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Topic: OT: Online Civility

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FearlessF

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #42 on: November 07, 2018, 03:34:01 PM »
@Hoss , your very first post on this site carried a weight that should have told readers you were no damn troll- it was insightful and on point.... we need a load more like you, but we don't need a single one as you describe elsewhere.
I'm a bit disappointed that the good old posters such as Old Scribe, B.G., Vine Street Bomber, and the poster formerly known as "Chuck Green" don't have the time or energy to join us here.  But, I understand folks priorities change over time.
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

Cincydawg

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #43 on: November 07, 2018, 03:35:07 PM »
Literally literally means figuratively now.  Penultimate is also misused.

Like, really really like kewl.

FearlessF

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #44 on: November 07, 2018, 03:35:31 PM »
 Teenage girls. Seriously. It's a highly durable and consistent international pattern.

they are highly verbal
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

Cincydawg

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #45 on: November 07, 2018, 03:38:11 PM »
Also: Something I didn't know until I met the linguistic scientist wife: The #1 driver of language change in EVERY modern language? Teenage girls. Seriously. It's a highly durable and consistent international pattern.
Those little ladies, past and present, influence all of our language use in ways that the vast majority of us never notice.
I like this conversation. My wife would like it more. It also applies to changing definitions that grate many people. Merriam-Webster recently gave "Literally" an auxilliary definition of "Figuratively." That one kills people.
But language is just a mutually understood series of symbols whose meaning is primarily born of their frequency of use. So "Literally" being used sufficiently often as "Figuratively" requires that Literally will ultimately mean Figuratively. It's not any more or less stupid than any other aspect of language change. It's all an emotionless and predictable evolutionary process.
Forget what Holy Roman Emperor said "I speak Latin to God,Italian to men,French to women an German to my horse"
My step grand kids lived in Munich for a while with a French mother and American father.  When they get mad at each other, they speak German, and when I need to get on them about something, I speak German.  SCHNELL!!!!

MrNubbz

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #46 on: November 07, 2018, 03:39:33 PM »
Those little ladies, past and present, influence all of our language use in ways that the vast majority of us never notice.
I dunno I've heard language at Cleveland-Pittsburgh games or at the Race Track I've never heard females use
Suburbia:Where they tear out the trees & then name streets after them.

Anonymous Coward

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #47 on: November 07, 2018, 03:41:22 PM »
Another dialectic peculiarity I noticed in Pennsylvania:
  • The lawn doesn't need to be mowed.
  • The coach doesn't need to be fired.
  • The food doesn't need to be eaten.
Instead the infinitive is elided:
  • It needs mowed.
  • He needs fired.
  • It needs eaten.
Elision is a common feature of language change. We tend to (unknowingly and in aggregate) chase the most succinct way to say something without sacrificing meaning.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2018, 03:44:28 PM by Anonymous Coward »

MrNubbz

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #48 on: November 07, 2018, 03:42:37 PM »
I'm a bit disappointed that the good old posters such as Old Scribe, B.G., Vine Street Bomber, and the poster formerly known as "Chuck Green" don't have the time or energy to join us here.  But, I understand folks priorities change over time.
You must be harkening back to the SI/CNN daze,because I don't recall any of those posters on CFN
Suburbia:Where they tear out the trees & then name streets after them.

FearlessF

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #49 on: November 07, 2018, 03:43:49 PM »
yup, the good ol daze

I can harken
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

Kris60

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #50 on: November 07, 2018, 04:24:23 PM »
CD, there’s something particular to Cincinnati that maybe you can comment on.  I have family in Cincinnati and they do something I’ve never seen anyone else do.  If they don’t quite catch something you said they don’t say, “Excuse me” or “I beg your pardon.”  They cup their hand to their ear and say, “please.”

I always noticed it but thought it was just something they did.  But a few years ago I caught a comedian on TV or somewhere and he had a joke about people in Cincinnati doing that very thing.  I laughed because I immediately thought of my family doing that.  Hell, I even wondered if it was my family he encountered and was joking about.

Did you ever see people do that while living there?

betarhoalphadelta

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #51 on: November 07, 2018, 06:03:13 PM »
the political board south of this one is a curiosity.  there are few posters from one side of the aisle and many from the other.  those guys, however, have been together for 20+ years, and they know how to take each other.
That may be true, and they may like each other and enjoy whatever it is they do down there, but they're not at all interested in debate. 

betarhoalphadelta

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #52 on: November 07, 2018, 06:08:30 PM »
I like this conversation. My wife would like it more. It also applies to changing definitions that grate many people. Merriam-Webster recently gave "Literally" an auxilliary definition of "Figuratively." That one kills people.
But language is just a mutually understood series of symbols whose meaning is primarily born of their frequency of use. So "Literally" being used sufficiently often as "Figuratively" requires that Literally will ultimately mean Figuratively. It's not any more or less stupid than any other aspect of language change. It's all an emotionless and predictable evolutionary process.
I was just listening to morning radio the other day when they brought up "irregardless" claiming it's not a word [which it's not]. But apparently Merriam-Webster has waved the white flag on this one... 
The one that gets me is "begging the question". It clearly does not mean what most people using it thinks it means, but the wrong usage has gotten so common that it's only language pedants that recognize that it's wrong. 

MrNubbz

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #53 on: November 07, 2018, 06:14:09 PM »
Well it begs the question what does it really mean then?
Suburbia:Where they tear out the trees & then name streets after them.

rolltidefan

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #54 on: November 07, 2018, 06:16:49 PM »
I suspect they change faster than that.  None of us could understand Olde English.

I have "heard" that the British spoke with an "American accent" in 1800, it was they who changed more than we, and that Quebequois is more similar to 1800s French than Parisian French.

German of course has changed massively since 1870.
which american accent? there's quite a few to choose from.
fwiw, i've heard this as well.

OrangeAfroMan

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Re: OT: Online Civility
« Reply #55 on: November 07, 2018, 06:46:58 PM »
Language is sort of democratic that way...the mass’ usage dictates what’s ‘correct’ over time.

One that stands out to me is ‘myriad’...people tend to say ‘a myriad’, but that’s wrong.  ‘There are myriad possibilities...’ is correct, but since so many people use it the ‘wrong’ way, it’s only a matter of time until it’s correct.
“The Swamp is where Gators live.  We feel comfortable there, but we hope our opponents feel tentative. A swamp is hot and sticky and can be dangerous." - Steve Spurrier

 

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