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Topic: Electricity update Pt. 10

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DunkingDan

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Hungary's Paks II project receives construction approval
« Reply #112 on: December 01, 2020, 04:22:24 PM »
The Hungarian Energy and Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (MEKH) has approved Atomerőmű Zrt's plan to construct two VVER-1200 reactors at the existing Paks nuclear power plant site. A construction licence for the Paks II project is required from the nuclear regulator, the Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA), before building work can start.

Atomerőmű Zrt submitted an application for a construction permit to MEKH last month.
After examining the contents of the application to ensure that it complies with the relevant legislation, MEKH on 20 November announced its decision to issue a construction permit for the Paks II plant. MEKH said in making its decision it had taken into consideration security of supply to the electricity network. It noted that procedures related to the safety of nuclear technology are conducted by the HAEA.
The last construction permit for an investment in a new power plant bigger than 50 MWe was issued by MEKH in 2007, the regulator said.
Paks II Limited submitted a construction licence application for the Paks II project to HAEA on 30 June this year. The regulator has 12 months in which to make a decision on the application, but this period can be extended by three months if required.
The existing Paks plant, which is 100 km south of Budapest, comprises four Russian-supplied VVER-440 pressurised water reactors, which started up between 1982 and 1987. Russia and Hungary signed an inter-governmental agreement in early 2014 for Russian enterprises and their international sub-contractors to supply two VVER-1200 reactors at Paks, including a Russian state loan of up to EUR10.0 billion (USD11.2 billion) to finance 80% of the project, which is known as Paks II.
In 2014, HAEA issued the site investigation and evaluation licence, and in 2017 the site licence. Under Hungary's nuclear laws, building permit applications for certain site preparation activities can be submitted no earlier than three months after the submission of the construction licence application. These permits cover activities including ground works, excavation of the foundation pit, slurry wall construction, as well as the manufacture of long lead items, such as the reactor pressure vessel.
Groundworks at Paks II can therefore start in early 2021, after obtaining a licence for pre-construction site preparation. The project company is expected to receive the licence for the construction of the main building in September 2021, after which construction work may begin.
Researched and written by World Nuclear News

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”


DunkingDan

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Re: Electricity update Pt. 10
« Reply #114 on: December 21, 2020, 11:13:41 AM »
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President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity update Pt. 10
« Reply #115 on: December 21, 2020, 06:30:51 PM »
If true, you'd think that there is a great recycling opportunity at some point....
Still think that solar makes huge sense on islands in the Caribbean, Hawaii, etc. where shipping in coal, oil, gas, etc. is very expensive....

DunkingDan

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Re: Electricity update Pt. 10
« Reply #116 on: December 22, 2020, 03:15:02 PM »
If true, you'd think that there is a great recycling opportunity at some point....
Still think that solar makes huge sense on islands in the Caribbean, Hawaii, etc. where shipping in coal, oil, gas, etc. is very expensive....
Not for sure on the viability of recycling at this time. From what I read it is very expensive, but that was years ago.

Solar and wind does make sense in some places. 
President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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What's the Lifespan for a Nuclear Reactor? Much Longer Than You Might
« Reply #117 on: December 22, 2020, 03:16:42 PM »
Think


U.S. nuclear plants are proving that age is really just a number.

As the average age of American reactors approaches 40 years old, experts say there are no technical limits to these units churning out clean and reliable energy for an additional 40 years or longer.

Thanks to research performed over the last decade by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), utilities now have the confidence and data they need to apply for a second 20-year operating license with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

Four utilities already announced plans to extend their operating licenses and four reactors have already been approved.

