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Topic: Electricity Update Pt 8

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HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 8
« Reply #56 on: September 24, 2019, 09:52:44 PM »


Looks like if trends persist, that nuclear, coal and alternatives (hydro, wind, solar) will each produce 20% of US electricity with natural gas producing 40% by 2025 or so.

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 8
« Reply #57 on: September 24, 2019, 09:53:29 PM »

DunkingDan

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Molten salt irradiation test completed at Petten
« Reply #58 on: September 26, 2019, 03:09:36 PM »
An irradiation test on molten nuclear fuel salts inside the High Flux Reactor has been completed at Petten in the Netherlands. The results will yield new data on the safe operation of molten salt reactors (MSRs).

The Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) said it is the first irradiation of its kind since the research carried out in the USA in the 1960s. "Irradiation tests of this kind form a crucial step in the development of molten salt reactor technology," it said.
MSRs use fuel dissolved in a molten fluoride or chloride salt. As MSR fuel salt is a liquid, it functions as both the fuel (producing the heat) and the coolant (transporting the heat away and ultimately to the power plant). This means that such reactors could not suffer from a loss of cooling leading to a meltdown.
The SALIENT-01 test is the first irradiation experiment conducted by NRG in the MSR research programme that started in 2015. Research under this programme is partly funded by the Ministry of Economic Affairs. The research is being carried out in collaboration with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission in Karlsruhe, Germany.
JRC has developed fuel comprising lithium and thorium fluoride salts. NRG started an irradiation in the High Flux Reactor of samples of this fuel in August 2017.
"Completing our work inside the reactor means we can now examine the irradiated salt more closely in the NRG labs," said Ralph Hania, a researcher at NRG. "This means we'll really be able to see how the salt responds to irradiation in the reactor."
NRG's MSR programme now includes research into appropriate construction materials, processing and purification of molten salt, and processing residual products.
Further irradiation tests are planned, including one later this year to investigate radiolysis of salts. This process may occur when nuclear fuel salts cool down to near room temperature while in a radiation field and results in the production of gases.
Another irradiation experiment in the High Flux Reactor is planned to start in early 2020 which will examine corrosion resistance of candidate alloys for construction of an MSR.
The basic technology of MSRs is not new - it was first demonstrated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where a 7.4 MWt test reactor, the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment, operated from 1965 to 1969.
Much of the interest today in reviving the MSR concept relates to using thorium (to breed fissile uranium-233), where an initial source of fissile material such as plutonium-239 needs to be provided. There are a number of different MSR design concepts, and a number of interesting challenges in the commercialisation of many, especially with thorium.
In February this year, NRG signed a contract with Terrestrial Energy to carry out testing of materials, including graphite, for key components of its Integral Molten Salt Reactor (IMSR). The agreement will see NRG provide expert technical services to support Terrestrial Energy's "in-core" materials testing and the development of its generation IV plant.
In March 2018, Terrestrial Energy signed a technical services agreement with JRC to perform confirmatory studies of the fuel and primary coolant salt mixture for the IMSR.
Researched and written by World Nuclear News

