,I have Bohemian/Bavarian ancestry cabbage and noodles have always been a staple(although I rarely do the cooking).One thing you might try is grilling different types of ethnic sausage slicing it up when done then add to the cabbage/noodles.The crunch & smoke add to the dish





utee94 wrote: 847badgerfan wrote: Chicken Francais4 boneless/skinless chicken breasts (1.5 to 2 pounds or so)floursalt and freshly ground black pepper4 TBL cup extra-virgin olive oil3 eggs1/2 lemon, juiced1/4 lemon, sliced thin with seeds removed1/3 cup dry white wine1 cup chicken broth2 TBL butter2 TBL Italian parsleyPound the chicken breasts to about 1/4 inch thickness. Combine flour, salt and pepper to make a dredge. Dredge the chicken. Heat the oil in a non-stick pan over medium/high heat. Beat the eggs (add a little milk if too thick) and dip the chicken into the eggs. Shake off the excess and put the chicken into the oil for about 2 minutes per side, until golden brown. Remove the chicken to a platter and keep warm.Add the lemon slices to the pan and lightly brown on both sides. Remove and set aside. Add the lemon juice, wine and broth and reduce by about half. Slowly add the butter and about 1 tsp of the flour and swirl around the pan with a whisk until melted and the flour is cooked through. The sauce should thicken.Reduce the heat to low and add the chicken back to the pan to warm through and then serve. Garnish with the reserved browned lemon slices and the parsley.This is great with a side of pasta (I prefer orzo here) or mashed potatoes. Some roasted asparagus completes the dish nicely.Note that this recipe can also be used with veal cutlets, which I absolutely love.Just saw this, sounds great, pretty much like a chicken piccata no?  No capers, but the lemon and pan fried chicken breast are the basis.One question, did you really need to do all 3 eggs?  Usually when I do 4 breasts pounded flat, 1 or a max of 2 eggs would do the trick?Much different than piccata. No eggs used in that dish. I like to use alot of egg - they actually form the crust on the chicken and give the overall dish a richness you don't get with piccata.Sorry for the late reply pal.





In honor of Cinco de Mayo...Shredded Pork BurritosStart with roughly a 3-4 lb pork roast.Wisk together...4 tbs chili powder1 tbs brown sugar1 tbs salt2 tsp cumin2 cloves garlic (minced)1 tsp cayenne pepper1 tsp garlic powder1 tsp onion powder1 tsp oregeno1/4 tsp cinnamon4 tbsp oilPut the roast in a crock pot, and cover in the mixture.  Cook for 9-10 hours on low.Remove the roast and pull apart.  Return to the crock pot to cook in the juices for 45-60 minutes.1 cup salsa3 oz. refried beans1 tsp fajita seasoning.Stir together in a bowl, and add the pork.  This is for roughly 1.5-2 cups of the pulled pork, so adjust based on how much you made.Warm tortilla shells in the oven.Place roughly 1/3 cup of the mixture onto the shell, and top with 1-2 oz (depending on taste) of the shredded cheese of your choice.Place in a baking pan and bake at 350 until heated through to desire.  20-30 minutes.Serve with shredded lettuce, sour cream, salsa and a shot of Cuervo, washed down with a light Carta Blanca.





Time to start making this one active again fellers.I've got a few good ones to share so I will get them written and posted here in the coming days.





About damn time.  Can't believe we went all summer without a new one added.





I know. I feel bad about that too.I'll get a recipe up this afternoon - marinara sauce.





SHARKWATER2 parts Tito's or otherwise "good" vodka1 part blue maui1 part red maui1/2 part triple secsplash of Rose's lime juicemeant to be tossed back in small cups over and over and over and over again





One Hour Marinara SauceExtra Virgin Olive Oil2 Vidalia Onions, finely diced1 Tsp red chili flakesSalt and freshly ground black pepper6 cloves of garlic, minced1/2 cup Italian flat leaf parsley leaves, chopped1/2 cup basil leaves, chopped1/4 cup fresh oregano leaves, chopped1 106 oz can of San Marzano tomatoes1 TBL Sugar1 Tsp Baking SodaPlace a large stock pot on medium heat and coat the bottom with a thin layer of the olive oil. Add the onions and chili flakes and sautee until the onions are translucent, maybe 8 minutes. Do not brown the onions. Add salt and pepper, the garlic and all the herbs and cook until fragrant. Add the tomatoes and cook on medium/low heat for about 45 minutes, stirring every ten minutes or so. Keep an eye on the heat so that nothing burns.Using and immersion blender, blend the sauce until completely smooth. If you don't have an immersion blender, use a regular blender and work in batches. (Be careful by placing a towel over the blender lid as the sauce is hot and could escape the lid.)After the sauce is fully pureed, continue cooking for 5 minutes on low heat.Add the sugar and baking soda and stir to incorporate fully. Continue cooking for 5 minutes on low heat.





Best treatment of an onion for purposes of eating an onion.  I had this last week while fishing in Canada, all during shore lunch.  Peel a large onion (yellow/vidalia/sweet)lather with butter (1-2 tbl I'm guessing)1/2 a slice of bacon, or just a slice I guess.wrap it up in aluminum foil like a...onion with a gentle twist at the top (the way a whole garlic clove appears).Park it on a hot grill for about an hour.  indirect is fine. once ready, don't you dare remove the onion from the foil, the jus alone is incredible.  cut off a slice or two for anything, or just eat the onion on its own.  The jus on the fish (grilled lake trout one day) is delightful.






Drew4UTk

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Here is an easy and delicious way to grill pork, works on all chops.  Equal parts:1 part Creole seasoning (I use Tony Chachere's)1 part cumin1 part garlic powder1 part olive oilMix those spices together first, then blend in olive oil and stir until you have a nice rub.  You can add more olive oil if you think you need to.  Rub it on your pork chops and grill, simple as that.  It goes good with some thick slices of yellow squash or zucchini, which you can rub with olive oil and sprinkle with the dry spice mix and grill as well.





So, not that I necessarily have much to offer this thread, since my wife is the cook of the house, but I just [finally] got around to setting up my grill to be a smoker.  I did the ghetto method -- put a metal partition between one grate and the other two, set two of the commercial cast iron wood chip boxes on the "hot" side to generate smoke and had no direct heat on the bird on the other side.  The internal temp of the grill (according to the grill thermometer) held ~240-250 degrees easily.  Yesterday I gave it my first run-through, with a *very* basic chicken.  Rubbed with olive oil and a pre-bought BBQ mix, smoked with hickory.  Regularly basted with a mix of my Imperial Milk Stout and a Santa Maria style BBQ seasoning mix, and a little bit of rub with a half-stick of butter at one point and slathered with olive oil later to help it crisp up.Overall, it was a success for the first time out.  It was a flavorful bird from both the smoke and the seasoning, and my wife [the critic] really liked it.  A few things I need to change, though.  First, I need to drill some holes in the metal partition at the top to help the smoke pass.  My big concern coming into this is that the grill would get too hot, but it looks like that's not an issue, so additional permeability for the smoke should help.  Second, I need better thermometers.  I'm sure the thermometer on the lid of the grill is not very accurate, and I only had a simple poultry thermometer for the bird itself.  Neither is up to the level of precision I'd like for moving to more serious meats.But I'm glad to have gotten this out of the way -- I've been thinking of building a smoker for years and never gotten around to it, so now that I have this in place, I think I'm going to jump in headfirst and start going nuts.  It's football season, so it's a perfect time to take up a lot of Saturdays smoking meat while watching the games :-)





There's a lengthy thread on the B12 forum about smoking meats, you should check it out if you're interested in such things.





utee94 wrote: There's a lengthy thread on the B12 forum about smoking meats, you should check it out if you're interested in such things.Thanks, I just headed over...  And updated my wares on the B12 beer thread too 





You can get grilling thermometers almost anywhere on line, but check the Sur Le Tab or Food Network web sites.





847badgerfan wrote: You can get grilling thermometers almost anywhere on line, but check the Sur Le Tab or Food Network web sites.I already have a thermoworks instant-read thermometer (not the Thermapen, but a lower-cost model), but of course I'd forgotten that I owned it when I was cooking on Monday.However, UPS is already on their way with this:http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007UFOUB8/I think that'll get the job done :-)





That should work. I was thinking more along the lines of an internal magnetic one. It would just need to be cleaned often.





utee94 wrote: LetsGoPeay wrote: One of my favorite football foods and it's very simple.Armadillo EggsGet about a pound of medium size fresh jalapenos - Halve them lengthwise and deseed. If you want to take a bit of the bite out of them it's best to do this a couple days before you plan to eat them (Gameday!) and then let them soak in water. But who really wants to take the bite out of them?Fill the jalapeno halves with cream cheese and then roll slices of bacon around them. Secure the bacon with a toothpick. You should then freeze the whole assembly. This keeps the cream cheese from oozing out when you bake them. To finish it off, bake for a half hour and eat up the awesomeness.I've been toying with an idea to bread and deep fry the assembled "eggs" but haven't been brave enough to try it yet.Breading and frying them is the most common way they're eaten down here in Texico.  Don't have to be deep-fried though, you can pan fry them if you like.Oh, and typically down here they're not halved, just opened up enough to put the filler inside.Do either of you have a tailgate version of this?  I can't bake or deep-fry things at my tailgate.  I have a two-burner camp stove and a grill.





UTerin03 wrote: Medina/Badgerfan... thanks SO MUCH for the index on the first post of this thread. I came back in here to look for a specific recipe not knowing when the heck it was originally posted, and the index pointed me to the right place in seconds. That was brilliant and I appreciate the efforts to keep this organized.I think I need to update it again.





That 2-burner Coleman stove will heat up a cast iron skillet and the oil hot enough to deep fry. I've done it.





My stove probably would do it, but I already have the two burners spoken for (rice and veggies).  I should have clarified because I said I had a stove and you gave me a way to do it on a stove, but what I really need is a way to do it on the grill.





How about doing the veggies on the grill, or doing the rice ahead and simply warming it on the grill in foil pans?





I do have a grill basket I could do the veggies in.  I'll have to see if it fits in the tailgate grill.  Good thought, ty badge.





I have made this a couple times and it was a big hit.  I am making this for my tailgate for the tOSU/SDSU game tomorrow:Columbia Gold Barbecue Sauce RecipeYield. About 4 1/2 cups. Click here to calculate how much you need and for tips on saucing strategies.Preparation time. 30 minutes.Ingredients2 cups prepared yellow mustard2/3 cup cider vinegar3 tablespoons tomato paste1/2 teaspoon chipotle Tabasco sauce or you favorite hot sauce3/4 cup sugar2 teaspoons chicken bouillon granules or 1 cube2 teaspoons dried rosemary leaves1 teaspoon celery seed3 teaspoons mustard powder2 teaspoons onion powder2 teaspoons garlic powder1 teaspoon table salt1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepperAbout the mustard. To be authentic, use yellow ballpark style mustard, not Dijon. Besides, it just doesn't taste right with Dijon.About the tomato paste. You can substitute ketchup if you wish.Method1) Mix the wet ingredients together in a bowl.2) If you are using a bouillon cube, crush it with a spoon in a bowl or mortar & pestle and add it to the bowl. Crush the rosemary leaves and celery seed in a mortar & pestle or in a blender or coffee grinder and add it to the bowl. Add the rest of the dry ingredients to the bowl and mix thoroughly. Let it sit for a an hour in the refrigerator for the flavors to meld. No cooking necessary. Leftovers will keep in the fridge for a month or more.





