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Topic: Misfits Thread

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MrNubbz

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7770 on: August 30, 2020, 04:21:17 PM »
A few days ago, a guy approaches me asking for something to eat, or some money, I forget his story.  I say wait here, I'll bring you a sandwich in 15 minutes (it was near home).  I walk home, fix a sandwich, throw in a cold Coke can, and some crackers.  I got back, he's waiting, and he asks me, again, for money.

I don't carry cash around.  I tell him that, he gets a bit smarmy telling me he really needs money.  Sorry, I don't have cash, I walk off.

He's cussing me out as I walk off.

I think he threw the sandwich in the garbage can
Use to have a pan handler at one of the grocery stores - same thing.I'd reach in my bag give him some bananas/apples/lunch meat.Sometimes he'd take it.I know the guy in the meat dept and they had him removed I did see him scratching off lottery tickets during the smoking break.Manager even offered him a job corraling carts,bagging and flattening boxes but evidently he refused
"It's the greastest gig in the world,being alive. You get to go to Denny's, wear a hat, whatever you wanna do." - Norm Macdonald

MrNubbz

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7771 on: August 30, 2020, 04:55:06 PM »
They have deserted middle America and this will show up on election day
I agree but Trumps tax changes did the same,I might show up just to vote Libertarian
"It's the greastest gig in the world,being alive. You get to go to Denny's, wear a hat, whatever you wanna do." - Norm Macdonald

longhorn320

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7772 on: August 30, 2020, 05:05:26 PM »
I agree but Trumps tax changes did the same,I might show up just to vote Libertarian
Well if youre not voting for Trump voting 3rd party is the next best thing.

You dont think Trump's tax cut helped middle America?
They won't let me give blood anymore. The burnt orange color scares the hell out of the doctors.

Honestbuckeye

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7773 on: August 30, 2020, 06:18:47 PM »
The Dispatch Weekly
Our Best Work From a Truly Ugly Week in America
Riots and looting and vigilantism have us all on edge.

Rachael LarimoreAug 2937227




Back when protests first sprang up in response to George Floyd’s death, I was actually a little optimistic. Let me explain. Even as riots and looting took place in Minneapolis and other large cities, peaceful demonstrations and marches were taking place in small towns and quiet suburbs all over the country.
My hometown (Alliance, Ohio) was featured in national news stories for its successful protest. Our oldest son attended a Black Lives Matter rally and march in our suburb, and we live in a county where Donald Trump got 68 percent of the vote in 2016. Not only was it peaceful, the chief of police gave a heartfelt speech to the crowd, and thanked the organizers for helping increase his awareness. More people than I can count shared Dave Chappelle’s 8:46 special. Occasionally, a fruitful and respectful conversation broke out on social media. It seemed like there was a glimmer of hope not only that we could make some headway on racism in America but that maybe people weren’t quite as divided as we thought.
So much for all of that. Activists took advantage of sympathetic mayors in big cities, giving us the CHAZ/CHOP in Seattle (where protesters made demands about “defunding the police” behind blockades protected by armed civilians) and more than two months of nightly violence in Portland. As mayors became nervous about deploying police to maintain the peace, violent crime has increased.
The events of the past week were like a spark hitting the embers of a dying fire. The police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, prompted a whole new round of protests, though news of such happenings being peaceful are sparse. Instead, we’ve seen protesters badgering diners at restaurants. We’ve seen looters destroy businesses owned by immigrants and minorities. And, worst of all, a teenager armed with a long rifle allegedly shot three people and killed two in Kenosha.
I can’t help but feel we are in a precarious place as a nation now. We were too polarized as a nation already as we headed into what was sure to be a fraught election year. The pandemic and the violence have only exacerbated that.  And it seems like we’ve lost the ability to make obvious, rational arguments. It should be easy to condemn violence and looting in favor of peaceful demonstrations. Instead, we have mayors and city councils goading police chiefs into resigning, and NPR featuring authors who write books literally titled, In Defense of Looting. Similarly, it should be easy to condemn  vigilantism, but instead we have people trying to make a hero out of Kyle Rittenhouse.
Andrew Sullivan wrote about the violence this week, and cautions that the Democrats are “walking into a trap” in terms of the election. Bridget Phetasy, a writer and podcaster who describes herself as “politically homeless” and whose work I’ve really come to enjoy, puts it in even starker terms: “Almost everyone I know here in LA is buying a gun, stocking up on water and wondering what the aftermath of the election results will look like. If Trump wins, I reckon America will burn. If Trump loses, America will burn. Either way, I’m preparing for America to burn.”
I wouldn’t say that I’m not quite that pessimistic yet. But I will say that in our conversations with our kids about these matters, it’s getting a little harder to say with confidence that our country is better than the current moment would indicate, or that we’re strong enough to overcome these struggles. . . .


Well written.  Sums up my feelings at the moment. 
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
-Mark Twain

bayareabadger

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7774 on: August 30, 2020, 06:51:47 PM »
The Dispatch Weekly
Our Best Work From a Truly Ugly Week in America
Riots and looting and vigilantism have us all on edge.

