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Topic: Electricity Update Pt 7

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Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #40 on: March 01, 2019, 08:23:40 AM »
Very interesting data and perspective.  I suspect the newest coal plants will be around in ten years, whatever they are.  I know Wyoming has some sited right at coal mines, easier to ship electrons than coal.  And we'll be exporting coal to China for their plants.

How much new NG generating capacity is in the offing in a decade?  

What will our energy mix look like in ten years?  BG 35%???  Coal 7%  Hydro 13% or whatever it is now  W&S  18%?  Nuclear 20%?  I don't get to 100% obviously unless W&S is MUCH higher.  And what portion of the auto fleet will be plug in?

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #41 on: March 01, 2019, 09:49:33 AM »
Natural Gas is adding about 18,000 megawatts in the next 2 years.
So it will grow, but probably not by more than a percentage or so.

My guess is that in two years, coal loses another couple of percentage points while Natural Gas picks up 0.5% to 1% while wind and solar pick up 1% to 1.5%.

Nuclear is finally being taken offline, so it will likely drop 1% as well - picked up by natty, solar and wind.

Hydro is pretty fixed, with its fluxuations dependent on rainfall that year. 
Should be a good year for California and other places as the snowfall was excellent this year - so the snowpack is large.

At the margin, solar and wind will push out natty & coal as the fuel costs for solar and wind is zero while coal and natty has costs to get up and running.  As battery storage becomes a viable alternative, it will be really interesting.    Especially as you can position batteries much closer to the end consumer than you can with a peaker natural gas plant.


HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #42 on: March 01, 2019, 09:51:03 AM »
Watch for solar in the Southeast.

By 2021, you could see solar providing 5% of all electricity in North & South Carolina, with growth continuing to be very strong in the following years.  Georgia and Florida are starting to ramp up as well.


HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #43 on: March 01, 2019, 09:57:11 AM »
What I think is fascinating is the AOC's of the world are insisting that the Government intervene immediately.  It is of national importance!  Meanwhile, their solutions are uneconomic, expensive, and push more power (and graft) to Washington DC.

Meanwhile, the economics of the private sector are moving in exactly the same direction, in a persistent and consistent fashion.  Yet that move "isn't enough."  So DC needs to get their dirty hands in the middle of it.  No thanks.

Utilities are quickly and dramatically reducing their carbon footprint along with all other pollutants that they emit.  I sometimes think that the environmentalists are desperate to "do something immediately" before the population realizes that the problem is solving itself by the best possible method - rational economics that increase the capacity of the cheapest form of new energy today - renewables.

Can't have that.  "What would happen to our opportunities for power and graft?", asks the typical DC politician.


DunkingDan

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USA launches test reactor project
« Reply #44 on: March 06, 2019, 06:52:48 PM »
The US Department of Energy has launched its Versatile Fast Neutron Source project to provide fast neutron testing capability to aid US development of advanced nuclear reactor technology. The Versatile Test Reactor (VTR), as it is also known, could be completed by 2026.

The DOE said fast neutron testing capability would help the country meet its goal for advanced nuclear reactor technology development. These facilities are currently available in only a few locations worldwide and the USA has not operated one in over 20 years. This means US developers have not had the ability to carry out accelerated irradiation testing needed for the development of non-light water advanced reactor concepts. The VTR would provide a reactor-based source of the fast neutrons needed to test advanced reactor technology, fuels and related materials.
The Nuclear Energy Innovation Capabilities Act, which became law last September, directed the DOE to develop a reactor-based fast neutron source for the testing of advanced reactor fuels and materials, and to execute a programme for enhancing the capability to develop new reactor technologies through high-performance computer modelling and simulation techniques. The launch of the VTR was announced on 28 February by US Energy Secretary Rick Perry, during a joint press conference with International Atomic Energy Agency Executive Director Fatih Birol.
Perry said the VTR was a key step to implementing President Donald Trump's direction to "revitalise and expand" the US nuclear industry.
"This cutting edge Advanced Reactor will give American companies the ability they currently lack to conduct advanced technology and fuels tests without having to go to our competitors in Russia and China," he said.
The VTR will eliminate a "research gap" and "drastically" speed up the time taken to test, develop and qualify advanced reactor technologies, as well as being pivotal in creating new fuels, materials, instrumentation and sensors, the DOE said.
"Having this domestic capability is critical to our national security and our ability to re-establish ourselves as a global leader in advanced reactor technologies," Ed McGinnis, principal deputy assistant secretary of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, said.
DOE's Idaho National Laboratory has previously selected GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy's (GEH) PRISM technology to support the VTR programme, and has subcontracted GEH to work with Bechtel to advance the design and cost estimates for a VTR based on the integral sodium-cooled fast reactor. DOE said on 1 March that it will now move forward with its conceptual design of the reactor, which could be completed "as early as 2026".
   
