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Topic: Gay ‘Marriage’ and Religious Freedom Cannot Coexist

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DunkingDan

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Gay ‘Marriage’ and Religious Freedom Cannot Coexist
« on: January 13, 2018, 12:33:08 PM »
 


Gay marriage proponents will not allow for religious freedom of their political opponents because their belief system does not allow for the fact that dissenters can be reasonable people of goodwill, Robert P. George, McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University, argued at the Institute on Religion and Democracy’s 2014 Diane Knippers Memorial Lecture.
Most of those arguing in favor of redefining marriage to include same-sex couples do not understand, or even know, the arguments of those who oppose the redefinition of marriage, George claimed. They assume there are no reasonable arguments against gay marriage and those who oppose it are simply driven by hatred of gays.
“The whole [gay marriage] argument was and is that the idea of marriage as the union of husband and wife lacks a rational basis and amounts to nothing more than ‘bigotry,’ reflecting animus against a certain group of people,” he said. “Therefore, no reasonable person of goodwill, we are told, can dissent from the liberal position on sex and marriage, any more than a reasonable person of goodwill could support racial segregation and subordination. You’ve heard the analogy drawn a thousand times.  And this is because marriage, according to the re-definers, consists principally of companionship — the companionship of people committed to mutual affection and care. Any distinctions beyond this one they condemn as baseless.”
The idea of marriage as a conjugal relationship between a husband and wife has a long history, George explained, as a variety of philosophers and religious traditions have recognized its importance for society, including Plato, Aristotle and Gandhi. But those who wish to redefine marriage seek to throw out that rich tradition while not even understanding the arguments in favor of that tradition. Instead, he continued, they understand marriage to be simply based upon romance, but do not put forth arguments as to why government should recognize romantic relationships.
Same-sex marriage proponents “uncritically, then, not knowing what they’re rejecting, not knowing what the alternative is, conceive marriage precisely as sexual-romantic companionship or domestic partnership, laying aside, ignoring altogether, its defining social purpose, imagining somehow, I suppose, that the law has some interest in people’s romantic relationships just as such. What that interest could be, none of my friends on the other side have ever managed to actually express a view about. And yet, we are told, marriage must be ‘expanded,’ or, in truth, redefined, or, perhaps in greater truth, abolished or replaced with, a conception of ‘marriage’ as sexual romantic companionship or domestic partnership, because they can’t fathom how any reasonable person of goodwill can understand it in any other way,” George said.
Since those proponents of redefining marriage do not know or understand the arguments in favor of the traditional definition of marriage, he continued, they jump to the conclusion that there is no rational reason to disagree with them. And since those same-sex marriage proponents view those who dissent from the liberal orthodoxy as bigots, or the equivalent of racists, they have no reason to support the religious freedom of dissenters.
While some liberals and conservatives believe there can be a “grand bargain” in which gay marriage is allowed and the religious freedom of dissenters is supported, George pointed out that he has long argued that could never be the case, because liberal secularism is a comprehensive doctrine in competition with other comprehensive doctrines.
“Liberal secularism,” he said, “never was and never will be what the late John Rawls depicted it as being and hoped it would be, namely, a purely political doctrine, as opposed to what he called a comprehensive view (a view of human nature, meaning, dignity, and destiny) that competes with other comprehensive views.
“Nowhere is the reality of contemporary liberalism as a comprehensive doctrine, a secularist religion, more plainly on display than in the moral-cultural struggle over marriage and sexual morality. Liberal secularism will tolerate other comprehensive views so long as they present no challenge or serious threat to its own most cherished values. The Amish are probably safe. But when they do, they must be smashed, in the name, for example, of ‘equality’ or preventing ‘dignitarian harm,’ and their faithful must be reduced to a dhimmi-like status in respect of opportunities, in employment, contracting, and other areas, that, from the point of view of liberal secularist doctrine, cannot be made available to them if they refuse to conform themselves to the demands of liberal ideology.”
There are some liberals, George added, that do still value religious freedom, tolerance and diversity who have spoken out against the liberals who have sought to punish or restrict the religious freedom of those who dissent from the liberal orthodoxy on marriage and sexuality. But he believes those tolerant liberals will ultimately lose their battle against intolerant liberals.
“Of course, there will be some within the liberal community, Rawlsians and others, who will try to make some room for meaningful dissent, even in practice and not just in thought and speech. And they will make various arguments, principled and practical, for why [liberals] should avoid being too draconian in its treatment of heretics and dissenters. But they will lose the battle,” he said.
HT: Christian Post
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

P1tchBlack

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Re: Gay ‘Marriage’ and Religious Freedom Cannot Coexist
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2018, 01:13:30 PM »
The basis of individual rights in this country is the United States Constitution, not the Bible. So, without referencing the Bible, only the US Constitution, make your case for why two adults should not be allowed to enter into a marriage contract, recognized by the government.

DunkingDan

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Diaper Boy aka Pitchy strikes out again
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2018, 01:21:20 PM »
I know nothing about on what America was founded

Christopher Columbus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  "It was the Lord who put into my mind (I could feel His hand upon me) the fact that it would be possible to sail from here to the Indies. . . . There is no question that the inspiration was from the Holy Spirit, because He comforted me with rays of marvelous inspiration from the Holy Scriptures. . . . I did not make use of intelligence, mathematics or maps. It is simply the fulfillment of what Isaiah had prophesied. . . . No one should fear to undertake any task in the name of Our Savior, if it is just and if the intention is purely for His holy service. The working out of all things has been assigned to each person by our Lord, but it all happens according to His sovereign will, even though He gives advice. He lacks nothing that is in the power of men to give Him. Oh, what a gracious Lord, who desires that people should perform for Him those things for which He holds Himself responsible day and night, moment by moment, everyone should express their most devoted gratitude to Him."
 
Early Settlers and Events Prior to the Revolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 
  1607 - The first act of the Jamestown Landing Party was to erect a magnificent cross representing the Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. The second act of the Colonists was to kneel down and commemorate the Last Supper together. Jamestown was the site of the first Protestant Church in America, and Robert Hunt laid down his life for this cause. Upon the base of the tallest and most conspicuous monument in Jamestown reads: ". . . Make yourselves all of one mind for the good of your country and your own, and to serve and fear GOD. . ."
1620 - November 9, the Mayflower ship landed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, with 101 colonists. On November 11, the Mayflower Compact was signed by the 41 men, establishing a form of local government in which the colonists agreed to abide by majority rule and to cooperate for the general good of the colony. It was not a constitution but rather an adaptation of the usual church covenant to a civil situation. The Compact set the precedent for other colonies as they established governments. It said, in part, "Having undertaken for the Glory of GOD, and Advancement of the Christian Faith, and the Honour of our King and Country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia . . ."
1634 - 200 settlers, many of them Catholic, established the first settlement in Marys-Land (Maryland), named for the Virgin Mary — lands granted to Roman Catholic Lord Baltimore by King Charles I.1636 - In June, Roger Williams founded Providence and Rhode Island. Williams had been banished from Massachusetts for "new and dangerous opinions" calling for religious and political freedoms, including separation of church and state, not granted under the Puritan rules. Providence then became a haven for many other colonists fleeing religious intolerance.
1681 - English Quakers granted a charter from Charles II to establish a colony (Pennsylvania) where religious and political freedom could flourish.
1682 - A large wave of immigrants, including many Quakers, arrived in Pennsylvania from Germany and the British Isles.
1682 - "All persons living in this province, who confess and acknowledge the One Almighty and Eternal GOD to be the Creator, Upholder, and Ruler of the world, and that hold themselves obliged in conscience to live peaceably and justly in civil society, shall in no wise be molested or prejudiced for their religious persuasion or practice, in matters of faith and worship; nor shall they be compelled at any time to frequent or maintain any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever." — Signed by William Penn to establish religious liberty in the new Provence of Pennsylvania.
1685 - Protestants in France lost their guarantee of religious freedom as King Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes, spurring many to leave for America.
1728 - Jewish colonists in New York City built the first American synagogue.
1734 - In December, the Great Awakening religious revival movement began in Massachusetts. The movement lasted ten years and spread to all of the American colonies.
   . . . The Awakening signaled . . . the belief that the essence of religious experience was the "new birth," inspired by the preaching of the Word. It invigorated even as it divided churches. The supporters of the Awakening and its evangelical thrust — Presbyterians, Baptists and Methodists — became the largest American Protestant denominations by the first decades of the nineteenth century.
 
Many of the British North American colonies ... were settled in the seventeenth century by men and women, who, in the face of European persecution, refused to compromise passionately held religious convictions and fled Europe. The New England colonies, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Maryland were conceived and established "as plantations of religion." Some settlers who arrived in these areas came for secular motives ... but the great majority left Europe to worship GOD in the way they believed to be correct.
  
 " ... scholars now identify a high level of religious energy in the colonies after 1700. ... Figures on church attendance and church formation support these opinions. Between 1700 and 1740, an estimated 75 to 80 percent of the population attended churches, which were being built at a headlong pace.
  
 The establishment of Protestant Christianity was one not only of law but also, and far more importantly, of culture. Protestant Christianity supplied the nation with its "system of values."
  
 In 1776, 98% of the population was Protestant Christian, 1.8% Catholic Christian, and .2 of 1% Jewish. That means that 99.8% of the people in America in 1776 professed to be Christians.
  
 Religion played a major role in the American Revolution by offering a moral sanction for opposition to the British - an assurance to the average American that revolution was justified in the sight of GOD.
  
 Ministers served the American cause in many capacities during the Revolution: as military chaplains, as penmen for committees of correspondence, and as members of state legislatures, constitutional conventions and the national Congress. Some even took up arms, leading Continental troops in battle.[14]
  
 One of the great slogans of the American Revolution was "No King but King Jesus!"[2]
   
 The spiritual emphasis manifested so often by the Americans during the Revolution caused one Crown-appointed British governor to write to Great Britain complaining that: "If you ask an American who is his master, he'll tell you he has none. And he has no governor but Jesus Christ".
   
