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Topic: Electricity Update

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HK_Vol

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Electricity Update
« on: December 03, 2017, 08:56:10 PM »
Data for the first three quarters of the year for US electricity now released:

https://www.eia.gov/electricity/monthly/

Solar is coming on strong in the Southwest (these were all close to 0% five years ago).
Which makes sense as they have a ton of sun and very little rain / cloud cover.

California    16.8%
Hawaii         12.1%
Nevada       11.2%
Utah            6.7%
Arizona        6.4%
New Mexico  4.1%







HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2017, 09:00:40 PM »
Wind still a very big contributor in the Midwest:

Kansas       34.9%
Iowa          34.4%
Oklahoma  30.3%
S. Dakota  27.1%
N. Dakota  25.2%
Colorado    16.7%
Texas        14.4%
Nebraska   13.3%

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2017, 09:15:30 PM »
10,500 mw of coal is shut down by the end of 2018 - including 428 megawatts at Johnsonville in Tennessee. (just over 6% of capacity).

Florida shuts down over 2,000 mw of coal plants in 2018 - that is over 20% of their total coal generating capacity.

New Mexico shuts down 840 mw of capacity this month - about 25% of their total coal generating capacity.

Ohio shuts down 2,300 mw of capacity next June - about 15% of their total output.  (and another 720 mw in 2020).


« Last Edit: December 03, 2017, 09:20:23 PM by HK_Vol »

DunkingDan

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Record 940 days of continuous operation for Heysham unit
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2017, 08:42:55 PM »
Unit 2 of the UK's Heysham II nuclear power plant was taken offline today for a scheduled maintenance and inspection outage, setting a new world record for the uninterrupted operation of a commercial power reactor. The achievement was announced by Vincent de Rivaz, CEO of EDF Energy, at the World Nuclear Association's Annual Symposium in London.
The Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) - also referred to as Heysham 2 unit 8 - operated non-stop since 18 February 2014. The Heysham I and II plants feature a total of four AGR units.
The Heysham unit was taken offline after 940 days of operation (Image: EDF Energy)
De Rivaz said unit 2 of Heysham II had generated more than 14 TWh of electricity and avoided the emission of over 7 million tonnes of carbon dioxide over the 940-day run.
"It is just one example of the outstanding performance of EDF Energy's 15 nuclear reactors in the UK. Since the acquisition of the UK fleet in 2009, we have increased safety performsnce by 51%. We have increased our output by 50% and it's a personal best we will try to beat in 2016. And we have safely extended the life of our AGRs by 25%, eight years on average."
Earlier this year EDF Energy announced new extended scheduled closure dates for four of its nuclear power stations, with Heysham 2 now scheduled to operate until 2030, an extension of seven years.
AGRs - which are cooled with carbon dioxide, graphite-moderated and fuelled with enriched uranium - are designed to be refuelled without being shut down first. During the current run, 123 fuel channels have so far been refuelled.
The previous record for continuous operation was held by unit 7 of the Pickering plant in Ontario, Canada, which had an 894-day continuous run between 26 April 1992 and 7 October 1994. This is a Candu pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), also designed to be refuelled during operation.
Torness 2 in Scotland - also an AGR - ran for 825 days between 4 August 1997 and 7 November 1999, now making it the third longest running reactor.
Unit 5 at India's Rajasthan Atomic Power Project, a PHWR, achieved continuous operation of 765 days on 6 September 2014.
The current operating run of Torness 1, another AGR operated by EDF Energy, currently exceeds 740 days, but the unit is not scheduled to be taken offline for maintenance until next April.
The world record for continuous operation of light water reactors, which need to be shut down for refuelling, resides with Exelon's LaSalle 2 boiling water reactor. In February 2007 this unit was shut down after a run of 739 days, shortly after unit 1 at the plant completed a 711 days of uninterrupted generation. Calvert Cliffs 2 set a world record for continuous operation of a pressurized water reactor in February 2009, having operated without interruption for 693 days.
     