That would keep nearly a quarter of the nation’s fleet online beyond 2050.



https://youtu.be/VKWZKptmCbA


Extending the Life of Reactors
Eighty-eight of America’s 96 reactors have received approval of their first 20-year extension. The majority of these will expire in the 2030s. Due to the amount of time it takes to prepare for regulatory reviews, utilities are now determining if they should apply for an additional 20 years of service.
In preparation for this uncharted territory, DOE proactively established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program in 2010 to research areas that would support the long-term operation of the nation’s reactors.
DOE, EPRI, NRC, and other stakeholders identified a list of key materials and parts used at the plants. This ranged from the reactor core (and much of the equipment inside of it) to the cabling and concrete around the plant. They then measured the performance of each material to determine how they function over time.
Most of these materials met the desired performance standards expected for long-term operation. The materials that did show signs of normal aging and degradation were identified so that plants could proactively monitor and maintain them over time.

Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant

Turkey Point Units 3 and 4 could be the first reactors cleared to operate for up to 80 years.
Florida Power and Light

The 80-Year Club
Eleven reactors are already using this research to apply for a second 20-year extension.
Florida Power and Light’s Turkey Point Units 3 and 4 became the first reactors cleared by the NRC to operate for up to 80 years. 
The NRC also approved Exelon's Peach Bottom Units 2 and 3 and is currently reviewing Dominion's Surry Units 1 and 2. Several other utilities, including Duke Energy, have announced plans to apply. Xcel Energy is also considering an extension.
To date, 20 reactors, representing more than a fifth of the nation’s fleet, are planning or intending to operate up to 80 years. More are expected to apply in the future as they get closer to the end of their operating licenses.
Why It’s Important
America has the largest fleet of reactors in the world. Nuclear energy generates more than 800 billion kilowatt hourof electricity each year and makes up more than half of the nation’s clean energy.
It operates at full power more than 92% of the time and has provided roughly a fifth of the nation’s power since the mid-'90s.
Despite this performance, 9 reactors have retired before their licenses expired since 2013 due to challenging market conditions, and an additional 6 units are slated to retire by 2025.  
Losing these reactors would ultimately reduce America’s large-scale supply of affordable and dependable clean power, as well as deplete the expertise, knowledge, and supply chain that goes along with the entire U.S. nuclear industry.
What’s Next?
In addition to materials research, the LWRS program is working on modernizing plant systems to reduce operation and maintenance costs, while also looking to diversify plant products through non-electric applications such as desalination and energy for hydrogen production.
Learn more about the LWRS.



President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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Korean artificial sun sets the new world record of 20-sec-long
« Reply #118 on: December 26, 2020, 01:09:30 PM »
operation 

The Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR), a superconducting fusion device also known as the Korean artificial sun, set the new world record as it succeeded in maintaining the high temperature plasma for 20 seconds with an ion temperature over 100 million degrees (Celsius).
On November 24 (Tuesday), the KSTAR Research Center at the Korea Institute of Fusion Energy (KFE) announced that in a joint research with the Seoul National University (SNU) and Columbia University of the United States, it succeeded in continuous operation of plasma for 20 seconds with an ion-temperature higher than 100 million degrees, which is one of the core conditions of nuclear fusion in the 2020 KSTAR Plasma Campaign.

It is an achievement to extend the 8 second plasma operation time during the 2019 KSTAR Plasma Campaign by more than 2 times. In its 2018 experiment, the KSTAR reached the plasma ion temperature of 100 million degrees for the first time (retention time: about 1.5 seconds).
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President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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20 Drawbacks Of Electric Vehicles Drivers Overlook
« Reply #119 on: December 28, 2020, 02:28:16 PM »
For almost 10 years now, electric vehicles have been the talk of the car industry. From the early Tesla models up to today’s Mustang Mach E, electric vehicles tried to show what the future of personal transport looks like. To some, they are appealing since modern electric vehicles introduced zero emissions and high-tech driving interfaces.