 Most of the Founding Fathers were graduates of Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Dartmouth, or Columbia, all of which in those days expressed Christian leanings and were considered Christian institutions of higher education.
  Harvard produced such men as John Adams, John Hancock, Elbridge Gerry, John Pickering, William Williams, Rufus King, William Hooper, William Ellery, Samuel Adams, and Robert Treat Paine.
  Yale's graduates included Oliver Wolcott, William Livingston, Lyman Hall, Lewis Morris, Jared Ingersoll, Phillip Livingston, and William Samuel Johnson.
  Princetoneducated such men as John Witherspoon, James Madison, Richard Stockton, Benjamin Rush, Gunning Bedford, and Jonathan Dayton. 33% of the Founding Fathers were graduates of Princeton.
   
 Of the 55 signers of the Declaration of Independence, 52 were Orthodox Christians.
   
 In his 1833 work, A Moral and Political Sketch of the United States, Achille Murat said, "There is no country in which the people are so religious as in the United States; to the eyes of a foreigner they even appear to be too much so. The great number of religious societies existing in the United States is truly surprising: there are some of them to distribute the Bible; to distribute tracts; to encourage religious journals; to convert, civilize, educate the savages; to marry the preachers; to take care of their widows and orphans; to preach, extend, purify, preserve, reform the faith; to build chapels, endow congregations, support seminaries; catechize and convert sailors, Negroes, and loose women."
   
 Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story (appointed by President James Madison) called America a "Christian country."
   
 As late as 1850 Christians ran virtually every newspaper in this country. The law and the federal and local judiciaries were either all Christians or Jewish.
   
 Donald S. Lutz and the late Charles S. Hyneman, historians at the University of Houston, did a 10-year study of the ideas that shaped our Republic. They started with 15,000 documents from the Colonial era, which were boiled down to 3,154 statements. The three most quoted individuals were French philosopher Montesquieu (8.3%), English jurist William Blackstone (7.9%) and English philosopher John Locke (2.9%). But Biblical citations dwarfed them all. Ninety-four percent of the founding fathers' quotes were based on the Bible — 34% directly from its pages and 60% from men who had used the Bible to arrive at their conclusions.
 
A Brief Look at the Chronology of US Historical Documents
The Magna Carta
1215
JOHN, by the grace of GOD King of England, Lord of Ireland, Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and Count of Anjou, to his archbishops, bishops, abbots, earls, barons, justices, foresters, sheriffs, stewards, servants, and to all his officials and loyal subjects, Greeting.
KNOW THAT BEFORE GOD, for the health of our soul and those of our ancestors and heirs, to the honour of GOD, the exaltation of the holy Church, and the better ordering of our kingdom, at the advice of our reverend fathers Stephen, archbishop of Canterbury, primate of all England, and cardinal of the holy Roman Church, Henry archbishop of Dublin, William bishop of London, Peter bishop of Winchester, Jocelin bishop of Bath and Glastonbury, Hugh bishop of Lincoln, Walter Bishop of Worcester, William bishop of Coventry, Benedict bishop of Rochester, Master Pandulf subdeacon and member of the papal household, Brother Aymeric master of the knighthood of the Temple in England, William Marshal earl of Pembroke, William earl of Salisbury, William earl of Warren, William earl of Arundel, Alan de Galloway constable of Scotland, Warin Fitz Gerald, Peter Fitz Herbert, Hubert de Burgh seneschal of Poitou, Hugh de Neville, Matthew Fitz Herbert, Thomas Basset, Alan Basset, Philip Daubeny, Robert de Roppeley, John Marshal, John Fitz Hugh, and other loyal subjects:
1.     FIRST, THAT WE HAVE GRANTED TO GOD, and by this present charter have confirmed for us and our heirs in perpetuity, that the English Church shall be free, and shall have its rights undiminished, and its liberties unimpaired. That we wish this so to be observed, appears from the fact that of our own free will, before the outbreak of the present dispute between us and our barons, we granted and confirmed by charter the freedom of the Church's elections - a right reckoned to be of the greatest necessity and importance to it - and caused this to be confirmed by Pope Innocent III. This freedom we shall observe ourselves, and desire to be observed in good faith by our heirs in perpetuity.
The First Virginia Charter
April 10, 1606
James, by the grace of GOD [King of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith], etc. Whereas our loving and weldisposed subjects, Sir Thomas Gates and Sir George Somers, Knightes; Richarde Hackluit, Clarke, Prebendarie of Westminster; and Edwarde Maria Winghfeilde, Thomas Hannam and Raleighe Gilberde, Esquiers; William Parker and George Popham, Gentlemen; and divers others of our loving subjects, have been humble sutors unto us that wee woulde vouchsafe unto them our licence to make habitacion, plantacion and to deduce a colonie of sondrie of our people into that parte of America commonly called Virginia, and other parts and territories in America either appartaining unto us or which are not nowe actuallie possessed by anie Christian prince or people, scituate, lying and being all along the sea coastes between fower and thirtie degrees of northerly latitude from the equinoctiall line and five and fortie degrees of the same latitude and in the maine lande betweene the same fower and thirtie and five and fourtie degrees, and the ilandes thereunto adjacente or within one hundred miles of the coaste thereof;
And to that ende, and for the more speedy accomplishemente of theire saide intended plantacion and habitacion there, are desirous to devide themselves into two severall colonies and companies, the one consisting of certaine Knightes, gentlemen, marchanntes and other adventurers of our cittie of London, and elsewhere, which are and from time to time shalbe joined unto them which doe desire to begin theire plantacions and habitacions in some fitt and conveniente place between fower and thirtie and one and fortie degrees of the said latitude all alongest the coaste of Virginia and coastes of America aforesaid and the other consisting of sondrie Knightes, gentlemen, merchanntes, and other adventurers of our citties of Bristoll and Exeter, and of our towne of Plymouthe, and of other places which doe joine themselves unto that colonie which doe desire to beginn theire plantacions and habitacions in some fitt and convenient place betweene eighte and thirtie degrees and five and fortie degrees of the saide latitude all alongst the saide coaste of Virginia and America as that coaste lieth;
Wee, greately commending and graciously accepting of theire desires to the furtherance of soe noble a worke which may, by the providence of Almightie GOD, hereafter tende to the glorie of His Divine Majestie in propagating of Christian religion to suche people as yet live in darkenesse and miserable ignorance of the true knoweledge and worshippe of GOD and may in tyme bring the infidels and salvages living in those parts to humane civilitie and to a setled and quiet govermente, doe by theise our lettres patents graciously accepte of and agree to theire humble and well intended desires
The Third Virginia Charter
March 12, 1612
James, by the grace of GOD [King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith;] to all to whom [these pres-ents shall come,] greeting. Whereas at the humble suite of divers and sundry our lovinge subjects, aswell adventurers as planters of the First Colonie in Virginia, and for the propagacion of Christian religion and reclayminge of people barbarous to civilitie and humanitie, we have by our lettres patent bearing date at Westminster the three and twentieth daie of May in the seaventh yeare of our raigne of England, Frannce and Ireland, and the twoe and fortieth of Scotland, given and grannted unto them, that they and all suche and soe manie of our loving subjects as shold from time to time for ever after be joyned with them as planters or adventurers in the said plantacion, and their succes-sors for ever, shold be one body politique incorporated by the name of The Treasorer and Planters of the Cittie of London for the First Colonie in Virginia;
And whereas allsoe for the greater good and benefitt of the said Companie and for the better furnishing and establishing of the said plantacion we did further [give], grannte and con-firme by our said lettres patent unto the said Treasorer and Com-panie and their successors for ever, all those landes, contries and territories scituate, lyeing and being in that part of America called Virginia, from the point of land called Cape [or] Pointe Comfort all along the seacoste to the northward twoe hundred miles, and from the said point of Cape Comfort all along the seacoste to the sowthward twoe hundred miles, and all the space and circuit of land lying from the sea coste of the precinct afore-said up or into the land throughout from sea to sea, west and northwest, and allso all the islandes lying within one hundred miles along the coast of both the seas of the precinct aforsaid, with diverse other grannts, liberties, franchises, preheminences, privileges, profiitts, benefitts, and commodities, grannted in and by our said lettres patent to the said Tresorer and Companie, and their successors, for ever:
Now for asmuchas we are given to undestande that in these seas adjoyning to the said coast of Virginia and without the com- passe of those twoe hundred miles by us soe grannted unto the said Treasurer and Companie as aforesaid, and yet not farr dis- tant from the said Colony in Virginia, there are or may be divers islandes lying desolate and uninhabited, some of which are al- ready made knowne and discovered by the industry, travell, and expences of the said Company, and others allsoe are sup-posed to be and remaine as yet unknowen and undiscovered, all and every of which itt maie importe the said Colony both in safety and pollecy of trade to populate and plant, in regard where of, aswell for the preventing of perill as for the better comodity and prosperity of the said Colony, they have bin hum-ble suitors unto us that we wold be pleased to grannt unto them an inlardgement of our said former lettres patent, aswell for a more ample extent of their limitts and territories into the seas adjoyning to and uppon the coast of Virginia as allsoe for some other matters and articles concerning the better government of the said Company and Collony, in which point our said former lettres patents doe not extende soe farre as time and experience hath found to be needfull and convenient:
We, therefore, tendring the good and happy successe of the said plantacion both in respect of the generall weale of humane society as in respect of the good of our owne estate and kinge- domes, and being willing to give furtherannt untoall good meanes that may advannce the benefitt of the said Company and which maie secure the safety of our loving subjects, planted in our said Colony under the favour and proteccion of GOD Almighty
The Mayflower Compact
1620
"In the name of GOD, Amen. We, whose names are underwritten, the Loyal Subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord, King James, by the Grace of GOD, of England, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, e&.
Having undertaken for the Glory of GOD, and Advancement of the Christian Faith, and the Honour of our King and Country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia; do by these presents, solemnly and mutually in the Presence of GOD and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil Body Politick, for our better Ordering and Preservation, and Furtherance of the Ends aforesaid; And by Virtue hereof to enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equal Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the General good of the Colony; unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.
In Witness whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names at Cape Cod the eleventh of November, in the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, King James of England, France and Ireland, the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fifty-fourth. Anno Domini, 1620."
The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut
January 14, 1639
For as much as it hath pleased Almighty GOD by the wise disposition of his divine providence so to order and dispose of things that we the Inhabitants and Residents of Windsor, Hartford and Wethersfield are now cohabiting and dwelling in and upon the River of Connectecotte and the lands thereunto adjoining; and well knowing where a people are gathered together the word of GOD requires that to maintain the peace and union of such a people there should be an orderly and decent Government established according to GOD, to order and dispose of the affairs of the people at all seasons as occasion shall require; do therefore associate and conjoin ourselves to be as one Public State or Commonwealth; and do for ourselves and our successors and such as shall be adjoined to us at any time hereafter, enter into Combination and Confederation together, to maintain and preserve the liberty and purity of the Gospel of our Lord Jesus which we now profess, as also, the discipline of the Churches, which according to the truth of the said Gospel is now practiced amongst us; as also in our civil affairs to be guided and governed accordinbg to such Laws, Rules, Orders and Decrees as shall be made, ordered, and decreed as followeth: 
January 14, 1639
For as much as it hath pleased Almighty GOD by the wise disposition of his divine providence so to order and dispose of things that we the Inhabitants and Residents of Windsor, Hartford and Wethersfield are now cohabiting and dwelling in and upon the River of Connectecotte and the lands thereunto adjoining; and well knowing where a people are gathered together the word of GOD requires that to maintain the peace and union of such a people there should be an orderly and decent Government established according to GOD, to order and dispose of the affairs of the people at all seasons as occasion shall require; do therefore associate and conjoin ourselves to be as one Public State or Commonwealth; and do for ourselves and our successors and such as shall be adjoined to us at any time hereafter, enter into Combination and Confederation together, to maintain and preserve the liberty and purity of the Gospel of our Lord Jesus which we now profess, as also, the discipline of the Churches, which according to the truth of the said Gospel is now practiced amongst us; as also in our civil affairs to be guided and governed accordinbg to such Laws, Rules, Orders and Decrees as shall be made, ordered, and decreed as followeth:
 
