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Topic: Electricity Update Pt 9

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Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 9
« Reply #14 on: December 22, 2019, 08:36:12 AM »
How can you tell if electricity on the grid came from coal?

DunkingDan

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Russia connects floating plant to grid
« Reply #15 on: December 23, 2019, 01:37:44 PM »
The floating nuclear power plant Akademik Lomonosov was today connected to the grid, generating electricity for the first time in the remote Chaun-Bilibino network in Pevek, in Russia’s Far East. The achievement followed Russian regulator Rostekhnadzor's provision of an operating licence, as well as permission to connect to the northern electricity grid maintained by Chukotenergo JSC. Connecting the plant to Pevek's heat networks will be completed next year.

The Akademik Lomonosov floating nuclear power plant (Image: Rosatom)
Akademik Lomonosov is a pilot project and a 'working prototype' for a future fleet of floating nuclear power plants and on-shore installations based on Russian-made small modular reactors (SMRs). These units will be available for deployment to hard-to-reach areas of Russia's North and Far-East, as well as for export.
Alexey Likhachov, director general of state nuclear corporation Rosatom, said Akademik Lomonosov had thus becomes the world's first nuclear power plant based on SMR technology to generate electricity. "This is a remarkable milestone for both the Russian and the world's nuclear energy industry. This is also a major step in establishing Pevek as the new energy capital of the region," he said.
World Nuclear Association Director General Agneta Rising said: “It is fantastic to see this innovative new floating nuclear power plant begin operating just in time for the winter celebrations. It will provide much needed clean electricity and heat to this remote arctic community." She added: “There are around 50 advanced nuclear technologies under development at the moment with many countries pursuing novel designs and seeking to use nuclear technology for new and exciting applications. This may be the world’s first SMR, but many more will soon follow. These smaller reactors are well-suited for supplying electricity to hard to reach regions as well as serving smaller grids and industrial centres. We are at the dawn of a new era in nuclear technology.”
Kirsty Gogan, head of Energy for Humanity, a London-based NGO, said: "For hard-to-reach regions, with a climate that is simultaneously too harsh to support the use of renewable energies and too fragile to continue its heavy dependence on fossil fuels, small nuclear, including floating plants, is the only answer. Akademik Lomonosov is the first step towards demonstrating its potential for decarbonisation of the Arctic and beyond."
Once it starts commercial operation, Akademik Lomonosov will become Russia’s eleventh nuclear power plant. It will also mark the first time in the history of the country's nuclear energy history that two nuclear power plants - Akademik Lomonosov FNPP and the Bilibino NPP - operate in the same region.

Named after the 18th century Russian scientist Mikhail Lomonosov, the plant is equipped with two KLT-40C reactor systems, each with a capacity of 35 MW, similar to those used on icebreakers. It is 144 metres long and 30 metres wide, and has a displacement of 21,000 tonnes.
SMR-based nuclear power plants (featuring reactors of less than 300 MWe each), floating and on-shore, are designed to made it possible to supply electricity to hard-to-reach areas, smaller grids and off-grid installations, Rosatom said.
"These small nuclear reactors can operate non-stop without the need for refuelling for three to five years, thereby considerably reducing the cost of electricity generation. Whilst variable renewable energy installations such as wind and solar for such areas require expensive and polluting diesel back-up or expensive energy storage, small nuclear power plants ensure uninterrupted electricity supply even for energy intensive users.
"The reactors have the potential to work particularly well in regions with extended coastlines, power supply shortages, and limited access to electrical grids and the plant can be delivered to any point along a coast and connected to existing electrical grids."
Pevek residents marked the symbolic day by turning on the fairy lights on the town's Christmas tree.
Researched and written by World Nuclear News
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 9
« Reply #16 on: December 23, 2019, 08:53:03 PM »
October and April are distortive months as mild temperatures results in lower electricity demand.  But at the same time, October isn't normally a very windy month...

Still, some interesting figures.