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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China dominates reactor connections, Russia leads export market
« Reply #59 on: September 28, 2019, 05:38:37 PM »
With nine reactors grid connected for the first time in 2018 and five reactors starting construction, the number of reactors under construction fell from 59 to 55 over the course of the year, according to the World Nuclear Association’s recently published Performance Report 2019. The reactors have a combined capacity of 6,279 MWe.
The report highlighted the rapid rise of Asia, with nuclear generation up more than 10% to 533TWh – accounting for more than 20% of global generation.
Unsurprisingly, it is China leading the way, with 46 operable nuclear reactors representing about 11% of the world’s nuclear capacity. In 2018, the country connected a record 8.3 GWe of new capacity – the second largest annual increase achieved by any country. Of the nine reactors connected to the grid in 2018, seven were in China (with reactors connected at Tianwan, Haiyang, Sanmen, Taishan and Yangjiang).
Taishan 1 became the world’s first operating EPR in June 2018, quickly followed the next month by Sanmen 1 – the first AP1000 to supply electricity to a grid. Earlier in the year, China connected Yangjiang 5, its first ACPR-1000.
While this growth is impressive, a study from China’s National Development and Reform Commission’s Energy Research Institute (published October 2018), said 554 GWe would be required by China by 2050 – to meet demand while also fulfilling emissions targets.
Slower construction
Commenting on the Productivity Report’s findings, WNA Director General Agneta Rising said the pace of progress of restarting more reactors was slow, and despite 55 new reactors under construction at the end of 2018, including five constructions starts, build times were considerable slower.
“The median construction time in 2018 was eight-and-a-half years; this was primarily due to the start-up of reactors utilizing new designs,” said Rising. “The average construction time for reactors in recent years has been around five to six years. We should see construction times return to more typical recent durations in 2019.”
Haiyang 1&2 and Sanmen 1&2 were the first four AP1000s to begin operation, Taishan 1 was the first EPR, Leningrad II-1 was the first VVER-1200 and Yangjiang 5 the first ACPR-1000. The second units at Haiyang and Sanmen had significantly shorter construction periods, demonstrating that even second units can benefit from the experience gained during first unit construction.
Rising highlighted construction commencing on the first of four planned units at Akkuyu in Turkey and the first formal start of construction in West & Central Europe since 2007 at Hinkley Point C in the UK, with first concrete poured for the first of two EPR units.
In South Korea, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) connected the country’s second APR1400, Shin Kori 4, to the grid in April 2019. Shin Hanul 1 is expected to follow later this year, which will see the country’s operable nuclear capacity rise to a record 24 GWe. Nuclear generates about a quarter of the country’s electricity.
South Korea’s nuclear industry continues to export successfully, completing the construction of the first of four APR1400 reactors at Barakah in the UAE in March 2019.
India is also showing a considerable appetite for nuclear reactors, with seven under constructions as of January 2019, with a combined capacity of 4.8 GWe. The country announced plans to bring 21 more reactors online by 2031.
Talks are ongoing with EDF for the construction of six EPRs at Jaitapur, and with Westinghouse for six AP1000 units at Kovvada. In October 2018, Russia and India signed an agreement to build six nuclear units at a new site in the country.

Russian export strength
Russia connected two units to the grid in early 2018 – Rostov 4 and Leningrad II-1 were the first to be connected since Novovoronezh II-1 in August 2016. First concrete was poured for unit 1 of the Kursk II plant in April 2019, while the second unit of Novovoronezh II began supplying electricity to Russia’s grid in May 2019.
 Significantly, Russia also completed construction of the first floating nuclear power plant, Akademik Lomonosov, with the plant’s two reactors brought up to 100% capacity in March and due to be connected to the grid in December – at the port of Pevek.
WNA’s report says the strength of the Russian nuclear industry is reflected in its strong export market – including building Turkey’s first nuclear power plant and (in December 2018) connecting Tianwan 4 to the grid in China, which was the fourth Russian-designed reactor deployed there. In June 2018, contracts were signed for four further VVER units in the country. Of the 47 reactors under construction outside Russia at the end of 2018, nine were Russian designs.
Saudi Arabia is planning to build two large nuclear power reactors, and has plans for small reactors for desalination, with vendors from China, France, Russia, South Korea and the US pitching for the contracts. Egypt plans to host four Russia-designed VVER-1200 units at El Dabaa, with Egypt’s Nuclear Regulation and Radiological Authority granting site approval in April 2019.



https://analysis.nuclearenergyinsider.com/china-dominates-reactor-connections-russia-leads-export-market
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 8
« Reply #60 on: September 28, 2019, 07:35:07 PM »
New nuclear plants are not going to be built in the US if they continually come in massively over budget and years behind schedule...


https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/georgia-utility-regulator-more-delays-likely-for-vogtle-nuclear-plant#gs.684o5b


SNIP:
Georgia's Vogtle nuclear plant expansion is already years behind schedule and billions of dollars over budget, and it may get delayed once again.

The Georgia Public Service Commission Public Interest Advocacy staff this week published an evaluation of the most recent reassessment of project timeline and cost for Vogtle Units 3 and 4. The good news: the staff concluded that the latest analysis by Southern Nuclear Company, the Southern Company subsidiary overseeing plant construction, was "generally sound."