 an so on that contains many more proofs our our foundation

1650-1700

18th Century
1701-1774

1775-1800

19th Century
1801-1824

Some quotes not taken out of context
Abigail Adams
 1744-1818  Wife of John Adams . . . mother of John Quincy Adams . . . One of the most influential First Ladies in American History.

"A patriot without religions is as great a paradox as an honest man without the fear of GOD ... The scriptures tell us 'righteousness exalts a nation.' "
 
 "... a true American Patriot must be a religious man ... He who neglects his duty to his maker, may well be expected to be deficient and insincere in his duty towards the public"

John Adams
 1735-1826 — 2nd President of US (1797-1801)... First Vice President under Washington... As a delegate to the First and Second Continental Congresses, he led in the movement for independence... During the Revolutionary War he served in France and Holland in diplomatic roles, and helped negotiate the treaty of peace... Minister to the Court of St. James's (1785-1788).

Excerpt from a letter to Benjamin Rush: "The Christian religion . . . is the brightness of the glory and the express portrait of the character of the eternal, self-existent, independent, benevolent, all powerful and all merciful creator, preserver, and Father of the universe, the first good, first perfect, and first fair. It will last as long as the world. Neither savage nor civilized man, without a revelation, could ever have discovered or invented it. Ask me not, then, whether I am a Catholic or Protestant, Calvinist or Arminian. As far as they are Christians, I wish to be a fellow disciple with them all." (Adam's Dairy, July 26, 1796, Christianity and the Constitution, John Eidsmoe, p. 285)
In November 1800, in his second evening in the White House, he wrote his wife:
 "Before I end my letter, I pray Heaven to bestow the best of Blessings on this House and all that shall hereafter inhabit it. May none but honest and wise Men ever rule under this roof."
Other statements:
 "If we make religion our business, GOD will make it our blessedness."
"If 'Thou shalt not covet,' and 'Thou shalt not steal,'were not commandments of Heaven, they must be made inviolable precepts in every society before it can be civilized or made free."
Fast and Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, issued at a time when the nation appeared to be on the brink of a war with France:
 Adams urged the citizens to "acknowledge before GOD the manifold sins and transgressions with which we are justly chargeable as individuals and as a nation; beseeching Him at the same time, of His infinite grace, through the Redeemer of the World, freely to remit all our offenses, and to incline us, by His Holy Spirit, to that sincere repentance and reformation which may afford us reason to hope for His inestimable favor and heavenly benediction."

On April 19, 1817, Adams wrote a letter to Thomas Jefferson in which he recounted a conversation between Joseph Cleverly and Lemuel Bryant; a schoolmaster and a minister he had known. Disgusted by the petty religious bickering displayed by those two, Adams declared: (The italicized portion is often quoted out of context by revisionist historians.)
 "Twenty times in the course of my late reading have I been on the point of breaking out, 'This would be the best of all possible worlds, if there were no religion in it!!!' But in this exclamation I would have been as fanatical as Bryant or Cleverly. Without religion this world would be something not fit to be mentioned in polite company, I mean hell."
John Quincy Adams
 1767-1848 — 6th President of US (1825-1829). . . Massachusetts State Legislative (1802) . . . Senator from Massachusetts (1803-1808). . . US Secretary of State (1817-1825) . . . House of Representatives: Massachusetts (1831-1848), during which, he was an opponent of slavery . . . Other Offices: Minister to the Netherlands; Minister to Prussia; Minister to Russia; Minister to Great Britain. By the time he died, he was known as a champion of freedom of speech

"The general principles on which the fathers achieved independence were . . . the general principles of Christianity."
 
 "My hopes of a future life are all founded upon the Gospel of Christ and I cannot cavil or quibble away [evade or object to] . . . the whole tenor of His conduct by which He sometimes positively asserted and at others countenances [permits] His disciples in asserting that He was GOD."

"Duty is ours; results are GOD's. The first and almost the only Book deserving of universal attention is the Bible. I speak as a man of the world to men of the world; and I say to you, Search the Scriptures! The Bible is the book of all others, to be read at all ages, and in all conditions of human life; not to be read once or twice or thrice through, and then laid aside, but to be read in small portions of one or two chapters every day, and never to be intermitted, unless by some overruling necessity. In what light so ever we regard the Bible, whether with reference to revelation, to history, or to morality, it is an invaluable and inexhaustible mine of knowledge and virtue. It is no slight testimonial, both to the merit and worth of Christianity, that in all ages since its promulgation the great mass of those who have risen to eminence by their profound wisdom and integrity have recognized and reverenced Jesus of Nazareth as the Son of the living GOD." "… Posterity — you will never know how much it has cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it." — America's GOD and Country, William Federer, p.19-20
 

 ". . . So great is my veneration for the Bible, and so strong my belief, that when duly read and meditated on, it is of all books in the world, that which contributes most to make men good, wise, and happy — that the earlier my children begin to read it, the more steadily they pursue the practice of reading it throughout their lives, the more lively and confident will be my hopes that they will prove useful citizens to their country, respectable members of society, and a real blessing to their parents."

Samuel Adams
 1722-1803 — A leader in the Boston Tea Party and Sons of Liberty . . . Has been called "The Father of the American Revolution" . . . One of the most voluminous and influential political writers of his time . . . Delegate to the Continental Congress (1774-1781) . . . Signer of the Declaration of Independence . . . One of the individuals responsible for the movement that led to the drafting and adopting of the Bill of Rights . . . Lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts (1789-1794), and governor (1794-1797).

Excerpt from a letter to his cousin John Adams, Oct. 4, 1790, (America's GOD and Country, William Federer, p.23)"Let … statesmen and patriots unite in their endeavors to renovate the age by … educating their little boys and girls . . . and leading them in the study and practice of the exalted virtues of the Christian system."[43]
Excerpt from his 1795 proclamation calling for for prayer, fasting and thanksgiving:
 “. . . That the peaceful and glorious being of our Divine Redeemer may be known and enjoyed throughout the whole family of mankind."

Excerpt from his 1797 proclamation:
 “ . . . Speedily bringing on that holy and happy period when the Kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ may be everywhere established and all the people willing bow to the scepter of him who is the Prince of Peace.”

"A general dissolution of Principles and Manners will more surely overthrow the Liberties of America than the whole Force of the common enemy. While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but when once they lose their virtue they will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader . . . If virtue and knowledge are diffused among the people, they will never be enslaved. This will be their great security."
From his will:
 "First of all, I . . . rely upon the merits of Jesus Christ for a pardon of all my sins."


  

Benjamin Franklin 1706-1790 — Statesman, scientist, inventor, printer, writer . . . Delegate to Continental Congress . . . Postmaster General . . . Appointed to committee to draft the Declaration of Independence, which he signed . . . Diplomat and agent for US in Europe . . . Served on the Federal Constitution Committee and worked earnestly for ratification of Constitution . . . In his early life he was said to be a Deist, but later embraced Christian principles although he believed that the teachings of Christ had been corrupted . . . Once Franklin had settled upon a . . . set of religious beliefs about GOD and man's relation to GOD, he remained faithful to them.

"Here is my Creed. I believe in one GOD, the Creator of the Universe. That He governs it by His Providence. That He ought to be worshipped . . . As to Jesus of Nazareth . . . I think the System of Morals and his Religion, as he left them to us, is the best the World ever saw, or is likely to see. "
In Benjamin Franklin's 1749 plan of education for public schools in Pennsylvania, he said:
 "History will afford the frequent opportunities of showing the necessity of a public religion, from its usefulness to the public; the advantage of a religious character among private persons; the mischiefs of superstition &c. and the excellency of the Christian religion above all others, ancient or modern."
 
 [Franklin] chose a New Testament verse for the motto of the Philadelphia Hospital; . . . he was one of the chief voices behind the establishment of a paid chaplain in Congress; and . . . in 1787 when Franklin helped found the college which bore his name, it was dedicated as "a nursery of religion and learning" built "on Christ, the Cornerstone."

From a letter to Thomas Paine:
 "If men are so wicked with religion, what would they be if without it?"
From a letter to his daughter:
 "Go constantly to church, whoever preaches. The act of devotion in the Common Prayer Book is your principal business there, and if properly attended to, will do more towards amending the heart than sermons generally can do. For they were composed by men of much greater piety and wisdom, than our common composers of sermons can pretend to be; and therefore I wish you would never miss the prayer days; yet I do not mean you should despise sermons, even of the preachers you dislike, for the discourse is often much better than the man, as sweet and clear waters come through very dirty earth."
Speech delivered to the Continental Congress on June 28, 1787, when that body was deadlocked over drafting our Nation's Constitution:
 "In the beginning of the contest with Britain, when we were sensible of danger, we had daily prayers in this room for Divine protection. Our prayers, Sir, were heard and they were graciously answered. All of us who were engaged in the struggle must have observed frequent instances of a superintending Providence in our favor . . . And have we now forgotten this powerful Friend? Or do we imagine we no longer need His assistance?
"I have lived, sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth: that 'GOD governs in the affairs of man.' And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid?
"We have been assured, sir, in the Sacred Writings that except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it. I firmly believe this. I also believe that, without His concurring aid, we shall succeed in this political building no better than the builders of Babel . . .
"I therefore beg leave to move that, henceforth, prayers imploring the assistance of Heaven and its blessing on our deliberation be held in this assembly every morning before we proceed to business.'"
 