Percent electricity produced by wind in October:

Iowa:            58.1%
Kansas:         57.4%
Oklahoma:     43.9%

North Carolina got 5.9% of its electricity from solar in October.
Double digit solar states:
California:  22.2%
Vermont:   17.0%
Nevada:     16.1%
Hawaii:      13.5%

Percent electricity from coal (National):       20.8%
Percent electricity from hydro, wind, solar:  16.5%






Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 9
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2019, 12:58:44 PM »
The numbers I see as estimates suggest the US might reasonably hit 50% "carbon free electricity" by 2030 (about).  Getting significantly beyond that mark could require some breakthroughs in areas like battery storage, the national grid, and/or backup power, as well as perhaps more nuclear.

The number of EVs needing recharging will have some impact on demand obviously, and I'd guess by 2030 most new EVs will have higher battery capacity (range).

DunkingDan

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Top 6 Nuclear Power Achievements of the Year
« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2019, 12:50:50 PM »
The past year has been filled with firsts for the nuclear power industry. Three power plants sporting first-of-a-kind reactors entered commercial operation, while the first U.S. AP1000 nuclear project reached key milestones on its path to completion. Furthermore, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) granted the first early site permit for a utility to construct small modular reactors (SMRs) and finished the fourth phase of its first SMR design certification review, keeping NuScale Power on track to have its first SMR in operation by the mid-2020s.
World’s First EPR Nuclear Power Plant Enters Commercial Operation
Technically, Taishan Unit 1—the first Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) unit to be connected to the power grid—entered commercial operation on Dec. 18, 2018, but Unit 2 followed suit on Sept. 7, 2019, giving the combined facility a place on this list. The pressurized water reactor (PWR) units are notable as the most-powerful reactors currently operating in the world, and the station was selected as a POWER Top Plant in 2019.
Excavation work for the Taishan nuclear station (Figure 1) in Guangdong province, China, began in 2008. EDF subsidiary Framatome supplied the third-generation technology, which is also being installed at Olkiluoto 3 in Finland (under construction since August 2005) and at Flamanville 3 in France (under construction since December 2007).

 

Taishan-nuclear-power-plant
1. Taishan Nuclear Power Plant. Courtesy: EDF
Cost overruns and schedule delays have plagued all the EPR units, but the trouble hasn’t kept the technology from being selected for other projects. In July 2016, EDF announced it would construct two EPR reactors at Hinkley Point C in Somerset, England. EDF and China General Nuclear Power Group (CGN) are also partnering on the Sizewell C project in the UK, which will have two similar units. In March 2018, EDF inked a deal with India’s state-owned nuclear operator, Nuclear Power Corp. of India Ltd., setting out the industrial framework for a massive six-unit, 9.9-GW project utilizing EPR technology. That facility will be the world’s largest nuclear power plant, if completed as planned.
World’s First ACPR-1000 Nuclear Power Plant Begins Commercial Operation
Yangjiang Unit 5—the first ACPR-1000 (Advanced Chinese PWR) unit to enter service—actually began operation in 2018. However, Unit 6 went commercial in August 2019, warranting inclusion on this top-achievements list. Completion of the first ACPR-1000 reactors at Yanjiang marked a major accomplishment for China in its efforts to commercialize the 1,000-MW evolutionary third-generation nuclear reactor. Like Taishan, the facility was recognized in 2019 with a POWER Top Plant award.
According to “Advanced Large Water Cooled Reactors,” a booklet published by the International Atomic Energy Agency, the ACPR-1000 was designed by CGN based on the CPR-1000 (Improved Chinese PWR), which in turn was based on the 900-MWe, three-loop, French M310 plant. The ACPR-1000, however, retains full Chinese intellectual property rights.
The Yangjiang facility has evolved into a major demonstration site for CGN. Yangjiang 1 and 2 feature CPR-1000 technology. Those units were brought online in March 2014 and June 2015, respectively. CGN then made more than two dozen safety and technical modifications to the CPR-1000 design, and created the CPR-1000+, which was utilized in Yangjiang Units 3 and 4. Now, the ACPR-1000 is showcased in Units 5 and 6. Furthermore, the latest units are the first to adopt a nuclear-grade distributed control system (Figure 2), known as FirmSys, which was developed by China Techenergy Co. (CTEC), a CGN subsidiary.

