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Topic: Hong Kong

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HK_Vol

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Hong Kong
« on: November 04, 2019, 09:37:16 PM »
Police attacking firemen


https://twitter.com/demosisto/status/1190605923300937729

Police drag out and arrest man for playing the "wrong music".


https://twitter.com/hoccgoomusic/status/1190537787683926017







HK_Vol

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Re: Hong Kong
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2019, 09:38:43 PM »

HK_Vol

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Re: Hong Kong
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2019, 09:39:24 PM »

HK_Vol

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Re: Hong Kong
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2019, 09:41:15 PM »

HK_Vol

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Drew4UTk

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Re: Hong Kong
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2019, 10:11:54 PM »
are these police from Chinese mainland or from HK?  Stanford Prison Experiment comes to mind if they're doing that to their own... 

HK_Vol

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Re: Hong Kong
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2019, 10:19:15 PM »
Background:

https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2019/09/hong-kong-police-lost-trust/597205/

From Asia’s Finest to Hong Kong’s Most Hated
The city’s police force was once widely respected for its restraint and trusted by the local population. No more.

SNIP:
Hong Kong has fought hard over many decades to establish one of the most honest governments in the world.

As with Frank Serpico and the New York City Police Department in the 1960s, Hong Kong’s corruption was rooted in prewar poverty; its eradication was possible with postwar professionalism. Tasked with a new ordinance to investigate bribery, Hong Kong police targeted one of their chief superintendents, Peter Godber, once considered a talented officer who helped calm the city in the wake of riots in 1966 and 1967. He had also socked away hundreds of thousands of dollars in overseas bank accounts and fled to Britain. One of the first tasks of the newly created Independent Commission Against Corruption in 1974 was to extradite Godber. He was convicted of conspiracy and accepting bribes and sentenced to four years in prison.

Trust between people and the authorities began to build from that moment.

Given the regularity of protests here, local police became expert in crowd management. Rioting in the 1950s and 1960s convinced officials they needed to maintain order by acting with restraint, marginalizing agitators with propaganda, and seeking tips from the public. The police adopted a somewhat tolerant approach to crowds, according to the work of Lawrence Ho, a sociology professor at Education University of Hong Kong who focused his doctoral dissertation on riot policing. The idea was that restraint would encourage peaceful rallies. Surround and contain the protests was the ethos, not suppress them.

The police then adapted and refined their strategies further. Anti-riot teams were ordered to keep heavy arms inconspicuous, to not provoke protesters, and to not take forceful actions against the crowd. They would deploy only if the situation spiraled out of their control. Tactical units were drilled in different degrees of escalation. Police approached protesters in soft hats and with bare hands as commanders talked with the crowd and tried to defuse tensions.

With that style, Hong Kong police became known for managing large demonstrations, such as rallies to decry the Tiananmen Square crackdown in 1989 and a 2003 march to oppose a bill defining treason and sedition. The territory’s policing was so respected that Hong Kong officers trained British forces in crowd control.

The professionalism and respect the force won helps explain why, in 2014, many Hong Kongers were stunned and outraged when police shot 87 rounds of tear gas to drive pro-democracy protesters from a central artery called Harcourt Road. Police had violated a moral compact with their fellow citizens. The tens of thousands of people who had picketed exploded into hundreds of thousands, many who occupied the highway for 79 days, as they chanted for democratic rights but also decried “black cops.”

The difference, Tsang, the professor, said, was that Hong Kong police now receive training from mainland Chinese agencies. During the 2014 Umbrella movement, participants and journalists witnessed troubling episodes. In a separate strike hub, thugs arrived and punched random protesters before the attackers were led away and freed by police. In a park one night in October, riot police hit protesters with batons as plainclothes officers pummeled and kicked the activist Ken Tsang, leaving his face unrecognizable. The seven officers were convicted of his assault, but incredibly, Tsang, too, was found guilty of assaulting police and resisting arrest, and served a brief prison term.

Drew4UTk

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Re: Hong Kong
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2019, 10:25:27 PM »
what. a. mess. 

Man, stay safe over there.  

though i support our police 98.5% of the time, i believe their fear of some of us has driven them to take aggressive tactics first against all of us as a matter of their training, and when that isn't needed most the time...  I still feel they'd back citizens if given an order to violently disperse a group of protesters- escalating force as is reasonable instead of starting off by firing canisters, as described above.   

HK_Vol

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Re: Hong Kong
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2019, 10:36:32 PM »
I walked down to the Bus Station in Central on Saturday night as my daughter had taken a SAT Chinese subject test followed by a volleyball match.  No way I'm letting a 16-year old walk back by herself with the nonsense going on.

I met her not far from the bus depot and within 15 seconds we could hear the police firing tear gas.  People started fleeing in the opposite direction yelling, "the police are coming!"  I was having none of this nonsense and kept walking towards home.  The police ended up running across a separate overpass.

We then walked through a shopping mall (The Landmark) where you could smell the teargas and our eyes teared up (predictably).  We then walked up the hill to the FCC, hoping to catch a cab, but with no success.  The person behind me had been at a bar drinking outside with others - no protest going on there.  But the police approached from both directions and fired tear gas.  He was appreciate as many now carry eye drops as a protective measure.  Said it was quite painful for 2 or 3 minutes. 

We finally ended up walking up the hill (carry my daughters very heavy bag) and the police forced up to walk up much higher up the hill as certain routes were "blocked".  But we got home safely. 

Monday through Friday is usually very quiet, especially during the day.  But the police come out with a vengeance each and every weekend.  And they now consider basically anyone on the street nowadays a "protester" - especially if you are young and/or are wearing a black shirt.  Thus the reason why I insisted on picking up my daughter.  Never, ever worried about her getting home on her own six months ago - but sure do now.....

Drew4UTk

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Re: Hong Kong
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2019, 10:48:13 PM »
i can't imagine my daughter being under such threat- for nothing- or, not of her own doing.  the crap i will do and the risks i've taken is one thing...... not my daughter.  frankly, i don't care what authority someone messing with my kid is representing- hell will follow shortly for anyone who accosts her, damn the torpedo's. 

HK_Vol

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Re: Hong Kong
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2019, 03:01:11 AM »

Cincydawg

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Re: Hong Kong
« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2019, 06:35:21 AM »
Interesting.  Often what we see on TV is highly exaggerated, some protest by the Yellow Jackets for example in Paris.  It's a protest over a block or three, and the news media makes it appear widely spread when nearly all of Paris was unaffected.  This sounds wide spread, not just some localized incident hyped by the media (who seem to be ignoring it here).

billyboy75

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Re: Hong Kong
« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2019, 06:41:07 AM »
I am very concerned about the good people of Hong Kong.   The Chinese will suppress all resistance, and the longer this goes on, the harsher will be their tactics.   They can't have a free and independent Hong Kong living by one set of rules and the rest of the country another.

When the violence begins, Trump will complain, as will all of the western world.  No one wants war with China, so I doubt that much will be done to stop them.   China knows this.  They will be patient for a while longer, but then it will end, and not well for those who want the old Hong Kong to survive.

Cincydawg

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Re: Hong Kong
« Reply #13 on: November 05, 2019, 06:46:59 AM »
I can't see anyone "going to war" for Hong Kong.  I doubt we'd even resort to trade sanctions.

I'm slightly surprised Taiwan still exists.

 

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