(The Congress then prayed and opened with prayers each day thereafter and, by doing so, was able to successfully complete its work.)
"A Bible and a newspaper in every house, a good school in every district  all studied and appreciated as they merit — are the principle of virtue, morality, and civil liberty." (America's GOD and Country, William Federer, p.246) 
Alexander Hamilton 1755-1804 — During Revolutionary war, he was the Captain of Artillery and Washington's secretary and aide-de-camp . . . He performed brilliantly on the Field at Yorktown . . . Delegate to Continental Congress . . . Secretary of Treasury under George Washington . . . Played a decisive role in shaping domestic and foreign policy. Author of The Federalist Papers.

"I have carefully examined the evidences of the Christian religion, and if I was sitting as a juror upon its authenticity I would unhesitatingly give my verdict in its favor. I can prove its truth as clearly as any proposition ever submitted to the mind of man."
[s
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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Diaper Boy aka Pitchy Continues to prove my point
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2018, 01:21:30 PM »
I don't care what this country was founded on or its laws
John Hancock 1737-1793 — Opposed British stamp act . . . Signer of Declaration of Independence . . . His signature appears first and is the largest thereon . . . He lost most of his fortune during the war, having given over $100,000 to the cause of freedom . . . Member of Continental Congress (1775-1780) . . . Served as its president (1775-1777).

A portion of his proclamation calling the state to prayer and thanksgiving issued on October 15, 1791 while serving as governor of Massachusetts:
 "And pray especially that universal happiness can be established in the world and that all may bow to the scepter of our Lord Jesus Christ and that the whole Earth may be filled with his glory."


Said while president of the Continental Congress:
"Let us humbly commit our righteous cause to the great Lord of the Universe."

Nominate | Report
Posted: 7/1/2009 8:39 PM
Pt. 3 

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Patrick Henry 1736-1799 — Known as an orator of no equal . . . Delegate to House of burgesses (1765-74) . . . Served in the Continental Congress (1774-1776) . . . Delegate to the Virginia Provincial Convention (1775) . . . Governor of Virginia (1776-1779) . . . Worked successfully to have first 10 amendments added to the US Constitution.
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"The Bible is worth all other books which have ever been printed."
Written on the back of Henry's Stamp Act, 1765:
 "Whether this [new government] will prove a blessing or a curse will depend upon the use our people make of the blessings which a gracious GOD hath bestowed on us. If they are wise, they will be great and happy. If they are of a contrary character, they will be miserable. Righteousness alone can exalt them as a nation [Proverbs 14:34]. Reader! Whoever thou art, remember this, and in thy sphere practice virtue thyself and encourage it in others."
March 23, 1775 at the Second Virginia Convention:
 ". . .Sir, we are not weak, if we make a proper use of the means which the GOD of nature hath placed in our power. Three millions of people, armed in the Holy cause of Liberty, and in such a country as that which we posses, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us. Besides, sir, we shall not fight our battle alone. There is a just GOD who presides over the destinies of nations; and who will raise up friends to fight our battle for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave . . . Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty GOD! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!"

From a 1796 letter to his daughter:
 Amongst other strange things said of me, I hear it is said by the deists that I am one of their number; and, indeed, that some good people think I am no Christian. This thought gives me much more pain than the appellation of Tory; because I think religion of infinitely higher importance than politics; and I find much cause to reproach myself that I have lived so long and have given no decided and public proofs of my being a Christian. But, indeed, my dear child, this is a character which I prize far above all this world has, or can boast.

From his last will and testament:
 "This is all the inheritance I can give to my dear family. The religion of Christ can give them one which will make them rich indeed."
  

Thomas Jefferson 1743-1826 — 3rd President of the US (1801-1809) . . . Delegate to second continental congress(1775-1776) . . . Served on committee to draft Declaration of Independence. Except for minor revisions by Adams, Franklin and others on the floor, the document was wholly his work . . . Pushed for a bill (1796) for establishing religious freedom, grounded in the belief that the opinions of man cannot be coerced.
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Jefferson was a member of the vestry of his local Anglican church.
As an elected official in Virginia in the mid 1770s he authored "A bill for appointing days for public fasting and thanksgiving." As Governor of Virginia in 1779 Jefferson issued "A day of public and solemn prayer to almighty GOD."
From his "Second Inaugural Address" in 1805:
 "[We are in the hands of] the GOD who ... led our fathers, as Israel of old, from their native land and planted them in a country flowing with all the necessaries and comforts of life; who has covered our infancy with His providence and our riper years with His wisdom and power, and to whose goodness I ask you to join in supplications with me that He will so enlighten the minds of your servants, guide their councils, and prosper their measures that whatsoever they do shall result in your good, and shall secure to you the peace, friendship and approbation of all nations."

Addressed to William Canby in 1813:
 "Of all systems of morality, ancient or modern, which have come under my observation, none appear to be so pure as that of Jesus."
"Can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are the gift of GOD? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? I tremble for my country when I reflect that GOD is just; that His justice cannot sleep forever."
"The GOD who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time."
"I hold the precepts of Jesus as delivered by Himself, to be the most pure, benevolent and sublime which have ever been preached to man..."
"To the corruptions of Christianity I am indeed opposed; but not to the genuine precepts of Jesus himself. I am a Christian, in the only sense he wished any one to be; sincerely attached to his doctrines, in the preference to all others."
From his last will and testament:
 "I am a real Christian, that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus Christ."
George Washington 1732-1799 — 1st President of the US (1789-1797) . . . At age 16 helped survey Shenandoah lands for Thomas, Lord Fairfax . . . Fought in the French and Indian War . . . Before the American Revolution, served in the Virginia House of Burgesses . . . Elected Commander in Chief of the Continental Army by the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia in May 1775 . . . Served in that capacity for six years . . . Prime mover in the steps leading to the Constitutional Convention at Philadelphia in 1787 . . . He was unanimously elected president after the new Constitution was ratified . . . Kept America neutral during war between France and England after the French revolution . . . Wearied of politics, he retired at the end of his second term and retired to Mount Vernon.[6]
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He issued this general order at New York on August 3, 1776 just prior to the battle of Long Island:
 "The General is sorry to be informed that the foolish, and wicked practice, of profane cursing and swearing (a Vice heretofore little known in an American Army) is growing into fashion; he hopes the officers will, by example, as well as influence, endeavour to check it, and that both they, and the men will reflect, that we can have little hopes of the blessing of Heaven on our Arms, if we insult it by our impiety, and folly; added to this, it is a vice so mean and low, without any temptation, that every man of sense, and character, detests and despises it.
By 1778, Washington had so often witnessed GOD's intervention that on August 20, he wrote Thomas Nelson:
 "The Hand of providence has been so conspicuous in all this, that he must be worse than an infidel that lacks faith, and more than wicked, that has not gratitude enough to acknowledge his obligations."
As commander in chief of the Army he believed strongly in religious disciplines. He insisted on having military Chaplains. He wrote to the army in 1778:
 "To the distinguished character of a Patriot, it should be our highest glory to add the more distinguished character of a Christian."
After the signing of the peace treaty between America and England, he resigned as Commander in Chief and sent a circular letter to the 13 state legislatures informing them of his resignation, ending with this prayer:
 "I now make it my earnest prayer that GOD will have you and the state over which you preside in His holy protection, that He would incline the hearts of the citizens to cultivate the spirit of subordination and obedience to government, to entertain a brotherly affection and a love for one another, for their fellow citizens of the United States and particularly for their brethren who have served in the field, and finally that He would be most graciously pleased to dispose us all to do justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with that charity, humility and peaceful temper of mind which were the characteristics of the Divine Author of our Blessed Religion and without an humble imitation in these things we can never hope to be a happy nation."
Washington was for many years a vestryman at Truro Parish, his local Episcopal Church. The entry of June 5, 1772, shows Washington and his neighbor, George Mason, the author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights, engaged in parish business, including making arrangements for replacing the front steps of the church, painting its roof and selling church pews to the members as a means of obtaining revenue. The minutes of the meeting also reveal that Washington and George William Fairfax presented the parish with gold leaf to be used to gild letters on "Carved Ornaments" on the altar.
When approached by Delaware Indian chiefs who desired that their youth be trained in American schools He advised them: "You do well to wish to learn our arts and our ways of life and above all, the religion of Jesus Christ. These will make you a greater and happier people than you are. Congress will do everything they can to assist you in this wise intention."
It is factual that President Washington knelt and prayed and read the Bible for one hour every day. Washington's Prayer Journal
Excerpts from his Farewell Speech on September 19, 1796:
 "Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great Pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of Men and Citizens. The mere Politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity . . . And let us indulge with caution the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion . . . Reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail to the exclusion of religious principle."
Research shows:
 Washington didn't wear Christianity on his sleeve; he was private in his beliefs. Mary Thompson, Official research Specialist at Mt. Vernon did a 7-year study of Washington's religious life and found he believed that GOD took an active part in the founding of the US, that GOD took an active interest in people's lives, and the way a person behaved in reference to GOD would influence the way GOD related to him. According to Dr. Peter Lillback of the Providence Foundation, Washington spoke of "Providence" (Divine care and guardianship )over 200 times in private letters and speeches showing that the believed that Providence is all-knowing, all wise, involved in what happens in the world.
John Marshall, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court described Washington:
 "Without making ostentatious professions of religion, he was a sincere believer in the Christian faith, and a truly devout man."