 
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President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 9
« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2019, 01:01:38 PM »
I find it interesting how Germany and Japan profess to be closing their power reactors entirely, France has made some murmurs about that but isn't really doing it for obvious reasons, the US is virtually at a standstill outside Vogtle 3 and 4, and China and India are going for it fairly hard.  I'm sure permitting in China is pretty easy.

https://www.world-nuclear.org/information-library/current-and-future-generation/plans-for-new-reactors-worldwide.aspx

I see one in France and UK and Finland in Europe other than in the old USSR.


DunkingDan

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 9
« Reply #20 on: December 26, 2019, 01:04:57 PM »
I find it interesting how Germany and Japan profess to be closing their power reactors entirely, France has made some murmurs about that but isn't really doing it for obvious reasons, the US is virtually at a standstill outside Vogtle 3 and 4, and China and India are going for it fairly hard.  I'm sure permitting in China is pretty easy.

https://www.world-nuclear.org/information-library/current-and-future-generation/plans-for-new-reactors-worldwide.aspx

I see one in France and UK and Finland in Europe other than in the old USSR.
Some permits are in place for two new units at Oak Ridge, Tn. TVA is eyeing more as is some utilities here n the NE. Likewise Belefonte (sp) may resume construction in NE Ala 
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 9
« Reply #21 on: December 26, 2019, 01:15:34 PM »
Near me is a large hole in the ground with a sales center for condos in a high rise.  It's been there for years now, a super deluxe sales center, but folks generally are dubious it will ever happen.  I'm in a wait and see mode myself, the place seems to be getting overrun with condos under construction as it is, and the Opus condos are pricey.

Likewise, I view "plans" with some doubt until they actually start putting up cranes etc.  A lot of things are planned and never happen, and the two Vogtle units a couple years back were in danger of not being completed even half way through construction.

https://atlanta.curbed.com/maps/map-midtown-atlanta-development-apartment-condo-office

26. No2 Opus Place

98 14th St NE
Atlanta, GA 30309 Visit Website

PROPOSED—Although developer Olympia Heights has secured a land disturbance permit and kicked off preliminary site work, we’re reluctant to call this one “under construction,” since it’s been talked about for so many years. If realized, though, the potentially skyscraping residential and office tower would be one of Atlanta’s tallest.


https://www.bisnow.com/atlanta/news/multifamily/despite-activity-doubts-swirl-around-citys-tallest-condo-tower-99534

Olympia Heights spent $3M building out No2 Opus Place’s sales center, located on the property, which contains a wall filled with video screens showing models of the skyline views, inside a model of a condo unit.

Read more at: https://www.bisnow.com/atlanta/news/multifamily/despite-activity-doubts-swirl-around-citys-tallest-condo-tower-99534?utm_source=CopyShare&utm_medium=Browser








DunkingDan

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 9
« Reply #22 on: December 26, 2019, 01:18:43 PM »
There goes that damned bird point once again
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 9
« Reply #23 on: December 26, 2019, 01:20:22 PM »
Plants under construction globally appear to me to be mostly in China and India, with few in the "west".

That seems like a self evidence "point".  I'm sure there are plans for more here and there, but the ones under construction are more substantive, in my view.