Ribs (for a tailgate):I really can't compete with what you can do at home (with a smoker and whatnot) and what people like UTEE can do at their tailgate with RV's and rolling industrial kitchens.  I live two hours from the stadium and do not own an RV.  This recipe is something that you can transport to a game in the trunk of a car and cook on a portable tailgate type grill.  What I do:I precut the ribs into individual bones.  This is blasphemous to some people, but at a tailgate where you have limited utensils I find it a lot easier to be able to let people grab one rib.  I cut so as to remove every other bone leaving the remaining bones with lots of meat on either side.  I use a good travelling crock-pot (latched lid helps avoid spillage in transit).  Line the bottom of said crock-pot with about half and half apple and onion wedges.  Dip each rib in cooking bourbon then add rub.  I use a mix of about half and half applewood and pork rub.  Place the ribs in the crock-pot.  Once you get a layer of ribs, stop and add a thin layer of apple slices (cored apples sliced into 1/4" or 1/8" slices), cut up onion, and cut up pepper.  Then add another layer of ribs.  Repeat until crock-pot is full.  Cook on low overnight (about 6 hours).  If possible you want to time this such that the six hours ends right when it is time to leave.  Leave the ribs in the crock-pot and head for the stadium.  At the stadium I use a small portable propane camp grill.  I realize that propane is blasphemous, but I just can't fit a smoker or even a decent sized grill in the trunk so this is all I can do.  I do add multiple smoker-boxes full of applewood chips to add something of a smoky flavor.  Pull the ribs out of the crock-pot, slather them with sauce (the mustard BBQ sauce I listed above is great and if you have never tried a mustard-based BBQ sauce you really should at least try it).  Put the ribs on the grill, flip, and enjoy.





Tomorrow's menu at the 'Shoe:Armadilo Eggs -Jalapeno Poppers- (thank you LetsGoPeay, utee94, and badge; see above)Ribs (see above) with mustard-based BBQ sauce (see further above).  Chicken (simple lemon-pepper marinade for my non-bbq lovers).  Sweet Potato Planks (thank you badge, see page 18)Rice (boil in a bag because I can do that on location without too much stuff)veggies (maybe in the grill basket, have to check tonight if it fits in the tailgate grill)Crescent rolls (made up in advance)Garlic Bread (thank you badge, see page 1)Grilled baked apples for dessert (thank you BurntEyes, see page 18)





medinabuckeye1 wrote: I do have a grill basket I could do the veggies in. I'll have to see if it fits in the tailgate grill. Good thought, ty badge.You could do the breading and frying ahead of time, but I'd worry that the crust would get soggy during reheating.





medinabuckeye1 wrote: Tomorrow's menu at the 'Shoe:Armadilo Eggs -Jalapeno Poppers- (thank you LetsGoPeay, utee94, and badge; see above)Ribs (see above) with mustard-based BBQ sauce (see further above).  Chicken (simple lemon-pepper marinade for my non-bbq lovers).  Sweet Potato Planks (thank you badge, see page 18)Rice (boil in a bag because I can do that on location without too much stuff)veggies (maybe in the grill basket, have to check tonight if it fits in the tailgate grill)Crescent rolls (made up in advance)Garlic Bread (thank you badge, see page 1)Grilled baked apples for dessert (thank you BurntEyes, see page 18)Sounds awesome man, have fun!  I sure wish we had a home game tomorrow, alas our team will be out in Provo this weekend.  Utah, not Spain.





medinabuckeye1 wrote: I have made this a couple times and it was a big hit.  I am making this for my tailgate for the tOSU/SDSU game tomorrow:Columbia Gold Barbecue Sauce RecipeYield. About 4 1/2 cups. Click here to calculate how much you need and for tips on saucing strategies.Preparation time. 30 minutes.Ingredients2 cups prepared yellow mustard2/3 cup cider vinegar3 tablespoons tomato paste1/2 teaspoon chipotle Tabasco sauce or you favorite hot sauce3/4 cup sugar2 teaspoons chicken bouillon granules or 1 cube2 teaspoons dried rosemary leaves1 teaspoon celery seed3 teaspoons mustard powder2 teaspoons onion powder2 teaspoons garlic powder1 teaspoon table salt1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepperAbout the mustard. To be authentic, use yellow ballpark style mustard, not Dijon. Besides, it just doesn't taste right with Dijon.About the tomato paste. You can substitute ketchup if you wish.Method1) Mix the wet ingredients together in a bowl.2) If you are using a bouillon cube, crush it with a spoon in a bowl or mortar & pestle and add it to the bowl. Crush the rosemary leaves and celery seed in a mortar & pestle or in a blender or coffee grinder and add it to the bowl. Add the rest of the dry ingredients to the bowl and mix thoroughly. Let it sit for a an hour in the refrigerator for the flavors to meld. No cooking necessary. Leftovers will keep in the fridge for a month or more.LOL...  Most of what I've learned about BBQ in my short research period has come from reading that site, and I'm making this same sauce for my pulled pork tomorrow...Also using his Memphis Dust for the rub, but I'm going to add a tbsp of cayenne in with the rub...





utee94 wrote: medinabuckeye1 wrote: I do have a grill basket I could do the veggies in. I'll have to see if it fits in the tailgate grill. Good thought, ty badge.You could do the breading and frying ahead of time, but I'd worry that the crust would get soggy during reheating.It would, unless you had one of these to reheat them in, like I do:





847badgerfan wrote: utee94 wrote: medinabuckeye1 wrote: I do have a grill basket I could do the veggies in. I'll have to see if it fits in the tailgate grill. Good thought, ty badge.You could do the breading and frying ahead of time, but I'd worry that the crust would get soggy during reheating.It would, unless you had one of these to reheat them in, like I do:That would be great except that I drive one of these:So I have no idea where I would put it.  However, it is in my longterm plan to build myself one of these:to tow behind the car and if I ever get around to building this, it will have a stove built in.





You need to get one of these:





You don't like the teardrop?  Seriously, ignoring the tOSU stuff (I know you don't like that) but those things have galley-kitchens built into the back.  I think they would be awesome for tailgating and the plans looked like something I could do.  I think it would be great!





And better for your overall gas spending too.





bwarbiany wrote: LOL...  Most of what I've learned about BBQ in my short research period has come from reading that site, and I'm making this same sauce for my pulled pork tomorrow...Also using his Memphis Dust for the rub, but I'm going to add a tbsp of cayenne in with the rub...LoL.  Good luck with it.  It is really easy to make, but make it up tonight because you need to let it sit in the refrigerator at least overnight for the flavors to blend properly.  The first time I made it I had decided to try making my own BBQ sauces for the first time.  I made this and two SUBSTANTIALLY more difficult tomato-based sauces.  Everyone preferred this one.





Here is a better view of the back of one.  This one has a cooler built in (at right) but I have also seem them with propane RV ranges built in.  Also note that it is being towed by a very small car.  Here is an OLD ad for one, note that the weight was a mere 665 lbs.  





medinabuckeye1 wrote: bwarbiany wrote: LOL...  Most of what I've learned about BBQ in my short research period has come from reading that site, and I'm making this same sauce for my pulled pork tomorrow...Also using his Memphis Dust for the rub, but I'm going to add a tbsp of cayenne in with the rub...LoL.  Good luck with it.  It is really easy to make, but make it up tonight because you need to let it sit in the refrigerator at least overnight for the flavors to blend properly.  The first time I made it I had decided to try making my own BBQ sauces for the first time.  I made this and two SUBSTANTIALLY more difficult tomato-based sauces.  Everyone preferred this one.Yeah, this just looked like it would taste great with pulled pork.  And I'll be making it tonight before trimming the shoulder and making/applying the rub, which I'm going to let sit a few hours in the fridge before waking up early tomorrow and firing it up.





utee94 wrote: Sounds awesome man, have fun!  I sure wish we had a home game tomorrow, alas our team will be out in Provo this weekend.  Utah, not Spain.Thank you.  This one is extra special for me because it is a family thing.  Yesterday was my dad's 73rd birthday so this is his birthday celebration.  He and my mom and my brother and I along with brother's wife and my g/f are going.  Fearless met my dad and brother.  You guys know that Dad, brother, and I visited all of the B1G stadiums together so we are pretty close.  Should be a fun day!





Enjoy!





medinabuckeye1 wrote: utee94 wrote: Sounds awesome man, have fun!  I sure wish we had a home game tomorrow, alas our team will be out in Provo this weekend.  Utah, not Spain.Thank you.  This one is extra special for me because it is a family thing.  Yesterday was my dad's 73rd birthday so this is his birthday celebration.  He and my mom and my brother and I along with brother's wife and my g/f are going.  Fearless met my dad and brother.  You guys know that Dad, brother, and I visited all of the B1G stadiums together so we are pretty close.  Should be a fun day!Very cool.  And I love the teardrop, you should definitely do it.  I helped a friend build one a couple of years ago.  You might or might not know, I'm in the midst of restoring a vintage Airstream, so I've done a lot of trailer building/rebuilding/fabricating.  It's a lot of fun.






Drew4UTk

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medinabuckeye1 wrote: utee94 wrote: LetsGoPeay wrote: One of my favorite football foods and it's very simple.Armadillo EggsGet about a pound of medium size fresh jalapenos - Halve them lengthwise and deseed. If you want to take a bit of the bite out of them it's best to do this a couple days before you plan to eat them (Gameday!) and then let them soak in water. But who really wants to take the bite out of them?Fill the jalapeno halves with cream cheese and then roll slices of bacon around them. Secure the bacon with a toothpick. You should then freeze the whole assembly. This keeps the cream cheese from oozing out when you bake them. To finish it off, bake for a half hour and eat up the awesomeness.I've been toying with an idea to bread and deep fry the assembled "eggs" but haven't been brave enough to try it yet.Breading and frying them is the most common way they're eaten down here in Texico.  Don't have to be deep-fried though, you can pan fry them if you like.Oh, and typically down here they're not halved, just opened up enough to put the filler inside.Do either of you have a tailgate version of this?  I can't bake or deep-fry things at my tailgate.  I have a two-burner camp stove and a grill.Reporting back:I prepared these last night and made them today.  I could neither bake nor fry them so I did them up on the grill and they were great that way.  Freezing definitely helps!





utee94 wrote: Very cool.  And I love the teardrop, you should definitely do it.  I helped a friend build one a couple of years ago.  You might or might not know, I'm in the midst of restoring a vintage Airstream, so I've done a lot of trailer building/rebuilding/fabricating.  It's a lot of fun.I have seen you mention the Airstream before.  Sounds great!  Do you do historic roadtrips?  You might have seen here that I finished Route 66 last weekend.  I really enjoyed that.  I came across the teardrop idea while driving Route 66.  There was a Popular Mechanics (IIRC) publication in the early/mid 50's that gave directions for a homemade teardrop.  I'd love to have one because it is small enough that I could tow it easily behind my convertible and I think it would be awesome for Route 66, camping, and tailgating.  We were talking about it today and trying to figure out how to create interchangeable decorations for the side so that it could be a "Route 66" teardrop in the summer and a "tOSU" teardrop in the fall.





A simple way might be to clad the sides in metal, and use magnets for decoration.





That would work, but I was planning on doing it in fiberglass.  I figured I could build it out of very thin wood and cover that with glass which would be light and strong.  Not sure yet.





Chilli Beer Glazed Steaks1/2-3/4 cups chilli sauce (I used Heinz)2/3 cup Heinz 57 or A-1 Bold and Spicy steak sauce1/2 cup shallots1/2 beer (I used Sam Adams Oktoberfest...poured the rest in my glass as I was cooking)4 Top Loin or NY Stripsalt and pepperMix all the in a sauce pan and bring a boil, then turn heat down and simmer for about 12 -15 minutes.  Salt and pepper the steaks to your liking and throw on the grill.  Bast the meat during cooking often and as wet as your desire yields.  I saved a little of the glaze for a dipping sauce, but did not really need it because I basted the steaks pretty good on the grill.  Smelled great and tasted wonderful.  Paired it with pineapple/green & red pepper shrimp skews, potato salad and grilled sweet corn.





Thanks!Now we need the shrimp recipe, and all the rest.





For the shrimp, I used the pre-cooked large or Jumbo's they had at the seafood counter, not bad but not near as good as the coastal folks get, I basted them with a light coat of butter and skewed length wise, placing a shrimp at the bottom then a pineapple chunk, a red pepper, a shrimp a pineapple chunk, a green pepper chunk and topped it with a pineapple chunk.  The corn was soaked in the husk, all day, then husked and de-silked, grilled directly on the grate while basting with butter served up.





BTW right now I'm rendering beef fat.  Meijers sells beef suet for about a buck a pound.  Chop it up and throw it in a pot on low heat and let it sit for a few hours and you will render a good amount of beef fat.  Beef fat is very nice for sautéing and frying - it has a high smoke point and doesn't degrade or burn easily.





