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Topic: Happy Thanksgiving

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Brutus Buckeye

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #56 on: November 26, 2020, 08:19:49 PM »
1919, 20, 21, 28, 29, 31, 34, 35, 36, 37, 42, 44
WWH: 1952, 54, 55, 57, 58, 60, 61, 62, 63, 65, 67, 68, 70, 72, 74, 75
1979, 81, 82, 84, 87, 94, 98
2001, 02, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19

FearlessF

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #57 on: November 26, 2020, 09:40:49 PM »
Utah State is going to be thankful for their first win of the season
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

GopherRock

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #58 on: November 27, 2020, 10:57:38 AM »
Happy Thanksgiving, all.


https://youtu.be/KXhesrnIcCY

Cincydawg

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #59 on: November 28, 2020, 07:04:43 AM »
I learned what "duck confit" actually is.  I'd had it before but never paid any attention to its being anything other than just cooked duck.

"Confit" of course is pronounced "coun-FEEE" apparently, or something akin to that.  It's a means of preservation apparently by cooking and storing the duck in fat.

The confit is prepared in a centuries-old process of preservation that consists of salt curing a piece of meat (generally goose, duck, or pork) and then cooking it in its own fat.[1]
To prepare a confit, the meat is rubbed with salt, garlic, and sometimes herbs such as thyme, then covered and refrigerated for up to 36 hours. Salt-curing the meat acts as a preservative.
Prior to cooking, the spices are rinsed from the meat, which is then patted dry. The meat is placed in a cooking dish deep enough to contain the meat and the rendered fat, and placed in an oven at a low temperature (76 – 135 degrees Celsius/170 – 275 Fahrenheit).[2][3] The meat is slowly poached at least until cooked, or until meltingly tender, generally four to ten hours.
The meat and fat are then removed from the oven and left to cool. When cool, the meat can be transferred to a canning jar or other container and completely submerged in the fat. A sealed jar of duck confit may be kept in the refrigerator for up to six months, or several weeks if kept in a reusable plastic container. To maximize preservation if canning, the fat should top the meat by at least one inch. The cooking fat acts as both a seal and preservative and results in a very rich taste. Skipping the salt curing stage greatly reduces the shelf life of the confit.



Cincydawg

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #60 on: November 28, 2020, 07:30:23 AM »
The wife had arranged with the owner of our local French restaurant to prepare it, so it only needed reheating as he told me, searing it a bit in a skillet and then putting it in a 400°F oven for 5 minutes.  They also provided green beans and ravioli, which were quite tasty.  The wife and our neighbor raved about the confit.  

I was pondering how it is vaguely related to barbecue and salt curing.  The neighbor brought a 2007 St. Emllion of some note and I was more impressed with it than the duck.


MrNubbz

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #61 on: November 28, 2020, 08:26:11 AM »
That's a shame  - you could have had a Lonestar or a Pabst
“Did I hear God call me an idiot? ”― William P. Young

Cincydawg

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #62 on: November 28, 2020, 10:02:12 AM »
The wife likes lighter beers, fortunately I have weaned her of Michelob whatever it is.  She likes Sweetwater 420 which is not bad beer at all IMHO.  She also like Peroni and Sapporo, which I can tolerate.

I had a Bitburger at lunch the other day and she liked it too.

utee94

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #63 on: November 28, 2020, 10:06:05 AM »
I was pondering how it is vaguely related to barbecue and salt curing.  The neighbor brought a 2007 St. Emllion of some note and I was more impressed with it than the duck.

[img width=499.988 height=499.988]https://i.imgur.com/LTOPxOm.png[/img]

Now you're speaking my language.  I'd be willing to down some of the right bank swill, if it were free. ;)


Cincydawg

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #64 on: November 28, 2020, 10:21:02 AM »
Right or Left, I'm usually impressed with either.  If you offered me a red burgundy of equal note, I might choose that instead.  Maybe, depending.

I had opened a Gigondas for the duck not knowing he was bringing the Bordeaux.  I think mine paired better, though it was a much cheaper wine.  I think I paid about $22 for it at Costco.

Another wine I've had good luck with is Lirac, but there are not well known in the US and hard to find, usually.

utee94

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #65 on: November 28, 2020, 11:01:50 AM »
I prefer Left Bank but it's all plenty tasty.

And in my opinion Bordeaux is complex enough that it pairs best with simpler more singular flavors, which is why it's great with steak, but not so good with a pepperoni pizza.

Cincydawg

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #66 on: November 28, 2020, 11:11:03 AM »
I was advised once to try an austere white wine with steak, and I was amazed how well that pairs.  I often have a white with steak, something like a Sancerre.


utee94

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #67 on: November 28, 2020, 11:13:39 AM »
Oh man, I wouldn't want anything other than a big, complex red with my steak.  It's the most perfect pairing in the world.  Just my opinion, of course.

huskerdinie

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #68 on: November 28, 2020, 12:09:40 PM »
Salmon loaf? I like salmon well enough but a salmon loaf just doesn’t sound appealing.
Trust me, it really was NOT appealing at all.  Points for trying, but....
I know that you believe you understand what you think I said,
but I am not sure you realize what you heard is not what I meant.  Anonymous

betarhoalphadelta

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving
« Reply #69 on: November 28, 2020, 03:00:27 PM »
Anyone got a good ham loaf recipe?

 

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