DunkingDan

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Minnesota Court Blocks Construction of Gas-Fired Plant
« Reply #24 on: December 26, 2019, 03:09:23 PM »
A Minnesota court on Dec. 23 said a proposed natural gas-fired power plant in neighboring Wisconsin needs more environmental review before construction can proceed, reversing an earlier decision by the state’s Public Utilities Commission (PUC) that approved the facility.
The state Court of Appeals on Monday said state regulators must look at whether the Nemadji Trail Energy Center in Superior, Wisconsin, which was approved by the PUC in October 2018 and would have a generation capacity of 525 to 625 MW, would have “significant environmental effects” on the surrounding area. The court’s ruling means the PUC must conduct another review of the plant.
Minnesota Power, a utility division of Midwestern energy company ALLETE, which is headquartered in Duluth, and La Crosse, Wisconsin-based Dairyland Power Cooperative want to build the proposed $700 million Nemadji Trail plant on land between the Nemadji River and Enbridge Energy’s Superior terminal, near Lake Superior at the border of Minnesota and Wisconsin. The terminal is a hub for U.S. crude oil imports, and a distribution center for the movement of crude oil across the U.S.
Minnesota Power has said the plant would support its transition away from coal-fired power, and supplement its increased use of renewable energy resources.
“We are disappointed in this unprecedented decision because a Minnesota environmental review has never been applied to a facility outside the state of Minnesota,” the utility said in a statement. Julie Pierce, Minnesota Power vice president of strategy and planning, said the company is reviewing the decision and “considering all of our options.”
The PUC will decide whether to appeal Monday’s ruling or comply with the court’s order. “The commission is reviewing today’s decision and has not yet made a decision on whether the commission will appeal,” said PUC Chairwoman Katie Sieben.
Need for Environmental Review at Issue
Environmental groups have said the PUC was wrong to initially approve the gas-fired plant because the agency ruled an environmental review was not necessary. The groups said the utilities did not show the new plant was needed, and also said Minnesota should give preference to emissions-free power generation.
The appeals court in its ruling Monday said state law requires an environmental assessment worksheet when a citizen petition “demonstrates that, because of the nature or location of the action proposed in the agreement, there may be potential for significant environmental effects.” The three-judge panel was unanimous in its ruling to have the PUC consider whether that worksheet is needed for Nemadji Trail, and if so, whether a full environmental impact statement would be required for the project to proceed.
Because the power plant is sited in Wisconsin, that state’s Public Service Commission (PSC) is looking at the project to determine whether the plant “satisfies the reasonable needs of the public for an adequate supply of electric energy,” whether its “design and location or route is in the public interest,” and to ensure it “will not have undue adverse impact on other environmental values.” A decision by the Wisconsin PSC is expected next year.
Superior city councilors in October signaled their support for the Nemadji Trail plant, unanimously approving a resolution that states the city “fully supports the Nemadji Trail Energy Center,” which is the largest private investment in the city’s history.



https://www.powermag.com/minnesota-court-blocks-construction-of-gas-fired-plant/
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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Oklo unveils its vision of Aurora plant
« Reply #25 on: December 28, 2019, 06:53:18 PM »
California-based Oklo Inc has announced the launch of its Aurora energy plant which is powered by a small reactor with integrated solar panels. The company is preparing to submit its first licence application for the plant.

Oklo describes Aurora as an "advanced fission clean energy plant design developed to power communities with affordable, reliable, clean power." The Aurora "powerhouse" includes a "fission battery" which uses metallic fuel. It can produce about 1.5 MW of electrical power and can also produce usable heat, the company says.
"The Aurora is built on years of technology research, development, and demonstration done at the US national labs and universities, and work done by Oklo to make the Aurora possible," Oklo CEO Jacob DeWitte said. "While heat and electrons are the product, the Aurora powerhouse is the main point for community interaction. We spent years thinking about how it could look, how it would function, and how it would become a point of pride in a community."
The company claims Aurora offers "many unique and beneficial attributes" including the ability to produce power for decades without needing to refuel, its small size, the placement of the fuel underground, the ability to operate without needing cooling water, the demonstrated natural shutdown behaviour of the fuel, and the use of a fission spectrum which can recycle fuel and ultimately convert nuclear waste to clean energy.
The Aurora powerhouse's sloped roof serves as the support for solar photovoltaic panels, which "also serve as a canvas for local art which will be developed in tandem with the communities that choose the Aurora as part of their low-carbon microgrid," the company says. "Oklo has been intentional to include solar panels as part of the Aurora powerhouse to illustrate how advanced fission and renewables can work together in a high reliability, clean microgrid."
Oklo has been engaged in pre-application activities with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission since 2016 for the Aurora design, and says it is preparing to submit its first licence application. The company has previously received federal cost-shared funding for technology development through the US Department of Energy's cost-shared Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) initiative.
Researched and written by World Nuclear News