Researched and written by World Nuclear News
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #45 on: March 07, 2019, 08:59:21 AM »
Does nuclear (fission) have any realistic future in the US (beyond Vogtle 3 and 4)?

US CO2 emissions are projected to head higher in the next few years, in part due to economic expansion.

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #46 on: March 07, 2019, 05:15:37 PM »
TVA says it is seriously considering small modular reactors.

I welcome the development - but remain extremely skeptical - not with the science - but with the cost and time needed.

Nuclear plants have historically come online way behind schedule and massively over budget.

https://www.tva.gov/Energy/Technology-Innovation/Small-Modular-Reactors

Small Modular Reactors
In its focus on developing small modular reactors (SMRs), TVA is demonstrating its leadership in the national movement toward cleaner, low-cost energy.

SNIP:
he Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting TVA’s work through an agreement which authorizes TVA to be reimbursed for up to 50 percent of its eligible costs.

TVA has submitted its early site permit (ESP) application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to asses the potential for construction and operation of small modular nuclear reactors at its 1,200-acre Clinch River Site. Valid for up to 20 years, an ESP addresses site safety, environmental protection and emergency preparedness associated with any of the light-water reactor SMR designs under development in the United States.


Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #47 on: March 07, 2019, 05:24:20 PM »
What is the soonest one of these SMRs could be up and running and generating power for the grid?  The verbiage above sounds speculative to me, like one might get built someday depending on funding etc.

DunkingDan

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #48 on: March 07, 2019, 07:28:02 PM »
TVA says it is seriously considering small modular reactors.

I welcome the development - but remain extremely skeptical - not with the science - but with the cost and time needed.

Nuclear plants have historically come online way behind schedule and massively over budget.

https://www.tva.gov/Energy/Technology-Innovation/Small-Modular-Reactors

Small Modular Reactors
In its focus on developing small modular reactors (SMRs), TVA is demonstrating its leadership in the national movement toward cleaner, low-cost energy.

SNIP:
he Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting TVA’s work through an agreement which authorizes TVA to be reimbursed for up to 50 percent of its eligible costs.

TVA has submitted its early site permit (ESP) application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to asses the potential for construction and operation of small modular nuclear reactors at its 1,200-acre Clinch River Site. Valid for up to 20 years, an ESP addresses site safety, environmental protection and emergency preparedness associated with any of the light-water reactor SMR designs under development in the United States.
Study the regulations behind them. Cost overruns and delays will be greatly reduced because of this as well as many other factors.

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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Lawmakers Introduce a Bill to Save Pennsylvania Power Plants
« Reply #49 on: March 12, 2019, 01:26:08 PM »
(WBRE/WYOU-TV) A pair of nuclear power plants in Pennsylvania are soon set to shut down with Three Mile Island slated to close this September and Beaver Valley closing in 2021. Now, Lawmakers have introduced a new bill aimed at saving those plants and thousands of jobs.  Eyewitness News Reporter Harrisburg Matt Heckel has the story,
 