Nellie Custis, their adopted daughter, who lived with the Washingtons 20 years from childhood to marriage, wrote to Jerod Sparks, a Chaplain of Congress:
 "George Washington attended church in Virginia at Alexandria when the weather and roads permitted a ride of ten miles. While serving as president in New York and Philadelphia, he never omitted attendance of church in the morning unless detained by sickness. No one in church attended to the services with more reverential respect. I should have thought it the greatest heresy to doubt his firm belief in Christianity. His life, his writings prove that he was a Christian . . . Is it necessary that anyone should prove that General Washington claimed to be a believer in Christianity? As well may we question his patriotism and his devotion to his country."
Sparks compiled George Washington's works and published them in twelve volumes between 1834 and 1837. Based on his extensive research into Washington's religious life, Sparks concluded:
 "To say that he [George Washington] was not a Christian would be to impeach his sincerity and honesty. Of all men in the world, Washington was certainly the last whom any one would charge with dissimulation or indirectness [hypocrisies and evasiveness]; and if he was so scrupulous in avoiding even a shadow of these faults in every known act of his life, [regardless of] however unimportant, is it likely, is it credible, that in a matter of the highest and most serious importance [his religious faith, that] he should practice through a long series of years a deliberate deception upon his friends and the public? It is neither credible nor possible."
Inscribed on Washington's tomb in Mount Vernon:
 "I am the resurrection and the life saith the Lord, he that believeth in me though he were dead, yet shall he live; and whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die. St. John XI.25.26"
  

Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859), French writer and politician, author of Democracy in America, wrote:
"The Americans combine the notions of Christianity and of liberty so intimately in their minds, that it is impossible to make them conceive the one without the other. "
"There is no country in the world where the Christian religion retains a greater influence over the souls of men than in America."
A study of America's past will show that a majority of Americans shared a common faith and a common ethic. America's earliest founders were self-professing Christians and their founding documents expressed a belief in a Christian world view."
 — 
Gary DeMar
 
 
"My extensive readings have left me without a doubt that this nation was founded by Christians, and was meant to be based on broad Christian principles. Religion was the bedrock upon which the nation stood, and without it these amazing men and women saw no future for the country they had established."
 - Rabbi Daniel Labin

This is just but a drop of sand in the desert of the overwhelming facts supporting that we where founded from a Christian heritage. This quote sums it up perfectly
From a letter Thomas Jefferson wrote to John Adams on May 5, 1817:
 "What makes revisionism so effective is that few citizens actually take time to confirm revisionists' claims or to proclaim to the public the real facts."
 
 As a note as to Christ not being mentioned someone needs to study and find out who composes the trinity as well as their relationship to each other.



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Nominate | Report
Posted: 7/1/2009 8:40 PM
Pt. 4 

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Alabama
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Alabama, in order to establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty GOD, do ordain and establish the following Constitution and form of government for the State of Alabama:

Section 1:
 That all men are equally free and independent; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Section 186, witness oath:
 "... so help me GOD."

Section 279, oath of office:
 "So help me GOD."

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Alaska
Preamble:
 We the people of Alaska, grateful to GOD and to those who founded our nation and pioneered this great land, in order to secure and transmit to succeeding generations our heritage of political, civil, and religious liberty within the Union of States, do ordain and establish this constitution for the State of Alaska.

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Arizona
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Arizona, grateful to Almighty GOD for our liberties, do ordain this Constitution.

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Arkansas
Preamble:
 We, the People of the State of Arkansas, grateful to Almighty GOD for the privilege of choosing our own form of government; for our civil and religious liberty; and desiring to perpetuate its blessings, and secure the same to our selves and posterity; do ordain and establish this Constitution.

Article 2, Section 24:
 All men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty GOD according to the dictates of their own consciences;

Article 19:
 No person who denies the being of a GOD shall hold any office in the civil departments of this State, nor be competent to testify as a witness in any Court.

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy four ...

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California
Preamble:
 We, the People of the State of California, grateful to Almighty GOD for our freedom, in order to secure and perpetuate its blessings, do establish this Constitution.

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Colorado
Preamble:
 We, the people of Colorado, with profound reverence for the Supreme Ruler of the Universe, in order to form a more independent and perfect government; establish justice; insure tranquillity; provide for the common defense; promote the general welfare and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this constitution for the "State of Colorado".

Article 5, Section 45:
 ... in the year of our Lord 1885 ...

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-six ...

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Connecticut
Preamble:
 The People of Connecticut acknowledging with gratitude, the good providence of GOD, in having permitted them to enjoy a free government; do, in order more effectually to define, secure, and perpetuate the liberties, rights and privileges which they have derived from their ancestors; hereby, after a careful consideration and revision, ordain and establish the following constitution and form of civil government.

Article 11, Section 1, oath of office:
 ... So help you GOD.

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Delaware
Preamble:
 Through Divine goodness, all men have by nature the rights of worshiping and serving their Creatoraccording to the dictates of their consciences, of enjoying and defending life and liberty, of acquiring and protecting reputation and property, and in general of obtaining objects suitable to their condition, without injury by one to another; and as these rights are essential to their welfare, for due exercise thereof, power is inherent in them; and therefore all just authority in the institutions of political society is derived from the people, and established with their consent, to advance their happiness; and they may for this end, as circumstances require, from time to time, alter their Constitution of government.

Article 1, Section 1:
 Although it is the duty of all men frequently to assemble together for the public worship of Almighty GOD; and piety and morality, on which the prosperity of communities depends, are hereby promoted; yet no man shall or ought to be compelled to attend any religious worship, to contribute to the erection or support of any place of worship, or to the maintenance of any ministry, against his own free will and consent;

Article 5, Section 2:
 ... in the year of our Lord, Nineteen Hundred ...

Article 14, Section 1, oath of office:
 "... so help me GOD."

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ninety-Seven ...

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Florida
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Florida, being grateful to Almighty GOD for our constitutional liberty, in order to secure its benefits, perfect our government, insure domestic tranquility, maintain public order, and guarantee equal civil and political rights to all, do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 2, Section 5, oath of office:
 "So help me GOD."

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Georgia
Preamble:
 To perpetuate the principles of free government, insure justice to all, preserve peace, promote the interest and happiness of the citizen and of the family, and transmit to posterity the enjoyment of liberty, we the people of Georgia, relying upon the protection and guidance of Almighty GOD, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

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Hawaii
Preamble:
 We, the people of Hawaii, grateful for Divine Guidance, and mindful of our Hawaiian heritage and uniqueness as an island State, dedicate our efforts to fulfill the philosophy decreed by the Hawaii State motto, "Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono."

Article 7, Section 13:
 Bonds issued by or on behalf of the State or by any political subdivision to meet appropriations for any fiscal period in anticipation of the collection of revenues for such period or to meet casual deficits or failures of revenue, if required to be paid within one year, and bonds issued by or on behalf of the State to suppress insurrection, to repel invasion, to defend the State in war or to meet emergencies caused by disaster or act of GOD.

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Idaho
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Idaho, grateful to Almighty GOD for our freedom, to secure its blessings and promote our common welfare do establish this Constitution.

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Illinois
Preamble:
 We, the People of the State of Illinois - grateful to Almighty GOD for the civil, political and religious liberty which He has permitted us to enjoy and seeking His blessing upon our endeavors - in order to provide for the health, safety and welfare of the people; maintain a representative and orderly government; eliminate poverty and inequality; assure legal, social and economic justice; provide opportunity for the fullest development of the individual; insure domestic tranquility; provide for the common defense; and secure the blessings of freedom and liberty to ourselves and our posterity - do ordain and establish this Constitution for the State of Illinois.

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Indiana
Preamble:
 TO THE END, that justice be established, public order maintained, and liberty perpetuated; WE, the People of the State of Indiana, grateful to ALMIGHTY GOD for the free exercise of the right to choose our own form of government, do ordain this Constitution.

Article 1, Section 1:
 WE DECLARE, That all people are created equal; that they are endowed by their CREATOR with certain inalienable rights;

Article 1, Section 2:
 All people shall be secured in the natural right to worship ALMIGHTY GOD, according to the dictates of their own consciences.

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Iowa
Preamble:
 WE THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF IOWA, grateful to the Supreme Being for the blessings hitherto enjoyed, and feeling our dependence on Him for a continuation of those blessings, do ordain and establish a free and independent government, by the name of the State of Iowa, the boundaries whereof shall be as follows:

Article 9, Part 2, Section 3:t 2, Section 3:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-one ...

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Kansas
Preamble:
 We, the people of Kansas, grateful to Almighty GOD for our civil and religious privileges, in order to insure the full enjoyment of our rights as American citizens, do ordain and establish this constitution of the state of Kansas, with the following boundaries, to wit:

Bill of Rights, Section 7:
 The right to worship GOD according to the dictates of conscience shall never be infringed;

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Kentucky
Preamble:
 We, the people of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, grateful to Almighty GOD for the civil, political and religious liberties we enjoy, and invoking the continuance of these blessings, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

Section 1, Clause 2:
 The right of worshipping Almighty GOD according to the dictates of their consciences.

Section 228, oath of office:
 ... so help me GOD.

Section 232:
 The manner of administering an oath or affirmation shall be such as is most consistent with the conscience of the deponent, and shall be esteemed by the General Assembly the most solemn appeal to GOD.

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one ...

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Louisiana
Preamble:
 We, the people of Louisiana, grateful to Almighty GOD for the civil, political, economic, and religious liberties we enjoy, and desiring to protect individual rights to life, liberty, and property; afford opportunity for the fullest development of the individual; assure equality of rights; promote the health, safety, education, and welfare of the people; maintain a representative and orderly government; ensure domestic tranquility; provide for the common defense; and secure the blessings of freedom and justice to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 10, Section 30, oath of office:
 "... so help me GOD."

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Maine
Preamble:
 We the people of Maine, in order to establish justice, insure tranquility, provide for our mutual defense, promote our common welfare, and secure to ourselves and our posterity the blessings of liberty, acknowledging with grateful hearts the goodness of the Sovereign Ruler of the Universe in affording us an opportunity, so favorable to the design; and, imploring GOD's aid and direction in its accomplishment, do agree to form ourselves into a free and independent State, by the style and title of the State of Maine and do ordain and establish the following Constitution for the government of the same.

Article 1, Section 3:
 All individuals have a natural and unalienable right to worship Almighty GOD according to the dictates of their own consciences, and no person shall be hurt, molested or restrained in that person's liberty or estate for worshipping GOD in the manner and season most agreeable to the dictates of that person's own conscience, nor for that person's religious professions or sentiments, provided that that person does not disturb the public peace, nor obstruct others in their religious worship;

Article 9, Section 1, oath of office
 "So help me GOD."

Article 9, Section 1, alternative oath of office
 "So help me GOD."