That's notable, seeing as the staff recommended canceling Vogtle when the commission voted on a revised budget and schedule in December 2017.

The bad news: The staff doesn't believe the baseline timeline to begin operations is "achievable." That target was May 2021 and 2022 for the two reactors. Even commercial operation by November 2021 and 2022 would be "a challenge to achieve," according to the staff.

costs, not including financing costs. Further delays would increase the project cost, however.

Delay and cost overruns have dogged Vogtle, which started the permitting process in 2005. Utility Georgia Power, the major owner and offtaker for the plant, originally filed to use the new plant for capacity in the 2016 to 2017 timeframe.

Since then, the Vogtle 3 and 4 units have earned the dubious distinction of being the last-surviving nuclear power plant under construction in the U.S. They are also the first to use the new AP1000 reactor from Westinghouse, a company whose 2017 bankruptcy threw an additional delay into the mix. Until then, Westinghouse had also served as primary contractor for the project.

The ongoing struggle prompted Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry to dedicate another $3.7 billion in loan support in March. The DOE had already committed $5 billion in loan guarantees as of 2017.


Despite the bloated price tag, round-the-clock production over decades of project lifetime could yield a favorable levelized cost of energy, Lovering added. If completed, these units will also be the first to benefit from a federal Production Tax Credit for new nuclear generation.

Even if Vogtle does meet the challenging timelines, it is unlikely that similarly large plants will be built in the U.S. going forward, especially after South Carolina's V.C. Summer plant fell through and left ratepayers with billions of dollars of charges for a project that never generated a single kilowatt-hour.

Going forward, small modular reactors offer a lower-cost route for nuclear plant development, but they have not yet cleared the regulatory process.



DunkingDan

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 8
« Reply #61 on: September 28, 2019, 08:02:45 PM »
New nuclear plants are not going to be built in the US if they continually come in massively over budget and years behind schedule...

TVA is fixing to build two more

Local power company is seriously looking at adding more nukes

It is happening and more will be built
« Last Edit: September 28, 2019, 08:09:40 PM by DunkingDan »
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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U.S. DoE opens National Reactor Innovation Centre; China plans five
« Reply #62 on: October 01, 2019, 05:55:49 PM »
five nuclear fuel processing plants

U.S. DoE opens National Reactor Innovation Centre
The U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DoE) has opened the National Reactor Innovation Centre (NRIC) to support the development of advanced nuclear energy technology.

A result of the Nuclear Energy Innovation Capabilities Act (NEICA), the new centre is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in Idaho Falls.

The act was signed into law in 2018 to accelerate the development of advanced reactors in the country by eliminating financial and technical barriers.

U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry said: “NRIC will enable the demonstration and deployment of advanced reactors that will define the future of nuclear energy.

“By bringing the industry together with our national labs and university partners, we can enhance our energy independence and position the US as a global leader in advanced nuclear innovation.”

Technology developers will receive support from NRIC required to test, demonstrate and evaluate the performance of their reactor concepts. It will also help technology developers in speeding-up the licensing and commercialization of their new nuclear energy systems.

U.S.-based NuScale is the only SMR developer to seek approval from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The first plant using NuScale technology is a 12-module plant in Idaho that is due to begin operations by the mid-2020s.

Idaho Senator Mike Crapo said: “This is the ultimate public-private sector partnership that will take the next step to grow clean nuclear power across the nation.

“It makes sense that the INL is the place where private developers will now work with the Department of Defense and Nasa to come and demonstrate new nuclear technologies. I look forward to seeing micro-reactors and small modular reactors being built here. The best is yet to come!”

China plans five nuclear fuel processing plants

The head of the Chinese national Nuclear Safety Administration says five nuclear processing plants are planned for the disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste, as it continues to work alongside French firm Areva.

Liu Ha said commercial negotiations were nearing their end, and plans for both Chinese facilities and the French cooperation project were all making progress.

“The commercial negotiations are almost near the end. I believe in the near future, the two countries will have even further progress on the nuclear fuel reprocessing project,” Liu said.

Liu said the plants would be located in provinces which already had nuclear facilities. The US$12 billion Areva project has been subject to delays, due to resident protests.

