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Topic: Tailgate and other Recipes.... rescued from damnation- a project for all of us.

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utee94

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We're doing the coca-cola braised short ribs in the instant pot for the eldest who is about to become a teenager for his birthday.

My good butcher is the place to go for whole slabs of short ribs... But sometimes $70+ for 6 lbs of meat requires a special occasion... Particularly when I can buy brisket for $3.29/lb at Costco.
Absolutely.  Very few pitmasters bother to cook beef ribs, they take up too much real estate on the cooker, and people balk at paying the price required for a pitmaster to even break even on them.  

I love braised short ribs too, they work well in more than just BBQ. :)

MarqHusker

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225 is fool-proof which is why I use it.  Going hotter works fine but requires a little more interaction from me, on most of the offsets I've ever used.

3-2-1  method for pork spare ribs:

3 hours on the smoke at 225

2 hours wrapped in heavy duty aluminum foil at 225.  You can keep it on the smoker, but since now it's just a heat source, you can also just move it to the oven for this step.  They should be fall-off-the-bone at this point, which is actually a little loose for my taste (and for most BBQ competitions if you're into that stuff)

1 hour with the wrapping open, to firm them back up.  However, the 1 hour is actually a little too long for me, you'll have to experiment on this step.  For my it's typically closer to 30 minutes for this step.

So my 3-2-1 is really 3-2-0.5 but that doesn't sound as good :)


Yes, this is my definition too, even down to the not exactly 1.

FearlessF

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We're doing the coca-cola braised short ribs in the instant pot for the eldest who is about to become a teenager for his birthday.

My good butcher is the place to go for whole slabs of short ribs... But sometimes $70+ for 6 lbs of meat requires a special occasion... Particularly when I can buy brisket for $3.29/lb at Costco.
$3.29???
you must be in Cali?
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

MaximumSam

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I always wrap brisket.  Not sure the science behind it other than it helps it go through the stall - but when I've done it unwrapped my results have been mixed.  Wrapped it always comes out amazing, so wrapped it gets.  I don't bother wrapping ribs - they are cheap enough and my family likes them enough I make them a lot.  My all scientific plan on ribs is to light 2/3 of a chimney along with a few unlit briquettes on one side and ribs on the other.  I move them around a bit during their cooking.  If they ain't done once the briquettes are I move them to the oven on a temp dictated by how much complaining from the family on how hungry they are.  They still come out really good.  Rub is typically 4 parts paprika/3 parts brown sugar/2 parts salt, chili powder, cumin, black pepper, sometimes oregano and cayenne.  Cook's Illustrated gave me that one and my wife likes it so that's what I use.

utee94

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I never wrap brisket, bark comes out better without the crutch and leaving it alone makes the whole process easier.  Just leave the door closed and let smoke and time do its thing.  I will put a little foil over the end of the flat after a few hours, to help keep it from drying out.

Never wrap beef ribs either, no need to crutch them.  Smoke and time once again.

Pork spare ribs on the other hand, like the wrap to get more tender.  They don't have as much fat and connective tissue as brisket or beef rib, so they can use the help.


MaximumSam

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Heh feel the opposite. Oh well that's bbq. A million methods to arrive at more or less the same point.

utee94

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It also depends on your cooker.  On an offset, I'm able to get the meat very far from the direct heat.  On a kettle, that's not possible.  I could see wrapping a brisket just to protect it from the more direct heat you get on a kettle, but that's not necessary on an offset. 

But the same is true for pork spares.  Give the 3-2-1 a try, it's pretty much the perfect method for pork spares.


MaximumSam

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I may. Do you ever read Meathead Goldwyn and amazingribs.com? He doesn't like it so I haven't given it a go. Also because I'm a firm believer in laziness.

utee94

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Wrapping a rack of spare ribs is way easier than wrapping a brisket, I promise. :)

Haven't read him, I stick pretty much to my CenTex BBQ gurus.  CenTex style is what I like best, so it's how I prepare food.

MaximumSam

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I recommend it - whether you are into the recipes or not, it has lots of good scientific info on bbq and why things come out the way they do (or not). Also good equipment reviews.

utee94

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That website looks like a mess.  :)  But I might look into it when I get a chance.


bwarbiany

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I like Meathead, but he's not an unquestionable authority. Especially in cooking where certain textural aspects that one person prefers might not be the same as others.

As with anything, it's something worth giving a try. If you like it, great. If you don't, great. I personally find wrapping the ribs gets the bark texture and doneness level where my family likes it more reliably than not doing so. So I typically do it, although I've had lazy days now and again where I skip it. 

I actually have mostly cooked brisket without foil or butcher paper, but I think I'm going to do the butcher paper thing next time. I find it hard to get it exactly the way I like it, and although some complain that foiling brisket can give it a sort of "pot roast" texture, I think it can help keep the moisture level where I like it. 


MaximumSam

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Heh I wouldn't call anyone an unquestioned authority. But overall I tend to like the food and science writing that has become more popular lately. I like having some clue as to why my food turns out the way it does. So I'm more into techniques and testing than straight up recipe books.

I've had brisket that had a very definite pot roast taste and consistency, though mine turns hasn't turned out that way. Also wrapping it gets it done faster, which is good if you have annoying family members clamoring about when will it be ready.

utee94

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I actually have mostly cooked brisket without foil or butcher paper, but I think I'm going to do the butcher paper thing next time. I find it hard to get it exactly the way I like it, and although some complain that foiling brisket can give it a sort of "pot roast" texture, I think it can help keep the moisture level where I like it.



Lots of folks crutch a brisket.  Comp cooks do it all the time, as well as cooking hotter and faster, as you've pointed out.  Some restaurants around here do it too, maybe 50/50, so down here in Texico it's certainly considered an "acceptable" and even a "common" practice.

I don't do it for a couple of reasons, mostly that I prefer the bark and texture of an unwrapped brisket, and it's an extra step that I deem unnecessary.

But the butcher paper is a good compromise, that's how Aaron Franklin does his brisket.  Of course, I actually prefer my own brisket, to his, so there you have it. :)


 

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