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Maryland
Preamble:
 We, the People of the State of Maryland, grateful to Almighty GOD for our civil and religious liberty, and taking into our serious consideration the best means of establishing a good Constitution in this State for the sure foundation and more permanent security thereof, declare:

Declaration of Rights, Article 36:
 That as it is the duty of every man to worship GOD in such manner as he thinks most acceptable to Him, all persons are equally entitled to protection in their religious liberty; ... nor shall any person, otherwise competent, be deemed incompetent as a witness, or juror, on account of his religious belief; provided, he believes in the existence of GOD, and that under His dispensation such person will be held morally accountable for his acts, and be rewarded or punished therefor either in this world or in the world to come.

Nothing shall prohibit or require the making reference to belief in, reliance upon, or invoking the aid of GOD or a Supreme Being in any governmental or public document, proceeding, activity, ceremony, school, institution, or place.
Declaration of Rights, Article 37:
 That no religious test ought ever to be required as a qualification for any office of profit or trust in this State, other than a declaration of belief in the existence of GOD; nor shall the Legislature prescribe any other oath of office than the oath prescribed by this Constitution.

Declaration of Rights, Article 39:
 That the manner of administering an oath or affirmation to any person, ought to be such as those of the religious persuasion, profession, or denomination, of which he is a member, generally esteem the most effectual confirmation by the attestation of the Divine Being.

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Massachusetts
Preamble:
 We, therefore, the people of Massachusetts, acknowledging, with grateful hearts, the goodness of the great Legislator of the universe, in affording us, in the course of His providence, an opportunity, deliberately and peaceably, without fraud, violence or surprise, of entering into an original, explicit, and solemn compact with each other; and of forming a new constitution of civil government, for ourselves and posterity; and devoutly imploring His direction in so interesting a design, do agree upon, ordain and establish the following Declaration of Rights, and Frame of Government, as the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Part 1, Article 2:
 It is the right as well as the duty of all men in society, publicly, and at stated seasons to worship the Supreme Being, the great Creator and Preserver of the universe. And no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping GOD in the manner and season most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience;

Chapter 5, Section 1, Article 1:
 Whereas our wise and pious ancestors, so early as the year one thousand six hundred and thirty-six, laid the foundation of Harvard College, in which university many persons of great eminence have, by the blessing of GOD, been initiated in those arts and sciences, which qualified them for public employments, both in church and state: and whereas the encouragement of arts and sciences, and all good literature, tends to the honor of GOD, the advantage of the Christian religion, and the great benefit of this and the other United States of America ...

Chapter 6, Article 1:
 "So help me, GOD."

Chapter 6, Article 10:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five ...

Chapter 6, Article 12:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven ...

... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven ...
Amendments, Article 6, oath of office:
 "So help me GOD."

Amendments, Article 11:
 As the public worship of GOD and instructions in piety, religion and morality, promote the happiness and prosperity of a people and the security of a republican government;

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Michigan
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Michigan, grateful to Almighty GOD for the blessings of freedom, and earnestly desiring to secure these blessings undiminished to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 1, Section 4:
 Every person shall be at liberty to worship GOD according to the dictates of his own conscience.

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Minnesota
Preamble:
 We, the people of the state of Minnesota, grateful to GOD for our civil and religious liberty, and desiring to perpetuate its blessings and secure the same to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

Article 1, Section 16:
 The right of every man to worship GOD according to the dictates of his own conscience shall never be infringed;

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Mississippi
Preamble:
 We, the people of Mississippi in convention assembled, grateful to Almighty GOD, and invoking hisblessing on our work, do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 4, Section 40, oath of office:
 "So help me GOD."

Article 6, Section 155, oath of office:
 "So help me GOD."

Article 14, Section 268, oath of office:
 "So help me GOD."

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Missouri
Preamble:
 We the people of Missouri, with profound reverence for the Supreme Ruler of the Universe, and grateful for His goodness, do establish this constitution for the better government of the state.

Article 1, Section 5:
 That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty GOD according to the dictates of their own consciences;

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Montana
Preamble:
 We the people of Montana grateful to GOD for the quiet beauty of our state, the grandeur of our mountains, the vastness of our rolling plains, and desiring to improve the quality of life, equality of opportunity and to secure the blessings of liberty for this and future generations do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 3, Section 3, oath of office:
 "... (so help me GOD)."

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Nebraska
Preamble:
 We, the people, grateful to Almighty GOD for our freedom, do ordain and establish the following declaration of rights and frame of government, as the Constitution of the State of Nebraska.

Article 1, Section 4:
 All persons have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty GOD according to the dictates of their own consciences.

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Nevada
Preamble:
 We the people of the State of Nevada Grateful to Almighty GOD for our freedom in order to secure its blessings, insure domestic tranquility, and form a more perfect Government, do establish this Constitution.

Article 15, Section 2, oath of office:
 ... so help me GOD.

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Sixty Four ...

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New Hampshire
Part 1, Article 5:
 Every individual has a natural and unalienable right to worship GOD according to the dictates of his own conscience, and reason; and no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping GOD in the manner and season most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience;

Part 2, Article 84, oath of office:
 So help me GOD.

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New Jersey
Preface:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and forty-seven.

Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of New Jersey, grateful to Almighty GOD for the civil and religious liberty which He hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him for a blessing upon our endeavors to secure and transmit the same unimpaired to succeeding generations, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

Article 1, Section 3:
 No person shall be deprived of the inestimable privilege of worshipping Almighty GOD in a manner agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience;

Article 8, Section 2:
 Nor shall anything in this paragraph contained apply to the creation of any debts or liabilities for purposes of war, or to repel invasion, or to suppress insurrection or to meet an emergency caused by disaster or act of GOD.

Article 10, Clause 5:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and forty-eight.

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New Mexico
Preamble:
 We, the people of New Mexico, grateful to Almighty GOD for the blessings of liberty, in order to secure the advantages of a state government, do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 2, Section 11:
 Every man shall be free to worship GOD according to the dictates of his own conscience, and no person shall ever be molested or denied any civil or political right or privilege on account of his religious opinion or mode of religious worship.

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New York
Preamble:
 We The People of the State of New York, grateful to Almighty GOD for our Freedom, in order to secure its blessings, DO ESTABLISH THIS CONSTITUTION.

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North Carolina
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of North Carolina, grateful to Almighty GOD, the Sovereign Ruler of Nations, for the preservation of the American Union and the existence of our civil, political and religious liberties, and acknowledging our dependence upon Him for the continuance of those blessings to us and our posterity, do, for the more certain security thereof and for the better government of this State, ordain and establish this Constitution.

Article 1, Section 1:
 We hold it to be self-evident that all persons are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creatorwith certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, the enjoyment of the fruits of their own labor, and the pursuit of happiness.

Article 1, Section 13:
 All persons have a natural and inalienable right to worship Almighty GOD according to the dictates of their own consciences, and no human authority shall, in any case whatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience.

Article 6, Section 7, oath of office:
 "... so help me GOD."

Article 6, Section 8:
 The following persons shall be disqualified for office:

First, any person who shall deny the being of Almighty GOD.
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North Dakota
[color=b
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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Diaper Boy aka Pitchy misses the point again
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2018, 01:21:42 PM »
I am always in denial about were our rights came from
Nominate | Report
Posted: 7/1/2009 8:40 PM
Pt. 4 

Alabama
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Alabama, in order to establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God, do ordain and establish the following Constitution and form of government for the State of Alabama:

Section 1:
 That all men are equally free and independent; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Section 186, witness oath:
 "... so help me God."

Section 279, oath of office:
 "So help me God."


Alaska
Preamble:
 We the people of Alaska, grateful to God and to those who founded our nation and pioneered this great land, in order to secure and transmit to succeeding generations our heritage of political, civil, and religious liberty within the Union of States, do ordain and establish this constitution for the State of Alaska.


Arizona
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Arizona, grateful to Almighty God for our liberties, do ordain this Constitution.


Arkansas
Preamble:
 We, the People of the State of Arkansas, grateful to Almighty God for the privilege of choosing our own form of government; for our civil and religious liberty; and desiring to perpetuate its blessings, and secure the same to our selves and posterity; do ordain and establish this Constitution.

Article 2, Section 24:
 All men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences;

Article 19:
 No person who denies the being of a God shall hold any office in the civil departments of this State, nor be competent to testify as a witness in any Court.

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy four ...


California
Preamble:
 We, the People of the State of California, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, in order to secure and perpetuate its blessings, do establish this Constitution.


Colorado
Preamble:
 We, the people of Colorado, with profound reverence for the Supreme Ruler of the Universe, in order to form a more independent and perfect government; establish justice; insure tranquillity; provide for the common defense; promote the general welfare and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this constitution for the "State of Colorado".

Article 5, Section 45:
 ... in the year of our Lord 1885 ...

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-six ...


Connecticut
Preamble:
 The People of Connecticut acknowledging with gratitude, the good providence of God, in having permitted them to enjoy a free government; do, in order more effectually to define, secure, and perpetuate the liberties, rights and privileges which they have derived from their ancestors; hereby, after a careful consideration and revision, ordain and establish the following constitution and form of civil government.

Article 11, Section 1, oath of office:
 ... So help you God.


Delaware
Preamble:
 Through Divine goodness, all men have by nature the rights of worshiping and serving their Creator according to the dictates of their consciences, of enjoying and defending life and liberty, of acquiring and protecting reputation and property, and in general of obtaining objects suitable to their condition, without injury by one to another; and as these rights are essential to their welfare, for due exercise thereof, power is inherent in them; and therefore all just authority in the institutions of political society is derived from the people, and established with their consent, to advance their happiness; and they may for this end, as circumstances require, from time to time, alter their Constitution of government.

Article 1, Section 1:
 Although it is the duty of all men frequently to assemble together for the public worship of Almighty God; and piety and morality, on which the prosperity of communities depends, are hereby promoted; yet no man shall or ought to be compelled to attend any religious worship, to contribute to the erection or support of any place of worship, or to the maintenance of any ministry, against his own free will and consent;

Article 5, Section 2:
 ... in the year of our Lord, Nineteen Hundred ...

Article 14, Section 1, oath of office:
 "... so help me God."

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ninety-Seven ...


