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Topic: Long term how much manufacturing

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Cincydawg

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2020, 01:08:49 PM »
You can find better brands no doubt, but if you buy a brand at Walmart, it's the same as that brand anywhere else.

Walmart is not going to carry the higher end brands of anything I can think of.  If you buy a Ryobi tool at Walmart, that is what it is.  If you prefer Snap-On, they won't have it obviously.  The wife likes these liquid yogurt things that are $5.69 at Kroger and $4.19 at Walmart, same brand.


awinatl

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2020, 01:13:30 PM »
Another prime example of shifting priorities is steel.
For years China has been flooding the American market with cheap steel.
Consider a contractor in today's market who has a contract to build an office building with a sizable penalty if not completed on time.
Do you think he will buy Chinese steel that is still in China and risk being bankrupted if increased tariffs, and natural disasters prevent him from getting his steel on time and completing his project on time?
No...he'll cut his margins in order to keep from being bankrupted and buy domestic steel at a higher price. Soon his competitors will do the same , causing an increase in price and his margins will return to normal.
Maybe not Econ 101 but Common Sense 311
I see this rationale but the American workforce is about to take a major beat down ...... low cost goods will be a necessity. And if Trump somehow loses then the tariffs go bye bye. Bottom line is American’s can’t afford and/or won’t accept paying higher prices for American made goods. 

gymvol

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2020, 01:53:30 PM »

With China threatening to cut off medical supplies to us during the Chinese virus outbreak in which they failed to notify the world how severe it was things will change drastically.

I believe with people now finding out just how much of our medical supply or their ingredients come from China you will see that a majority of companies will either move back to the U.S. by choice or by legislation.

Even some democrats during an election year will be supportive off that.

Either that or Trump will put tariffs on them that their loss of profits will force them to move.  Especially since their ambassador failed to take any responsibility when called to the State Department.

I think China will see the world will turn against them for their lies and lack of action.
If everyone is thinking alike then somebody isn't thinking.

George S. Patton

Cincydawg

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #17 on: March 22, 2020, 02:00:36 PM »
https://www.politico.com/news/2019/12/20/policymakers-worry-china-drug-exports-088126

Last year, China accounted for 95 percent of U.S. imports of ibuprofen, 91 percent of U.S. imports of hydrocortisone, 70 percent of U.S. imports of acetaminophen, 40 to 45 percent of U.S. imports of penicillin and 40 percent of U.S. imports of heparin, according to Commerce Department data. In all, 80 percent of the U.S. supply of antibiotics are made in China.

I would say if the above doesn't change, something is badly wrong.  

gymvol

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #18 on: March 22, 2020, 02:01:17 PM »
I see this rationale but the American workforce is about to take a major beat down ...... low cost goods will be a necessity. And if Trump somehow loses then the tariffs go bye bye. Bottom line is American’s can’t afford and/or won’t accept paying higher prices for American made goods.

Prices won't change that much only the profits companies are now raking in.  Most things are still priced as high as the market will bear any higher people only purchase the necessities.  

Companies like NIKE have been raping the American consumer for decades with their over priced garbage while paying less than slave wages to get it made.
If everyone is thinking alike then somebody isn't thinking.

George S. Patton

DunkingDan

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #19 on: March 22, 2020, 02:07:53 PM »
With China threatening to cut off medical supplies to us during the Chinese virus outbreak in which they failed to notify the world how severe it was things will change drastically.

I believe with people now finding out just how much of our medical supply or their ingredients come from China you will see that a majority of companies will either move back to the U.S. by choice or by legislation.

Even some democrats during an election year will be supportive off that.

Either that or Trump will put tariffs on them that their loss of profits will force them to move.  Especially since their ambassador failed to take any responsibility when called to the State Department.

I think China will see the world will turn against them for their lies and lack of action.
I remember a man who said "We need to close our borders"
I remember a man who said "We need to bring our businesses home"
I remember a man who said "We need to become less dependent on other countries to survive"
 I remember a man who said "We need to take care of America first "
 Now I know all the reasons why he said those things.
 And I'll NEVER forget the people who purposely got in his way.....will you?