I've never used beef fat. What would you cook in it, and what would you not cook in it?





roaddawg2 wrote: Chilli Beer Glazed Steaks1/2-3/4 cups chilli sauce (I used Heinz)2/3 cup Heinz 57 or A-1 Bold and Spicy steak sauce1/2 cup shallots1/2 beer (I used Sam Adams Oktoberfest...poured the rest in my glass as I was cooking)4 Top Loin or NY Stripsalt and pepperMix all the in a sauce pan and bring a boil, then turn heat down and simmer for about 12 -15 minutes.  Salt and pepper the steaks to your liking and throw on the grill.  Bast the meat during cooking often and as wet as your desire yields.  I saved a little of the glaze for a dipping sauce, but did not really need it because I basted the steaks pretty good on the grill.  Smelled great and tasted wonderful.  Paired it with pineapple/green & red pepper shrimp skews, potato salad and grilled sweet corn.drooling......





847badgerfan wrote: I've never used beef fat. What would you cook in it, and what would you not cook in it?It has a very high smoke point and is very stable, which means you can use and reuse it without it going rancid, and has a meaty flavor that lends well to frying things like French fries and other things.  I like cooking chicken in it too.  Also for the Super Bowl we fry beef hot dogs in beef fat.  It's a heart healthy tradition.





Anyone ever do roasted acorn squash?  My mom used to make it when I was a little, but I'd completely forgotten about it until my i s c & a aggie wife came home with an acorn squash a few days ago, that she purchased because "it looked Thanksgivingy."Anyway...Cut an acorn squash in half, scoop out all of the seeds and stringy bits (you can toast the seeds just like a pumpkin if you want), then set them in a casserole dish or roasting pan open-side up. Put a tablespoon of butter and a tablespoon of brown sugar in each open half, a sprinkle of sea salt, and drizzle a little maple syrup over the top. Bake in the oven at 400 for an hour or a little more, until the flesh is soft and the top is browned. Pull it out when done, and spoon the buttery syrupy goodness all over the tops and sides, then serve, either in their skins, or scooped out onto plates or bowls.You can also put apple slices or chunks into the cavity and bake them together, and you can sprinkle the whole mess with cinnamon or nutmeg if you like the flavors.1/2 squash will serve a couple of people if you have other courses/sides, so one whole squash is enough for 3-5 people, especially if you're roasting some apples in there with it.





I've done butternut squash alot, as a savory dish served as a soup or a puree under short ribs and the like. It's a very similar cooking method, with the cavity and all, which I like to fill with garlic, shallots, olive oil and aged balsamic.





Yup, I've made a  lot of butternut squash soups.  Very hearty.





I have a couple acorn squash on my counter - from my buddy's garden





847badgerfan wrote: Caesar Salad DressingTHE DRESSING1- 3 oz jar of anchovies3 garlic cloves, peeled, and more if you like up to 5 total1/2 cup of nice extra virgin olive oil1 tsp Grey Poupon (or other fine mustard)1 dash of red wine vinagarfresh cracked pepper1 TB  worchershire sauce1 raw eggAdd the anchovies and garlic to a food processor and pulse to a paste. Add the remaining ingredients to combine and buzz until liquid.That's IT! And it will keep for about a week in the fridge too. Good eats.Ok Badge, mine is similar and I can put my down on here, but basically I use anchovie paste, I do use 3 cloves, and I use more red wine vinegar, less EVOO, and a little more dijon than that.  Plus I use white worcestershire, and often skip the raw egg.   I do use a stick electric mixer, and it does last a week.  I'm fairly liberal with the cracked black pepper.The key to an elite caesar salad, besides the dressing, is great croutons (easy to make your own) and most importantly, a cold plate and a cold fork.  9/10 people don't want the anchovies, including me, the paste gives the essence.





Back on page 2 of this long and distinguished thread, badgerfan posted a recipe for some pretty darn authentic-looking Texas chili.  I haven't posted my recipe before now, because honestly I don't have one, I change it up almost every time.  But there are some basic elements that are always present, and this past weekend I made a very nice batch, and actually bothered to record what I did.  So here it is, this time in fewer than 7 years...Note, for this recipe I actually used some dried chili peppers and reconstituted them.  You can use ALL chili powder if you want, but if you do I'd suggest using a couple tbsp. of several different kinds, rather than 3-4-5 tbsp. all of the same kind.  There are many blends on the market, but if you're in a chili-poor area, then just look for two basic kinds-- regular chili powder, and dark chili poweder, and use some combination of the two.  It makes the chili more complex if you use a blend of actual dried chiles and/or chili powders.  Anyway, here goes:1 lb chorizo2-3 lbs cubed beef  (1" cubes -- lots of cuts you can use here.  FF suggests tri-tip, I like using beef shortrib, or beef shoulder chuck.  Some people just use the "stew meat" that the butcher pre-cuts for you, that works  too)SaltPepperFlour3 dried New Mexican red chiles3 dried chile cascabel2-3 dried chile de arbol2-3 tbsp. chile powder1 tbsp. cumin1 tbsp. paprika1 tsp Mexican oregano1/2 tsp cayenne1 packet Goya sazonSalt to taste (usually 1-3 tsp)2 jalapenos, diced2 serranos, halved1 small onion diced (save some raw to go on top of chili)2-3 cloves garlic, minced2 tbsp. cooking oil (if necessary)6 12-oz dark beers (only one is for cooking, the rest go in your belly)2 cups beef stockFresh cilantro for garnishQueso fresco or grated cheddar for garnish1) Toast the dried chiles on a cookie sheet in the oven at 225 for a few minutes, until they become fragrant.  Don't burn them, if you do, start over.  Burned chile in chili tastes nasty.2) Remove the chiles from the oven and remove the stem and seeds.  They'll be dry and crackly, you can do this with your hands.  If your skin is sensitive then wear some nitrile or rubber disposable gloves, and do not wipe our eyes.3) Heat a pot of water to boiling, turn off, and steep the chiles in the water for 10-15 minutes, until they're tender.  Remove the chiles from the pot (reserve the chile-water), and put them in a blender, with enough of the chile water to blend until smooth.  Set aside this chile puree.4) Heat a tiny bit of oil in a large, heavy pot.  I have  7-quart cast iron enameled dutch oven that I use for this, a "Le Creuset" knockoff I've had for ages.  It's awesome for chili, beef bourguignon, and any other stews that require long periods of simmering.  I highly recommend such a pot.5) Place the chorizo in the pot, and brown until a lot of the fat is rendered out.  It'll be bright red.  Don't be alarmed.  Remove the chorizo and reserve on a plate.6) In the meantime, cube your beef if not already cubed. I do ~1" cubes, because I let it simmer for a long time.  If you want to cook faster, then you can do 1/2" cubes.  Sprinkle beef on all sides with a little bit of salt, pepper, and flour.7) Work in batches to brown the cubed beef on all sides, and reserve off to the side. 8) Remove the last batch of meat, add a little cooking oil if necessary, and then sautee the onions until almost tender.  Then put in the garlic and jalapenos and sautee them for a few minutes, until the onions are translucent.9) Pour your 12-oz beer into the pot to de-glaze, be sure to scrape the browned bits off the bottom with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula.  Allow around 1/2 to evaporate.  Then put all of the meat back in, and pour in the beef stock, to cover the meat. Bring to a boil, then reduce to the lowest simmer you can.10) Pour the chile puree into the pot.  Add the powdered chile powder, comino, paprika,cayenne, Goya sazon, salt, and Mexican oregano (I usually pour a tsp into the palm of my hand, crush until really fine, and sprinkle over the top.  Otherwise you might end up with too-large oregano chunks).11) Float the serrano halves on top and remove at the end, or you can dice them really finely and leave them in.  Sometimes they dissolve anyway and disappear, even if you float them, so don't sweat this step.12) Simmer the chili on the lowest setting you have until the meat is tender and falls apart on its own, or is easily shredded by fork.  I typically simmer for 6-8 hours, just check it every so often after the first 4 hours or so.  If the liquid gets too low, you can add some of the reserved chile-water.  Or plain water.  Or stock.  But be careful not to over-beef-stock it, you want the falvor of the chiles to shine through.13) When it's done, serve in bowls with some fresh cilantro on top, and either some shredded queso fresco, or grated cheddar works too.  Also, some raw diced onion on top if you like that sort of thing.There you have it, authentic Texas Red.  Down here in Texico, this will often be served with cornbread on the side, as well as beans.  ON THE SIDE, of course.And the second meal you make out of it can be Frito pie, with grated cheddar and onions on top of course.Happy Thanksgiving!





Oh, and in the above, you can definitely make it hotter by adding more than 1/2 tsp cayenne (up to 2-3 tsp would be fine) and using more jalapenos/serranos or adding in some habanero.I made this batch for my whole family including the toddler kids, so I kept the heat down.





I like that recipe. That would yield very deep, bold flavors.I like to use 1" diced short rib as well, and also 1/2" diced skirt steak for contrast. I've been putting a lb of ground sirloin in to thicken the sauce.





Skirt steak would be good, the long simmer should break down all of that connective tissue and help thicken the sauce.  Some folks use cubed or coarse-ground brisket to get a similar effect.





Badge, I made your chili recipe a few days ago, I used top sirloin, bottom round, ground sirloin and chourico.  Damn good!I washed it down with some Glenlivet 15 year.  I'm saving the 18 year for the holidays.  I want to make Utee's recipe as well, but noticed I will need to hunt down a few of those ingredients.





Eggsellent!Go online to the Spice House, or go to Evanston/Milwaukee/Geneva and get them from their store. They should have all of them. You're near Chicago, right? It's worth the trip if you are.





I'm In Daytona Beach, FL.  I like the weather better.  I was born at Christ Hospital in Oak Lawn on the southwest side of Chicago and lived in that area until we moved to Pittsburgh, where I grew up.  I haven't been back to Chicago in a while, though the wife and I have been trying to plan a trip there.





OK, so here's my take on shrimp cocktail (4 servings +/-):1 pound, 15 count shrimp, peeled and deveined, tail-onCanola OilFresh ground salt and pepper1/2 cup ketchup (Heintz is best)4 tablespoons of good horseradish (or fresh ground if you choose)1 teaspoon of cayenne pepper sauce (I use Frank's)1 tablespoon of lemon juice1 tablespoon of Worchestershire saucePreheat the oven to 450 degrees.Rinse and then pat the srimp dry with paper towel. Lightly coat in the canola oil, and season both side with salt and pepper. Arrange on a baking sheet, and allow to come to room temperature.Combine the remaining ingredients and stir to combine, allowing the mixture to come to room temperature.Place the shrimp in the preheated oven and bake for 8 minute until just done. Remove from the oven and allow to return to handling temperature.Serve with the sauce, for dipping.





Just made some Ahi tuna with a nice fresh topping. Here it is (2 servings):2 - 6 ounce Ahi tuna steaksFresh ground salt and pepper1 cup red seedless grapes, quartered1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil1 shallot, finely minced2 cloves of garlic, finely minced or crushed (preferred)1 tablespoon of capers, drained and finely minced1 tablespoon Italian flat leaf parsley, finely mincedFresh squeezed lemon juiceRinse the tuna steaks and pat dry. Season with salt and pepper and allow to come to room temperature.At least 2 hours ahead, make the topping. Combine all ingredients after the tuna steaks and through the parsley, and season with fresh cracked pepper and a little salt. (You don't need much salt because of the capers)Preheat a sautee pan on very high heat, with a tablespoon of canola oil, until just smoking. Squeeze the lemon juice on the tuna steaks just before adding them to the pan. Cook one minute on each side and remove from the heat. Slice thinly and place on serving plates, over a bed of microgreens (if desired). Top with the grape mixture and serve immediately.NOTE:This topping can also be used on grilled pork tenderloin or chicken, a well as any firm white fish.