Florida
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Florida, being grateful to Almighty God for our constitutional liberty, in order to secure its benefits, perfect our government, insure domestic tranquility, maintain public order, and guarantee equal civil and political rights to all, do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 2, Section 5, oath of office:
 "So help me God."


Georgia
Preamble:
 To perpetuate the principles of free government, insure justice to all, preserve peace, promote the interest and happiness of the citizen and of the family, and transmit to posterity the enjoyment of liberty, we the people of Georgia, relying upon the protection and guidance of Almighty God, do ordain and establish this Constitution.


Hawaii
Preamble:
 We, the people of Hawaii, grateful for Divine Guidance, and mindful of our Hawaiian heritage and uniqueness as an island State, dedicate our efforts to fulfill the philosophy decreed by the Hawaii State motto, "Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono."

Article 7, Section 13:
 Bonds issued by or on behalf of the State or by any political subdivision to meet appropriations for any fiscal period in anticipation of the collection of revenues for such period or to meet casual deficits or failures of revenue, if required to be paid within one year, and bonds issued by or on behalf of the State to suppress insurrection, to repel invasion, to defend the State in war or to meet emergencies caused by disaster or act of God.


Idaho
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Idaho, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, to secure its blessings and promote our common welfare do establish this Constitution.


Illinois
Preamble:
 We, the People of the State of Illinois - grateful to Almighty God for the civil, political and religious liberty which He has permitted us to enjoy and seeking His blessing upon our endeavors - in order to provide for the health, safety and welfare of the people; maintain a representative and orderly government; eliminate poverty and inequality; assure legal, social and economic justice; provide opportunity for the fullest development of the individual; insure domestic tranquility; provide for the common defense; and secure the blessings of freedom and liberty to ourselves and our posterity - do ordain and establish this Constitution for the State of Illinois.


Indiana
Preamble:
 TO THE END, that justice be established, public order maintained, and liberty perpetuated; WE, the People of the State of Indiana, grateful to ALMIGHTY GOD for the free exercise of the right to choose our own form of government, do ordain this Constitution.

Article 1, Section 1:
 WE DECLARE, That all people are created equal; that they are endowed by their CREATOR with certain inalienable rights;

Article 1, Section 2:
 All people shall be secured in the natural right to worship ALMIGHTY GOD, according to the dictates of their own consciences.


Iowa
Preamble:
 WE THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF IOWA, grateful to the Supreme Being for the blessings hitherto enjoyed, and feeling our dependence on Him for a continuation of those blessings, do ordain and establish a free and independent government, by the name of the State of Iowa, the boundaries whereof shall be as follows:

Article 9, Part 2, Section 3:t 2, Section 3:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-one ...


Kansas
Preamble:
 We, the people of Kansas, grateful to Almighty God for our civil and religious privileges, in order to insure the full enjoyment of our rights as American citizens, do ordain and establish this constitution of the state of Kansas, with the following boundaries, to wit:

Bill of Rights, Section 7:
 The right to worship God according to the dictates of conscience shall never be infringed;


Kentucky
Preamble:
 We, the people of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, grateful to Almighty God for the civil, political and religious liberties we enjoy, and invoking the continuance of these blessings, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

Section 1, Clause 2:
 The right of worshipping Almighty God according to the dictates of their consciences.

Section 228, oath of office:
 ... so help me God.

Section 232:
 The manner of administering an oath or affirmation shall be such as is most consistent with the conscience of the deponent, and shall be esteemed by the General Assembly the most solemn appeal to God.

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one ...


Louisiana
Preamble:
 We, the people of Louisiana, grateful to Almighty God for the civil, political, economic, and religious liberties we enjoy, and desiring to protect individual rights to life, liberty, and property; afford opportunity for the fullest development of the individual; assure equality of rights; promote the health, safety, education, and welfare of the people; maintain a representative and orderly government; ensure domestic tranquility; provide for the common defense; and secure the blessings of freedom and justice to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 10, Section 30, oath of office:
 "... so help me God."


Maine
Preamble:
 We the people of Maine, in order to establish justice, insure tranquility, provide for our mutual defense, promote our common welfare, and secure to ourselves and our posterity the blessings of liberty, acknowledging with grateful hearts the goodness of the Sovereign Ruler of the Universe in affording us an opportunity, so favorable to the design; and, imploring God's aid and direction in its accomplishment, do agree to form ourselves into a free and independent State, by the style and title of the State of Maine and do ordain and establish the following Constitution for the government of the same.

Article 1, Section 3:
 All individuals have a natural and unalienable right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences, and no person shall be hurt, molested or restrained in that person's liberty or estate for worshipping God in the manner and season most agreeable to the dictates of that person's own conscience, nor for that person's religious professions or sentiments, provided that that person does not disturb the public peace, nor obstruct others in their religious worship;

Article 9, Section 1, oath of office
 "So help me God."

Article 9, Section 1, alternative oath of office
 "So help me God."


Maryland
Preamble:
 We, the People of the State of Maryland, grateful to Almighty God for our civil and religious liberty, and taking into our serious consideration the best means of establishing a good Constitution in this State for the sure foundation and more permanent security thereof, declare:

Declaration of Rights, Article 36:
 That as it is the duty of every man to worship God in such manner as he thinks most acceptable to Him, all persons are equally entitled to protection in their religious liberty; ... nor shall any person, otherwise competent, be deemed incompetent as a witness, or juror, on account of his religious belief; provided, he believes in the existence of God, and that under His dispensation such person will be held morally accountable for his acts, and be rewarded or punished therefor either in this world or in the world to come.

Nothing shall prohibit or require the making reference to belief in, reliance upon, or invoking the aid of God or a Supreme Being in any governmental or public document, proceeding, activity, ceremony, school, institution, or place.
Declaration of Rights, Article 37:
 That no religious test ought ever to be required as a qualification for any office of profit or trust in this State, other than a declaration of belief in the existence of God; nor shall the Legislature prescribe any other oath of office than the oath prescribed by this Constitution.

Declaration of Rights, Article 39:
 That the manner of administering an oath or affirmation to any person, ought to be such as those of the religious persuasion, profession, or denomination, of which he is a member, generally esteem the most effectual confirmation by the attestation of the Divine Being.


Massachusetts
Preamble:
 We, therefore, the people of Massachusetts, acknowledging, with grateful hearts, the goodness of the great Legislator of the universe, in affording us, in the course of His providence, an opportunity, deliberately and peaceably, without fraud, violence or surprise, of entering into an original, explicit, and solemn compact with each other; and of forming a new constitution of civil government, for ourselves and posterity; and devoutly imploring His direction in so interesting a design, do agree upon, ordain and establish the following Declaration of Rights, and Frame of Government, as the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Part 1, Article 2:
 It is the right as well as the duty of all men in society, publicly, and at stated seasons to worship the Supreme Being, the great Creator and Preserver of the universe. And no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping God in the manner and season most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience;

Chapter 5, Section 1, Article 1:
 Whereas our wise and pious ancestors, so early as the year one thousand six hundred and thirty-six, laid the foundation of Harvard College, in which university many persons of great eminence have, by the blessing of God, been initiated in those arts and sciences, which qualified them for public employments, both in church and state: and whereas the encouragement of arts and sciences, and all good literature, tends to the honor of God, the advantage of the Christian religion, and the great benefit of this and the other United States of America ...

Chapter 6, Article 1:
 "So help me, God."

Chapter 6, Article 10:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five ...

Chapter 6, Article 12:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven ...

... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven ...
Amendments, Article 6, oath of office:
 "So help me God."

Amendments, Article 11:
 As the public worship of God and instructions in piety, religion and morality, promote the happiness and prosperity of a people and the security of a republican government;


Michigan
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Michigan, grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of freedom, and earnestly desiring to secure these blessings undiminished to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 1, Section 4:
 Every person shall be at liberty to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience.


Minnesota
Preamble:
 We, the people of the state of Minnesota, grateful to God for our civil and religious liberty, and desiring to perpetuate its blessings and secure the same to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

Article 1, Section 16:
 The right of every man to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience shall never be infringed;


Mississippi
Preamble:
 We, the people of Mississippi in convention assembled, grateful to Almighty God, and invoking his blessing on our work, do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 4, Section 40, oath of office:
 "So help me God."

Article 6, Section 155, oath of office:
 "So help me God."

Article 14, Section 268, oath of office:
 "So help me God."


Missouri
Preamble:
 We the people of Missouri, with profound reverence for the Supreme Ruler of the Universe, and grateful for His goodness, do establish this constitution for the better government of the state.

Article 1, Section 5:
 That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences;


Montana
Preamble:
 We the people of Montana grateful to God for the quiet beauty of our state, the grandeur of our mountains, the vastness of our rolling plains, and desiring to improve the quality of life, equality of opportunity and to secure the blessings of liberty for this and future generations do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 3, Section 3, oath of office:
 "... (so help me God)."


Nebraska
Preamble:
 We, the people, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, do ordain and establish the following declaration of rights and frame of government, as the Constitution of the State of Nebraska.

Article 1, Section 4:
 All persons have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences.


Nevada
Preamble:
 We the people of the State of Nevada Grateful to Almighty God for our freedom in order to secure its blessings, insure domestic tranquility, and form a more perfect Government, do establish this Constitution.

Article 15, Section 2, oath of office:
 ... so help me God.

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Sixty Four ...


New Hampshire
Part 1, Article 5:
 Every individual has a natural and unalienable right to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience, and reason; and no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping God in the manner and season most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience;

Part 2, Article 84, oath of office:
 So help me God.


New Jersey
Preface:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and forty-seven.

Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of New Jersey, grateful to Almighty God for the civil and religious liberty which He hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him for a blessing upon our endeavors to secure and transmit the same unimpaired to succeeding generations, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

Article 1, Section 3:
 No person shall be deprived of the inestimable privilege of worshipping Almighty God in a manner agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience;

Article 8, Section 2:
 Nor shall anything in this paragraph contained apply to the creation of any debts or liabilities for purposes of war, or to repel invasion, or to suppress insurrection or to meet an emergency caused by disaster or act of God.

Article 10, Clause 5:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and forty-eight.


New Mexico
Preamble:
 We, the people of New Mexico, grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of liberty, in order to secure the advantages of a state government, do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 2, Section 11:
 Every man shall be free to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience, and no person shall ever be molested or denied any civil or political right or privilege on account of his religious opinion or mode of religious worship.