However, EV manufacturers have hidden the downsides of those vehicles. The purpose of this list is to reveal to you the 20 things they won’t tell you. Keep reading to discover why electric cars are still far from perfect. Here’s why you should think twice before purchasing one.
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President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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5 Advanced Reactor Designs to Watch in 2030
« Reply #121 on: December 28, 2020, 04:03:49 PM »
The U.S. Department of Energy recently announced its latest round of selections for our new Advanced Reactor Demonstration Program, commonly referred to as ARDP. The goal of the program is to help our domestic nuclear industry demonstrate their advanced reactor designs on accelerated timelines. This will ultimately help us build a competitive portfolio of new U.S. reactors that offer significant improvements over today’s technology.
The advanced reactors selected are an excellent representation of the diverse designs currently under development in the United States. They range from advanced light-water-cooled small modular reactors to new designs that use molten salts and high-temperature gases to flexibly operate at even higher temperatures and lower pressures.
All of them have the potential to compete globally once deployed and will offer consumers more access to a reliable, clean power source that can be depended on in the near-future to flexibly generate electricity, drive industrial processes and even provide potable drinking water to communities in water-scarce locations.


Demonstrating Advanced Reactors
Two ARDP demonstration projects are currently moving forward as TerraPower and X-energy aggressively work with their teams to plan for and ultimately deliver operational reactors within the next 7 years. And, although these designs may be further along in the technology development process at this time, we recognize that other domestic vendors need additional financial, technical, and regulatory support to mature their designs.
Many companies don’t have access to the infrastructure, facilities and computer models needed to gather the data that’s required to prove to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) that these reactors work as designed.
To help lower this technology development risk, we awarded $30 million to five U.S. teams to address the technical, operational and licensing challenges that they currently face. The goal is to improve technology readiness and prepare them for future demonstration, and eventual deployment.
Here’s a quick look at five U.S. designs that could be operational within the next 14 years.
BWXT Advanced Nuclear Reactor

BWXT Advanced Nuclear Reactor
Design concept of BWXT Advanced Nuclear Reactor
BWX Technologies
BWX Technologies is developing a transportable microreactor that can thrive in off-grid applications and remote areas to produce 50 megawatts of thermal energy for deployment in the early 2030s. The high-temperature gas reactor uses a different form of DOE’s TRISO fuel that contains a uranium nitride fuel kernel for higher performance. The team will work with Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test and qualify the fuel. They will also focus on optimizing new manufacturing technologies that could help cut the cost of microreactors in half and develop capabilities that could benefit other advanced reactor designs in the process. 
eVinciTM Microreactor
eVinci microreactor by Westinghouse Nuclear
Design concept of Westinghouse eVinci microreactor 
Westinghouse Nuclear
Westinghouse Electric Company is also pursuing a transportable microreactor that can be installed on-site in less than 30 days. The 15 megawatt thermal reactor utilizes TRISO fuel and a specialized heat pipe design to flexibly operate on a grid or in remote locations. The company will work with Los Alamos National Laboratory, INL, and Texas A&M University to test and manufacture components for its heat pipe and moderator in order to develop a small demonstration unit. This short term, 2-year project supports a larger effort by Westinghouse to demonstrate a prototype reactor by 2024, with full commercial deployment targeted for the mid-to-late 2020s.
Hermes Reduced-Scale Test Reactor
KP-FHR design concept by Kairos Power
Design concept of Kairos Power flouride salt-cooled high temperature reactor.
Kairos Power
Kairos Power will work with ORNL, INL, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Materion Corporation to deliver Hermes—a scaled-down version of the company’s KP-FHR commercial reactor. The reactor uses a TRISO fuel pebble bed design with a liquid fluoride salt coolant to efficiently transfer heat from the fuel to produce power. The 140 megawatt electric commercial design will operate at lower temperatures than most advanced reactors and offers high availability with online refueling. Hermes is expected to be operational in 2026 and will be demonstrated in Oak Ridge, TN.
Holtec SMR-160 Reactor
SMR-160 design concept by Holtec International
Design concept of Holtec SMR-160 nuclear power plant.
Holtec International
Holtec is partnering with Kiewit Power Constructors, Framatome, Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Western Services Corporation and INL to complete the early-stage research and power plant development work needed to demonstrate its advanced light-water small modular reactor. The 160 megawatt electric design can be adapted to use air-cooled condensers on its secondary side, allowing it to be deployed in the most arid regions of the world. Holtec has excellent manufacturing capabilities and can fabricate the majority of the components right here in the United States. They plan to demonstrate the reactor at the Oyster Creek site in New Jersey, following the decommissioning of that nuclear power plant.   
Molten Chloride Reactor Experiment
Molten Chloride Fast Reactor technology by TerraPower
Design concept of TerraPower molten chloride fast reactor technology. 
TerraPower
Southern Company is looking to build and operate a small reactor experiment based on TerraPower’s molten chloride fast reactor (MCFR) technology. The MCFR can be scaled up for commercial use on the grid and could flexibly operate on multiple fuels, including used nuclear fuel from other reactors. Southern Company will work with TerraPower, CORE-POWER, Orano and EPRI, in addition to other private companies, labs and universities, to build the world’s first fast-spectrum salt reactor. MCFR technology transfers heat with incredible efficiency and can be utilized for thermal storage, process heat or electricity production. The molten chloride reactor experiment will inform the design, license and operation of a demonstration reactor and is expected to be operational within the next five years.  
Developing New Concepts
ARDP plans to leverage the National Reactor Innovation Center at INL to efficiently test and assess these technologies by providing access to the world-renowned capabilities of our national laboratory system.
In addition to these five designs, we also plan to invest $20 million on less mature, but novel advanced reactor designs later this month. The funding will further support their concept development in order to demonstrate these promising reactors by the mid-2030s.
These aggressive timelines are needed to ensure the United States takes advantage of the advanced reactor market that’s expected to be worth billions of dollars. That’s why we plan to invest more than $600 million in these projects over the next 7 years, pending the availability of future appropriations by Congress.
Advanced reactors have the potential to create thousands of domestic jobs, grow our economy and lower emissions at the same time. By proactively pursuing a diverse portfolio of U.S. reactors, we can help reestablish our global leadership in the technology that we first developed.
We believe the United States has the best innovators and technology in the world to solve our most pressing environmental and energy challenges. We’re optimistic and excited to see what these life-changing reactors can do in the very near future with support from our new program.
Learn more about our ARDP program