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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UAE Set to Start First Nuclear Plant
« Reply #26 on: December 31, 2019, 05:08:52 PM »
The first nuclear power plant in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) reportedly will come online in early 2020. The report comes one day after Sweden on Dec. 30 shut down one of four reactors at the nation’s largest nuclear plant, closing Unit 2 at the Ringhals facility after more than 40 years of operation.
Germany also shut down the Philippsburg nuclear plant on Tuesday, part of that country’s planned phase-out of nuclear power by year-end 2022. The plant’s operating license was set to expire at midnight Central European Time on Tuesday.
The Al-Ittihad newspaper on Dec. 31 said one unit of the $24.4 billion Barakah plant in the UAE will enter commercial operation in the first quarter of 2020, and testing on a second reactor is set to begin soon, according to information from the Emirates Nuclear Energy Corp. (ENEC). The ENEC has said it is nearing issuance of an operating license for the first reactor.
ENEC told the paper: “This will mark the start of the operational phase of peaceful nuclear energy in the Arab world.” The Barakah plant, operated by Nawah Energy Co. and built by Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), would be the world’s largest in terms of generation capacity when complete, with its four South Korea-supplied APR-1400 reactors totaling 5,600 MW of capacity.
The contract for the plant was awarded in late 2009. Start-up of the plant has previously been delayed by a lack of trained local staff to operate the facility.
Ringhals 1 Also Set for Closure
Swedish news agency TT on Monday said Vattenfall, the Swedish state-owned utility group, and German utility Uniper finalized the permanent closure of the 852-MW Ringhals 2 reactor. The two groups had said in 2015 they planned to close the unit, citing rising maintenance costs and profitability concerns.
“It’s clear that there’s a bit of a sad feeling at the moment,” Lars Bjornkvist, project manager overseeing the Ringhals 2 closure, told TT on Monday. The plant is located about 40 miles south of Goteborg, the nation’s second-largest city.
Vattenfall and Uniper also have said they will shut down the Ringhals 1 reactor by year-end 2020. The other two units at Ringhals are expected to remain in service for at least another 20 to 30 years. Unit 4 was named a POWER Top Plant in 2017.
Vattenfall had planned to operate Units 1 and 2 until 2025, but in September 2015 said investment in the units would end after 2017, resulting in savings of about $200 million. The company at the time said it planned to invest about $100 million to make upgrades to Units 3 and 4 to keep those reactors operating.


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President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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Landfill begins burying non-recyclable Wind Turbine Blades
« Reply #27 on: January 02, 2020, 12:04:54 PM »
Waste management experts estimate they’ll take hundreds of years to biodegrade
Hundreds of Non-recyclable Wind Turbine Blades to be Buried in Landfill
Hundreds of giant windmill blades are being shipped to a landfill in Wyoming to be buried because they simply can’t be recycled.Local media reports several wind farms in the state are sending over 900 un-reusable blades to the Casper Regional Landfill to be buried.While nearly 90 percent of old or decommissioned wind turbines, like the motor housing, can be refurbished or at least crushed, fiberglass windmill blades present a problem due to their size and strength.

“Our crushing equipment is not big enough to crush them,” a landfill representative told NPR.
Prior to burying the cumbersome, sometimes nearly 300-foot long blades, the landfill has to cut them up into smaller pieces onsite and stack them in order to save space during transportation.
To make matters worse, the blades aren’t exactly compostable. The Casper Sold Waste Manager tells Wyoming News Now they’ll take hundreds of years to biodegrade.
“So Casper happens to be, I think it is, the biggest landfill facility in the state of Wyoming. These blades are really big, and they take up a lot of airspace, and our unlined area is very, very large, and it’s going to last hundreds of years.”
As if that’s not bad enough, NPR reports researchers estimate the US will soon have to grapple with over 720,000 tons of blades over the next 20 years, “a figure that doesn’t include newer, taller higher-capacity versions.”
So much for saving the environment.
https://www.educationviews.org/landfill-begins-burying-non-recyclable-wind-turbine-blades/?fbclid=IwAR0f97SgnmzEU4lE_ixmHNGVqokdZ3LBMFgNks2ek9acZZaukXZUsLb-lLU

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

 

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