New York
Preamble:
 We The People of the State of New York, grateful to Almighty God for our Freedom, in order to secure its blessings, DO ESTABLISH THIS CONSTITUTION.


North Carolina
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of North Carolina, grateful to Almighty God, the Sovereign Ruler of Nations, for the preservation of the American Union and the existence of our civil, political and religious liberties, and acknowledging our dependence upon Him for the continuance of those blessings to us and our posterity, do, for the more certain security thereof and for the better government of this State, ordain and establish this Constitution.

Article 1, Section 1:
 We hold it to be self-evident that all persons are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, the enjoyment of the fruits of their own labor, and the pursuit of happiness.

Article 1, Section 13:
 All persons have a natural and inalienable right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences, and no human authority shall, in any case whatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience.

Article 6, Section 7, oath of office:
 "... so help me God."

Article 6, Section 8:
 The following persons shall be disqualified for office:

First, any person who shall deny the being of Almighty God.

North Dakota
Preamble:
 We, the people of North Dakota, grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of civil and religious liberty, do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 11, Section 4, oath of office:
 "... so help me God."


Ohio
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Ohio, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, to secure its blessings and promote our common welfare, do establish this Constitution.

Article 1, Section 7:
 All men have a natural andle right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own conscience.

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one ...


Oklahoma
Preamble:
 Invoking the guidance of Almighty God, in order to secure and perpetuate the blessing of liberty; to secure just and rightful government; to promote our mutual welfare and happiness, we, the people of the State of Oklahoma, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and seven ...


Oregon
Article 1, Section 2:
 All men shall be secure in the Natural right, to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences.


Pennsylvania
Preamble:
 WE, the people of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of civil and religious liberty, and humbly invoking His guidance, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

Article 1, Section 3:
 All men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences;

Article 1, Section 4:
 No person who acknowledges the being of a God and a future state of rewards and punishments shall, on account of his religious sentiments, be disqualified to hold any office or place of trust or profit under this Commonwealth.


Rhode Island
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, grateful to Almighty God for the civil and religious liberty which He hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him for a blessing upon our endeavors to secure and to transmit the same, unimpaired, to succeeding generations, do ordain and establish this Constitution of government.

Article 1, Section 3:
 Whereas Almighty God hath created the mind free; ... and that every person shall be free to worship God according to the dictates of such person's conscience, and to profess and by argument to maintain such person's opinion in matters of religion;

Article 3, Section 3, oath of office:
 So help you God.


South Carolina
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of South Carolina, in Convention assembled, grateful to God for our liberties, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the preservation and perpetuation of the same.

Article 3, Section 26, oath of office:
 "So help me God."

Article 6, Section 5, oath of office:
 "So help me God."

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord, one thousand Eight hundred and Ninety-five.


South Dakota
Preamble:
 We, the people of South Dakota, grateful to Almighty God for our civil and religious liberties, in order to form a more perfect and independent government, establish justice, insure tranquillity, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare and preserve to ourselves and to our posterity the blessings of liberty, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the state of South Dakota.

Article 3:
 The right to worship God according to the dictates of conscience shall never be infringed.

Article 21, Section 1:
 Properly divided between the upper and lower edges of the circle shall appear the legend, "Under God the People Rule" which shall be the motto of the state of South Dakota.


Tennessee
Preamble:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six ...

... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-three ...
... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-four ...
... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-five ...
... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine ...
... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy ...
Article 1, Section 2:
 That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own conscience;

Article 9, Section 1:
 Whereas ministers of the Gospel are by their profession, dedicated to God and the care of souls, and ought not to be diverted from the great duties of their functions; therefore, no minister of the Gospel, or priest of any denomination whatever, shall be eligible to a seat in either House of the Legislature.

Article 9, Section 2:
 No person who denies the being of God, or a future state of rewards and punishments, shall hold any office in the civil department of this state.


Texas
Preamble:
 Humbly invoking the blessings of Almighty God, the people of the State of Texas, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

Article 1, Section 6:
 All men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences.

Article 16, Section 1, oath of office:
 "... so help me God."


Utah
Preamble:
 Grateful to Almighty God for life and liberty, we, the people of Utah, in order to secure and perpetuate the principles of free government, do ordain and establish this CONSTITUTION.

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five ...


Vermont
Chapter 1, Article 3:
 That all persons have a natural and unalienable right, to worship Almighty God, according to the dictates of their own consciences and understandings, as in their opinion shall be regulated by the word of God; ... Nevertheless, every sect or denomination of Christians ought to observe the sabbath or Lord's day, and keep up some sort of religious worship, which to them shall seem most agreeable to the revealed will of God.

Article 2, Section 16, oath of office:
 So help you God.

Article 2, Section 17, oath of office:
 So help you God.

Article 2, Section 56, oath of office:
 So help you God.


Virginia
Article 1, Section 17:
 That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence;

Article 2, Section 7, oath of office:
 "... (so help me God)."


Washington
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Washington, grateful to the Supreme Ruler of the Universe for our liberties, do ordain this constitution.


West Virginia
Preamble:
Since through Divine Providence we enjoy the blessings of civil, political and religious liberty, we, the people of West Virginia, in and through the provisions of this Constitution, reaffirm our faith in and constant reliance upon God and seek diligently to promote, preserve and perpetuate good government in the state of West Virginia for the common welfare, freedom and security of ourselves and our posterity.

Wisconsin
Preamble:
 We, the people of Wisconsin, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, in order to secure its blessings, form a more perfect government, insure domestic tranquility and promote the general welfare, do establish this constitution.

Article 1, Section 18:
 The right of every person to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of conscience shall never be infringed;


Wyoming
Preamble:
 We, the people of the State of Wyoming, grateful to God for our civil, political and religious liberties, and desiring to secure them to ourselves and perpetuate them to our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine.


American Samoa
Article 5, Section 6, oath of office:
 So help me God.


Guam - Organic Act
Subchapter 3, Section 1423d, oath of office:
 I solemnly swear (or affirm) in the presence of Almighty God that I will well and faithfully support the Constitution of the United States...

Terminus:
 ... in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-five ...


Puerto Rico
Preamble:
 We, the people of Puerto Rico, in order to organize ourselves politically on a fully democratic basis, to promote the general welfare, and to secure for ourselves and our posterity the complete enjoyment of human rights, placing our trust in Almighty God, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the commonwealth which, in the exercise of our natural rights, we now create within our union with the United States of America.

Terminus:
 ... in the year of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred and fifty-two.


U.S. Virgin Islands - Organic Act
No mention.

Notes
The above excerpts illustrate some interesting points:
  • In almost all cases, states mention God in the preambles to their Constitutions. Only a few do not. New Hampshire, Vermont, and Virginia do not have preambles. Tennessee's only mentions "Lord" in the context of dates. Oregon's preamble is decidedly neutral.
  • The use of the term "in the year of our Lord" is very common.
  • Many states mention God in sections that refer to religious freedom, but many of those refer to "Almighty God," which, by all objective standards, is an endorsement of the Judeo-Christian-Islamic deity (several of the religious freedom sections mention Christianity specifically).
  • A handful of states, Arkansas, Maryland, North Carolina, and Tennessee, have provisions that deny elective office to anyone who does not believe in God. These provisions are probably not enforceable. In Arkansas and Maryland, persons who do not believe in God are constitutionally forbidden from being witnesses in a trial.
  • The oaths of office codified in the various constitutions often include the closing statement, "So help me God." Several states allow an alternate statement such as "Under the pains and penalties of perjury." Several do not allow an alternate closing, and several have no such closing whatever.
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

P1tchBlack

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Re: Gay ‘Marriage’igious Freedom Cannot Coexist
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2018, 02:04:46 PM »
Again, US Constitution......

DunkingDan

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Diaper Boy aka Pitchy Continues to prove my point
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2018, 02:12:03 PM »
Again, US Constitution......
Not my fault if you do not understand what the US Constitution was founded upon or this country 
Not my fault that you cannot grasp the points of the original post
Maybe if you read something you might get a clue
Just like victimless acts, when you are exposed you try and change the subject  :57:  
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 02:23:04 PM by DunkingDan »
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

P1tchBlack

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Re: Diaper Boy aka Pitchy Continues to prove my point
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2018, 02:36:38 PM »
Not my fault if you do not understand what the US Constitution was founded upon or this country
Not my fault that you cannot grasp the points of the original post
Maybe if you read something you might get a clue
Just like victimless acts, when you are exposed you try and change the subject  :57:  
The supreme Court is the highest court.  The supreme Court decides if things are constitutional according to the US Constitution, not state constitutions.  So, referencing the US Constitution, tell me your basis for disallowing gay marriage.

gymvol

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Re: Gay ‘Marriage’ and Religious Freedom Cannot Coexist
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2018, 02:54:10 PM »
The supreme Court is the highest court.  The supreme Court decides if things are constitutional according to the US Constitution, not state constitutions.  So, referencing the US Constitution, tell me your basis for disallowing gay marriage.
So according to you states have no rights contrary to the 10th ammendment. Then all the states that have made Marijuana legal are violating the law so all their representatives and Governors of those states legalizing the drug should be in jail.

On the other hand if states do have rights according to the 10th ammendment then Lincoln was wrong when he started a war to keep them in the Union.

If everyone is thinking alike then somebody isn't thinking.

George S. Patton

DunkingDan

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Re: Diaper Boy aka Pitchy Continues to prove my point
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2018, 02:58:45 PM »
You said ''The basis of individual rights in this country is the United States Constitution, not the Bible''
It has been demonstrated what the US Constitution was founded upon or this country. Not my fault if you cannot grasp what that is  
Not my fault that you cannot grasp the points of the original post
Maybe if you read something you might get a clue

Nor is it my fault you cannot grasp gays always had the same marriage rights
Just like victimless acts, when you are exposed you try and change the subject or in this case saying something else
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 03:22:41 PM by DunkingDan »
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

P1tchBlack

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Re: Diaper Boy aka Pitchy Continues to prove my point
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2018, 03:06:53 PM »
It has been demonstrated what the US Constitution was founded upon or this country. Not my fault if you cannot grasp what that is  
Not my fault that you cannot grasp the points of the original post
Maybe if you read something you might get a clue
Just like victimless acts, when you are exposed you try and change the subject or in this case saying something else
If the US Constitution is bases on biblical teachings/Christian beliefs, then you should have no problem making your case.  

 

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