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Topic: Electricity Update Pt 7

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DunkingDan

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US federal funding granted for SSR technology development
« Reply #112 on: July 11, 2019, 02:49:46 PM »
Moltex Energy USA LLC has been awarded USD2.55 million of US federal funding to develop technologies that will be capable of shortening Stable Salt Reactor (SSR) construction timelines to under three years.

The funding, from the US Department of Energy's Advanced Research Project Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), will be used to develop composite structural technologies (COST) for the reactor. Moltex says this will bring the Stable Salt Reactor-Wasteburner (SSR-W) - the first variant of the SSR being developed by the company - even closer to market and global roll-out.
"If we are to displace fossil-fuelled generation fast, the entire plant - from reactor to final construction and operation - needs to consider the real-world financing, economic issues, operating practicalities and lead times of nuclear new build," said Adam Owens, principal investigator of Moltex's COST programme. "This project demonstrates SSR-W as an economically practical solution to climate change in the urgent timeframes required, in the highest impact areas for global decarbonisation in the 2030s, rather than the 2040s or 2050s."
Moltex will work in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Electric Power Research Institute, Purdue University and Vanderbilt University on the SSR, exploiting innovative technologies such as advanced structural composites and coatings to enable rapid construction.
The SSR is a molten salt reactor. This type of reactor uses fuel dissolved in a molten fluoride or chloride salt, which also functions as the reactor's coolant and operate at atmospheric pressure. In Moltex's SSR design, molten salt fuel is held in vented tubes bundled into fuel assemblies which make up the reactor's core modules. Each 150 MW module is factory built and contains a support structure for the fuel assemblies, heat exchangers and all other pumps and controls. The rectangular core modules are held in a larger tank, which is filled with a molten salt coolant. A second similar coolant salt system takes heat from the primary coolant salt.
Moltex’s technical advisory committee for the project is comprised of leading international experts and utility customers, including its technology demonstration partner New Brunswick Power (NB Power).
The SSR-W is the first variant of SSR being developed by the company and will use fuel produced from used nuclear fuel from conventional reactors. Moltex last year signed an agreement with the New Brunswick Energy Solutions Corporation and NB Power to build a demonstration SSR-W at the Point Lepreau nuclear power plant site in Canada. The second-generation SSR envisaged by the company, which will use uranium fuel, is aimed at those countries which do not have existing nuclear reactors and therefore have no waste to burn. The company also envisages a thorium breeder version of the reactor.
Moltex CEO for North America Rory O’Sullivan said the project will allow the company to access US expertise in construction technology, design codes and design safety analysis to support Moltex Energy Canada, which is leading the licensing, plant design and deployment of the demonstration reactor.
"At the same time, the [company's] UK laboratory will drive the fundamental scientific research and experiments related to the Moltex SSR technology portfolio," he said.
ARPA-E says it advances "high-potential, high-impact energy technologies that are too early for private-sector investment".
The award to Moltex is part of ARPA-E's MEITNER (Modeling-Enhanced Innovations Trailblazing Nuclear Energy Reinvigoration) programme, which, ARPA-E says, "seeks to identify and develop innovative technologies that can enable designs for lower cost [and] safer advanced nuclear reactors".
Researched and written by World Nuclear News

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #113 on: July 11, 2019, 05:25:00 PM »
https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=40072

SNIP:
Utility-scale battery storage units (units of one megawatt (MW) or greater power capacity) are a newer electric power resource, and their use has been growing in recent years. Operating utility-scale battery storage power capacity has more than quadrupled from the end of 2014 (214 MW) through March 2019 (899 MW). Assuming currently planned additions are completed and no current operating capacity is retired, utility-scale battery storage power capacity could exceed 2,500 MW by 2023.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2019, 09:31:54 AM by HK_Vol »

DunkingDan

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Investment in Renewables Down in 1H2019
« Reply #114 on: July 12, 2019, 04:47:02 PM »
Investments in renewable energy projects slowed in the first half of 2019, primarily due to a 39% year-over-year drop in China, the world’s largest renewables market, according to data published July 10 by BloombergNEF (BNEF).
BNEF said investments in China dropped to $28.8 billion, the lowest figure for any six-month period since 2013. China is moving away from government-set tariffs for solar and wind capacity and instead moving to auctions for renewable power. BNEF said global investment in renewables was $117.6 billion in the first half of this year, off 14% compared to the January-June 2018 period.
Justin Wu, head of Asia-Pacific for BNEF, in a news release said: “The slowdown in investment in China is real, but the figures for first-half 2019 probably overstate its severity. We expect a nationwide solar auction happening now to lead to a rush of new PV project financings. We could also see several big deals in offshore wind in the second half.”
BNEF reported that three projects have highlighted investment in renewables this year, in two relatively new markets. About $4.2 billion was invested in a 950-MW solar thermal and photovoltaic complex in Dubai. Another $5.7 billion was invested in two offshore Taiwan wind farms, with a combined 1,540 MW of power generation capacity. BNEF said the Dubai project—
Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum IV—is the biggest financing ever in the solar sector, involving 10 Chinese, Gulf and Western banks, the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority, Saudi-based developer ACWA Power, and equity partner Silk Road Fund of China.
BNEF said investment dropped in the U.S. and Europe along with China, with the U.S. off 6% to $23.6 billion, and Europe down 4% to $22.2 billion.
Poland Seeking $30 Billion in Foreign Investment for Nuclear Plants
Krzysztof Tchórzewski, Poland’s energy minister, on July 10 said the country will need about $30 billion from foreign investors to help build the country’s first nuclear power plant. Tchórzewski earlier this year said the country wants a nuclear unit with generation capacity of at least 1 GW in service by 2033, as part of a plant to build reactors with 6 GW to 9 GW of capacity by 2043.
Most of Poland’s current power generation is from coal. Poland, like other countries concerned about reducing emissions of greenhouse gases from power plants, is looking for cleaner energy solutions.
“Investors are needed for around $30 billion, however this money would be provided over 20 years,” Tchórzewski told reporters Wednesday in Warsaw while discussing the country’s nuclear plans. The energy minister said the Polish government estimates the cost of its nuclear power program at about $60 billion. Tchórzewski said Poland is actively pursuing foreign investors in addition to the U.S., with which the country has a memorandum on energy cooperation.