5 Advanced Reactor Designs to Watch in 2030 | Department of Energy

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

DunkingDan

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hina starts building second CFR-600 fast reactor
« Reply #122 on: January 01, 2021, 05:54:00 PM »
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Construction work has started on the second CFR-600 sodium-cooled pool-type fast-neutron nuclear reactor in Xiapu County, in China's Fujian province. Also known as the Xiapu fast reactor demonstration project, the CFR-600 is part of China's plan to achieve a closed nuclear fuel cycle.

Construction of unit 1 started in late 2017. The fuel will be supplied by TVEL, a subsidiary of Russia's Rosatom, according to an agreement signed in 2019 with CNLY, which is part of China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC).
CNNC has announced that construction of unit 2 started on 27 December, adding that excavation work at the site had begun exactly a year before. Since then, "the scale of engineering work, tight schedule, construction difficulties and other adverse conditions" were all overcome to achieve the target as planned, it said.
"All the construction workers will continue to do a good job with the demonstration fast reactor project in order to achieve the historical mission of the [Communist] Party to achieve China's historic transformation into a nuclear industrial power making an ever greater contribution!"
China's research and development on fast neutron reactors started in 1964. A 65 MWt fast neutron reactor - the Chinese Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR) - was designed by 2003 and built near Beijing by Russia's OKBM Afrikantov in collaboration with OKB Gidropress, NIKIET and the Kurchatov Institute. It achieved first criticality in July 2010, can generate 20 MWe and was grid connected in July 2011. Core height is 45 cm, and it has 150 kg Pu (98 kg Pu-239). Temperature reactivity and power reactivity are both negative.
The CFR-600 demonstration fast reactors (CDFR) are the next step in China Institute of Atomic Energy's (CIAE) programme. Xiapu 1 is expected to be grid connected in 2023. The reactors will be 1500 MWt, 600 MWe, with 41% thermal efficiency, using MOX fuel with 100 GWd/t burn-up, and with two sodium coolant loops producing steam at 480°C. Later fuel will be metal with burn-up 100-120 GWd/t. Breeding ratio is about 1.1, design operational lifetime 40 years. The design has active and passive shutdown systems and passive decay heat removal.
Researched and written by World Nuclear News

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity update Pt. 10
« Reply #123 on: January 01, 2021, 07:32:13 PM »

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/01/business/GE-wind-turbine.html





A Monster Wind Turbine Is Upending an Industry
G.E.’s giant machine, which can light up a small town, is stoking a renewable-energy arms race.

