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Topic: Electricity Update Pt 7

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HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #98 on: June 19, 2019, 12:18:51 AM »
Peter Tertzakian posts a great set of charts each week:

https://www.arcenergyinstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/190617-Energy-Charts-1.pdf

Note chart #28 in terms of Natty vs. Coal
And chart #29 as to how cheap gas is at present in each locale...

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #99 on: June 19, 2019, 09:46:33 AM »
Nice map on where solar makes sense.  I'm a bit surprised at how few homes in the SW have PVs on their roofs.  I know there is a starting capital cost.

I think a business could be had that installs turnkey systems and takes a portion of your savings to pay back the loan so the homeowner would have zero to do with it.

Maybe the math doesn't work.

DunkingDan

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IAEA, ITER expand cooperation on fusion
« Reply #100 on: June 21, 2019, 06:18:22 PM »
The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organisation are to enhance their cooperation in nuclear fusion research and related activities following the signing of an agreement that expands one signed in 2008.

IAEA Assistant Director General and Chief Coordinator Cornel Feruta signed the agreement - known as Practical Arrangements - at the IAEA's headquarters in Vienna earlier this week. The document was conveyed to ITER Organisation Director-General Bernard Bigot, who signed it yesterday at the ITER Council Session at ITER's headquarters in St Paul-lez-Durance, France.
Under the arrangements ITER will share its experience related to nuclear fusion safety and radiation protection with the IAEA and its 171 Member States, including those who are not members of ITER. ITER's information would play an important role for the potential development of IAEA safety standards related to nuclear fusion as well as relevant nuclear security guidance.
The two organisations will also implement educational initiatives on plasma physics and fusion engineering. They will coordinate activities in public outreach and will cooperate in knowledge management and human resources development.
IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano said: "The challenge to achieve the goal of fusion power production can only be met through concerted international efforts. ITER's impressive work plays a central role in this field. We look forward to our intensified collaboration."
Bigot added, "The IAEA hosts a wide range of initiatives in fusion and is the key international organisation in fostering global research in this area. Our Practical Arrangements deepen the long tradition of cooperation between our organisations."
The ITER Organisation is coordinating the construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor at Cadarache, in southern France. This is a major international project to build a 500 MW tokamak fusion device (requiring an input of 50 MW) designed to prove the feasibility of fusion as a large-scale and carbon-free source of energy. The European Union is contributing almost half of the cost of its construction, while the other six members (China, India, Japan, South Korea, Russia and the USA) are contributing equally to the rest.
Under a revised schedule established by the ITER Organisation in 2016, first plasma is planned for 2025, with deuterium-tritium fusion experiments commencing in 2035. Construction costs are expected to be around EUR20.0 billion (USD22.6 billion), with components contributed by the ITER members on an 'in-kind' basis.
Activities leading to the establishment of ITER were carried out under Agency auspices and the IAEA Director General is the Depository of the ITER agreement, which was signed in 2006.
Researched and written by World Nuclear News

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #101 on: June 21, 2019, 06:38:44 PM »
From what I've read, ITER is an international mess of epic proportions.

It's a shame really.

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #102 on: June 27, 2019, 08:39:36 AM »
https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=39992

U.S. electricity generation from renewables surpassed coal in April

SNIP:
U.S. coal generation has declined from its peak a decade ago. Since the beginning of 2015, about 47 GW of U.S. coal-fired capacity has retired, and virtually no new coal capacity has come online. Based on reported plans for retirements, EIA expects another 4.1 GW of coal capacity will retire in 2019, accounting for more than half of all anticipated power plant retirements for the year.

According to forecasts in EIA’s latest Short-Term Energy Outlook, coal will provide more electricity generation than renewables in the United States for the remaining months of 2019. On an annual average basis, EIA expects that coal will provide more electricity generation in the United States than renewables in both 2019 and 2020, but it expects renewables to surpass nuclear next year.



Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #103 on: June 27, 2019, 08:43:26 AM »




Looks like wind power is the major factor in the increase here, right?

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #104 on: June 27, 2019, 08:47:27 AM »




The big shift, which we all know, is NG for coal, with wind power taking up some slack also.

