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Topic: RIP Walter Williams

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ATexasVol

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RIP Walter Williams
« on: December 02, 2020, 01:11:22 PM »
In an age where common sense is uncommon, it's a blow to lose someone as brilliant as Williams.   

Conservatives mourn the death of economist Walter E. Williams: 'Punch in the gut' (washingtonexaminer.com)
Conservatives mourn the death of economist Walter E. Williams: 'Punch in the gut' (washingtonexaminer.com)

Drew4UTk

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2020, 01:12:21 PM »
I enjoyed his writings and musings since i first encountered them in the newspaper lord knows how many years ago... RIP

TREX

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2020, 02:35:27 PM »
Loved him.

Was thinking about him last night

HK_Vol

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2020, 06:16:49 PM »
Ugh.  One of the few rational economists.  

Who will replace him and Thomas Sowell (age 90)?
Halfway through a book by Sowell that he dedicated in part to Walter Williams.

He will be missed indeed.


Volbrigade/oU

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2020, 06:28:06 PM »
Williams was, simply, superb.  A giant.  May Heaven open its door to welcome its new arrival (I don’t know if Williams professed to be a Christian or not.  He certainly fits the profile of an intellectual believer).

The mighty oaks continue to fall.

I don’t think that the scrubby saplings behind them can take their place.

The kudzu of pernicious, Godless Leftism is choking them out with its mindless, worthless Whateverism.   



Nate924

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2020, 10:10:03 PM »
In an age where common sense is uncommon, it's a blow to lose someone as brilliant as Williams. 

Conservatives mourn the death of economist Walter E. Williams: 'Punch in the gut' (washingtonexaminer.com)
Conservatives mourn the death of economist Walter E. Williams: 'Punch in the gut' (washingtonexaminer.com)
He had more common sense in his little finger than 90% of the “economists” out there. A true hero for speaking up about how to fix the issues surrounding liberal racism. 

HK_Vol

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2020, 11:56:24 PM »
Thumbnail

HK_Vol

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2020, 12:24:36 AM »
https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/417766/#respond


ONE LAST COLUMN FROM THE LATE, GREAT WALTER WILLIAMS: The Tragedy of Black Education Is New.

Quote
Several years ago, Project Baltimore began an investigation of Baltimore’s school system. What it found was an utter disgrace.
In 19 of Baltimore’s 39 high schools, out of 3,804 students, only 14 of them, or less than 1%, were proficient in math.
In 13 of Baltimore’s high schools, not a single student scored proficient in math.
In five Baltimore City high schools, not a single student scored proficient in math or reading.
Despite these academic deficiencies, about 70% of the students graduate and are conferred a high school diploma—a fraudulent high school diploma.
The Detroit Public Schools Community District scored the lowest in the nation compared to 26 other urban districts for reading and mathematics at the fourth- and eighth-grade levels.
A recent video captures some of this miseducation in Milwaukee high schools: In two city high schools, only one student tested proficient in math and none are proficient in English.

Yet, the schools spent a full week learning about “systemic racism” and “Black Lives Matter activism.”


I know I don’t have to remind you to read the whole thing.


HK_Vol

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2020, 12:50:45 AM »
Thomas Sowell eulogy of Walter Williams.

https://townhall.com/columnists/thomassowell/2020/12/02/walter-e-williams-19362020-n2580965

SNIP:
Walter Williams loved teaching. Unlike too many other teachers today, he made it a point never to impose his opinions on his students. Those who read his syndicated newspaper columns know that he expressed his opinions boldly and unequivocally there. But not in the classroom.

Walter once said he hoped that, on the day he died, he would have taught a class that day. And that is just the way it was, when he died on Wednesday, December 2, 2020.

He was my best friend for half a century. There was no one I trusted more or whose integrity I respected more. Since he was younger than me, I chose him to be my literary executor, to take control of my books after I was gone.

But his death is a reminder that no one really has anything to say about such things.


As an economist, Walter Williams never got the credit he deserved. His book "Race and Economics" is a must-read introduction to the subject. Amazon has it ranked 5th in sales among civil rights books, 9 years after it was published.

Despite his opposition to the welfare state, as something doing more harm than good, Walter was privately very generous with both his money and his time in helping others.

He figured he had a right to do whatever he wanted to with his own money, but that politicians had no right to take his money to give away, in order to get votes.






HK_Vol

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2020, 01:05:30 AM »
Big writeup on Walter Williams in the New York Times.  I expected a hatchet job, but it was a very good and balanced piece.  Kudos to the author - Robert D. Hershey Jr. who seems to be a reasonable reporter who hasn't drunk the Kool-Aid....

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/04/business/economy/walter-e-williams-dead.html 

Walter E. Williams, 84, Dies; Conservative Economist on Black Issues
Skeptical of antipoverty programs, he was a scholar who reached a wide public through a newspaper column and books, and as a fill-in for Rush Limbaugh.