Researched and written
by World Nuclear News
 
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

gymvol

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Re: Electricity Update
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2017, 08:35:53 AM »
Yep we're in really big trouble in energy production with Obama's plan to shut down everything except windmills and solar.

We will live to regret it, mark it down we are a nation going ass backwards in energy production.
If everyone is thinking alike then somebody isn't thinking.

George S. Patton

DunkingDan

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Re: Electricity Update
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2017, 02:21:48 PM »
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2017, 05:11:33 PM »
Should we take those capacity numbers and multiply by cost to build / cost to operate?
If so, I would argue that solar and wind are now cheaper (maybe not true a decade ago, but true today) per megawatt hour of electricity produced.


DunkingDan

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« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 07:12:24 PM by DunkingDan »
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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Re: Electricity Update
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2017, 05:56:49 PM »
Should we take those capacity numbers and multiply by cost to build / cost to operate?
If so, I would argue that solar and wind are now cheaper (maybe not true a decade ago, but true today) per megawatt hour of electricity produced.
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2017, 06:08:09 PM »
That data is from 5 years ago (2012)

https://passiiviidentiteetti.wordpress.com/2012/12/15/mita-voimalat-oikeastaan-maksavat/

Since then, solar costs have dropped in half:
Fixed Tilt from $1.93 to $0.89
Single Axis from $2.48 to $1.02



HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2017, 06:10:24 PM »
Wind costs have dropped by 1/3rd from 2012 to 2017.
And costs for both wind and solar continue to drop.




DunkingDan

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Re: Electricity Update
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2017, 06:28:36 PM »
Still relevant and the const ignores the fact wind and solar can not meet base load, and its capacity factor is unreliable. Likewise also ignore is the environmental problems associated with each.

Thanks to over reliance on solar and wind we have brown outs here while generators are brought on line of increase their output

Each has its place but yuppie, pipe dreamers are pushing the market and not looking to long term needs which is going to cause problems

once again how much land per compatible output?  I need to find my calculations and link that thread to this one 

Meanwhile


  
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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found it
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2017, 07:15:20 PM »
the basic footprint of facilities for a moment in order to get 1000MW from wind you need ~260 Square miles, to get 1000MW from Nuclear (coal is about the same) you need ~1 Square Mile, solar needs ~150 Square miles to get 1000MW (note there is some dispute to this, mostly dealing with location of the panels. Add in if the sun is not shining or the wind does not blow, at a certain minimum speed, neither solar or wind produce anything. Therefore efficiency is a big issue.Another issue is some of the rare earth elements needed. It is not only an environmental problem to mine them but their countries of origin are not the most stable of sources for US manufacturing.
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity Update
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2017, 07:53:28 PM »



http://www.theenergycollective.com/jessejenkins/2242632/how-much-land-does-solar-wind-and-nuclear-energy-require

According to the MIT authors, powering 100 percent of estimated U.S. electricity demand in 2050 with solar energy would require roughly 33,000 square kilometers (sq-km) of land. That’s if we spread solar panels evenly across the entire country. If we concentrate solar production in the sunniest regions, the total land footprint falls to 12,000 sq-km.

Those sound like big numbers. On the one hand they are. Massachusetts (where I reside) spans about 27,000 sq-km, for comparison.

On the other hand, the United States apparently devotes about 10,000 sq-km of land just to golf courses. And as the infographic illustrates, it’s agriculture and forestry that truly drives humanity’s footprint on the natural landscape.

In reality, no one is calling for 100 percent solar energy. Even the most bullish renewable energy advocates typically envision solar providing less than half and usually no more than a quarter of U.S. electricity. (See: “Is There An Upper Limit to Variable Renewables”)

If solar provided one-third of Americans’ electricity in 2050, it would require just 4,000-11,000 sq-km.

In other words: with an area no larger than the amount of land currently devoted to golf courses, we could power a third of the country with solar energy.

 

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