Hydropower plants produced about 7% of total U.S. electricity generation and about 41% of electricity generation from renewable energy in 2018. Hydropower plants use flowing water to spin a turbine connected to a generator.

Wind energy was the source of about 7% of total U.S. electricity generation and about 39% of electricity generation from renewable energy in 2018. Wind turbines convert wind energy into electricity.


HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #105 on: June 27, 2019, 09:01:33 AM »
Yep.  But solar is increasing fast as well, to about 3 percent many months, up from zero.   Both wind and solar do a great job in certain geographic areas and are irrelevant elsewhere.

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #106 on: June 27, 2019, 09:04:52 AM »
PV to the grid can't do that much yet even if it doubles obviously.  Wind looks like the main player, along with NG.

I keep thinking PV should make sense in desert areas in particular where AC demand can be so high in the daytime.  If I lived in Phoenix, I'd be very interested.

DunkingDan

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Lawmakers Introduce National Renewable Standard
« Reply #107 on: June 28, 2019, 04:04:08 PM »
A bill introduced by Senate Democrats on June 26 establishes a national electricity standard that would require large retail suppliers to source at least 1.5% of their power from renewables by 2020 and gradually grow that share through 2035. 
The measure comes a day after the Energy Information Administration (EIA) revealed monthly generation from renewable sources exceeded coal-fired generation in April 2019 for the first time in the U.S. 
A Federal Electricity Standard for Renewables
The Renewable Electricity Standard Act of 2019 introduced by Sens. Tom Udall (D-N.M.),  Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.), Tina Smith (D-Minn.), and Angus King (I–Maine), would amend the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978—a law that has historically played an important role in the development of renewable technologies and the power sector’s transition to competitive markets—to ensure future growth of renewables.
The bill seeks “to achieve at least 50% renewable electricity nationwide in just 15 years—putting the U.S. on a trajectory to decarbonize the power sector by 2050,” a statement from Sen. Udall’s office said on Wednesday. That’s “roughly double business as usual and nearly triple current levels (17.6% in 2018),” it noted.
However, it also includes a provision that encourages states to create their own renewable or clean energy standards, which it says would function “above the federal renewable electricity standard.” 
At the end of 2018, 29 states and Washington D.C. had a renewable portfolio standard (RPS), while eight states had renewable portfolio goals. State RPS targets range widely—from 10% to 100% renewable energy, and at least seven states—California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, and Vermont, and Washington, D.C.—have requirements of 50% or greater.

Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies in the U.S. as of April 2019. Courtesy: AWEA
According to the EIA, states with legally binding RPSs collectively accounted for 63% of electricity retail sales in the U.S. in 2018. If it is enacted, the bill would mainly affect retail electric suppliers, who would need to source an increasing percentage of their “base quantity of electricity”—or the total quantity sold, measured in kilowatt-hours—from renewables.
The schedule requires retailers who sell more than 1 TWh a year to source at least 1.5% of their power from renewables in 2020, but to increase that share by 2% every year between 2021 and 2029. In 2030, the annual percentage increase would rise to 2.5% through 2035. For retailers who sell less than 1 TWh, the percentage increases would be half of what is stipulated for large retailers. Retailers would satisfy the bill’s requirements through federal renewable energy credits (1 kWh is one credit), which are obtained by purchase or exchange, and which will be tracked through state or regional tracking systems.