 Right now, Pennsylvania's five nuclear power plants account for 16,000 full-time jobs. But two of those plants are soon slated to close. 
"They are good paying jobs that simply can not be recreated once they are gone," said Rep. Tom Mehaffie, (R) Sponsor of House Bill 11. 
On Monday, Rep. Tom Mehaffie introduced the Keep Powering Pennsylvania Act. It adds nuclear energy to the Pennsylvania Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards Program, which incentivizes renewable forms of energy like solar and wind. 
"Even though Pennsylvania nuclear energy provides 93 percent of the Commonwealth's zero-carbon electricity, nuclear energy is not permitted to participate in Pennsylvania's AEPS program," said Rep. Mehaffie. 
The cost of the bill is about $500 million. Supporters say the cost of doing nothing is $4.6 billion. 
"The plan that was unveiled today is a fancy way of saying bailout. And who will be hurt by this the most are ratepayers and taxpayers," said Eric Epstein, Three Mile Island Alert. 
Eric Epstein with the group, Three Mile Island Alert says Three Mile Island has been bailed out a number of times already, and hasn't proven to be profitable. 
Rep. Mehaffie says if the bill passes, there's a clause for TMI to remain open for six years. 
"The plant can't make money. Hasn't made money in five years. It should be replaced by a cleaner, more efficient, profitable technology. That's the way the marketplace works," said Epstein. 
That bill was just introduced Monday. It now needs to pass committee before being introduced to the full house.

https://www.pahomepage.com/news/lawmakers-introduce-a-bill-to-save-pennsylvania-power-plants/1841687883?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook_Eyewitness_News_WBRE_WYOU&fbclid=IwAR3PHvBYCSJnvsoxMBEGNV1pB-Gb_ByOdScp5HQjewOLKI0kvKNXo-ol1SE
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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Germany to close all 84 of its coal-fired power plants, will rely
« Reply #50 on: March 14, 2019, 05:13:06 PM »
primarily on renewable energy
Germany, one of the world’s biggest consumers of coal, will shut down all 84 of its coal-fired power plants over the next 19 years to meet its international commitments in the fight against climate change, a government commission said Saturday.

The announcement marked a significant shift for Europe’s largest country — a nation that had long been a leader on cutting CO2 emissions before turning into a laggard in recent years and badly missing its reduction targets. Coal plants account for 40% of Germany’s electricity, itself a reduction from recent years when coal dominated power production.

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President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #51 on: March 14, 2019, 05:15:59 PM »
The LA Times article features a photo of cooling towers emitting water vapor, to try and display pollution I surmise from coal burning.

DunkingDan

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #52 on: March 14, 2019, 05:18:57 PM »
The LA Times article features a photo of cooling towers emitting water vapor, to try and display pollution I surmise from coal burning.
In this Jan.6, 2019, file photo water vapor rises from the cooling towers of the Joenschwalde lignite-fired power plant of Lausitz Energie Bergbau AG in Brandenburg, Germany. (Patrick Pleul / AP)

From below the photos

Feel free to misrepresent, I mean well us what they were doing as you still are the wise one and the rest of us are know nothings  :smiley_confused1: 
« Last Edit: March 14, 2019, 05:29:06 PM by DunkingDan »
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #53 on: March 14, 2019, 05:20:22 PM »
Yeah, I saw that, but the photo generates more of an immediate perception.

DunkingDan

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Kentucky coal investor makes offer to buy TVA's Paradise plant
« Reply #54 on: March 28, 2019, 06:47:48 PM »
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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CEOs Say Preserving the Nuclear Power Fleet Is Imperative
« Reply #55 on: March 29, 2019, 09:12:45 PM »
everal power-sector CEOs—appearing at the Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) Summit in New York this week—suggested that existing nuclear power plants should not be allowed to slowly vanish from the U.S. electricity grid under market pressure caused by cheap natural gas and the growth of renewable energy. The leaders submitted that nuclear power provides important carbon-free energy needed to meet greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals.
“We have this issue in the U.S. around nuclear. It doesn’t compete against gas, but is a critical component of a decarbonized future,” said Audrey Zibelman, CEO and managing director of the Australian Energy Market Operator. Although Zibelman no longer resides in the U.S., she appeared to still have a vested interest in the country’s energy sector, having previously chaired the New York State Public Service Commission, and having been executive vice president and chief operating officer of the PJM Interconnection, among other things.
Ralph Izzo, chairman, president, and CEO of Public Service Enterprise Group Inc. (PSEG), said his company is highly focused on preserving its nuclear fleet. He noted that the Oyster Creek nuclear plant in New Jersey—an Exelon-owned facility—was recently decommissioned. “Megawatt-hour for megawatt-hour of lost load from that—of lost supply from that—was picked up by natural gas at half a ton of carbon per megawatt-hour,” Izzo said, implying that the GHG penalty was significant.
PSEG operates three nuclear reactors in New Jersey—the 1,173-MW Hope Creek unit and the dual-unit, 2,278-MW Salem station. The company has long been lobbying for the New Jersey Legislature to provide financial support to help keep the units economical. Some states, such as Illinois, New York, and Connecticut, have already enacted legislation to help keep in-state nuclear plants afloat, while Pennsylvania and others contemplate similar options.
“For Duke Energy, nuclear is foundational. In the Carolinas, 50% of the power comes from carbon-free nuclear,” Duke Energy CEO Lynn Good said. “Our objective is to keep those nuclear plants running as long as we can. We’re a proponent of second license renewal. But we also have to recognize with that foundation, how do intermittent resources fit on top of it?” she asked. “I have an eastern Carolina nuclear plant that we’re experimenting on flexibility. Can I take it down? I can’t load follow with it right now, but, ‘Is there some flexibility that I can put into place in the operation of that unit?’ is part of the maturing of this reliability picture,” she said. Duke Energy operates 11 nuclear units at six sites in the Carolinas with a combined generating capability of about 10,719 MW (Figure 1).