SNIP:

Twirling above a strip of land at the mouth of Rotterdam’s harbor is a wind turbine so large it is difficult to photograph. The turning diameter of its rotor is longer than two American football fields end to end. Later models will be taller than any building on the mainland of Western Europe.

Packed with sensors gathering data on wind speeds, electricity output and stresses on its components, the giant whirling machine in the Netherlands is a test model for a new series of giant offshore wind turbines planned by General Electric. When assembled in arrays, the wind machines have the potential to power cities, supplanting the emissions-spewing coal- or natural gas-fired plants that form the backbones of many electric systems today.

The prototype is the first of a generation of new machines that are about a third more powerful than the largest already in commercial service. As such, it is changing the business calculations of wind equipment makers, developers and investors.


The G.E. machines will have a generating capacity that would have been almost unimaginable a decade ago. A single one will be able to turn out 13 megawatts of power, enough to light up a town of roughly 12,000 homes.

The turbine, which is capable of producing as much thrust as the four engines of a Boeing 747 jet, according to G.E., will be deployed at sea, where developers have learned that they can plant larger and more numerous turbines than on land to capture breezes that are stronger and more reliable.


The race to build bigger turbines has moved faster than many industry figures foresaw. G.E.’s Haliade-X generates almost 30 times more electricity than the first offshore machines installed off Denmark in 1991.

A larger turbine produces more electricity and, thus, more revenue than a smaller machine. Size also helps reduce the costs of building and maintaining a wind farm because fewer turbines are required to produce a given amount of power.

These qualities create a powerful incentive for developers to go for the largest machine available to aid their efforts to win the auctions for offshore power supply deals that many countries have adopted. These auctions vary in format, but developers compete to provide power over a number of years for the lowest price.

To make a blade of such extraordinary length that doesn’t buckle from its own weight, G.E. called on designers at LM Wind Power, a blade maker in Denmark that the company bought in 2016 for $1.7 billion. Among their innovations: a material combining carbon fiber and glass fiber that is lightweight yet strong and flexible.


DunkingDan

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Could Hydrogen Help Save Nuclear?
« Reply #124 on: January 05, 2021, 04:54:02 PM »
This is a crucial time for nuclear energy.
The nation’s fleet of reactors dwindled to 95 in April 2020 with the loss of Indian Point Unit 2 outside New York City.
Since 2013, 10 nuclear units have shut down prematurely with seven currently scheduled for early retirement.
If this trend continues, we could lose more than 10% of the nation’s nuclear capacity within the next decade.
That’s a big deal considering nuclear produces nearly 20% of America’s power and 55% of its clean energy.

A lack of market value and historically low natural gas prices are just some of the reasons making it hard for nuclear to compete in certain markets.
And with the rise of more renewables coming onto the grid, many utilities are considering a hybrid or integrated systems approach to improve the economics for baseload energy sources like nuclear reactors.
One opportunity is to utilize nuclear’s thermal heat and electricity to produce hydrogen.
Why hydrogen?
Hydrogen is an energy carrier that can be used to store massive amounts of energy for grid resilience and security and it is a critical feedstock for most of the chemicals industry.
Today, we primarily use hydrogen for oil refining and ammonia production, but there is a growing demand for it in steel manufacturing and in transportation to power vehicles, upgrade biofuels, and even produce synthetic fuels that may use carbon dioxide as a feedstock.