“The process of choosing sites might need more active communication with the local government and local residents,” said Liu.

The five new plants will be part of the next phase of China’s nuclear power programme, which will also includes R&D on the deep disposal of high-level waste.

As of June 2019, China had 47 nuclear power units in operation with a capacity of about 48.73 GW and 11 nuclear power units under construction, with a capacity of 10.8 GW.

In its 13th Five-Year Plan, published in 2016, China planned to raise its installed nuclear capacity to 58 GW by 2020, with another 30 GW under construction.

Operating license still under review for UAE’s Barakah plant

The operating license for the United Arab Emirates’ Barakah nuclear power plant is still under review, according to a senior official at the industry regulator.

Speaking at a panel discussion in Abu Dhabi, Christer Viktorsson, director-general of UAE’s Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR), said he could not give an exact date for the approval of the license. 

“In nuclear projects you never know. As soon as we get declaration from ENEC (Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation) and Nawah [Energy Company] they are ready to operate, we are ready to do final inspections and draw final conclusions,” said Viktorsson.

Barakah is being built by Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) and is the world’s largest nuclear plant under construction. It is due to begin operations before early 2020.
Nuclear Energy Insider
   



President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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Composite Structural Technology “industry-changing” for safety, econom
« Reply #63 on: October 03, 2019, 05:37:20 PM »
Moltex Energy is entering the U.S. market after receiving funding for research into structural composites that could reduce SSR construction schedules to 24 months and provide “industry-changing” safety and economies for the industry.




The $2.55 million ARPA-E funding was awarded through the MEITNER program, which develops enabling technologies for advanced reactor designs to bring them closer to market and make them more investable as an affordable clean energy route.
UK-based Moltex chose to develop Composite Structural Technology to reduce construction times for the Stable Salt Reactor (COST SSR) and is involved in the U.S. for the first time after previously focussing on the UK and Canada.
“We see those nations as having higher likelihood of near-term deployment but there is expertize in the U.S. that does not exist anywhere else and we see the U.S. as a huge market in the next three decades,” Rory O'Sullivan, CEO for North America Moltex Energy, told Nuclear Energy Insider.
Fleet model
Moltex aims to reduce the construction schedule to less than 36 months for the FOAK (First-Of-A-Kind), with a path for future reductions for NOAK (Nth Of A Kind). The mission is to make SSR as routine to build and qualify as a Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) plant, which is commonly around 24 months.
“Most of the current focus for advanced reactor vendors is getting to ‘demonstration’ with a single plant, but to make the global impact Moltex is seeking, we are thinking about the fleet model: how do we get whole fleets deployed on the urgent timeframes required for climate and social change,” added O’Sullivan.
Moltex Energy was formed as recently as 2015, and in a short time has made significant progress. In December 2017 Moltex Canada Inc. commenced the CNSC (Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission) Vendor Design Review process and received government research funding in the UK for C&I development. In 2018, Moltex signed an MOU with New Brunswick Power to develop SSR-W working towards a FOAK deployment in the province. 