 [img width=100%]https://cdn.powermag.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/oconee_nrc_duke-energy.jpg[/img]
 
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1. Duke Energy’s Oconee Nuclear Station in Seneca, South Carolina, was a POWER Top Plant Award winner in 2018. It was recognized for replacing two 40-year-old feedwater heaters at the plant in a stunning 12.5 days. Courtesy: Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Geisha Williams, former CEO of Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), was interviewed during a separate session at the BNEF Summit. PG&E owns the two-unit, 2,256-MW Diablo Canyon nuclear facility, which is slated to close in August 2025. Tony Earley was PG&E’s CEO when the decision to retire the facility was first announced, but Williams was at the helm when the California Public Utilities Commission accepted the plan. Nonetheless, Williams suggested it is in the country’s best interest to preserve the existing nuclear fleet.
“I think carbon’s the enemy. I think greenhouse gas emissions are the enemy. We’ve got to be laser focused about it. How do we reduce that in the most cost-effective manner?” Williams said. “With something like 20% of the power produced in this country coming from nuclear, to sort of cast that aside would be pretty irresponsible. It’s safe. It’s clean. It’s affordable. It’s zero emission. So, I think part of our strategy—a big part of our strategy—has got to be how do we maintain, how do we retain, these nuclear reactors in play, providing its baseload power, very affordably and very cleanly, to buy ourselves time to figure out long-term what the solutions are,” she added.
   
“I personally believe that nuclear is very much a part of the solution,” said Williams.

https://www.powermag.com/ceos-say-preserving-the-nuclear-power-fleet-is-imperative/
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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DOE announces funds for overseas fusion research
« Reply #56 on: March 31, 2019, 06:05:35 PM »
The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science has announced USD30 million of funding for experimental research on magnetic fusion energy science at to be carried out at international tokamak facilities.

Research will be conducted by US scientists using existing facilities in the European Union, South Korea and other countries that have existing bilateral agreements with the USA, the DOE said. The awards will support both multiple- and single-institution research teams to conduct bilateral research on facilities with capabilities not available domestically. Such collaborations will take advantage of the "unique capabilities" of the most advanced international research facilities and allow the US fusion programme to gain the knowledge needed to operate long duration plasma discharges in ITER and other fusion facilities, according to the funding opportunity announcement.
James Van Dam, DOE acting associate director of science for fusion energy sciences, said research on tokamaks in the European Union and Asia would enable the US fusion programme to gain the knowledge needed to operate long-duration plasma discharges in future fusion energy devices.
"US scientists and engineers are working closely with research laboratories overseas to make optimal use of fusion facilities that can take decades to design, construct, and commission," he said.
National laboratories, universities and private industry will be eligible for the three-year awards from the DOE Office of Science. Recipients will be selected on the basis of peer review.
Tokamaks use a strong toroidal - or doughnut-shaped - magnetic field to confine a hot plasma in which fusion takes place, and is the leading candidate currently being studied in pursuit of a fusion power plant based on magnetic plasma confinement.
Several tokamaks have been built, including the Joint European Torus and the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak in the UK, and the KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Reactor) at the National Fusion Research Institute in Daejeon, South Korea. KSTAR produced its first plasma in mid-2008 and is a pilot device for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project, which is under construction in Cadarache, France.
QIS funding for fusion research

 The DOE has also announced USD6million for research in Quantum Information Science (QIS) with relevance to fusion energy and plasma science, its first awards in this area. According to the DOE Office of Science, QIS is an emerging multidisciplinary field that seeks to harness exotic quantum effects of matter for computing, information processing, sensing and other applications.