Was doing the mess around in the kitchen before getting serious when parents arrive.Turkey Sloppy Joesa little Olive Oil (2 tbl) in a large skillet or sauté pan.1lb ground turkey (some fat 7-10%), more if you're feeding more of course1 diced green pepper2-3 garlic cloves minced (i never use a press btw, hone your knife skills I say)cook through (whatever heat you need, med, med high)A palmful of chili powder (2-3 TBL I'm guessing), work it in for a minute1 beer, ale, lager or pilsner, I used Founder's session ale tonight, all I had.1/2 a bottle of chill sauce (Heinz is fine).a can (4 oz?) diced green chilisShake or two or three of worcestershiresimmer for a good 15 minutes, stir occasionally while tending to your buns until it thickens, then addthinly chopped green onion at the buzzer and stir.salt and pepper to taste if you'd like.I shouldn't have to say it, but please toast your buns before serving.Garnish with a little shredded cheese.  Open face it, or don't.





utee94 wrote: Back on page 2 of this long and distinguished thread, badgerfan posted a recipe for some pretty darn authentic-looking Texas chili.  I haven't posted my recipe before now, because honestly I don't have one, I change it up almost every time.  But there are some basic elements that are always present, and this past weekend I made a very nice batch, and actually bothered to record what I did.  So here it is, this time in fewer than 7 years...Note, for this recipe I actually used some dried chili peppers and reconstituted them.  You can use ALL chili powder if you want, but if you do I'd suggest using a couple tbsp. of several different kinds, rather than 3-4-5 tbsp. all of the same kind.  There are many blends on the market, but if you're in a chili-poor area, then just look for two basic kinds-- regular chili powder, and dark chili poweder, and use some combination of the two.  It makes the chili more complex if you use a blend of actual dried chiles and/or chili powders.  Anyway, here goes:1 lb chorizo2-3 lbs cubed beef  (1" cubes -- lots of cuts you can use here.  FF suggests tri-tip, I like using beef shortrib, or beef shoulder chuck.  Some people just use the "stew meat" that the butcher pre-cuts for you, that works  too)SaltPepperFlour3 dried New Mexican red chiles3 dried chile cascabel2-3 dried chile de arbol2-3 tbsp. chile powder1 tbsp. cumin1 tbsp. paprika1 tsp Mexican oregano1/2 tsp cayenne1 packet Goya sazonSalt to taste (usually 1-3 tsp)2 jalapenos, diced2 serranos, halved1 small onion diced (save some raw to go on top of chili)2-3 cloves garlic, minced2 tbsp. cooking oil (if necessary)6 12-oz dark beers (only one is for cooking, the rest go in your belly)2 cups beef stockFresh cilantro for garnishQueso fresco or grated cheddar for garnish1) Toast the dried chiles on a cookie sheet in the oven at 225 for a few minutes, until they become fragrant.  Don't burn them, if you do, start over.  Burned chile in chili tastes nasty.2) Remove the chiles from the oven and remove the stem and seeds.  They'll be dry and crackly, you can do this with your hands.  If your skin is sensitive then wear some nitrile or rubber disposable gloves, and do not wipe our eyes.3) Heat a pot of water to boiling, turn off, and steep the chiles in the water for 10-15 minutes, until they're tender.  Remove the chiles from the pot (reserve the chile-water), and put them in a blender, with enough of the chile water to blend until smooth.  Set aside this chile puree.4) Heat a tiny bit of oil in a large, heavy pot.  I have  7-quart cast iron enameled dutch oven that I use for this, a "Le Creuset" knockoff I've had for ages.  It's awesome for chili, beef bourguignon, and any other stews that require long periods of simmering.  I highly recommend such a pot.5) Place the chorizo in the pot, and brown until a lot of the fat is rendered out.  It'll be bright red.  Don't be alarmed.  Remove the chorizo and reserve on a plate.6) In the meantime, cube your beef if not already cubed. I do ~1" cubes, because I let it simmer for a long time.  If you want to cook faster, then you can do 1/2" cubes.  Sprinkle beef on all sides with a little bit of salt, pepper, and flour.7) Work in batches to brown the cubed beef on all sides, and reserve off to the side. 8) Remove the last batch of meat, add a little cooking oil if necessary, and then sautee the onions until almost tender.  Then put in the garlic and jalapenos and sautee them for a few minutes, until the onions are translucent.9) Pour your 12-oz beer into the pot to de-glaze, be sure to scrape the browned bits off the bottom with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula.  Allow around 1/2 to evaporate.  Then put all of the meat back in, and pour in the beef stock, to cover the meat. Bring to a boil, then reduce to the lowest simmer you can.10) Pour the chile puree into the pot.  Add the powdered chile powder, comino, paprika,cayenne, Goya sazon, salt, and Mexican oregano (I usually pour a tsp into the palm of my hand, crush until really fine, and sprinkle over the top.  Otherwise you might end up with too-large oregano chunks).11) Float the serrano halves on top and remove at the end, or you can dice them really finely and leave them in.  Sometimes they dissolve anyway and disappear, even if you float them, so don't sweat this step.12) Simmer the chili on the lowest setting you have until the meat is tender and falls apart on its own, or is easily shredded by fork.  I typically simmer for 6-8 hours, just check it every so often after the first 4 hours or so.  If the liquid gets too low, you can add some of the reserved chile-water.  Or plain water.  Or stock.  But be careful not to over-beef-stock it, you want the falvor of the chiles to shine through.13) When it's done, serve in bowls with some fresh cilantro on top, and either some shredded queso fresco, or grated cheddar works too.  Also, some raw diced onion on top if you like that sort of thing.There you have it, authentic Texas Red.  Down here in Texico, this will often be served with cornbread on the side, as well as beans.  ON THE SIDE, of course.And the second meal you make out of it can be Frito pie, with grated cheddar and onions on top of course.Happy Thanksgiving!Just made this again today, a double-batch to use tonight, and then for post-Christmas camping in the Airstream.Added in a couple of chipotle in adobo, totally delicious and makes it spicier.  Also tossed in a cup and a half of red wine left over from last night and cut down the beef stock a bit, made it even richer if possible.It's always good the day of, but man after a couple of days left to meld in the refrigerator, it might end up being the best freaking thing I've ever put in my mouth.





------------------------------------------------ utee94 wrote:utee94 wrote: Back on page 2 of this long and distinguished thread, badgerfan posted a recipe for some pretty darn authentic-looking Texas chili.  I haven't posted my recipe before now, because honestly I don't have one, I change it up almost every time.  But there are some basic elements that are always present, and this past weekend I made a very nice batch, and actually bothered to record what I did.  So here it is, this time in fewer than 7 years...Note, for this recipe I actually used some dried chili peppers and reconstituted them.  You can use ALL chili powder if you want, but if you do I'd suggest using a couple tbsp. of several different kinds, rather than 3-4-5 tbsp. all of the same kind.  There are many blends on the market, but if you're in a chili-poor area, then just look for two basic kinds-- regular chili powder, and dark chili poweder, and use some combination of the two.  It makes the chili more complex if you use a blend of actual dried chiles and/or chili powders.  Anyway, here goes:1 lb chorizo2-3 lbs cubed beef  (1" cubes -- lots of cuts you can use here.  FF suggests tri-tip, I like using beef shortrib, or beef shoulder chuck.  Some people just use the "stew meat" that the butcher pre-cuts for you, that works  too)SaltPepperFlour3 dried New Mexican red chiles3 dried chile cascabel2-3 dried chile de arbol2-3 tbsp. chile powder1 tbsp. cumin1 tbsp. paprika1 tsp Mexican oregano1/2 tsp cayenne1 packet Goya sazonSalt to taste (usually 1-3 tsp)2 jalapenos, diced2 serranos, halved1 small onion diced (save some raw to go on top of chili)2-3 cloves garlic, minced2 tbsp. cooking oil (if necessary)6 12-oz dark beers (only one is for cooking, the rest go in your belly)2 cups beef stockFresh cilantro for garnishQueso fresco or grated cheddar for garnish1) Toast the dried chiles on a cookie sheet in the oven at 225 for a few minutes, until they become fragrant.  Don't burn them, if you do, start over.  Burned chile in chili tastes nasty.2) Remove the chiles from the oven and remove the stem and seeds.  They'll be dry and crackly, you can do this with your hands.  If your skin is sensitive then wear some nitrile or rubber disposable gloves, and do not wipe our eyes.3) Heat a pot of water to boiling, turn off, and steep the chiles in the water for 10-15 minutes, until they're tender.  Remove the chiles from the pot (reserve the chile-water), and put them in a blender, with enough of the chile water to blend until smooth.  Set aside this chile puree.4) Heat a tiny bit of oil in a large, heavy pot.  I have  7-quart cast iron enameled dutch oven that I use for this, a "Le Creuset" knockoff I've had for ages.  It's awesome for chili, beef bourguignon, and any other stews that require long periods of simmering.  I highly recommend such a pot.5) Place the chorizo in the pot, and brown until a lot of the fat is rendered out.  It'll be bright red.  Don't be alarmed.  Remove the chorizo and reserve on a plate.6) In the meantime, cube your beef if not already cubed. I do ~1" cubes, because I let it simmer for a long time.  If you want to cook faster, then you can do 1/2" cubes.  Sprinkle beef on all sides with a little bit of salt, pepper, and flour.7) Work in batches to brown the cubed beef on all sides, and reserve off to the side. 8) Remove the last batch of meat, add a little cooking oil if necessary, and then sautee the onions until almost tender.  Then put in the garlic and jalapenos and sautee them for a few minutes, until the onions are translucent.9) Pour your 12-oz beer into the pot to de-glaze, be sure to scrape the browned bits off the bottom with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula.  Allow around 1/2 to evaporate.  Then put all of the meat back in, and pour in the beef stock, to cover the meat. Bring to a boil, then reduce to the lowest simmer you can.10) Pour the chile puree into the pot.  Add the powdered chile powder, comino, paprika,cayenne, Goya sazon, salt, and Mexican oregano (I usually pour a tsp into the palm of my hand, crush until really fine, and sprinkle over the top.  Otherwise you might end up with too-large oregano chunks).11) Float the serrano halves on top and remove at the end, or you can dice them really finely and leave them in.  Sometimes they dissolve anyway and disappear, even if you float them, so don't sweat this step.12) Simmer the chili on the lowest setting you have until the meat is tender and falls apart on its own, or is easily shredded by fork.  I typically simmer for 6-8 hours, just check it every so often after the first 4 hours or so.  If the liquid gets too low, you can add some of the reserved chile-water.  Or plain water.  Or stock.  But be careful not to over-beef-stock it, you want the falvor of the chiles to shine through.13) When it's done, serve in bowls with some fresh cilantro on top, and either some shredded queso fresco, or grated cheddar works too.  Also, some raw diced onion on top if you like that sort of thing.There you have it, authentic Texas Red.  Down here in Texico, this will often be served with cornbread on the side, as well as beans.  ON THE SIDE, of course.And the second meal you make out of it can be Frito pie, with grated cheddar and onions on top of course.Happy Thanksgiving!Just made this again today, a double-batch to use tonight, and then for post-Christmas camping in the Airstream.Added in a couple of chipotle in adobo, totally delicious and makes it spicier.  Also tossed in a cup and a half of red wine left over from last night and cut down the beef stock a bit, made it even richer if possible.It's always good the day of, but man after a couple of days left to meld in the refrigerator, it might end up being the best freaking thing I've ever put in my mouth.---------------------------------------------If you were a fan of the lentils, and you assumed I wanted to add them to the mix, how would you change the recipe up, if any?





I suppose chili-flavored lentel soup would taste OK.





You know not of what you speak, oh culinary challenged cheese curdle.






Drew4UTk

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Anyone have any good salad dressing recipes?  I usually just go with olive oil and balsamic but want to stretch out some.





I've got a couple things I've been saving up for a while now. I'll get something up this weekend when I'm done compiling/writing.





MaximumSam wrote: Anyone have any good salad dressing recipes? I usually just go with olive oil and balsamic but want to stretch out some.a good cheat for homemade dressings is to buy some dressing starters from Penzeys Spices.  They are versatile and keep well.You may live near a location, otherwise shopping online works.  They've got about six or seven that I do use fairly regularly.  My favorite being creamy peppercorn, which is 1 tbl base mix, 2 tbl water, equal parts sour cream and mayo (I make my own mayo), stick mixer to blend, cover, chill and it lasts a good 5 days.Basically, you use a tablespoon or two of the dressing base, and then add some number of additional liquid/cream ingredients, typically a fat or two, and maybe water.





I've been using alot of citrus lately, mostly lemon. Makes a nice dressing and very light too.





Does anyone know how to make clarified butter?