Simplified construction
The Moltex SSR leans heavily on existing approaches to reactor design and licensing approaches to expedite the licensing process as much as possible, a major hurdle to any advanced reactor deployment. However, that’s only half the battle; the First-Of-A-Kind then needs to be constructed, and the build time can be just as significant a hurdle.
Contemporary New Build programs are beset by construction difficulties due to incremental design changes, logistics challenges, financing large indirect costs of construction, and complex onsite processes for managing Quality Assurance. This makes them challenging to finance successfully, and with such high investment risk unwilling to be borne by the private sector, the number of New Build projects are dwindling.
COST technology allows greater versatility of standardized design site-to-site, and vastly simplifies onsite labor and quality assurance processes to achieve a comparable build quality. Plus, with the inherent safety of the SSR and lack of any high pressures in the nuclear island, radical simplifications can be made without impacting safety. 
Economic reality
“Moltex believes that to truly displace cheap fossil fuelled generation on the TW scale and satisfy an insatiable need for mass clean energy, SSR plants eventually need to be as fast to build, and cheaper in terms of electricity cost, than a CCGT or coal-fired plant, driving them out of the market by economic reality, rather than subsidy,” said O’Sullivan.
“SMRs, or any clean energy candidate for that matter, has a simple success criteria: be cheaper than everything else. Government subsidies and carbon taxes to encourage change can only ever be a short-term fix; if a technology is less profitable it cannot be sustainable, someone has to pay. That’s where SSR comes in, it wants to undercut fossil fuelled generation, truly displacing it from the market.”
O’Sullivan says that SMRs have many advantages but their small size increases costs as they lose economies of scale. The SSR, although small in size is large in power. The first design is the 300 MW reactor which can be coupled to 900 MW turbines using GridReserve to run 8 hours a day at the higher output power or scaled up to a 1000 MW reactor which could be coupled to 3000 MW turbines.
“This gives the SSR both the advantage of economies of numbers and economies of scale,” he says.
Composite opportunity
There are numerous examples of industry-ready composite construction solutions in the wider civil engineering industry, which have demonstrated the opportunity from these contemporary design methods. Given the absence of a nuclear regulatory process in alternative industries it is perhaps logical that they have been adopted in other major projects first, well before nuclear has been able to fully capitalize on the opportunity.
“Moltex is not developing ‘all-new’ solutions,” admits O’Sullivan, “rather we are assessing the available options and downselecting the most suitable method (or methods) from a shortlist of high Technology Readiness Level (TRL) candidate composite technologies.
“Purdue University, who shall conduct the concept design and selection phase, are familiar with a number of these candidate technologies currently on the market. They are well-positioned to quantify the potential efficiencies of adopting the methods for SSR.”
Changing perceptions
Advanced reactors like SSR are about more than just an evolution of current nuclear power plants; they present an opportunity for a change in the social perception of nuclear power.
O’Sullivan believes the political desire and economic potential are clear but selling the concept to the public could limit deployment.
“The COST project seeks to quantify the actual hazard arising from severe accidents in SSR plants, which have strong inherent safety features, such as absence of pressure and non-volatile chemistry,” says O’Sullivan.
“Moltex understand this is the first public project of its kind to do so, in a quantitative sense – rigorously calculating the precise sources of radioactivity that can depart the reactor under such extreme scenarios. Moltex expects to show that beyond the small site boundary, there is no perceptible impact; that’s an industry-changing claim for nuclear power.
“If we can demonstrate conclusively that a nuclear power plant accident cannot conceivably result in a greater risk to the public than any other form of power generation (alongside the fact SSR-W is a consumer of current nuclear waste), then there can be no greater social advertisement for the technology.”
Nuclear Energy Insider

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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5 Fast Facts About Nuclear Waste
« Reply #64 on: October 15, 2019, 12:44:28 PM »

5 Fast Facts about Nuclear Waste


WATCH: Get up to speed on these 5 fast facts about nuclear waste.
Nuclear energy is one of the largest sources of emissions-free power in the world.
It generates nearly a fifth of America’s electricity and more than half of its clean energy.
During this process, it creates spent or used fuel (sometimes referred to as nuclear waste) but it’s not the green oozy liquid you might be thinking of when watching “The Simpsons.”
In fact, some in the industry actually consider it a valuable resource.
Say what?
Don’t worry, we’ll get you up to speed with these 5 fast facts on nuclear waste that’s generated from nuclear power.
Graphic of a nuclear power reactor with nuclear waste in concrete casks.
Click above to view or download our 5 Fast Facts about Nuclear Waste infographic
1. Commercial used nuclear fuel is a solid
Used fuel refers to the uranium fuel that has been used in a commercial reactor. The fuel is made up of metal fuel rods that contain small ceramic pellets of enriched uranium oxide. The fuel rods are combined into tall assemblies that are then placed into the reactor.
It’s a solid when it goes into the reactor and a solid when it comes out.
Sorry “Simpsons.”
2. The U.S. generates about 2,000 metric tons of used fuel each year
This number may sound like a lot, but it’s actually quite small. In fact, the U.S. has produced roughly 83,000 metrics tons of used fuel since the 1950s—and all of it could fit on a single football field at a depth of less than 10 yards.
3. Used fuel is stored at more than 70 sites in 34 U.S. states
Commercial used fuel rods are safely and securely stored at 76 reactor or storage sites in 34 states.
The fuel is either enclosed in steel-lined concrete pools of water or in steel and concrete containers, known as dry storage casks.
For the foreseeable future, the fuel can safely stay at these facilities until a permanent disposal solution is determined by the federal government.
4. Used fuel is safely transported across the United States
Over the last 55 years, more than 2,500 cask shipments of used fuel have been transported across the United States without any radiological releases to the environment or harm to the public.
The fuel is shipped in transportation casks that are designed to withstand more than 99 percent of vehicle accidents, including water immersion, impact, punctures and fires.
5. Used fuel can be recycled
That’s right!
Used nuclear fuel can be recycled to make new fuel and byproducts.
More than 90% of its potential energy still remains in the fuel, even after 5 years of operation in a reactor.
The United States does not currently recycle used nuclear fuel but foreign countries, such as France, do.
There are also some advanced reactor designs in development that could consume or run on used nuclear fuel in the future.
Learn more about our work with nuclear waste.