About 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States comes from natural gas.
Gas pipeline for hydrogen

It’s created using steam methane reforming, which basically uses high temperatures to convert steam and methane into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide.
The challenge is, global demand for hydrogen and its emerging applications could increase by a factor of ten, surpassing our current infrastructure for producing and delivering hydrogen.
In order to meet this demand, the U.S. Department of Energy is looking at ways to develop new technologies through its H2@Scale initiative to efficiently scale-up the production of hydrogen using all of our nation’s energy sources, including nuclear.

Different uses of hydrogen produced by different energy sources

Creating new markets         
Nuclear power plants can produce hydrogen in a variety of methods that would greatly reduce air emissions while taking advantage of the constant thermal energy and electricity it reliably provides.
Existing nuclear plants could produce high quality steam at lower costs than natural gas boilers and could be used in many industrial processes, including steam-methane reforming.
However, the case for nuclear becomes even more compelling when this high-quality steam is electrolyzed and split into pure hydrogen and oxygen.
A single 1,000 megawatt nuclear reactor could produce more than 200,000 tonnes of hydrogen each year.
Ten nuclear reactors could produce about 2 million tonnes annually or one-fifth of the current hydrogen used in the United States.

Aerial view of the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant
California's Diablo Canyon nuclear plant is expected to start shutting down reactors in 2024.
PG&E

This process would allow utilities to produce and sell hydrogen regionally as a commodity in addition to providing clean and reliable electricity to the grid.
For instance, reactors in Ohio could sell hydrogen to iron and steel manufacturing plants. The Midwest could target fertilizer producers and California could market hydrogen stations for fuel cell electric vehicles.
This new revenue stream could also help build an economic case to keep the nation’s at-risk reactors up and running—possibly providing higher market value for hydrogen commodities in states and countries that are looking to reduce emissions.
Bringing the heat
By extending the life of the commercial fleet, it will give the industry time to bring new advanced reactors online.
Advanced reactors are expected to operate at considerably higher temperatures and would allow nuclear plants to more efficiently produce hydrogen to dramatically scale-up the industry.
High temperature reactors could even be used to significantly reduce the emissions produced by conventional steam-methane reforming processes by replacing the natural gas that is burned to produce steam and to provide the essential heat to reform the natural gas/steam mixtures.
New electrochemical processes are also being developed to directly convert natural gas into hydrogen and plastics using nuclear, which would completely avoid air emissions and achieve significantly higher efficiencies.
Ultimately, nuclear energy could support the nation’s manufacturing industries across multiple sectors by providing clean energy to produce hydrogen, fuels, fertilizers, steel, plastics, and other chemicals.
Stay tuned…
Learn more about H2@scale and our NICE Future initiative—an international effort focusing on integrated clean energy systems involving nuclear energy.


Could Hydrogen Help Save Nuclear? | Department of Energy

President Harry S. Truman said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount.  The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings…  If we don't have the proper fundamental moral background, we will finally wind up with a totalitarian government which does not believe in rights for anybody except the state.”

HK_Vol

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Re: Electricity update Pt. 10
« Reply #125 on: January 05, 2021, 08:38:48 PM »
Planned nuclear retirements:

https://www.eia.gov/electricity/monthly/epm_table_grapher.php?t=table_6_06


  • 5,100 megawatts in 2021
  • 772 megawatts in 2022
  • 1,122 megawatts in 2024
  • 1,118 megawatts in 2025




  • 2021 4 Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 3 IPP Indian Point 3  1,038
  • 2021 9 Exelon Nuclear IPP Byron Generating Station - 1 1,164
  • 2021 9 Exelon Nuclear IPP Byron Generating Station - 2 1,136
  • 2021 11 Exelon Nuclear IPP Dresden Generating Station - 2 902
  • 2021 11 Exelon Nuclear IPP Dresden Generating Station - 3 895

  • 2022 6 Entergy Nuclear Palisades LLC IPP Palisades - 1 772

  • 2024 11 Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Electric Utility Diablo Canyon - 1 1,122
  • 2025 8 Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Electric Utility Diablo Canyon - 2 1,118.


 

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