847badgerfan wrote: Does anyone know how to make clarified butter?Pretty simple really.  Use unsalted* butter, and plan on losing 25% of it in milk solids, etc. In other words, 1 cup of butter will get you 3/4 cup clarified butter.  Cut it in cubes in a heavy saucepan on low heat, you're not making brown butter. (All-clad actually has a little saucepan that's perfect for this, and other sauce uses, as it has a small pouring lip).  1. Heat until melted and the foam popping subsides, at this point skim the white foam/solids with a spoon, get as much as you can and discard.  some people save this and put it on popcorn or rice, whatever. Remove butter from heat for a minute or two as you set up #2.2. Mesh strainer over a glass bowl, layer it with cheesecloth (coffee filter does work but takes much longer to strain).  Pour the mostly clarified butter over the cheesecloth lined strainer and it will strain nicely into the bowl, leaving behind the remaining solids in the cloth.3. It actually keeps nicely in the fridge in a air tight container, and can easily be reheated w/o any real loss.  I generally don't keep it around much longer than a couple days.  Usually I make it ahead of time (a day) and then use it for whatever purpose (shell fish usually), although people like to fry with it.*I've asked and wondered 'why unsalted' and the reasons I've been given are these. 1. Less 'solids' in unsalted butter, which means better yield.  2. It is cleaner tasting.  3. Unsalted butter is typically fresher than salted butter.  I rarely buy 'high end' butter (I don't bake), but do if I'm making a bunch of shell fish and thus lots of clarified butter, or if I'm making a compound butter, as you can always add salt to it.





Thanks a lot pal.I want to use it for basting my hamburgers and steaks, so this is perfect.





847badgerfan wrote: I've got another tip, for those of you who use ovens alot.I've got a higher-end GE (if there is such a thing) and whenever I preheat it, it's never right when it says it is.I bought a magnetic thermometer and stuck it inside, and I was shocked to find out that when the oven said it was a 450, it was at 350!It's also off temperature, up or down, depending on the setting. 180 means 205 in my oven, while 500 means 460.Until I can buy a Viking, this is what I deal with.Moral of the story is to go spend $10-15 at Williams Sonoma or Sur Le Table and get a thermometer so you can quit wrecking your food.one thing to consider is your oven's heating element.  Last summer, we were cooking something, and I often use a thermometer with the long rip cord in the oven to keep an eye on my meat temp, as the golden rule for meat is never cook to time, cook to temperature, and I was like what the #$%* is going on.   I got the heating element replaced and all was well.





utee94 wrote: BurntEyes wrote: medinabuckeye1 wrote: BurntEyes wrote:Easy dessert... Easy to pre prep Take an apple for every one you want Core out the apple and wash it well. Take aluminum foil and wrap around the bottom In the top of the apple poor in sugar/cinnamon mixed like cinnamon toast (2/3 sugar 1/2 cinnamon) into the open core of the appel. Drop in a small piece of butter (Totally optional) Wrap foil tight As you are finishing your meat off drop in the premade apples After your meal and a few brews, (the apples should be soft to the touch through the foil) open and serve.I'm really curious about this.  Our thread only has three desserts.  The other two are my chocolate/PB Buckeyes which are obviously pre-prep and cold serve and UTErin's cupcakes which require an oven and therefore can't be prepared at most tailgates.  Thus, this is the only hot dessert in this entire thread that I could actually make at my tailgate/campsite.  I plan to try it this weekend.  When you say to "core out the apple", do you mean to just cut out the core and leave the rest completely intact?  I have an apple-corer, but it cuts the rest into wedges and I don't think that would work for this recipe.  Am I reading that correctly, and do you do it with a knife or do you have a tool for it?Keep it intact. Simply using a paring or heck any knife to cut out the core. So basically you have a apple donut, if you will. Then pour the sugar and cinnamon inside the core using the foil as the bottom. When it's soft to the touch, it's ready. Nice thing for camping and tailgating is, when premaid, if you don't use butter, you don't even have to refrigerate them. With butter, be sure to put them in a cooler. I occasional throw one these in the pack when trekking, and you should see the looks of envy from others. (I usually share)My sister-in-law is trained a as a pastry chef, she makes what she calls "inside-out apple pie" like this, but adds some strudel mix to the filling to form a bit of a crust.  Delicious.Do you have any suggestions for a non-trained-pastry-chef for the crust?  Also, does she wrap it around the apple, or put it in the removed core?





medinabuckeye1 wrote: utee94 wrote: BurntEyes wrote: medinabuckeye1 wrote: BurntEyes wrote:Easy dessert... Easy to pre prep Take an apple for every one you want Core out the apple and wash it well. Take aluminum foil and wrap around the bottom In the top of the apple poor in sugar/cinnamon mixed like cinnamon toast (2/3 sugar 1/2 cinnamon) into the open core of the appel. Drop in a small piece of butter (Totally optional) Wrap foil tight As you are finishing your meat off drop in the premade apples After your meal and a few brews, (the apples should be soft to the touch through the foil) open and serve.I'm really curious about this.  Our thread only has three desserts.  The other two are my chocolate/PB Buckeyes which are obviously pre-prep and cold serve and UTErin's cupcakes which require an oven and therefore can't be prepared at most tailgates.  Thus, this is the only hot dessert in this entire thread that I could actually make at my tailgate/campsite.  I plan to try it this weekend.  When you say to "core out the apple", do you mean to just cut out the core and leave the rest completely intact?  I have an apple-corer, but it cuts the rest into wedges and I don't think that would work for this recipe.  Am I reading that correctly, and do you do it with a knife or do you have a tool for it?Keep it intact. Simply using a paring or heck any knife to cut out the core. So basically you have a apple donut, if you will. Then pour the sugar and cinnamon inside the core using the foil as the bottom. When it's soft to the touch, it's ready. Nice thing for camping and tailgating is, when premaid, if you don't use butter, you don't even have to refrigerate them. With butter, be sure to put them in a cooler. I occasional throw one these in the pack when trekking, and you should see the looks of envy from others. (I usually share)My sister-in-law is trained a as a pastry chef, she makes what she calls "inside-out apple pie" like this, but adds some strudel mix to the filling to form a bit of a crust.  Delicious.Do you have any suggestions for a non-trained-pastry-chef for the crust?  Also, does she wrap it around the apple, or put it in the removed core?She puts it in the removed core, so the crust is on the inside, hence the name "inside-out apple pie."  I'll check with her on how she does it, I just know she mixes the strudel stuff with cinnamon, sugar, and most likely butter, and it gets crusty on the inside as it bakes.





So my daughter, who is turning 8, has requested a pig roast for her birthday.  So by God, I am going to roast a pig.  Anyone done this?  Suggestions?





Are you doing it on a smoker or in a hole? Are you doing the head too?For smoking, if at all possible, I would suggest a long brine or lots of injections to keep it moist. The standard rubs listed on here would all work well.





847badgerfan wrote: Are you doing it on a smoker or in a hole? Are you doing the head too?For smoking, if at all possible, I would suggest a long brine or lots of injections to keep it moist. The standard rubs listed on here would all work well.I think I'm going to build a pit out of cinder blocks, and hell yes I'm doing the head.  What kind of pig roast doesn't have the head ?  Brining may be unrealistic - also, I don't want to make the skin too soggy, but I may do injections.  My main issues right now are figuring out the pit and getting the pig.





I only asked because I've seen it done without it and was disappointed.The cheek meat is the best meat on the pig, after the belly.Injection would be good. It will dry out otherwise. If you could brine, do it (need to do it in the bathtub). The skin will still crisp up.If you do the brine, use equal salt and brown sugar, along with allspice berries, whole peppercorns, roasted ginger, roasted onions and garlic. There are lots of guides on this and the amounts vary depending on how much water you use. 24 hours is normally long enough for pork. Just keep fresh ice on it every 4 hours or so.





847badgerfan wrote: I only asked because I've seen it done without it and was disappointed.The cheek meat is the best meat on the pig, after the belly.Injection would be good. It will dry out otherwise. If you could brine, do it (need to do it in the bathtub). The skin will still crisp up.If you do the brine, use equal salt and brown sugar, along with allspice berries, whole peppercorns, roasted ginger, roasted onions and garlic. There are lots of guides on this and the amounts vary depending on how much water you use. 24 hours is normally long enough for pork. Just keep fresh ice on it every 4 hours or so.I'm on the fence on brining.  Some people swear by it, but a lot of people are against it.  Not sure how I feel about it, though when I'm on the fence and it requires a lot of work I usually go with the no work option.





My vote is pork cheek #1 and probably the best single bite of meat, definitely a finalist.I wouldn't turn away a halibut cheek either.





So I've ordered the pig, and the next step is building the bbq.  I drive a Camry, so I'm regularly getting cinder blocks in small amounts.





Are you going to brine it in the bathtub?What will be your rub? I just put one together this morning, actually.I added celery salt to my standard rub.





847badgerfan wrote: Are you going to brine it in the bathtub?What will be your rub? I just put one together this morning, actually.I added celery salt to my standard rub.I borrowed one from Amazing Ribs the other day when I made some ribs, and I liked it quite a bit and have lots left over, so I'll use that.  Probably not going to brine, debating whether I want to inject or not.  I kind of want to just have the hog flavor.  Going to wet and salt the skin, as I hear that's the best way to get edible skin through the roast.3/4 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar 3/4 cup white sugar 1/2 cup paprika 1/4 cup Morton's kosher salt 1/4 cup garlic powder 2 tablespoons ground black pepper 2 tablespoons ground ginger powder 2 tablespoons onion powder 2 teaspoons rosemary powderThat's his rub recipe, but I substituted 1/4 cup chili powder, cumin, and cayenne for 1/4 cup of paprika





So, how did this ever shake out Max?





847badgerfan wrote: So, how did this ever shake out Max?Well!  I built the pit with my father-in-law, and used cinder block, some old fence and rebar as a cooking grate, and some plywood covered in aluminum foil as a lid.  I left two blocks out in the bottom row and used cookie sheets as vents, and shoveled in lit coals about every hour or so to maintain a 250 degree temp, give or take 25 degrees.  The pig was bigger than I expected, so we had to cut his feet off to get him to fit, but fit he did.  I didn't brine him but I did inject with some chicken stock with salt and sugar solution, and salted the skin as well as put a rub on the cavity.  I had planned to flip him midway through, but he was so big I abandoned that plan and just let him cook on his stomach the whole way.  The meat ended up very tender, but I was disappointed in the skin - I wasn't able to get that cracklin crunch I wanted.  Still, it ended up really good and the carcass was pretty well stripped by the end of the night.





Awesome. Thanks for sharing.





Dare that be 'spatchcock style'?





MarqHusker wrote: Dare that be 'spatchcock style'?LOL well I asked for it butterflied.  But spatchcock sounds better.





I didn't serve a whole hog this 4th of July weekend, but I did brine and grill a whole pork loin for a family party at the lake and it turned out quite nicely (citrus based brine).The real hit though was the Peach Mustard (sauce). and I don't even like peaches on their own.  One thing I noticed over the years, people just don't like mustard as much as I do, which is their loss.  This works because it isn't 'just mustard'Mustards, and soft cheeses (blue, gorgonzola) pair very well with pork (especially loin) IMO.This Peach Mustard is a breeze. hat tip: bon appetit1 overripe peach, peel it like a tomato by scoring with an 'x' on top and bottom, place in boiling water for about 45 seconds, remove from the hot water, cool in ice water bath and peel.roughly chop the Peach (discard the pit)splash Apple Cider Vinegar2 TBL water2 TBL sugarpinch of kosher saltbring to boil and simmer for 5 minutes until it thickens slightly.  Remove from heat and  blend (I use a stick mixer) a little bit, but don't puree.  Pour this into a bowl and cool.Add equal parts whole grain mustard/dijon mustard, (1/4 c each sounds good)S & P to taste.  and chill.optional: add fresh chives (chopped) at time of serving.I will put this on pork, chicken, ham / turkey sandwiches, lamb,





A man’s guide to cooking the perfect steak (17 Photos) http://thechive.com/2013/05/23...teak-17-photos/





Skip the room temperature steak and instead do a reverse sear, where you warm it to a desired temperature through indirect heat and then sear it over high heat.





MaximumSam wrote: Skip the room temperature steak and instead do a reverse sear, where you warm it to a desired temperature through indirect heat and then sear it over high heat.That's a decent cheat, but to me, the 'take the meat out' hour (or less) is the time to prep, and make other items, and also get started on the drinks.  Perhaps the package in the white butcher paper on the counter is a sign to those dining.Either way, anything is better than sous vide, which to me doesn't lend itself to proper crusting (carmelization) no matter the techniques of the chef.