Rachael LarimoreAug 2937227




Back when protests first sprang up in response to George Floyd’s death, I was actually a little optimistic. Let me explain. Even as riots and looting took place in Minneapolis and other large cities, peaceful demonstrations and marches were taking place in small towns and quiet suburbs all over the country.
My hometown (Alliance, Ohio) was featured in national news stories for its successful protest. Our oldest son attended a Black Lives Matter rally and march in our suburb, and we live in a county where Donald Trump got 68 percent of the vote in 2016. Not only was it peaceful, the chief of police gave a heartfelt speech to the crowd, and thanked the organizers for helping increase his awareness. More people than I can count shared Dave Chappelle’s 8:46 special. Occasionally, a fruitful and respectful conversation broke out on social media. It seemed like there was a glimmer of hope not only that we could make some headway on racism in America but that maybe people weren’t quite as divided as we thought.
So much for all of that. Activists took advantage of sympathetic mayors in big cities, giving us the CHAZ/CHOP in Seattle (where protesters made demands about “defunding the police” behind blockades protected by armed civilians) and more than two months of nightly violence in Portland. As mayors became nervous about deploying police to maintain the peace, violent crime has increased.
The events of the past week were like a spark hitting the embers of a dying fire. The police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, prompted a whole new round of protests, though news of such happenings being peaceful are sparse. Instead, we’ve seen protesters badgering diners at restaurants. We’ve seen looters destroy businesses owned by immigrants and minorities. And, worst of all, a teenager armed with a long rifle allegedly shot three people and killed two in Kenosha.
I can’t help but feel we are in a precarious place as a nation now. We were too polarized as a nation already as we headed into what was sure to be a fraught election year. The pandemic and the violence have only exacerbated that.  And it seems like we’ve lost the ability to make obvious, rational arguments. It should be easy to condemn violence and looting in favor of peaceful demonstrations. Instead, we have mayors and city councils goading police chiefs into resigning, and NPR featuring authors who write books literally titled, In Defense of Looting. Similarly, it should be easy to condemn  vigilantism, but instead we have people trying to make a hero out of Kyle Rittenhouse.
Andrew Sullivan wrote about the violence this week, and cautions that the Democrats are “walking into a trap” in terms of the election. Bridget Phetasy, a writer and podcaster who describes herself as “politically homeless” and whose work I’ve really come to enjoy, puts it in even starker terms: “Almost everyone I know here in LA is buying a gun, stocking up on water and wondering what the aftermath of the election results will look like. If Trump wins, I reckon America will burn. If Trump loses, America will burn. Either way, I’m preparing for America to burn.”
I wouldn’t say that I’m not quite that pessimistic yet. But I will say that in our conversations with our kids about these matters, it’s getting a little harder to say with confidence that our country is better than the current moment would indicate, or that we’re strong enough to overcome these struggles. . . .


So to things in this popped out to me and I kinda wanted to delve into them.

1. "NPR featuring authors who write books literally titled, In Defense of Looting."
I found this 
notable because media outlets for a long time ran all sorts of weird, extreme stuff on both sides. Like, it was just seen as part of the landscape that an outlet might interview a controversial figure or profile one or accept a piece of writing that just represented opinion (letters to the editor). But at some point, it became very, very important to say, "how dare this outlet give that person attention!" I think it has to do with the internet, which makes media more permanent. I couldn't share what I heard on the radio or saw on TV news. And the newspaper got replaced by a new one every day. And maybe I'd take offense in the moment, but it wouldn't become quite as much of a thing. And if NPR had a person on who had an unnuanced take on the role of modern militia movements and why they're super great, I think that would be fine (I'm also here for nuanced takes on militias. I think there's interesting discussion about looting, how it tacks alongside protest and how people don't notice protest without disruption, but am not really here for many defenses of it). 

2. “Almost everyone I know here in LA is buying a gun, stocking up on water and wondering what the aftermath of the election results will look like. If Trump wins, I reckon America will burn. If Trump loses, America will burn. Either way, I’m preparing for America to burn.”
This strikes me as a traditional sort of American pessimism. The country was going to hell in the 60s, and 70s and 80s, and parts of the 2000s. Predicting the worst is as American as apple pie. And I know it goes against all that, but I'm an optimist. I've lived in places where folks have a lot of guns for nearly a decade. And folks are still folks. They want to go to school, work, meet friends, see their kids are doing stuff they like. Perhaps the fringes are more fringy, and those fringes are certianly more highlighted and better organized, but most folks go along and get along despite all this. (I also find it funny because I live in a county that's highly on one side of the political spectrum next door to one on the extreme other. And both work off one another, functioning symbiotically even in our charged times)

Bonus: The idea that "Democrats are walking into a trap." This is one of those dire comments that doesn't really matter right now. People vote in November. Things will be different then. Now maybe this is the trap, Democrats climbing atop a high horse too high. But we've had all sorts of dire warnings before all sorts of elections, and it's mostly hard to tell if these are real things or just noise. It also led me to remember that NAFTA was mostly the work of presidents from 1980-1992, with a member of the opposite party carrying it over the finish line. First this is funny because just imagine that kind of transition process. But also, imagine telling one of those two presidents that a member of their party would one day use their vision as a cudgel to crush a member of the opposite party. The future is aways weird, and the trap isn't usually that out in the open. 