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https://www.powermag.com/power-notebook-investment-in-renewables-down-in-1h2019/

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #115 on: July 13, 2019, 09:37:56 AM »
April electricity stats:

Percent from source:
Coal:  20.4%
Wind:  10.2%
Hydro: 8.6%
Solar:  7%
(25.8% from wind, solar & hydro - more than coal).
Rest mainly from Natural Gas and Nuclear

Wind as a percentage of total electricity produced:
Iowa:    61.3%
Kansas: 54.2%
Okla:     45.3%
N. Dakota: 37.6%
Texas:  24.1%

Solar:
Nevada:    18.3%
N. Carolina: 9.2%
Florida:     2.7%
Georgia:    2.3%




Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #116 on: July 13, 2019, 11:34:01 AM »
Do you have data on how much wind power typically varies by month in the US?  Passing 10% is significant I think.  It moves wind from the also ran category, in a sense, even if it's one month.

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #117 on: July 13, 2019, 09:32:04 PM »
Much of the reason solar, hydro and wind perform much better than in other months is the demand for electricity is much lower.  April demand is roughly 2/3rds that of January, July and August when people are heating and/or cooling their homes. (which is why most nuclear plants go offline in the spring and fall for refueling, etc.).

As wind, solar and hydro have zero fuel costs, utilities take that energy first.
(i.e. coal and natural gas are inputs that cost money whereas wind blows for free).
So even if wind is constant, the percentage goes up in months like April simply because demand is so much lower.

Solar makes a lot of sense in the south, especially in the summer months in places like Nevada where demand is much higher in June, July & August - exactly the months when solar produces the most electricity.

As for wind, the best months are from November to May - which helps in terms of winter demand, but doesn't do much for the summer months as wind production drops by about 1/3 from June to September vs. the winter months.




Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #118 on: July 14, 2019, 07:01:56 AM »
I am surprised more houses don't have roof solar in places like Arizona.

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #119 on: July 14, 2019, 07:48:01 AM »

https://www.hawaiianelectric.com/2018-saw-5-jump-in-residential-rooftop-solar-installations

HONOLULU, Jan. 16, 2019 – Installation of residential rooftop solar systems used by Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric and Hawaii Electric Light customers increased by 5.3 percent in 2018 from 2017, continuing Hawaii’s leadership as the No. 1 state for private rooftop solar.

Year-end figures show that 18 percent of residential customers in the Hawaiian Electric Companies’ five-island service territory are using rooftop solar, up from 17 percent in 2017. Nearly 4,000 new systems came online in 2018, supporting the companies’ drive to reach the state’s next milestone of 30 percent renewable energy by 2020.

Hawaii’s percentage is more than double that of Connecticut, which is second at 6.8 percent; California is third at 5.9 percent; Arizona, fourth at 4.5 percent; and Utah and Massachusetts are both at 3.4 percent, according to the Smart Electric Power Alliance.

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #120 on: July 14, 2019, 08:00:33 AM »
Yeah, those are low numbers in my view.

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #121 on: July 14, 2019, 10:15:17 AM »
I'd say they are low numbers for a couple of reasons.
First, people are more likely to install in a new home or one being refurbished.

Second, solar costs are about 60% cheaper than about eight years ago.
What made no sense in 2010 might make sense today.
So people will respond as costs continue to drop.


HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #122 on: July 14, 2019, 10:16:46 AM »

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #123 on: July 14, 2019, 10:20:09 AM »
My simple minded notion is that Arizona is hot and sunny, so PVs on the roof could perhaps at least power the AC for much of the day.  If it makes sense anywhere, it should there.  Plus you won't suffer from power outages except at night if you don't have batteries.

I have a "vision" of a turnkey operation for AZ, a company that installs the unit and finances it out of your savings on your power bill (presuming the economics works).

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #124 on: July 14, 2019, 10:25:52 AM »
Solar City has been doing it for years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SolarCity

The key has been the ability to sell excess electricity back into the grid and at what price (if at all).

For example, solar installations in Nevada fell off a cliff when the price paid for residential solar dropped from the retail rate to the wholesale rate (which made the economics much less viable).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_metering_in_Nevada







Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 7
« Reply #125 on: July 14, 2019, 11:54:05 AM »
It is interesting to me that roof top solar is less economical than centralized solar.  Where might wind power be by 2030?  I see projections all over the place.


 

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