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Topic: This is interesting.

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highVOLtage

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This is interesting.
« on: April 23, 2021, 11:33:10 AM »
The "fact checker" at the Washington Post has an interesting family history.


https://twitter.com/JackPosobiec/status/1385600137985150985



Cincydawg

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Re: This is interesting.
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2021, 11:43:24 AM »
Glenn Kessler on Twitter: "My father’s father ran the Dutch steel company and was placed in a concentration camp because he refused to cooperate with the Nazis. When soldiers came to take my teenage father to Germany for forced conscription, he escaped by leaping from a second floor window….4/8" / Twitter
Glenn Kessler on Twitter: "My father’s father ran the Dutch steel company and was placed in a concentration camp because he refused to cooperate with the Nazis. When soldiers came to take my teenage father to Germany for forced conscription, he escaped by leaping from a second floor window….4/8" / Twitter

This is his side of the story.  

Cincydawg

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Re: This is interesting.
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2021, 11:45:21 AM »
From wiki:

Kessler is a great-grandson of Jean Baptiste August Kessler, who was largely responsible for the growth and development of the Royal Dutch Shell (Shell Oil Company) and a grandson of Geldolph Adriaan Kessler, who helped create the Dutch steel industry.[66] He was born in Cincinnati, where his father, Adriaan Kessler, was an executive at Procter & Gamble, and he attended high school there and in Lexington, Kentucky. Kessler's mother, Else Bolotin, was a psychologist who in Lexington "helped women in that era of feminist awakening confront a society dominated by men."[67] Both of his parents were Dutch, and immigrated to the United States after marriage.[68]

In an interview with Brian Lamb broadcast on C-SPAN, Kessler said he had decided he wanted to be journalist when he was only in fifth grade, after he created a neighborhood newspaper. "Even though it was a newsletter for only a few blocks in the neighborhood, I grandly called it the 'Cincinnati Fact,'" he said.[69]


highVOLtage

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Re: This is interesting.
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2021, 11:58:27 AM »
According to the declassified U.S. intelligence document as part of the tweet, it sure looks like Royal Dutch Shell under the directorship of August Kessler significantly increased production in Germany during the 1930's and made capital outlays within the framework of Hitler's 4 year plan.  Just a coincidence I reckon.

Cincydawg

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Re: This is interesting.
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2021, 04:27:55 PM »
I imagine a lot of companies invested in Nazi Germany before the war. His grandfather appears not to have been top dog during the war. Also from wiki:

Both Guus and his older brother Geldolph Adriaan Kessler were considered the "crown princes" of the Royal Dutch, but after their father died unexpectedly they had to work under their father's domineering successor, Henri Deterding. Dolf eventually left, at the urging of his fiancé,[1] and helped create and lead the Dutch steel company Hoogovens. Guus, by contrast, seemed to get along better with Deterding. "The brothers were also strong willed but only Guus, the younger son, succeeded in controlling his emotions and avoiding coming into conflict with Deterding, in order to reach his ultimate goal," wrote Joost Junker and Jan Luiten van Zandem in their history of the company.[2] The two brothers, as leading figures in two major Dutch business concerns, at one point formed a joint venture between the Hoogovens and Royal Dutch Shell to combat a threat to the oil business by IG Farben.[3] Guus, who became a director of Royal Dutch in 1923, was instrumental in leading Shell into the petroleum-based chemicals business.[4]
Guus was the "obvious candidate" to lead Royal Dutch Shell after Deterding was forced out in 1936, but instead he was passed over in favor of a compromise choice. "It must have been a huge disappointment to Kessler to see his life's ambition thwarted with fulfillment so near."[5] He eventually achieved his dream and became director-general of Royal Dutch Shell in the years 1947–1949, retiring at age 60. For the next 12 years, he served as president-commissioner of the company.
Guus and his first wife, Anna Francoise "Ans" Kessler-Stoop (1889–1983), had five daughters and one son. In 1932, they commissioned the noted French Fauvist Raoul Dufy to paint a portrait of the family on their horses, a work that now hangs in the Tate Collection in London. Ans was a noted collector of modern art, advised by her uncle C. Frank Stoop, and donated to the Tate Collection a substantial portfolio that included works by Pablo PicassoHenri MatisseAmedeo Modigliani and Edgar Degas. She purchased a Vincent van Gogh painting on paper in 1930 and it was sold at auction for 8.8 million British pounds in 1997 by a family trust.
The marriage of Guus and Ans ended in divorce. He married Thalia "Lia" de Kempenaer (1917–2000) in 1948.







 

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