Eligible renewables include solar, wind, ocean, tidal, geothermal, landfill gas, and hydrokinetic power, as well as from what it calls “renewable biomass” and “incremental hydropower.” Notably absent from the bill is power sourced from existing hydropower facilities and wood-to-energy biomass plants. 
Under the bill, “renewable biomass” includes crop byproducts and residues that are harvested from actively managed agricultural land that was cleared before 2019, closed-loop biomass, byproducts of wood or paper mill operations, small diameter trees, logging residues, and trees removed for “ecological restoration.” It defines “incremental hydropower” as generation that has been achieved from upgrades at existing hydro facilities. As a spokesman from the National Hydropower Association (NHA) confirmed, this limits eligible hydropower to upgrades, efficiency, and non-powered dams.
“As Congress and states continue to develop clean energy goals, it’s clear that hydropower, existing and new, must play a key role in achieving carbon emission reduction targets,” the trade group told POWER on June 27. “In fact, hydropower is the renewable that integrates other renewables like wind and solar onto the electrical grid. We believe that hydropower, in all its forms, should be counted as an eligible renewable, and we will continue working with members of Congress as the bill moves forward.”
Why a National Renewable Standard?
The legislation says the measure is needed for several reasons, including that renewable power is the “cheapest new form of electricity in many regions” of the U.S. It also says that every state “must transition to carbon-free electricity by 2050” to meet U.S. climate goals, and that renewable energy is a “virtually unlimited” resource that can help avoid pollution. 
The bill says states without high levels of renewable power “should not be penalized for past inaction,” but it suggests they should comply with an annual percentage increase schedule. As notable is that it gives the Energy Secretary the authority to allow states to opt-out of the federal standard if they produce more than 60% of their power from renewables or have a program that will ultimately exceed the federal standard. And in another significant provision, it directs the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to ensure transmission providers identify the electric transmission needs driven by the bill. 
Udall’s statement noted the bill has already received endorsements from a wide range of groups such as American Council on Renewable Energy (ACORE), American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), Appalachian Voices, Climate for Health, ecoAmerica, Environment America, Environmental Law and Policy Center, Environmental Working Group, Health Care Without Harm, Interwest Energy Alliance, League of Conservation Voters, National Wildlife Federation, Physicians for Social Responsibility, Rocky Mountain Institute, Sierra Club, Solar Energy, Industries Association (SEIA), Union of Concerned Scientists, and the Wilderness Society.
Initial reactions to the bill, which began trickling in on Wednesday, were mostly from renewable trade groups. Tom Kiernan, CEO of AWEA, for example, said the measure proposed a “flexible framework for states to make meaningful power-sector carbon emissions cuts, fueled by market competition between renewable energy technologies.” Kiernan added, “This is the kind of policy, along with improvements to transmission planning and permitting, that is needed to build a 21st century clean economy, drive major new investment in wind farms, grow demand for U.S. factories, and cut consumer energy bills.”
Renewables (as well as Nuclear) Surge Ahead of Coal
The national renewable electricity standard was introduced barely a day after the EIA revealed that renewable generation had surged ahead of coal in April. Renewable sources—including utility-scale hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass—provided 23% of total electricity in the U.S. that month, compared to 20% from coal, the EIA said on June 26, citing data from its Electric Power Monthly.
The milestone was fueled by record generation from wind (30.2 TWh) and near-record generation from solar (6.9 TWh), which includes PV and solar thermal. Solar PV set an all-time monthly record in June 2018 with 7.3 TWh. Conventional hydropower facilities also produced higher amounts of power, owing in part to melting snowpacks. Hydropower generated 25.4 TWh; geothermal contributed 1.3 TWh; and biomass, landfill gas, and wood-derived fuels added a combined 4.6 TWh. That brought total generation from renewable sources in April to 68.4 TWh.
Comparatively, in April, coal plants produced 60 TWh—a little less than the nation’s nuclear plants, which produced 60.6 TWh. Petroleum liquids and pet coke, combined, produced 1.2 TWh. Natural gas and other gas dominated the national power scene, producing 103.9 TWh.

Source: EIA
“This outcome reflects both seasonal factors as well as long-term increases in renewable generation and decreases in coal generation,” the EIA noted. Power generation from fuels such as natural gas, coal, and nuclear is often at its lowest point during spring and fall months, owing to temperatures that are moderate and lower power demand for heating and air conditioning, which leads many plants to schedule planned maintenance outages, while renewables tend to pick up due to seasonal conditions.
However, it also noted that coal generation has declined markedly from its peak a decade ago. “Since the beginning of 2015, about 47 GW of U.S. coal-fired capacity has retired, and virtually no new coal capacity has come online,” the EIA said. “Based on reported plans for retirements, EIA expects another 4.1 GW of coal capacity will retire in 2019, accounting for more than half of all anticipated power plant retirements for the year.”
—Sonal Patel is a POWER associate editor (@sonalcpatel, @POWERmagazine)
Updated (June 27) to include RPS data and map.
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President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

Cincydawg

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DunkingDan

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Russia gets operating licence for floating plant
« Reply #109 on: July 01, 2019, 04:42:25 PM »
Russia's Rosenergoatom has received an operating licence for its floating nuclear power plant, Akademik Lomonosov, from the country's regulator Rostechnadzor. The facility is 144 metres in length, 30 metres wide and has a displacement of 21,000 tonnes. It has two 35 MWe KLT-40S reactors.

