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Topic: Electricity Update Pt 6

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DunkingDan

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 6
« Reply #70 on: January 07, 2019, 08:04:11 PM »
More coal: 584 mw to shutter in February in Kentucky and another 470 mw to close in Texas.

Pilgrim Nuclear Power (677 mw) to close in May and Three Mile Island (803 mw) to shutter in September this year.
TMI may still be sold and kept running

Susquehanna may add two more units

More wind farms permits denied in NEPA
« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 08:09:38 PM by DunkingDan »
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 6
« Reply #71 on: January 07, 2019, 08:16:02 PM »
http://www.thegardenisland.com/2018/12/16/hawaii-news/renewables-in-2018/

SNIP:
Kauai Island Utility Cooperative is celebrating successes in 2018, namely a boost in use of renewable energy resources and implementing member service enhancements.

“When we became a cooperative in 2003, our rates were 78 percent higher than rates on Oahu,” said David Bissell, chief executive officer of KIUC. “By the end of 2017 we’d closed that gap to 17 percent. This is a trend that we expect will continue over the next several years as we replace the volatility of diesel pricing with renewables at 11 cents per kilowatt hour or less.”

Tesla’s solar-plus-storage facility put its first year under its belt in 2018, pushing KIUC to reach nearly 45 percent of fuel needs supplied by renewable resources and up to 20 percent of evening peak demand can be powered with dispatchable solar.

Renewable energy generation has reached close to 99 percent during mid-day on most sunny days. And by the end of 2018, the cooperative will be receiving power from a new solar-plus-storage facility in Lawai, operated by AES Distributed Energy.

That will boost overall renewable generation capacity to nearly 60 percent, with up to 40 percent of evening peak powered by dispatchable solar.

DunkingDan

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NuScale SMR to be considered for use in Jordan
« Reply #72 on: January 18, 2019, 07:07:43 PM »
A joint feasibility study on the deployment of NuScale's small modular reactor in Jordan will be carried out through a memorandum of understanding signed between NuScale Power and the Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC).

Announcing the MoU today, NuScale said the feasibility study will "inform JAEC's decision on moving forward with the project as part of Jordan's planned deployment of nuclear power plants".
"As Jordan considers its energy future, I'm confident that the unmatched resiliency and safety features of NuScale's SMR technology make us the ideal partner on the Kingdom's nuclear power goals," said NuScale Power Chairman and CEO John Hopkins. "We look forward to using the agreement to showcase our SMR's unique capabilities, cost benefits and flexibility, all of which demonstrate what a game-changer this technology will be for Jordan."
"NuScale is at the forefront of US SMR technology," said Khaled Toukan, chairman of JAEC. "We look forward to this collaboration to assess the viability and potential for deployment of NuScale SMR technology in Jordan."
NuScale's self-contained SMR design houses the reactor core, pressuriser and steam generator inside a single containment vessel. A single module can generate 50 MWe (gross) of electricity and at just under 25 metres in length, 4.6 metres in diameter and weighing 450 tonnes, incorporates simple, redundant, diverse, and independent safety features, the company says. A power plant could include up to 12 modules to produce as much as 720 MWe (gross).
NuScale's SMR is undergoing design certification review by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the first and so far only SMR to do so. The NRC completed the first phase of its review in April last year, and the regulator is scheduled to complete its safety evaluation report in August 2020. NuScale expects the application to be approved by the commission the following month.
Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems plans the development of a 12-module demonstration NuScale plant at a site at the Idaho National Laboratory, with operation expected by 2027. The US Department of Energy in December signed an MoU on the use of power from two of the 12 modules.
In November, NuScale Power signed an MoU with Bruce Power to develop a business case to introduce its SMR technology to the Canadian market.
NuScale said it has "seen considerable interest in its SMR technology in regions of the world, like the Middle East, where fossil fuels are the source of heat and electricity for desalination".
Jordan's Committee for Nuclear Strategy in 2007 set out a programme for nuclear power to provide 30% of electricity by 2030, plus some for export.
Jordan, which relies on imports to meet over 95% of its energy needs, had planned to build a nuclear power plant, comprising two 1000 MWe units, in the Amra region, about 70 kilometres east of Amman. The first unit was expected to in operation by 2021 and a second one by 2025. Jordan selected Russia as the preferred bidder for the plant, into which Russia was also to make a significant investment. However, Jordan scrapped the project, citing costs.
In November 2013, JAEC said it would build several small reactors of about 180 MWe capacity. In March 2017, an agreement between JAEC and Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah City for Atomic and Renewable Energy was signed for a feasibility study on construction of two SMRs in Jordan. In November that year, JAEC signed an MoU with Rolls-Royce to conduct a feasibility study for the construction of an SMR. Later in the same month, JAEC signed an MoU with X-energy to assess the US company's SMR.
     