I need some advice.  At the County Fair today I bought a pig, well actually half a pig, I'm splitting with another guy.  I need to talk to the butcher on Monday to give him instructions and I don't have any idea what I want to tell him.  Oh, I'll also need to review pork recipes as I'm going to have LOTS of pork.






Drew4UTk

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medinabuckeye1 wrote: I need some advice.  At the County Fair today I bought a pig, well actually half a pig, I'm splitting with another guy.  I need to talk to the butcher on Monday to give him instructions and I don't have any idea what I want to tell him.  Oh, I'll also need to review pork recipes as I'm going to have LOTS of pork.How many pounds is it?You can probably ask the butcher what is common - you'll get ribs, some shoulder roast, belly, chops, and whatever they want to do with the hams.  Can you have the bacon cured?  Don't ignore the feet - great in soup, skin for cracklins, and the leaf and back fat.  You can develop lard from the fat, which can be good for all sorts of things.  The leaf lard is very mild and is prized for baking, while the back fat has a piggier flavor and is better for things like tamales.





I hope you got the cheeks.  Yeah, do not discard the skin.  You just can't readily walk in to a store and get yourself cracklin quality product.I got some pork parts this weekend from a new Amish vendor at our local Saturday farmer's market.   Succulent.  I'm really looking forward to trying his chicken sausage.





Grilled Deviled Avocados1. Cut avocados in half horizontally (held so the stem is at the top). Remove the pit and scoop out the flesh into a bowl. Save the skin.2. Mash up the avocado until is of a smooth consistency. 3. Brown your favorite type of sausage until it is nice and grainy.  Drain excess grease and liquid. 4. Mix avocado, sausage, and sour cream (optional) thoroughly.5. Fill the avocado skins with the mixture, place on the grill 10-15 minutes until thoroughly heated.6. Top with shredded cheese and enjoy.I've also mixed some salsa in with the filling and while still good, it tends to either get lost or overpower the sausage flavor depending on how much you put in there.





I'm going to try that recipe this weekend, LGP. Thanks.





847badgerfan wrote: I'm going to try that recipe this weekend, LGP. Thanks.I forgot to mention that grilling them in a muffin pan works best so they don't fall over and spill the filling. I've only done these three times so I'm sure there are plenty of ways to improve the recipe with spices or other things.





I was contemplating a chorizo (flavor) and turkey sausage (low fat) blend for the stuffing.I have a rack for veggies that will work out well for this, I think. Again, thanks.





Ok, I've got another one for you. I got a new grill a few weeks ago so that explains my sudden grilling proliferation.Grilled Bananas (Dessert)1. Lay banana on it's side and down the length of it through the peel and through most of the actual banana (This allows the glaze to penetrate.)2. Gently open the peel in the slice you just made but don't remove it. 3. I always do this part just by look so I don't have any actual measurements. Put butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, a little honey, and a little vanilla extract in a microwave safe cup and heat it up until you have a nice thick liquid.4. Pour some of the glaze from the previous step into the sliced banana.5. Loosely wrap the banana in foil with the sliced side up. 6. Place on the grill for 10 minutes or so. I usually put them on the upper warming rack of the grill.7. Open up the foil and the banana should be a nice gooey mess inside the now brown and disgusting looking peel. Top with spoonfuls or vanilla ice cream or whipped cream and enjoy. It has a very banana bread-like taste to it.  My kids absolutely destroy these things when I make them. 





I'm guessing you missed the word 'slice' or 'score' ' in #1  after the word 'and'.These are my kinds of bites from a grill.I'm going to do this tonight, after I eat another tasty treat with my fish, which was earlier wrapped in foil, bathed in butter and a slice of bacon, that being a whole onion.another cool thing to grill sometimes is watermelon, seriously.





I didn't get to make the avocado dish over the weekend, but I will be doing it soon.I grill a lot of fruit. Especially stone fruits.





I grilled plantains one time - I just sliced them down the middle with the peel on, brushed butter on them, then finished with salt and pepper.  Tasty tasty





Overnight low at my house was 59.  So of course this morning I woke up and decided to make a big pot of chili.  I can smell it just simmering away, gonna enjoy the heck out of it tonight whilst watching my team play the man's game of football.





I made some stock a few weeks ago, and this weekend it is time to make some soup with it, with the am temps getting into the 40s.





we've had some frost on the greens in the mornings, but it's gotta get a little colder for me to brew a batch of chili





Heh.  If I waited that long, I'd just about never get to eat chili!





y'all could always move north!





Uhhh, thanks anyway...





Thank You for your support





You don't need to run a campaign, people are willingly leaving the rust belt in droves.





 dudekd wrote: I'm looking for a great chili recipe with lots of beans... I figured this would be the best place to come.  OK here is my first foray into the recipe thread. Be gentle. Pumpkin, & Chorizo ChiliIngredients:2 lbs lean ground turkey1/2 lbs. ground chorizo 1 can Chili Beans1 can Pinto Beans1 can Black Beans4 cups Chicken Broth1 16oz can Pumpkin Puree2 6oz cans Tomato Paste1/2 cup Onion Flakes2 tsp Minced Garlic3 tsp Pumpkin Pie Spice1 tsp Brown Sugar1 tsp All Spice1 tsp CuminDirections:Brown MeatMix ingredients in a crock pot and cook over night.Notes: - I'm a cook to taste type guy, so amounts are guessed and can/should vary.- I don't like "skin" in my chili so I used tomato puree and onion flakes instead of crushed/diced tomato and saute onions.- Brown the Turkey and Chorizo together, and let simmer in their juices while you do the rest of the prep to mix the chorizo fat and spice with the turkey.- This is a sweet chili, have hot sauce on the side for those who want to spice it up.- Addins I like include Frito's, guacamole, sour cream and shredded cheddar cheese.





 utee94 wrote: You don't need to run a campaign, people are willingly leaving the rust belt in droves.  And I've been handing them pamphlets from the Austin Welcome Wagon/Chamber of Commerce





Sausage/cabbage/kraut/onions/apples(in the slow cooker)There's brazillion versions of this recipe.I've played with & tweeked it until I found my preference :Need a BIG mixing bowl or I use a white 5 gallon bucket my buddy gave me that  cucumbers came in(he runs a kitchen).- Take 1 head of cabbage run it thru the food processor(FP)with the shreading disk.Rinse 1 bag/can/jar of Kraut.Toss both in the bucket(you'll get the crunch of the cabbage & tartness of Kraut)- 2 apples(I like Granny Smith or MacIntosh)both turn sweet when cooked and 2-3 onions depending on size.Put onions & apples thru FP with slicing disk. Thow into white bucket- I add 1-2 table spoons of Caraway seed to bucket.Roll up your sleeves and mix Cabbage/Kraut/ Apples/Onions w  caraway seed all up by hand real good until evened out good.- Empty contents of bucket into slow cooker.I have a 7 QT Crock Pot and it fits perfect.Add 2/3rds  of a beer(I use Porter) and 1 tablespoon of honey into slow cooker.Turn on low and don't even think of opening it for 4 hrs.-As the 4 hour mark approaches I grill 5-6 Fresh Sausages.Grilling the sausage is tastier than leaving them in the slow cooker the whole time.You can use German/Italian/Polish/Hungarian/Slovenian/Ukranian sausages.Cleveland is a big ethnic mix so procuring these are no problem.Today I'm using Brats- I throw Brats on the hot grill for 2-3 minutes a side after that I drag them over to the cool side shut the lid and let them finish indirect.When done bring Brats inside let them cool down for half hr or so then I slice them diagonally  and add them to the Crock Pot(by this time ingredients will have rendered/settled leaving room for brats)- Leave in Crock Pot a minimum of 2 more hrs more.I usually go 8-9 hrs total- I steam redskin potatoes or cook egg noodles on the side.Then ladle crock Pot concoction over spuds/noodles.I like pumpernickel bread with this.-This is a great fall comfort recipe.It's cold & wet  today but I'll have to wait-





I'm gonna try that one Mr. N. Looks great.





847 Meat MarinadeThis is one that I've been working on refining for a while now, and I'm pretty happy with it. It works really well for tougher cuts like flank or skirt, but can be used for all meats. The time required depends upon the cut. A strip would take about and hour or so - a flank up to overnight.1/2 cup canola oil1 TB Worcestershire sauce1/4 cup water2 TB meat marinade mix*Combine all ingredients and stir together completely. Coat the meat and place in the fridge for as long as desired. When ready to cook, remove the meat from the marinade and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook as normal.*Recipe for meat marinade mix:2 TB beef base powder (bouillon/soup base)1 TB garlic powder1 TB onion powder1 TB meat tenderizer1 TB paprika powderCombine all ingredients into a consistent powder. Keep on hand for quick use whenever you need it.





847badgerfan wrote: I'm gonna try that one Mr. N. Looks great.Thanx Badge coming from a gourmet to a gourmund that means a lot.It really came out good.I use to use all sauerkraut but it bothered Cindy's stomach.The cabbage balances out the kraut.I also tossed in two tablespoons of raisins that seemed to temper the acidity.I forgot the Honey this time but adding the raisins worked.She loved it so I'll use that version now.BTW what is "TB" does this marinade work on Pork Tenderloin?





TB is tablespoon. I don't know it that's the proper way but that's what it means in my recipe.I don't know that I'd use that on pork, because of the beef base and tenderizer. I use the beef base to further enhance the natural beef flavors.For pork, a good brine is always my answer.





Ya I use a Soy sauce based brine.When scribbling down recipes I use T for TB and t for teaspoon.





Whatever works is the best way.Try a brine of all spice berries, whole peppercorns, salt, brown sugar and ginger.BRINE RECIPEAbout 2-3 cups of water would do. Add the berries (about 2T), peppercorns (1T), ginger (pickled, to taste), 1/2 cup of salt and a 1/2 cup of brown sugar.Toast the berries and peppercorns to release the oils - about 2 minutes or so. Add the water and then the rest of the ingredients and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for about a 1/2 hour so. Let it cool completely, and then refrigerate to get cold.Add this to the pork and let it go overnight.This same brine can be used for poultry (I'm doing this right now) but you have to cut the salt and sugar in half.No matter the protein, you have to be careful to rinse the brine off or your food will be too salty.





Today is one of those days. Found time to get to the gym and keep an eye on the bad news bears, among..Roasted a chicken, making pork ribs, have some beef short ribs braising away and finally I'll do some grilled veggies and then some homemade fries.I'll be posting all of these recipes if they work, although I already posted the chicken brine above.





Tried a new salad dressing recipe which I liked-olive oil-white vinegar-lime juice- honey- sriracha - salt and pepper





 MaximumSam wrote: Tried a new salad dressing recipe which I liked-olive oil-white vinegar-lime juice- honey- sriracha - salt and pepper Looks similar to one my wife makes, out of Betty Crocker. She serves it over a salad of half romaine, half iceberg, candied slivered almonds, mandarin oranges, celery and green onions.






Drew4UTk

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For my meal for Monday night:Roasted Duck Stuffing:4.5 cups cooked brown rice (I used a rosemary rice/cus cus mix)1 cup chopped onion and four bulbs of finely chopped garlic sauteed in 6 tbsp unsalted butterMix rice with onion/butter mix, 8 sprigs chopped fresh sage, 3/4 cup chopped pecans, Brandied Balsamic Cherry Sauce:Combine 1 can (15oz) pitted cherries, 1 1/2 cups cherry brandy, 1/4 cup honey (I used local buckwheat honey), and 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar.  Heat until mixture is reduced by half.





I know this is a play on the Ducks, but come on, where's the roasted duck part of the recipe.  Some of us love to eat duck.