OrangeAfroMan

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7775 on: August 30, 2020, 07:15:32 PM »
But what if "government help" is a major reason that the homeless person is homeless?  (And, in real life, that is often the case.)  Is more of it going to be the fix?
If bad policies are ineffective, why is the answer to have no policies?  Why not better policies?  

Earned assistance in various ways, etc.  I don't have all the ideas, but if something hasn't worked, you try something else.  We don't pretend everyone's uphill climb has the same distance, obstacles, and is at the same incline.  

I live in a poor area and one thing I've noticed is that another way the poor are behind is time.  Everything takes longer for them.  Half their lives are spent waiting - waiting on the bus, waiting in lines, waiting longer at appointments....taking longer to pay things off and thus spending more money on the same item.  

“The Swamp is where Gators live.  We feel comfortable there, but we hope our opponents feel tentative. A swamp is hot and sticky and can be dangerous." - Steve Spurrier

CWSooner

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7776 on: August 30, 2020, 08:04:32 PM »
If bad policies are ineffective, why is the answer to have no policies?  Why not better policies? 

Earned assistance in various ways, etc.  I don't have all the ideas, but if something hasn't worked, you try something else.  We don't pretend everyone's uphill climb has the same distance, obstacles, and is at the same incline. 

I live in a poor area and one thing I've noticed is that another way the poor are behind is time.  Everything takes longer for them.  Half their lives are spent waiting - waiting on the bus, waiting in lines, waiting longer at appointments....taking longer to pay things off and thus spending more money on the same item.
I don't see much suggesting of better policies.  Instead, it's the same-old, same-old, except with more money.
Do you have specific programs you'd like to see tried?
Good point about time.
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MaximumSam

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CWSooner

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7778 on: August 30, 2020, 09:08:15 PM »
That's hard to read.  Maybe this will work better.

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MrNubbz

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7779 on: August 30, 2020, 09:16:01 PM »
« Last Edit: August 30, 2020, 09:28:56 PM by MrNubbz »
"It's the greastest gig in the world,being alive. You get to go to Denny's, wear a hat, whatever you wanna do." - Norm Macdonald

OrangeAfroMan

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7780 on: August 30, 2020, 09:18:10 PM »
No matter how radical you THINK Biden or Democrats are, they're nowhere near the absurdities Trump & Co. are putting out there.  It's like cartoony silliness.  


It's hard to respect people when they can't tell they're being pandered to or fear-mongered in such a way.  
“The Swamp is where Gators live.  We feel comfortable there, but we hope our opponents feel tentative. A swamp is hot and sticky and can be dangerous." - Steve Spurrier

FearlessF

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7781 on: August 30, 2020, 09:31:27 PM »
if leaders of impoverished and minority communities would speak up about the way to better themselves, it would help more than most government programs. IMO

maybe a high percentage can't be NBA players or hollywood actors, but if more downtrodden folks would accept responsibility, raise their children with better expectations, and quit relying on handouts and blaming the government or rich/white folks for their situation..............

yes , we/they understand that the playing field isn't level.............  that's unfortunate and unfair, but........... there's only one real way to help yourself and your neighbors.  

Rise above it

asking the government to rescue the masses from oppression and poverty hasn't worked for decades and probably won't work for decades.  The government isn't real good at doing anything.

Asking the very rich 10% to create a better world isn't working and hasn't worked in the past.

sending a clear and unified message regarding how to help yourself is probably a must better choice
"Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."

Honestbuckeye

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7782 on: August 30, 2020, 09:41:29 PM »
No matter how radical you THINK Biden or Democrats are, they're nowhere near the absurdities Trump & Co. are putting out there.  It's like cartoony silliness. 


It's hard to respect people when they can't tell they're being pandered to or fear-mongered in such a way. 
Your focus group of one.  Wrong again.

absurd is supporting  and enabling rioting, looting and destruction under the false premise of protesting.  Violence. 99 days and counting.
and then blaming someone else for it.  They reaped what they sowed.
it’s hard to respect people who start trouble, and then cry when it blows up in their face.

the stuff Pelosi, Obama, Biden, Schurmer, Schmitt and these Dem mayors out there is clown like- and has no credibility.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
-Mark Twain

Honestbuckeye

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Re: 2020 Offseason Stream of Unconciousness
« Reply #7783 on: August 30, 2020, 09:48:56 PM »
I forgot to mention funding the violence.  But I guess if you can get into one of the nicest hotels in town, like some of the rioters at the RNC convention did for their out of town stay( stayed at the same hotel as some of the dignitaries they tried to attack) why not?

Step one left- stop the violence.  Until then, no conversations in the world will improve this. 
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
-Mark Twain

 

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