Rosenergoatom, the nuclear power plant operator subsidiary of state nuclear corporation Rosatom, said yesterday it is now entitled to operate the new facility for 10 years, up to 2029.
Andrey Petrov, Rosenergoatom CEO, said obtaining the licence is the pinnacle of many years of hard work. "This gives us the opportunity to start transporting the vessel to the Pevek port in late August, where it will then undergo trials and operational launch as part of the floating nuclear heat and power plant at the end of 2019," he added.
The floating power unit is scheduled to be transferred from the Baltic Shipyard to Rosenergoatom by the end of this month, with connection to the Chukotenergo power grid and the city's heat networks expected to be completed by year-end. The plant will eventually replace the withdrawn generating capacities of the Chaunskaya combined heat and power plant in the city of Pevek and the Bilibino nuclear power plant in the city of Bilibino.
"As the floating plant is going to be located in Pevek, it will boost the social and economic development of the Chaun municipal district specifically and Chukotka in general, Rosenergoatom said. In addition, it will become one of the key infrastructure elements within the Northern Sea Route development programme," the company said.
Researched and written by World Nuclear News

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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NRC has hearing on Oak Ridge site that could host small nuke reactors
« Reply #110 on: July 03, 2019, 07:30:20 PM »


The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has scheduled a hearing for an application for a site in west Oak Ridge where small modular nuclear reactors could be built.
The hearing has been scheduled for 9 a.m. Wednesday, August 14, at the NRC in Rockville, Maryland.
The NRC will discuss an early site permit application submitted by the Tennessee Valley Authority for the Clinch River Nuclear Site. TVA has proposed using the 935-acre site, which is along the Clinch River south of Heritage Center (the former K-25 site), to build two or more small modular reactors. The site once hosted the former Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project.
During the August 14 hearing, the NRC will have an evidentiary session to hear testimony and receive exhibits in the uncontested proceeding for TVA’s early site permit application, according to a notice published in the Federal Register on Monday.
The hearing will concern safety and environmental matters that are related to the early site permit application, the notice said. It will help determine whether the review of TVA’s application by the NRC staff has been adequate under federal laws and regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act and National Environmental Policy Act.



In June, the NRC completed a final safety evaluation report for the Clinch River Nuclear Site and said two or more small nuclear reactors could be safely located there.
In April, Oak Ridge Today reported that the NRC had issued a final environmental impact statement for the site, and the staff had recommended, based upon that review, issuing the early site permit.
That recommendation came after the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards recommended approving the early site permit in a January 9 letter to the NRC. The committee reports on the parts of an early site permit application that concern safety.
TVA submitted its application for the early site permit in May 2016.
The Clinch River Nuclear Site could be used to demonstrate small modular reactors with a maximum total electrical output of 800 megawatts. Small modular reactors, or SMRs, would be smaller than traditional nuclear power plants, and they would produce less power.
The NRC’s early site permit process for the reactors allows an applicant to address site-related issues, such as environmental impacts, for possible future construction and operation of a nuclear power plant at the site.



The early site permit has not been issued for the Clinch River Nuclear Site. The August 14 NRC hearing is required now that the final safety evaluation report has been published.
After the hearing, the five-member commission is expected to make a decision about whether to issue the early site permit. If it is issued, the permit will be valid for up to 20 years.
An early site permit is the NRC’s approval of a site for one or more nuclear power facilities. It does not authorize the actual construction and operation of a new nuclear power plant. That requires a construction permit and an operating license, or a combined license.
TVA has not selected a specific reactor technology for the Clinch River site. Instead, TVA used a plant parameter envelope to develop its early site permit application. That means the public utility used technical information from various reactor designs to develop parameters that were used to evaluate the suitability of the site for the future construction and operation of a nuclear power plant.
No certified small modular reactor designs are currently available.