Researched and written by World Nuclear News
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 6
« Reply #73 on: January 19, 2019, 12:26:04 AM »
https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/top-10-utility-regulation-trends-of-2018?utm_source=google&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=google_news#gs.XKxfUijs

Renewable energy is winning on price

In 2018, the trend in recent years toward a cleaner, more flexible grid continued. In the first three quarters of the year, there was over $35 billion in new investments in clean energy, as defined by Bloomberg New Energy Finance. This trend is driven in large part by the falling costs of wind and solar power.

This continued price decline means it is now often cheaper to build new wind and solar plants than to operate existing coal-fired power plants, a reality expressed in many regulatory filings in 2018. Perhaps most notably, in October Northern Indiana Public Service’s 2018 integrated resource plan found that the utility could save customers $4 billion by replacing its entire coal fleet by 2028 with a portfolio of solar, wind, storage and demand management resources.

TREX

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 6
« Reply #74 on: January 19, 2019, 08:34:05 AM »
Man I am torn on my off grid power plans.

I could put up a big windmill as I am on a hill and get all the air there is to get.  Lotsa battery banks for when a storm or Tornado comes through.

I could put up a bunch of Solar Panels for sure as I have the room.  Trouble is I like my trees on the boundary of the property. Kinda keeps the nosey neighbors guessing.

Hmmmmm  wonder if Youtube has a video for a mini Nuclear plant.

Or I could just burn wood for heat and  use a generator for the AC.

I have another option but it involves something the local electric might not be cool with. Best I keep it to myself for now.

DunkingDan

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Russia starts installing MBIR control assembly
« Reply #75 on: January 25, 2019, 02:12:01 PM »
Share
The Volgodonsk branch of AEM Technology has completed the first stage of installation of the control assembly of the MBIR multipurpose sodium-cooled fast neutron research reactor. MBIR is under construction at the site of the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (NIIAR) at Dmitrovgrad, which is in Russia's Ulyanovsk region.
 
Vyacheslav Pershukov, Rosatom's special representative for international and scientific projects, witnessed the milestone, which AEM Technology, a subsidiary of Rosatom's Atomenergomash, announced today.
"This is unique equipment, a unique enterprise, and Atommash is of course up to the task," Pershukov said. "The task is quite complex for the whole of Rosatom owing to the large volume of international orders. Its uniqueness means MBIR is not a priority for us from the commerce perspective, but rather from the reputation perspective," he said.
Andrey Nikipelov, general director of Atomenergomash, noted the thinness of the MBIR casing - 25-50 mm - with a diameter of 4 metres, which contrasts with that of a VVER-1200 reactor which is 300 mm. This means it is challenging to alter the equipment geometry during processing. he said.
The MBIR project will next involve hydrotesting and the assembly of a protective casing. Then the second stage of the control assembly installation will be completed with all the internal components.
Igor Kotov, general director of AEM Technology said: "You could say that, at our site today, a new page has been written in the history of nuclear energy. MBIR is a fundamentally new product and all the operations the AEM Technology team is carrying out are being carried out for the first time."
Atomenergomash is the main equipment supplier of the MBIR reactor. Its Volgodonsk branch is manufacturing 14 products, including housing elements and supporting structures.
The MBIR is a 150 MWt, sodium-cooled fast reactor and will have a design life of up to 50 years. It will be a multi-loop research reactor capable of testing lead, lead-bismuth and gas coolants, and running on MOX (mixed uranium and plutonium oxide) fuel. NIIAR intends to set up on-site closed fuel cycle facilities for the MBIR, using pyrochemical reprocessing it has developed at pilot scale.
The MBIR project is to be open to foreign collaboration, in connection with the International Atomic Energy Agency's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO).
The MBIR will replace the BOR-60 experimental fast reactor that started operations at NIIAR's site in 1969.
   
