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Topic: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...

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betarhoalphadelta

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #238 on: March 18, 2021, 03:06:12 PM »
Sure, it's a wild-eyed, silly idea.  But I'm using this space to think aloud and just found it funny that while our places of business are 3-dimensional, our access to them are only 2-dimensional.  That seems somewhat short-sighted, no?
But in major cities, it's not 2-dimensional.

Badge already pointed out that there are a lot of multi-level roads in Chicago. Lower Wacker Drive, for example, acts almost as an "express" to get through the city from I-290 to Lake Shore Drive, whereas if you're on Upper Wacker you're dealing with lots of pedestrians, traffic lights, cross streets, etc. 

Much of public transit in these cities in underground subways, and in some cases you can get directly into businesses without going back up to ground level. 

Major cities are already 3-dimensional in ways that you're completely discounting because they don't fit your picture of what 3-dimensional means.

I'd venture to say that the failure here is one of imagination. City planners across the entire world have been trying for a hundred years to try to optimize designs in order to improve the way cities flow. The Chinese, as one example, can simply dictate how a city should be constructed and if you look at the recent and massive growth of cities like Shanghai, you know that in many of these cases they can design almost a "blank slate" and construct it without worrying about impact on legacy systems. 

Yet... Nobody, across the world--being the experts in their fields with the most incentive to get it right and make their cities more functional--is implementing your idea. 

I guess they're just short-sighted, unlike you...

847badgerfan

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #239 on: March 18, 2021, 03:06:52 PM »
Don't people have access from ground-level roads and sidewalks into buildings now?  It would be the same, just 1 story up. 
1. Yes, of course they do. Anyone can walk into the first floor of most (non-government - those are locked, mostly, even though they are publicly funded) buildings. However, to gain access to an elevator you must either have a pass, or a client/resident who notifies security that you are coming.

They then ask you for your ID (what a concept!!) and decide whether or not you can enter.

2. No, it would not be the same, just 1 story up. Those spaces are private residences or offices.
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Cincydawg

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #240 on: March 18, 2021, 03:10:41 PM »
Underground Atlanta is a version, has not been a success as entertainment district.

847badgerfan

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #241 on: March 18, 2021, 03:13:56 PM »
Badge already pointed out that there are a lot of multi-level roads in Chicago. Lower Wacker Drive, for example, acts almost as an "express" to get through the city from I-290 to Lake Shore Drive, whereas if you're on Upper Wacker you're dealing with lots of pedestrians, traffic lights, cross streets, etc.
Chicago also has the pedway, to keep pedestrians off the surface streets and out of the elements.


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Cincydawg

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #242 on: March 18, 2021, 03:27:39 PM »
We could do more of it.

https://urbanize.city/atlanta/post/atlanta-connector-park-midtown-higway-cap-georgia

Park on top of freeway concept.

The freeway really divides midtown.  

847badgerfan

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #243 on: March 18, 2021, 03:33:19 PM »
I like the idea, in concept. Entrances and exits could be complicated.

This has been floated in Chicago too, and has also been implemented a little bit.

McCormick Place is built over tracks, but those were there prior to the buildings. There has been talk of covering the area in yellow with a park, to increase lakeshore access.

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OrangeAfroMan

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #244 on: March 18, 2021, 03:38:39 PM »
But in major cities, it's not 2-dimensional.

Badge already pointed out that there are a lot of multi-level roads in Chicago. Lower Wacker Drive, for example, acts almost as an "express" to get through the city from I-290 to Lake Shore Drive, whereas if you're on Upper Wacker you're dealing with lots of pedestrians, traffic lights, cross streets, etc.

Much of public transit in these cities in underground subways, and in some cases you can get directly into businesses without going back up to ground level.

Major cities are already 3-dimensional in ways that you're completely discounting because they don't fit your picture of what 3-dimensional means.

I'd venture to say that the failure here is one of imagination. City planners across the entire world have been trying for a hundred years to try to optimize designs in order to improve the way cities flow. The Chinese, as one example, can simply dictate how a city should be constructed and if you look at the recent and massive growth of cities like Shanghai, you know that in many of these cases they can design almost a "blank slate" and construct it without worrying about impact on legacy systems.

Yet... Nobody, across the world--being the experts in their fields with the most incentive to get it right and make their cities more functional--is implementing your idea.

I guess they're just short-sighted, unlike you...
Right, my idea is different than what's already out there.  And my idea may be awful, idk.  I'm just sharing.  
Modern big cities' 3-dimensional transportation systems aren't anything the ancient Romans couldn't have built.  It's limited, and probably for great, sound reasons.  
Hell, even highway interchange stacks only go up to 5-6 at the most, right?  And I'm envisioning several square miles of downtown city streets being stacked that high up.  That's all.  
It's weird that I'm willing to share ideas you all laugh at, but also laugh at and seem to bother you.  
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847badgerfan

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #245 on: March 18, 2021, 03:43:50 PM »
I'm all about listening to ideas, but I'm also all about evaluating them from a design, logistics and economic standpoint. This conversation is in my wheelhouse. I've been doing this shit since 1984.
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medinabuckeye1

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #246 on: March 18, 2021, 03:52:20 PM »
I'm going with the golf course

doesn't even need to be a community
Give @FearlessF a tent on a golf course, near the 19th hole and he'll be happy forever. 

MaximumSam

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #247 on: March 18, 2021, 03:56:23 PM »
Just throw transportation down the well


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OrangeAfroMan

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #248 on: March 18, 2021, 03:58:10 PM »
I'm all about listening to ideas, but I'm also all about evaluating them from a design, logistics and economic standpoint. This conversation is in my wheelhouse. I've been doing this shit since 1984.
I just view it as a low-stakes place to toss stuff out there.  

Are EV batteries a certain shape and could they be a different shape?
“The Swamp is where Gators live.  We feel comfortable there, but we hope our opponents feel tentative. A swamp is hot and sticky and can be dangerous." - Steve Spurrier

847badgerfan

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #249 on: March 18, 2021, 04:00:51 PM »
No idea. Ask the electrical engineers here.

I try to be (a) civil (engineer).
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MrNubbz

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #250 on: March 18, 2021, 04:12:01 PM »
are you calling me just another random poster?
No, you're a treasure.  :88:
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MaximumSam

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Re: Major changes in our lives over the next decade ...
« Reply #251 on: March 18, 2021, 04:21:03 PM »
I almost used you as an example of another demographic that likes downtown walkable living. The older, retired childless couple.

There is something to be said for that sort of convenience--I may try it myself when the kids fly the coop. Especially if I'm still working but continue to have a WFH situation and don't have to worry about a commute, but then may consider it when I retire as well.

It'll probably either be that or a golf course community ;-)
I would disagree a bit to the extent that nearly everyone likes walkable living. Never have I looked outside and thought man, I'm so glad I have to drive to get to the grocery store or was happy to see cars parked on the curb. I haven't been to every big city but Columbus is like most I've seen, streets that make way for people to walk around them rather than the other way around. Sometimes I see people riding a bike and think they must have a suicide wish.

 

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