Tea Smoked Rotisserie DuckA soy sauce brine followed by tea smoking on the rotisserie creates an incredibly flavorful bird worth of a holiday celebration.Prep Time:30 MinutesInactive Time:14 HoursCook Time:1 HourTotal Time:15 Hours 30 MinutesYield:4 servingsIngredientsFor the Brine2 quarts ice-cold water2 cups soy sauce3 tablespoons salt1/4 cup honey6 clove garlic, smashed1 1-inch piece of ginger, thinly sliced1 medium orange, quartered 1 whole duck2 quarts boiling water For the Tea Packet1/4 cup tea leaves1/4 cup brown sugar1/4 cup rice2 whole star anise pods1 3-inch long cinnamon sticks2 teaspoons orange zestProcedureTo make the brine, place water, soy sauce, salt, honey, garlic, and ginger in a large bowl. Squeeze orange quarters into bowl, then drop in peel. Stir to combine. Place duck in brine, breast side down, and weight down with plate to keep fully submerged. Place in refrigerator and brine for at least 2 hours, up to 8 hours.Remove duck from brine; pat dry with paper towels. Transfer duck to wire rack set in a sheet pan. Place in refrigerator for 12 to 24 hours to air dry.Remove duck from refrigerator. Using the point of a skewer or paring knife, prick holes all over duck breasts, being careful not to pierce the meat. Place duck on a wire rack in the sink. Pour 1 quart of boiling water over duck. Flip and pour remaining quart of water over other side. Allow duck to dry while preparing the grill.To make the tea packet, place tea leaves, brown sugar, rice, star anise, cinnamon sticks, and orange zest in a double layer of heavy-duty aluminum foil and fold into a packet. Cut slits at top of foil packet.Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on either side of the charcoal grate and place a foil pan between the two piles of coals. Cover gill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Place tea packet directly on top of the coals. Run spit of the rotisserie through middle of duck and secure ends with rotisserie forks. Place on the grill, cover, and cook at medium-high heat until duck registers 160 degrees when an instant read thermometer is inserted into the thickest part of the breast. Remove from grill, let rest for 15 minutes, then remove spit and serve.





MarqHusker wrote: I know this is a play on the Ducks, but come on, where's the roasted duck part of the recipe.  Some of us love to eat duck.As Fearless, NUWildcat and my other Facebook friends on here can attest, I actually did roast a Duck for the game.  I posted the stuffing and Brandied Cherry Sauce recipes but roasting a duck is pretty simple.  They don't need basted so it is pretty much just time and temperature.FWIW:  The stuffing and particularly the sauce were excellent!





Face what?   That looks fantastic.I did wing it last night (empty the pantry night) making a batch of chili for tonight's dinner.  It tasted great last night.  The only interesting twist is using the homemade beef stock1 lb. ground bison1 white onion diced2 cloves garlic dicedabout 2 cups homemade beef stockBrown meat for a bit, then add onion and garlic.  I also season meat with a little s&pThen, using some beef stock I made on NYE/NYD, I started treating the meat like rice in a rissotto and started adding the broth a little at a time, stirring constantly as it soft boiled, until a decent amount of the stock was absorbed and then did it again.  Bison  is pretty lean and generally isn't that flavorful, I thought this would dominate, and I'm optimistic it will absorb the rich stock nicely and pay off tonightThen I addeddiced tomatoesa can of Rotelcouple diced chipotle peppers w adobo sauceI have a Penzey's chili powder and cumin and I add a little rubbed palmful of each.simmer for as long as you'd like.Edit for Verdict: I certainly will not make turkey chili or buffalo chili again without working in the beef stock as described above.  Very good method and use of beef stock (which I encourage everybody to make their own stock, high yield product).





You guys are gonna think I'm going nuts, but I made a meatless chili flavored soup the other night, and it had black beans in it.I'll post what I did a little later. I'm just waking up still. Need coffee.





I received a Immersion Circulator (Sous Vide cooking) as a gift recently.  I'm looking forward to giving this thing a spin this week.  Anybody play around with one of these before?





I have not. Been thinking about it - let me know what you think.





  The Sous Vide results for the Duck Breast tonight.   I have the Anova immersion circulator, which looks like a bigger version of a hand held stick mixer for dressings, etc.  This thing is really easy to use. Fill your pot (I used a pasta pot) with water, attach the clip to the pot, slide in the Anova, tighten it, set your temp (I set it at 134 degrees) and hit play.  The circulator circulates the water, prep your meat, season it, insert it in a ziplock bag, or vacuum seal it (I don't have one, so I used ziplock and used good old fashioned water displacement to get the air out and then sealed the bag.  Once the thing hits the temp you set, place the bag(s) in the water pot and walk away.  Remember cooking meat is all about the temp. not time, this is easy to understand when you use sous vide methods.  I basically left this in the water bath of 134 for 2 hours and 10 minutes, plenty of time to play with kids, get them ready for bed and book time   I tried this out with duck breast for a few reasons.  Duck is probably my favorite food, it has a great skin, which renders so nicely, the fat is the best and it would be an easy way to test my doubts I had with this thing.   Plus my wife was out and she doesn't eat duck.  I heated an iron skillet to med high heat, After removing the bags from the water, and the ziplock, pat the duck dry, hatch marks on the fat with a knife, it is warm at 134 not hot, slightly oiled pan, drop the duck in skin side down.  (ordinarily this would be an 8 minute sear for  me, then 1 min on the meat side, flip back to fat side and 7 minutes in the 375 degree oven for medium rare.)  This was two minutes on skin side, one minute on the meat side for color, and then its done, rest the meat.  There's no questioning, this device removes all doubt in terms of cooking your meat to the desired doneness.  There was no need to poke, prod, or use probe meat thermometers.  If I do it again w duck, I'd drop my temp to 130 on the water, I like it a teeny bit more pink/red.  The skin, and this was my doubt with using this.  The fat renders a little bit in the water bath, but surprisingly it crisps and renders very quickly post bath in just two minutes.  That skin in the picture looks as good as it tasted.   The meat was just as tender and juicy as done via conventional methods.verdict:  not really necessary if you're cooking for yourself, as it is a time commitment, but it removes any error, and if you're prepping four different dishes for a dinner party or something, than this is a no brainer to use.  Weeknight dinners, I don't get home before 6 so I didn't eat until 9, which is ok, but not going to work for my wife or kids.  I know people use this thing for burgers, I think I'll be using it for chicken and fish (which can be done in less time).





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847badgerfan wrote: You guys are gonna think I'm going nuts, but I made a meatless chili flavored soup the other night, and it had black beans in it.I'll post what I did a little later. I'm just waking up still. Need coffee.you are nutz





The next innovative ballpark food is set to hit Miller Park this season, as Milwaukee Brewers fans will have a chance to take a bite of the Inside The Park Nachos.They feature a stick of beef, loaded with refried beans, rolled in Doritos, and then deep fried and drizzled with sour cream and cheese.The Inside The Park nachos feature a stick of beef, loaded with refried beans, rolled in Doritos, and then deep fried and drizzled with sour cream and cheese."We've sold nachos before, but some people don't want to get messy," said Jamie Hodgson, general manager of Miller Park hospitality for concessionaire Delaware North. "I think this is going to be a big seller because you can eat this in one hand and have a beer in the other."Two other items will get the attention of Brewers fans. One is the Down Wisconsin Avenue Brat. It's an 18-inch brat covered with gravy, French fries, cheese curds, cheese sauce, fried sauerkraut and jalapeños, then topped with sour cream and chives. The behemoth will cost $20."The smart fan knows that you pay for something like this by just splitting it, but we know there are going to be people that save it all for themselves," Hodgson said.The third star of the Miller Park menu this season is the Miller Park Bratchos, a take on the meat-based nachos that were popularized recently by the Green Bay Packers.This version has four sausages -- chorizo, Italian, Polish and bratwurst -- cut up and served on top of kettle chips, sour cream, fried jalapeños and sauerkraut.The Brewers will be competing for the item that gets the most buzz at major league ballparks this year. The leader in the clubhouse is the Arizona Diamondbacks, who are serving a Churro Dog, which is a churro inside a doughnut bun topped by a frozen yogurt sundae.





I doubt I'll get these, but if you do find yourself in Appleton (Rookie A ball) you would be wise to get the bacon cheeseburger with two funnel cakes serving as the bun, that's good eats.Though the Bratchos, or some variation of that item has long been a great food served at tailgate parties.





I finally broke down and bought a Vitamix.  Blending is fun.  I haven't tried to blend an Ipad, but I did just order a new phone and wonder what would happen if I dropped my old phone in there...





I'm liking this Anova device.  I used it for some chicken tonight, and finished them with a sear on the grill and brush of various sauces for my discriminating children.





Badge,  I officially like this immersion circulator a lot.  I've had great results for chicken, beef, duck and fish.   Its best attribute is allowing you to do other things, while you prepare dinner,  loosely ahead of its primary purpose, to prep your meat to the exact temp for final searing, broiling, grilling, whatever.





Sounds good enough for me. I'm getting one.Getting a Vitamix too. I keep hearing great things from everyone. My Kitchenaid sucks.





847badgerfan wrote: Sounds good enough for me. I'm getting one.Getting a Vitamix too. I keep hearing great things from everyone. My Kitchenaid sucks.I'm about to start making some chili sauce - I can never get it to the right consistency before, but I'm quite confident the Vitamix will turn it smooth as silk





Let us know how it goes, and share the recipe too please.





So my wife and I (along with a few others) recently bought a cattle (well, we are buying a claim to the carcass).  We're now all figuring out what to buy, and what to have them do with the cuts.  The slaughter was yesterday.My #1 draft pick is a bone-in 'Standing' Ribeye Roast.  Yeah, prime rib, but nothing makes better beef stock than those rib bones.I've got skirt steak, a brisket (side), short ribs, a flat iron, boneless rump roast for carved or Italian roast beef, chuck for chili/stews and I'm sure my wife will  want some ground.  We've pre divided any filets and ribeyes.  I'm not into beef back ribs, or strips and sirloin.What am I missing? …besides the stent?





You should end up with some burger. You will be very happy with it,  but you are taking a critical component with the flat iron cuts.





That's a good point.  I really like using flat iron (as a cut) but as noted, the tradeoff is what I can't do with the flat iron, unless I grind it myself, which defeats the purpose of having the meat locker do it for me (for a price of course).





I used to get cows all the time, when I had the two boys under the roof. You couldn't have enough food in the house...I got some of the roasts and the steaks (filet, T-bone, flank, skirt, ribeye) and left everything else (including tongue, brain, etc) to grind. That was some of the best burger meat I've ever had. I always figured I could go get a brisket from the local butcher if needed, which is what I always did and still do.Out of the total weight, around half of it went to the grind. I also used to get the liver for my Dad when he was still here.Now that we are free of eating machines in the house, I just use the butcher. For my burgers now, I use 1/3 brisket, 1/3 ribeyes and 1/3 skirt. I grind it myself. Ends up around 20 pounds at 85/15, depending on the size of the brisket I get (I shoot for 7 pounds).I like the ribeye component better than the chuck component. Deeper flavor, I believe.





I'd suggest beef short ribs off the plate, but to get really meaty ones, you'd have to sacrifice some of your ribeye steak, and not many people want to do that.Personally, I like meaty beef ribs more than I like ribeye steak, so that's an easy decision for me. 





I've also used short ribs in my grind, in place of the ribeye. Thanks for the reminder!





You better believe it.  I use cubed beef short rib in chili all the time as well.





Me too. Gives that deep flavor we all love, rather than sirloin or something.Another dish that I love short rib for is Beef Bourguignon. Give that a whirl sometime, with Julia Childs' recipe from Volume One (available on line in many places).





I've done it, works great!    I've also approximated osso bucco with it.  Basically, any dish that requires long braising, is well suited for beef short rib.





Oh, I posted this in the B12 BBQ/chili thread, but will do so here as well.  Anyone interested in knowing more about slow-smoked BBQ, should watch the show "BBQ with Franklin" on PBS, featuring Austin pitmaster Aaron Franklin.  Really interesting stuff.http://www.pbs.org/food/shows/bbq-with-franklin/






Drew4UTk

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It is exciting to buy mass quantities of an animal, I've traditionally have done so with pigs for awhile because I'm in the middle of Indiana, and why wouldn't you buy 1/2 a hog if you live in Indiana or Iowa for that matter, but haven't done so with cattle in a number of years.   It didn't make sense when I was single.





Some good stuff on here now fellas. Now it's time to start adding more.I've got a lot to put here from the past year or so, and need to find time to take my scribbles and put them into Word docs. Maybe next week. Supposedly I'm on vacation. We'll see how that goes.





utee94 wrote: Personally, I like meaty beef ribs more than I like ribeye steak, so that's an easy decision for me. geez, we have something else in common





Made very good, very simple breaded boneless pork chops the other day.Dipped them in spicy brown mustard, rolled them in a mixture of 3 parts bread crumbs, 1 part finely grated parmesean cheese.Didn't need to do a thing to them when they came off.