SNIP:
Mr. Williams also opposed affirmative action programs and proposals to pay reparations to Black people for slavery. (“The problems that Black people face are not going to be solved by white people,” he said.) And he could be blunt in taking on liberal leaders in the Black community.

“Racial discrimination and racism in our country could have earned a well-deserved death,” he once said, “but it has been resurrected by race hustlers, or poverty pimps as I call them, such as Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton and many others in the civil rights movement who make a living on the grievances of Blacks.”

Walter Edward Williams was born on March 31, 1936, in Philadelphia. His father, Walter, worked in masonry, and his mother, Catherine Morgan Urchette, was a housekeeper. His neighbors included Bill Cosby and the basketball star Julius Erving, who was a second cousin.


After receiving his bachelor’s degree, Mr. Williams moved on to the University of California, Los Angeles, where he collected master’s and doctoral degrees.

At one point in his pursuit of a Ph.D., he was shocked when he flunked an economic theory exam and was told that a paper of his was among the worst in the class. The experience helped shape his thinking about race.

“It convinced me that U.C.L.A. professors didn’t care anything about my race: They’d flunk me just as they’d flunk anyone else who didn’t make the grade,” he wrote in his autobiography, “Up From the Projects” (2010).

Until then his political leanings had been liberal; he believed, for example, that higher minimum wages unquestionably helped poor people. But a professor asked him to weigh good intentions against real-world effects and pointed to the work of, among others, the University of Chicago economists Yale Brozen and Milton Friedman. (Mr. Williams would go on to appear in Mr. Friedman’s PBS series “Free to Choose” in 1980.)


In the 1970s, during a yearlong stint at the conservative-leaning Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University, Mr. Williams was commissioned by the Joint Economic Committee of Congress to study the ramifications of a minimum wage and of the Davis-Bacon Act, which mandated that laborers in federal construction projects be paid no less than the locally prevailing wages for corresponding work on similar projects in the area.

He outlined his findings in a 1977 report: A minimum wage causes high rates of teenage unemployment, especially among minority workers, and actually “encourages racial discrimination.”

He concluded, he recalled in an interview with The New York Times for this obituary in 2017, that the Davis-Bacon Act had “explicit racist motivations.”

Suppose, he said, that there are 10 secretaries, five of them white and five of them Black — all equally qualified — who are applying for a job. “If by law you must pay them all the same wage,” he said, “it doesn’t cost anything to discriminate against the Black secretaries.” Without such a mandate, he suggested, the Black secretaries would have a better chance at being gainfully employed, even if at lower pay.


Mr. Williams traced his political evolution to his days at U.C.L.A., when he had turned away from liberal orthodoxies.

“I probably became a libertarian,” he said, “through exposure to tough-minded professors who encouraged me to think with my brain instead of my heart.”



gymvol

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2020, 09:24:59 AM »

I loved listening to him when he would fill in for Rush Limbaugh. He truly was a great historian that didn't try to rewrite history. He spoke out against large government along with the confiscation of others wealth and property to give to others.




snip:

Black civil rights activists, their white liberal supporters and historically ignorant Americans who attack the Confederate flag have committed a deep, despicable dishonor to our patriotic Southern black ancestors who marched, fought and died not to protect slavery but to protect their homeland from Northern aggression. They don't deserve the dishonor. Dr. Leonard Haynes, a black professor at Southern University, stated, "When you eliminate the black Confederate soldier, you've eliminated the history of the South."
Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University.


Blacks and the Confederacy, by Walter E.Williams | Creators Syndicate







If everyone is thinking alike then somebody isn't thinking.

George S. Patton

fuzzynavol

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2020, 10:08:33 AM »
Thumbnail
"Prior to capitalism, there was no such thing as wealth.  For ~200,000 years, we lived as Socialists, ordinarily with around 150 - 200 people in cooperative communities living in harmony with the environment and everyone working for the common good."
Fuzz Y. Navol

ATexasVol

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2020, 10:13:08 AM »
"Prior to capitalism, there was no such thing as wealth.  For ~200,000 years, we lived as Socialists, ordinarily with around 150 - 200 people in cooperative communities living in harmony with the environment and everyone working for the common good."
Fuzz Y. Navol

If you were to really think about your post ... 

gymvol

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Re: RIP Walter Williams
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2020, 12:07:45 PM »
"Prior to capitalism, there was no such thing as wealth.  For ~200,000 years, we lived as Socialists, ordinarily with around 150 - 200 people in cooperative communities living in harmony with the environment and everyone working for the common good."
Fuzz Y. Navol

Like Cincy you must have flunked history. That has to be one of the most ignorant statements ever made.



If everyone is thinking alike then somebody isn't thinking.

George S. Patton

 

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