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

Drew4UTk

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2020, 02:30:33 PM »
box stores carry different products made under license... for instance, a husqi chainsaw from lowes or walmart is NOT the same saw as from an authorized licensed dealer.  

buy one from lowes and carry it to an authorized dealer for repair and they'll send you away. 

it happens a lot with electronics too... televisions in particular.. hell, there is a special model designation for TV's made for black friday... usually a single letter different in the model number... and it is inferior to the primary model.  it won't last near as long in most cases. 

these underpriced licensed products are crap.. i wonder how much it's worth to the companies that do this to sell their name.. i won't buy another husqi product at all, now, as a for instance, because it's getting increasingly hard to find the real mccoy... i have a few of them, but sthil i my primary now... they haven't done this yet to my knowledge.  echo doesn't do it often, either. 

used to be a cub cadet was almost of the kabuto quality.... then the name was licensed... and they're crap now.  the list goes on and on...   

HK_Vol

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2020, 07:12:03 PM »
I suspect that corporations will now much more take into consideration over-reliance on a single country to source their products.  So if it was 80% China before, I think that they are going to seriously consider reducing that to 40% or so.  They won't eliminate China, but they sure aren't going to be beholden and vulnerable to sourcing from a single place or country.

Biggest issue is that China has built out an excellent infrastructure including parts that go into final products, railroads, highways, ports, etc.  Many countries are improving, but they are not anywhere as efficient as China has now become.

As 3-D printing and automated manufacturing increases, massively reducing labor as a product cost, the US will have increasing advantages.  US taxes, real estate costs, electricity, etc. is the same price or lower than in China.  If you don't have to pay for shipping or take the 2 weeks to transit, then it becomes ever more advantageous to consider moving production to the US.

For example, things like this:

http://softwearautomation.com/announcing-sewbots-service/






HK_Vol

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #22 on: March 22, 2020, 07:15:57 PM »

http://www.fashionatingworld.com/new1-2/industry-4-0-a-responsible-approach-needed-to-propel-growth-in-apparel-sector

Increasing labor costs driving automation

One factor driving demand for automation is increasing labor costs. For instance, Chinese apparel firm TianyuanIndustry 4.0 A responsible approach needed to propel growth in apparel sector Garments has invested more than $20 million in a factory in Little Rock, Arkansas in the US. Though the factory has a staff of 400 laborers, it also uses 24 robots capable of producing one T-shirt every 30 seconds without any need for human intervention. Similarly, sportswear giant Adidas has developed highly automated speed factories that boast production speeds by three times.



TREX

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #23 on: March 23, 2020, 06:41:12 AM »
Having a little background in Process Manufacturing one would think
drugs manfactring would be something that would already be pretty much automated.   

Time to bring it on home.  


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WjtndPBN6jE

Cincydawg

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2020, 07:13:17 AM »
Companies that allow others to put their name on inferior products are asking for trouble (duh).

I recently needed a drill, the batteries in the old one failed, and I saw one at Walmart for $16.  It had a Ni-Cd battery, but OK, I use one about twice a year.  So I got it, cheaper than new batteries, works "fine", once, haven't needed it since.  At least I know it's a crap drill.  Then the wife bought batteries for the old one, which was our son's.  He did a ton of work on cars back in the day, like engine swaps and so forth, he had some nice tools, all gone now, he's the one in SF.

He wanted to come visit us this month.  He's a lot of fun to be out and about with, has that facility to make friends in 10 seconds.

gymvol

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #25 on: March 23, 2020, 10:00:41 AM »
If you want to know how we got to this point just think back.

It was the presidents prior to Trump with all their free trade agreements, NAFTA and the New World Order that started us on the downward spiral of where we are.

Also the Chamber of Commerce and the Business Round Table who own politicians that support out sourcing high paying jobs for profit then flooding the American labor pool with illegal aliens for more profit for what's left here.

You can include the tree huggers, environmentalist wackos, and global warming nitwits that help with all the regulations that stifled businesses so bad that they had to move elsewhere or go bankrupt taking the jobs with them.

It was also the MSM who helped beat the drums as usual for any left wing crazy idea in order to support democrats and their liberal socialist agenda.

Maybe the virus will wake up the people in this country to how screwed up it has become when we are dependent upon on a communist country for the very medicines to save our lives that should be manufactured at home.

It got this way by allowing liberalism, socialism and the radical ideas of the left wing loons to take root in this country.
If everyone is thinking alike then somebody isn't thinking.

George S. Patton

Cincydawg

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #26 on: March 23, 2020, 10:04:14 AM »
I've heard of NAFTA as a trade agreement, but could you expound just a bit on the New World Order trade agreement?

DunkingDan

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Re: Long term how much manufacturing
« Reply #27 on: March 23, 2020, 11:47:04 AM »
I've heard of NAFTA as a trade agreement, but could you expound just a bit on the New World Order trade agreement?
I think he was referring to the NWO as what it is intended not a trade agreement. 
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

 

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