 EastLansingAdam wrote: Made very good, very simple breaded boneless pork chops the other day.Dipped them in spicy brown mustard, rolled them in a mixture of 3 parts bread crumbs, 1 part finely grated parmesean cheese.Didn't need to do a thing to them when they came off. Off of what?





Sorry.  Slapped them on the grill.  I had doubts, I don't recall grilling breaded meat before, but it worked well.





That's what I was wondering.I've never done that.





Cooked it lower and longer so, I'm not sure how much work the direct flame did.  Kept it in the 350ish range.





 EastLansingAdam wrote: Cooked it lower and longer so, I'm not sure how much work the direct flame did.  Kept it in the 350ish range. Yes, this is a nice change of pace (grilling breaded meats), I saw my sister in law do this with chicken a few years ago and now copy her technique.    Clean grates a must, but I also keep the temps on the lower side





I thought breading was what deep fat fryers were all aboutI suppose anything can be grilled





Never heard of grilling something that's breaded.  Frying, pan--frying, baking, sure.  But grilling?  Interesting...I wonder if you could BBQ something breaded.  Hmmmmm....





ya gotta have a small corner in the back of the smoker that you could try an experiment this weekend





FearlessF wrote: ya gotta have a small corner in the back of the smoker that you could try an experiment this weekendWell sure.  I'm only doing one brisket, 2 racks of beef ribs, and 3 racks of pork ribs.  Plenty of extra room.I'm just not sure what I'd bread and smoke? Gotta be something that stand up to some heat over time without drying out. Maybe something bacon-wrapped and then breaded?





I hope you tried something and it was a huge success





I never got around to breading anything to smoke, sadly.  Perhaps next time.





I can understand that





But the beef ribs were other-worldly.  Not to pat myself on the back too much, but they might have been the most delicious BBQ I've ever tasted.  And they were super-easy to make.





that's the wonderful thing about BBQ, it's easy enough that folks from Kansas City, Memphis, and South Carolina can make superb BBQya don't hafta be a rich, arrogant Texan to BBQ meat 





No, you certainly don't. But I can guarantee you that having access to the right equipment makes it a lot easier, and having access to the right heritage makes it better.  When you're growing up on great BBQ, you're going to make better BBQ.  Them's the facts o' life.





I picked up the beef last week at the Meat Locker near the farm.  It is pretty awesome to be load up the back of a car with hundreds of pounds of beef.  Based on the rough math, we (the four of us who bought an equal 1/4 of our half of the cattle, another group bought the other half of cattle) we each took home about 65 lbs of meat ( I got most of the rib bones).  Total cost is about $5.38 per lb, We had plenty of grind (packed at 1.05lbs) , rib eyes , strips, some filet, a few bottom rumps, stew meat,  6 packs of short ribs (between 2-4lbs each), a little bit of flank, and I got my full brisket which will be smoked by my English friend in the neighborhood, who knows what he's doing with his smoker.  From what I understand, the other group had somebody that wanted some of the tongue, and other parts.





Corngrats on the beef





Oh man, you definitely should have gotten some of the tongue, and cheek meat.  Makes scrumptious tacos!





I am a big fan of the cheek, which is almost always the best bite of food from any fish or animal IMO.I passed on the cheek in order to secure the rib bones.  We basically had a draft for the one off cuts.  In truth, the other lady really wanted to the cheeks





I can't keep track of what I've posted here.  Anyways, made a dish I liked last night.  The Mexican grocery store had short ribs marked down to 3 bucks a pound, so I bought two pounds of those and braised them with onion, garlic, jalapenos, chili powder, cumin, a couple guajillo chiles, fish sauce, vinegar, and water.  I fried plantains, then smashed and fried them again.  I topped the plantains with the beef, some cheese, cilantro, tomatoes, sweet onion, and avocado.  Add some lime juice or hot sauce and that was a really good meal.





I don't think you've made something like that and posted it here.Looks real good. Did you sear the ribs before the braise?





Very similar concept to Puerco Pibil, which I still need to post here.I stopped using shoulder to make that and now use country ribs - the short rib of the pig.





847badgerfan wrote: I don't think you've made something like that and posted it here.Looks real good. Did you sear the ribs before the braise?A few of them.  I would do them all but the perils of cooking while chasing three kids has made corner cutting an acceptable method.





Also, use a ripe plantain.  I've been trying to hit the four flavors - sour, salty, spicy, and sweet, and this dish really highlights that.





I've been trying that too, but for you it also looks like you may have hit the 5th flavor with the fish sauce.





847badgerfan wrote: I've been trying that too, but for you it also looks like you may have hit the 5th flavor with the fish sauce.Yeah, a little bit.  There were some bones in the short ribs so that helped too.  You ever cook with MSG?  I'm thinking of trying it.






Drew4UTk

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I have not. I don't think the wife would like that. When we order Chinese food, we always have them make it without.





Just ordered some ground buffalo meat for the first time.  Should I treat it the same as ground beef?  Any suggestions?





EastLansingAdam wrote: Just ordered some ground buffalo meat for the first time.  Should I treat it the same as ground beef?  Any suggestions?I haven't cook much of it, but from what I read it has very little fat so be careful overcooking it.





Agree, don't want to past medium IMO.    Most bison is 90-95%, and bison has no marbling, which ordinarily works to slow the cooking of meat.  Without marbling bison will cook faster than beef.Whatever you're doing with it, burgers, chili, tacos, etc., you should find a way  to some moisture into the meat.  If you take it to far, you're going to have ground turkey, in terms of being fairly dry.  Depending on the flavor of the dish, I'm talking using anything from onion (red, white or green), beef stock, celery minced finely.   I actually use sour cream with ground turkey, though never used it on beef or bison.If you do make burgers, make them thicker than you otherwise would.  I love caramelized onions on a bison burger.





yes, similar to ground venison, very lean and healthyvery good in moist recipes such as chili and sloppy Joe





I'm cooking a brisket on our first college football Saturday.  What's everyone favorite brisket rub?





How are you cooking it?  What type of brisket (whole packer or something else?), what type of cooker (offset smoker, kamado-style, Weber smoky mountain vertical, etc?)? What's your target cooking temp and for how long?Brisket is serious bidness around here. 





I may smoke a pork shoulder for a Husker-BYU party at my placeIf I'm not busy playing golf that morning  any tips?





FearlessF wrote: I may smoke a pork shoulder for a Husker-BYU party at my placeIf I'm not busy playing golf that morning  any tips?225 until it's falling apart.  Really tough to go wrong with pork butt.





I was planning on 225no wonder its what my brother smokes the most 





Wagyu Top Round - Ranch Raised. Grain fed to Prime ++Double grocery bagged 2 parts salt 1 part pepper - put it in the bag and turn a few times - allow to restPut in a few pop ups for Medium in the Top roundGrill -- charcoal all around sides (so you never have to turn the meat)Water pan below in Grill (so the meat never dries out)Light the charcoal with a torch - no need for lighter fluid (ad charcoal as needed)Close the lid maintain lower heat and open a Shiner BockTell Aggie Jokes and bash sooners -- ya know normal conversation. PS: Aggies and sooners (be sure to put the top round on the grill before you open your first beer)





Really no need to even sauce it despite what all the Carolina folk do.  Put a pan down under it to catch the drippings, then pour those over the meat after you pull it and are ready to serve.





utee94 wrote: How are you cooking it?  What type of brisket (whole packer or something else?), what type of cooker (offset smoker, kamado-style, Weber smoky mountain vertical, etc?)? What's your target cooking temp and for how long?Brisket is serious bidness around here. I'm not doing at my house, and my buddy just has a gas grill.  Going to smoke it on the gas grill for a couple hours, then finish it wrapped in foil in the oven.  I may get a whole brisket and cut it - depends on what Costco has available next week.  I've only seen flats there though I'd prefer a point.  The grill temp will probably be about 275 and finished at 300 in the oven.  Not sure what temp on the brisket.  I'm leaning to 203 but with it wrapped in foil it may be hard to check.





You can probe through the foil if you like.Get a full packer if you can find one, and if you can fit one on your grill.  Ask the butcher about full untrimmed packers if you don't see them out in the bins.Obviously make the heat as indirect as possible.  I assume you're going to use wood chips in a pan or something like that to produce smoke?Temp on the brisket doesn't really matter all that much, I've seen them done at 195, or 205, always depends on the individual slab o'meat.  I typically don't "crutch" my briskets (crutching = wrapping in foil) and just use a finger to probe the fat cap.  If your finger slides in like warm butter, it's done, no matter what the temp or how much time it's taken.Anyway, to answer your original question, I use a very simple rub-- 1 part salt, 1 part black pepper, 1 part paprika.  Apply liberally all over.  The paprika doesn't really add any flavor but acts as a carrier for the salt and pepper, to help form a nice bark.





I don't have probes (I know, I need to get them.  I bought a set which stopped working almost immediately).  I do use a Thermapen, but am wary of putting holes in the foil repeatedly.  Plan to use a packet of chips wrapped in foil for the smoke.  I've never smoked on a gas grill but understand it isn't too difficult.  As far as the rub - any thoughts on sugar in it?  I've seen rubs with and without, not sure if it has any difference that matters too much but I love it in my pork rubs.





I wouldn't do sugar on a beef rub. It works for some pork cuts, but not all.I use a standard rub of smoked salt, pepper, chili powder, cayenne pepper, smoked paprika, ground dried thyme, onion powder and garlic powder. All are the same 1 part except the salt, which is 2 parts.For some pork cuts I will add 1 part of brown sugar to that mix.Sometimes with beef, like a brisket, I just go with straight salt and pepper - 2:1.





Sugar can burn once you hit temperatures of 300 or more.  If you're staying down at 225 it should be okay, but it sounds like you want to go higher.Also, agree with badgerfan, I don't use sugar for beef rubs in general, and especially not for brisket.  As always though, you should do what you like, there's no single  "right way" to do it despite what most arrogant Texicans will tell you. 





Oh, and I'll often mix in about 1/4 part ground chipotle or 1/2 part ground ancho, but you have to know your audience.  Like cayenne, this will spice up the meat considerably.  Not everyone wants a lot of heat in their meat, so to speak.





A lot of this also depends on whether or not you are intending to use sauce, and also on what kind of sauce.A thicker sweet sauce is good with a spicier rub. To the contrary, a spicy vinegar sauce is good with a little sugar in the rub.It's all about balance.





Sauce?  On brisket?????





 utee94 wrote: Sauce?  On brisket????? I was talking in general terms, for pairing sauces and rubs.I don't sauce my brisket, but I make it available for people who do. In the case of brisket, I never offer up a sweet sauce. It has enough fat to tame the heat all by itself.I've seen many people use sauce on brisket, including that time we all met up at Ruby's (you were not there).Their sauce, which I happen to really like, can work on brisket. I tried it there for the sake of it.I have some in my cabinet too. I order it online.





Yes, there are weird people  even in Central Texas, that put sauce on their brisket. Cryin' shame I tells ya. And I'm sort of kidding.  I've actually posted the BBQ sauce recipe from my dad's BBQ restaurant, on this very thread. But I rarely put sauce on brisket.  If I have about 6 slices of brisket in front of me, I'll most likely eat the first 5 straight.  Then I'll take the last one, toss it on a piece of white bread, throw on some sliced onion and jalapenos, and then a squirt of sauce.  Fold that sucker over, and that's a nice way to finish the meal.





Heh. I go the opposite in 'Q joints.Get the fluff out of the way, and then it's straight meat.





I like beer with my brisket





Amen, brutha.





I wasn't going to use any sauce besides the drippings.





Oh you should definitely make some sauce.  What else will people dip their white bread into whilst enjoying the brisket?  You must also serve sliced white or yellow onion, jalapenos, and pickles.  Pinto beans, potato salad, and cole slaw on the side.And nanner pudding for dessert.I'm pretty sure there's no other way to serve brisket.





Shiner's Octoberfest is on the shelfis it worth the $8/sixer?





There are many better Oktoberfests out there IMO.  Also, for me, it's WAY too early to be drinking Fest.  It's still 100 degrees outside for goodness' sake!





cooling off nicely herebeen in the 40's overnightwaiting for the El Nino winter






 

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