https://oakridgetoday.com/2019/07/01/nrc-has-hearing-on-oak-ridge-site-that-could-host-small-nuclear-reactors/?fbclid=IwAR3nBQYy0HNjlG8oakKye1s6DsIzgH6OBB3ZcCUks2yl7Q5pwHyo2UdBn1s
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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Bringing the APR1400 Reactor to Market
« Reply #111 on: July 08, 2019, 07:07:15 PM »
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission conducts an extensive evaluation of reactor technology before approving and ultimately licensing nuclear power plants. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. began the process of certifying its APR1400 design nearly five years ago and its efforts have finally paid off.
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a final safety evaluation report and standard design approval (SDA) to the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. (KHNP) and Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO) for their Advanced Power Reactor, a 1,400-MW electrical power reactor (APR1400). KHNP’s APR1400 Standard Plant Design application is the first non-U.S. reactor design to receive an SDA under Section 103 of the Atomic Energy Act and Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR), “Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants.”
The APR1400 is a two-loop pressurized water reactor, developed in the Republic of Korea, based on innovative design improvements and technology enhancements built on the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the Optimized Power Reactor 1000. The APR1400 has a design life of 60 years.
KHNP’s dedicated APR1400 project team assembled dozens of companies and expertise from around the globe to bring innovation in design and licensing approaches. KHNP not only relied on the engineering and technology manufacturing capabilities of Korea, but it also depended on numerous U.S. engineering, licensing, consulting, and supply chain partners, including AECOM, Jensen and Hughes, MPR Associates, Structural Integrity, and Westinghouse, to name a few. The collective efforts truly demonstrated a collaborative international success—further promoting the tenants of the U.S.-Korean Energy Cooperation—and working together to meet the energy needs and economic opportunity as global demand for nuclear energy accelerates.
A Time-Consuming Process
The NRC’s safety assessment was achieved during 42 months of careful review and consideration to certify the reactor. The NRC staff review also drew upon process efficiencies gained and lessons learned from its own Part 52 experiences, which allowed the NRC to meet the 42-month agency benchmark set for conducting the technical reviews, as well as the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) approval, which concluded, “The APR1400 design is mature and robust” and it can be “constructed and operated without undue risk to the health and safety of the public.”
KHNP overcame many challenges and used some of them to its advantage to assure meeting a 42-month review schedule. For example, KHNP was able to reduce the response time in interacting with NRC staff by utilizing the 14-hour time difference between the countries to its advantage. KHNP’s willingness to hold meetings on Eastern U.S. time (despite it being late evening in Asia) allowed NRC reviewers the necessary interactions with subject matter experts in Korea, and in many cases, follow-up information was provided early the next business day.
“I am pleased to say that through extensive staff and applicant [KHNP/KEPCO] efforts, including the development of novel approaches to the remaining challenging issues, the staff completed its first design certification review within 42 months and issued the standard design approval for the APR1400,” said Rob Taylor, director of the Licensing, Siting, and Environmental Analysis division for the NRC’s Office of New Reactors.
As part of its commitment to the application’s success, KHNP established a dedicated team of more than a dozen technical and licensing experts in a Washington, D.C., Center (WDCC), which enabled the quick response and vital interface necessary with the NRC staff. KHNP’s WDCC makeup included AECOM and representative managers of sister companies from Korea. The WDCC was instrumental in driving issue identification, effective responses, and closure of NRC audits and Design Control Document (DCD) chapter reviews; whereas, other applicants that maintained either remote and/or larger staffs to coordinate technical exchanges and interactions met lesser success.
KHNP submitted its application to the NRC for certification of the APR1400 design on December 23, 2014. The application was submitted in accordance with 10 CFR Part 52, Subpart B, “Standard Design Certifications.” KHNP also requested a design approval in accordance with 10 CFR Part 52, Subpart E, “Standard Design Approvals.” The APR1400 application consisted of the DCD, including an extensive probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), along with a number of key issue topical reports and an environmental report.


More see links below
Pages:


https://www.powermag.com/bringing-the-apr1400-reactor-to-market/
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

 

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