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Topic: Ridgetop, Tennessee no longer has a police force

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HK_Vol

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Ridgetop, Tennessee no longer has a police force
« on: November 07, 2019, 06:21:02 PM »
All five officers have resigned - and for good reason.
These type of stunts are basically a regressive tax on the poor.



https://reason.com/2019/11/06/a-tennessee-police-departments-last-officer-resigns-over-ticket-quotas/



A Tennessee Police Department's Last Officer Resigns Over Ticket Quotas

Ridgetop no longer has any police officers after recordings captured city officials demanding that the department write 210 citations a month.



HK_Vol

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Re: Ridgetop, Tennessee no longer has a police force
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2019, 06:25:41 PM »
Which is exactly why people in poor communities harbor such resentment against police forces....



https://www.npr.org/2014/08/25/343143937/in-ferguson-court-fines-and-fees-fuel-anger

SNIP:
To understand some of the distrust of police that has fueled protests in Ferguson, Mo., consider this: In 2013, the municipal court in Ferguson — a city of 21,135 people — issued 32,975 arrest warrants for nonviolent offenses, mostly driving violations.

A new report released the week after 18-year old Michael Brown was shot and killed in Ferguson helps explain why. ArchCity Defenders, a St. Louis-area public defender group, says in its report that more than half the courts in St. Louis County engage in the "illegal and harmful practices" of charging high court fines and fees on nonviolent offenses like traffic violations — and then arresting people when they don't pay. The report singles out courts in three communities, including Ferguson.



Last year, Ferguson collected $2.6 million in court fines and fees. It was the city's second-biggest source of income of the $20 million it collected in revenues.

Earlier this year, in the series Guilty and Charged, NPR's investigations unit found that the practices in Ferguson are common across the country. The series reported that nationwide, the costs of the justice system are billed increasingly to defendants and offenders, and that this creates harsher treatment of the poor. Because people with money can pay their hundreds or thousands of dollars in fines and fees right away, they are usually done with the court system.

People who can't pay their fines and fees go on payment plans. But then there are extra fees, sometimes interest — 12 percent on felonies in Washington state — and, if poor people fall behind on payments, they may go to jail. Courts often ignore laws, Supreme Court rulings and protections that outlaw the equivalent of debtors prisons.




 

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