Research to be supported will include the use of quantum computing to solve fusion and plasma science problems; the development of quantum sensing approaches that can enhance diagnostic capabilities for plasma and fusion science; and the application of high-energy density laboratory plasmas to develop quantum materials at ultra-high pressures.
The funding is expected to be competition-based three-year grants of USD50,000 to USD1 million per year. Universities, non-profit organisations, private sector companies and DOE national laboratories are eligible to apply
   
Researched and written by World Nuclear News
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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THE BIG PICTURE: Cost of Power Comparison
« Reply #57 on: April 05, 2019, 01:00:21 PM »
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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NRC recommends issuing early site permit for Clinch River Nuclear Site
« Reply #58 on: April 09, 2019, 07:42:02 PM »
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a final environmental impact statement, and the staff has recommended, based upon the environmental review, issuing an early site permit for the Clinch River Nuclear Site in west Oak Ridge, where two or more small modular nuclear reactors could be built.
The final environmental impact statement, or EIS, was issued by the NRC on April 3. A notice of the EIS and the staff’s recommendation were published in the Federal Register on Monday, April 8.
The 935-acre Clinch River Nuclear Site is located in Roane County along the Clinch River.
 
An application for the early site permit was submitted by the Tennessee Valley Authority in May 2016. A draft EIS was published last year, and in June, the NRC had public meetings in Kingston to discuss its draft conclusion that environmental impacts would be small enough to allow the early site permit to be issued.
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President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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Site approval for Egyptian nuclear power plant
« Reply #59 on: April 11, 2019, 07:59:32 PM »
Egypt's Nuclear Power Plants Authority (NPPA) has received a site approval permit for the El Dabaa site from the Egyptian Nuclear Regulation and Radiological Authority (ENRRA). The permit acknowledges that the site and its specific conditions comply with national and international requirements.

The site approval permit marked the achievement of the first major milestone in the licensing process for the El Dabaa plant, the NPPA said. The approval was issued in early March following a "detailed comprehensive review" by ENRRA of the application documents submitted by the NPPA in 2017, the authority added. These included: data about the reactor installation; site data and characteristics; design basis and concept; and a project Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) report reviewed by the Environmental Affairs Agency.
To support the review, the government of Egypt had invited an independent review mission by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the NPPA said. This focused on the Site Evaluation Report and the radiological part of the EIA report, and was provided within the framework of a Site and External Events Design (SEED) review mission held in late January. The review paid specific attention to safety-related site characteristics and external natural and human-induced hazards, including earthquakes, tsunamis, and human induced external events, the NPPA said.
"Issuance of the Site Approval Permit is an acknowledgement that the El Dabaa site and its specific conditions comply with national and IAEA requirements for NPP [nuclear power plant] sites," the NPPA said. "Site specific conditions must be appropriately considered in the design of the NPP to ensure the future safe and reliable operation of the nuclear installations."
The site approval permit is issued for four nuclear units. All other permits within the nuclear licensing process are issued for each unit separately, the NPPA said. The site approval permit is a condition for obtaining the next licensing document: a construction permit authorising the implementation of any nuclear related works at the El Dabaa site.
Four Russian-designed VVER-1200 pressurised water reactors are planned for El Dabaa, which is on the Mediterranean coast, 170 kilometres west of Alexandria and Zafraana on the Gulf of Suez. Russian State Atomic Energy Corporation Rosatom is to develop the plant, which will be owned and operated by the NPPA. With a nameplate capacity of 4.8GWe, the plant is expected to account for up to 50% of Egypt’s power generation capacity to meet the country’s increasing demand for electricity, according to Rosatom.
 
Researched and written by World Nuclear News
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

 

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