Researched and written by World Nuclear News
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 6
« Reply #76 on: January 26, 2019, 02:18:58 AM »
On Islands - like Hawaii, it appears that Solar + Batteries are now the cheapest and best alternative especially given that at present they mainly import diesel fuel to produce electricity.

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/aes-completes-its-record-breaking-solar-and-battery-plant-on-kauai#gs.OnbGVPHQ

AES Completes Record-Breaking Solar and Battery Plant on Kauai
It makes solar power available at night, bolstering Hawaii’s renewable grid ambitions.

SNIP:
The Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) is finishing up commissioning for the Lawai Solar and Energy Storage Project, which combines 28 megawatts of solar photovoltaic capacity with a lithium-ion battery capable of storing 100 megawatt-hours.

The battery alone holds more energy than all but one other U.S. plant: the 120 megawatt-hour facility AES built in Escondido in 2017. Taken as a whole, Lawai’s storage capacity outranks any other operational solar-paired battery system in the world, according to Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables. But the ever-growing solar-plus-storage project pipeline means that title won’t be safe for long.

AES owns and operates the plant on behalf of KIUC, under a power-purchase agreement pegged at 11 cents per kilowatt-hour.

The plant delivers solar power when a standalone solar plant can’t: at night. That offsets the peaker plants that turn on for the evening peak; in Hawaii, those plants tend to run on imported oil, at considerable expense.

Lawai can crank a full output of 20 megawatts for five hours. With 100 megawatt-hours of stored energy, the battery can also operate more like a baseload plant, delivering a lower amount of power for more hours through the night until the sun comes back up. AES expects to offset 3.7 million gallons of diesel each year by dispatching more cost-effectively than the fossil-fueled incumbents.

With the new plant, Kauai will be able to operate for certain parts of the day entirely from renewables, Rubin said. 

“There’s too much discussion about renewable energy; there’s not enough discussion about capacity,” Gluski said of decarbonization in general. “With batteries in place, it’s a game-changer — you can produce very cheap energy and turn it into that 24/7 capacity.”

Now, KIUC will be able to serve up to 40 percent of evening peak power with stored solar energy, President and CEO David Bissell said in a statement.

Just last week, the Hawaiian Electric Company asked regulators to approve seven new solar-storage plants across the islands of Hawaii, Maui and Oahu. That move confirmed that this type of resource will play an increasingly central role in Hawaii's energy future. All but one of the proposed projects beat Lawai’s price per kilowatt-hour.

AES had two massive plants in that portfolio: one with 30 megawatts/120 megawatt-hours and one with 60 megawatts/240 megawatt-hours, both clocking in at 8 cents per kilowatt-hour.

The concept has also made its way to the mainland, with median bids of 3.6 cents per kilowatt-hour in Xcel’s Colorado solicitation, and a 4.5 cent per kilowatt-hour hybrid system going to Tucson Electric Power. (The lower costs reflect several factors, include construction costs on the mainland versus Hawaii and the relative size of the battery component compared to the solar capacity.)


HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 6
« Reply #77 on: January 26, 2019, 02:29:38 AM »

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/hawaiian-electric-industries-announces-mind-blowing-solar-plus-storage-cont#gs.vvrFuUVd

Hawaiian Electric Announces ‘Mind-Blowing’ Solar-Plus-Storage Contracts
“It’s hard to overstate the scale of this announcement.”

SNIP:
This week Hawaiian Electric Company sent seven new solar-plus-storage contracts to state regulators. Six come in at record-low prices for the state, under 10 cents per kilowatt-hour.

The projects, which now await regulatory approval, would add 262 megawatts of solar and 1,048 megawatt-hours of storage distributed over three islands. The company said the projects will provide power “in place of volatile prices of fossil fuels,” which it quotes at about 15 cents per kilowatt-hour. 


“What’s even more notable is the range of PPA prices,” said Finn-Foley. 

Past solar-plus-storage prices in Hawaii came in at 13.9 cents per kilowatt-hour in 2016 and 11 cents per kilowatt-hour in 2017. One of the projects announced this week by Hawaiian Electric is more expensive than the latter price — 15 megawatts of solar and 60 megawatt-hours of storage at 12 cents per kilowatt-hour. But another 90 megawatts of solar and 360 megawatt-hours of storage came in at what Finn-Foley called a “jaw-dropping” 8 cents per kilowatt-hour. That means that from 2016 to 2019 solar-plus-storage PPA prices in the state dropped by 42 percent. 







Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 6
« Reply #78 on: January 26, 2019, 08:42:00 AM »
These articles rarely mention how much of the overall electricity production is provided by these new developments.

Hawaii is an ideal location for wind and solar.  The leeward side of the large island is sunny almost all the time, and the winds are steady and predictable.  Their primary alternative source is burning petroleum, which is very expensive relative to coal or NG.  Geothermal is also an obvious option for the Big Island and is used. 

But, despite this, well over half of their power comes from burning coal and petroleum.  Solar is well under 1%, and wind power is under 3% for the most populated island of Oahu, higher on the Big Island.  One would think the transition to wind/solar/geo would be happening at a much faster pace if these glorious economics are indeed accurate.

https://www.hawaiianelectric.com/clean-energy-hawaii/clean-energy-facts/about-our-fuel-mix

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 6
« Reply #79 on: January 26, 2019, 06:30:33 PM »
It's called legacy costs.
The stranded assets that they shut down incur a cost.

And note that battery / solar costs have dropped by 42% in the past 5 years.
So they're probably down closer to 80% of the past decade.

The result is that the economics work today and that any and all new capacity add will likely be wind, geothermal or solar with the majority being solar + battery.



Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 6
« Reply #80 on: January 26, 2019, 07:03:21 PM »
So, rather than shut down a polluting coal or oil burning plant that likely is old anyway, they just keep going rather than building cheaper sources of electricity?

The math doesn't work on that for me, especially in Hawaii where the fuel has to be imported by ship at considerable expense.

We were vacationing on Bonaire a few years back and were warned that we could experience brown outs in the afternoons because much of their power came from wind (for similar reasons) and they didn't have enough backup for higher demands when the ACs kicked in.  And we did.


HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 6
« Reply #81 on: January 27, 2019, 12:38:04 AM »
It is because prices have come down so dramatically in a short period of time.

If they can add at 9 cents per kwh today (and have dropped -42% in the past five years), that means that the cost was roughly 15 cents per kwh 5 years ago (marginal improvement) and probably 30 cents per kwh a decade ago.  

Basically, in Hawaii at least, we've now hit the tipping point where all future sources of new electricity add will be geothermal, wind or solar - 100% of new add will have zero fuel costs - as batteries are now affordable enough to provide back up when the sun doesn't shine or the wind doesn't blow.

It wasn't economically feasible 5 or 10 years ago, but it is today.

We'll see the same in Puerto Rico and other islands as well - making them more competitive with the mainland in terms of energy costs.  And other places will be doing the same.   That is, in places like Nevada where the sun shines 350 days a year, solar will make sense. (but will never make sense in Seattle, Maine, etc.).

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 6
« Reply #82 on: January 27, 2019, 08:19:27 AM »
One would think any capacity added would be wind/solar/geo on islands like Hawaii.

It's still a small part of their production, and I think articles should note that for perspective.  If they have new capacity planned over say five years that changes that significantly, note that also.  Just listing how many watts are being produced is not useful without that perspective.

Cincydawg

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Re: Electricity Update Pt 6
« Reply #83 on: January 27, 2019, 09:01:58 AM »
https://thinkprogress.org/hawaii-will-soon-get-all-of-its-electricity-from-renewable-sources-ba2a31ccbbfe/

Interesting article, they signed legislation to get to 100% renewable by 2045 (which the headline says is "soon").  Obviously that is 26 years, quite a bit slower than the 2030 date thrown around by AOC for the entire country.  

Hawaii of course should be a poster child for wind and solar for reasons noted, including that current rates are 3x higher than in CONUS.  But the TARGET is still 26 years out, and just a target.  This sort of thing convinces me that reaching heavy reliance on renewables where coal and NG are cheap options is going to take a much longer time than 26 years out.

If we can't get there in an ideal island environment, how much longer would it take in states with heavy reliance on cheap coal?

(And how can the grid deal with surges and lapses in production as well.)

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/plugged-in/3-reasons-hawaii-put-the-brakes-on-solar-and-why-the-same-won-t-happen-in-your-state/

Another rather interesting article about surges and lapses without reliable backup power generation.

 

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