https://www.energy.gov/ne/articles/5-fast-facts-about-nuclear-waste?fbclid=IwAR382xXIOFpHjuFbjNOfMjycKth9ZMMfCO9lWqzY-RR44MXInwsNditc-Fg
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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4 Key Benefits of Advanced Small Modular Reactors
« Reply #65 on: October 17, 2019, 05:45:14 PM »
Welcome to the future of nuclear energy.
Within the next 15 years, advanced small modular reactors (SMRs) could change the way we think about reliable, clean and affordable nuclear power.

Instead of going big, scientists and engineers went small developing mini reactors that are roughly a third of the size of a typical nuclear power plant.
That means America’s largest clean energy source
 market near you—making nuclear more scalable and flexible than ever before.
Here’s how they work.
Graphic of a small modular reactor that explains how it works.

This infographic explains how small modular reactors work.
Intrigued?
Take a look at these four key benefits to advanced small modular reactors:
SMRs Require Less Prep Time
SMR parts will be factory-made and shipped to site locations. This makes them quicker to build and less expensive than traditional designs—drastically reducing up-front costs for plant construction.
SMRs Provide More Options
Check out our podcast
If you're not quite sure what you just heard, do a quick search for ASMR -- you'll learn everything you need to know!
Because SMRs have a simple and compact design, consumers will have more options to utilize nuclear power. This includes locations unable to support large reactors, in addition to powering smaller electrical markets and grids, isolated areas, and sites with limited water.
SMRs Are Flexible
SMRs are extremely flexible. They can be scaled up or down to meet energy demands and help power areas where larger plants are not needed. SMRs can also be used to help replace or repower retiring power plants or to complement existing power plants with zero-emission fuel.
SMRs Attract New Business Opportunities
SMRs can help strengthen American dominance in nuclear energy worldwide. According to a study, estimated deployment of a 100 megawatt SMR could create 7,000 jobs and generate more than $1 billion in sales.



https://www.energy.gov/ne/articles/4-key-benefits-advanced-small-modular-reactors?fbclid=IwAR3NAKyGfNAWhAYZ1qHbdIImmhGZGT1WN3oqWzObVYvYLHoCm4GOjbhJe6U
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 8
« Reply #66 on: October 17, 2019, 07:42:16 PM »
Looks pretty good....
But I'll believe it when I see it...
Over-promising and under-delivering seems to be the norm for nuclear over the past few decades....


Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 8
« Reply #67 on: October 17, 2019, 07:47:54 PM »
I agree, I'll believe it when it happens.  To some extent, all these different proposals run at cross purposes.  I can't imagine a utility going down this path any time soon.


DunkingDan

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 8
« Reply #68 on: October 17, 2019, 07:50:43 PM »
I agree, I'll believe it when it happens.  To some extent, all these different proposals run at cross purposes.  I can't imagine a utility going down this path any time soon.
Many are in other countries are building more nukes as well as stronlgy looking at this newer technology and some here are exploring it. TVA is moving forward with it on a site just outside of Oak Ridge and is talking internally about other sites.
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 8
« Reply #69 on: October 17, 2019, 07:54:49 PM »
Yeah, talking about it.  Looking at it.  I'll believe it when sites are permitted and money is funded for construction.


 

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